Loading...
Urban Water Management Plan - 2020 ,;N a. i s + aC5 CN '37 O CN 44 This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Y Ofi OB CITY OF PISMO BEACH 2020 Urban Water Management Plan JUNE 2021 QQ,pFE5Sfp JNa.60762 Z d �r q O TFOF CAlWp� Prepared by VV-ter S—tems Consulting, Inc. OR w S C This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The 2020 Pismo Beach UWMP was prepared on behalf of: City of Pismo Beach 760 Mattie Road Pismo Beach, CA 93449 With support from the City of Pismo Beach Staff: Benjamin A. Fine, Public Works Director/City Engineer Madeline Kacsinta, City Engineer Russell Fleming, Utilities Manager Brandon Shea, Water System Lead Operator Erin Olsen, Public Works/Engineering Management Analyst In coordination with the City of Pismo Beach Council: Ed Waage, Mayor Mary Ann Reiss, Mayor Pro Tempore Sheila Blake, Council Member Marcia Guthrie, Council Member Scott Newton, Council Member Prepared by: Water Systems Consulting 805 Aerovista Place, Suite 201 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Water Systems Consulting Team: Daniel Heimel, PE, MS Spencer Waterman Rebecca Nissley, PE Trishna Chandarana, EIT, MS City of Pismo Beach i 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Listof Figures.....................................................................................................................................................A Listof Tables.....................................................................................................................................................vii Acronyms & Abbreviations..............................................................................................................................ix ExecutiveSummary........................................................................................................................................1-1 Purpose and Organization of the Plan..............................................................................................ES-2 Outreach and Engagement..................................................................................................................ES-2 Water Demands and Uses...................................................................................................................ES-4 WaterSupplies......................................................................................................................................ES-5 WaterSupply Reliability......................................................................................................................ES-7 Water Shortage Contingency Plan..................................................................................................ES-10 1. Introduction and Lay Description...........................................................................................................1-1 1.1 The California Water Code............................................................................................................1-2 1.2 UWMP Organization.......................................................................................................................1-3 1.3 UWMPs in Relation to Other Efforts..............................................................................................1-3 1.4 UWMPs and Grant or Loan Eligibility..........................................................................................1-4 1.5 Demonstration of Consistency with the Delta Plan for Participants in Covered Actions......1-4 2. Plan Preparation......................................................................................................................................2-1 2.1 Basis for Preparing a Plan..............................................................................................................2-2 2.2 Coordination and Outreach............................................................................................................2-3 3. System Description...................................................................................................................................3-1 3.1 Service Area Climate.......................................................................................................................3-3 3.2 Service Area Population and Demographics...............................................................................3-5 3.3 Land Uses within Service Area .......................................................................................................3-6 4. Water Use Characterization..................................................................................................................4-1 4.1 Non-Potable Versus Potable Water Use.....................................................................................4-2 4.2 Past, Current, and Projected Water Use by Sector...................................................................4-2 4.2.1 Water Use Sectors in Addition to Those Listed in Water Code......................................4-2 4.2.2 Distribution System Water Losses.........................................................................................4-2 4.2.3 Projected Water Use..............................................................................................................4-3 4.2.4 Characteristic Five-Year Water Use....................................................................................4-3 4.3 Water Use for Lower Income Households....................................................................................4-5 City of Pismo Beach ii 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents 4.4 Climate Change Considerations.....................................................................................................4-5 5. SBX7-7 Baseline, Targets and 2020 Compliance .............................................................................5-1 5.1 SBX7-7 Forms and Tables...............................................................................................................5-2 6. Water Supply Characterization............................................................................................................6-1 6.1 Water Supply Analysis Overview.................................................................................................6-2 6.1.1 Water Supply Facilities..........................................................................................................6-2 6.1.2 Distribution System and Storage...........................................................................................6-3 6.2 UWMP Water Supply Characterization......................................................................................6-4 6.2.1 Purchased or Imported Water..............................................................................................6-4 6.2.2 Groundwater............................................................................................................................6-4 6.2.3 Surface Water......................................................................................................................6-10 6.2.4 Stormwater.............................................................................................................................6-1 2 6.2.5 Wastewater and Recycled Water....................................................................................6-1 2 6.2.6 Desalinated Water Opportunities.....................................................................................6-19 6.2.7 Water Exchanges and Transfers........................................................................................6-20 6.2.8 Future Water Projects..........................................................................................................6-20 6.2.9 Summary of Existing and Planned Sources of Water....................................................6-21 6.2.10 Special Conditions..............................................................................................................6-23 6.3 Energy Intensity..............................................................................................................................6-25 7. Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment..................................................................7-1 7.1 Water Service Reliability Assessment...........................................................................................7-2 7.1.1 Constraints on Water Sources...............................................................................................7-2 7.1.2 Year Type Characterization..................................................................................................7-4 7.1.3 Water Service Reliability.......................................................................................................7-8 7.1.4 Descriptions of Management Tools and Options............................................................7-10 7.2 Drought Risk Assessment...............................................................................................................7-1 1 7.2.1 Data, Methods, and Basis for Water Shortage Condition............................................7-1 1 7.2.2 DRA Water Source Reliability and Total Water Supply and Use Comparison........7-1 1 8. Water Shortage Contingency Plan.......................................................................................................8-1 8.1 Water Supply Reliability Analysis.................................................................................................8-2 8.2 Annual Water Supply and Demand Assessment.........................................................................8-3 8.3 Water Shortage Levels....................................................................................................................8-3 8.3.1 Water Shortage Levels Crosswalk.......................................................................................8-4 8.4 Shortage Response Actions.............................................................................................................8-5 8.4.1 Demand Reduction...................................................................................................................8-9 8.4.2 Supply Augmentation..............................................................................................................8-9 City of Pismo Beach iii 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents 8.4.3 Operational Changes..........................................................................................................8-17 8.4.4 Guidelines For Building Restriction During An Extended Drought................................8-17 8.4.5 Additional Mandatory Restrictions....................................................................................8-19 8.4.6 Emergency Response Plan...................................................................................................8-20 8.4.7 Seismic Risk Assessment and Mitigation Plan...................................................................8-20 8.4.8 Shortage Response Action Effectiveness...........................................................................8-20 8.5 Compliance and Enforcement, Monitoring and Reporting, and Communication Protocols...... ........................................................................................................................................................8-20 8.6 Legal Authorities ............................................................................................................................8-22 8.7 Financial Consequences of WSCP..............................................................................................8-22 8.8 WSCP Refinement Procedures....................................................................................................8-22 8.9 Special Water Feature Distinction..............................................................................................8-22 8.10 Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Availability............................................................................8-23 9. Demand Management Measures..........................................................................................................9-1 9.1 Existing Demand Management Measures for Retail..................................................................9-2 9.1.1 Water Waste Prevention Ordinances.................................................................................9-2 9.1.2 Metering....................................................................................................................................9-2 9.1.3 Conservation Pricing................................................................................................................9-2 9.1.4 Public Education and Outreach.............................................................................................9-3 9.1.5 Programs to Assess and Manage Distribution System Real.............................................9-3 9.1.6 Water Conservation Program Coordination and Staffing Support...............................9-4 9.1.7 Other Demand Management Measures..............................................................................9-4 9.2 Reporting Implementation...............................................................................................................9-4 9.2.1 Implementation Over the Past Five Years...........................................................................9-4 9.2.2 Implementation Achieve Water Use Targets......................................................................9-4 9.3 Water Use Objectives (Future Requirements)..............................................................................9-5 10. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation.............................................................................. 10-1 10.1 Notice of Public Hearing............................................................................................................ 10-2 10.1.1 Notice to Cities and Counties........................................................................................... 10-2 10.1.2 Notice to the Public............................................................................................................ 10-2 10.2 Public Hearing and Adoption.................................................................................................... 10-3 10.3 Plan Submittal.............................................................................................................................. 10-3 10.4 Public Availability ....................................................................................................................... 10-3 10.5 Amending an Adopted UWMP or Water Shortage Contingency Plan............................ 10-3 11. References............................................................................................................................................. 1 1-1 Appendix A - DWR Review Sheet Checklist................................................................................................A City of Pismo Beach 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents Appendix B — 60 Day Notice Letters............................................................................................................B Appendix C — Delta Reliance Technical Memorandum.............................................................................C AppendixD — Public Hearing Notices.......................................................................................................... D AppendixE —Adoption Resolution.................................................................................................................E AppendixF — 2020 Water Audit..................................................................................................................F Appendix G — SBX7-7 Compliance Forms..................................................................................................G Appendix H —Adjudicated Judgement........................................................................................................ H Appendix I — Gentlemen's Agreement...........................................................................................................I Appendix J — 2020 NCMA Annual Report...................................................................................................J City of Pismo Beach v 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents LIST OF FIGURES FigureES-1.City Service Area...................................................................................................................ES-3 Figure ES-2. 2000 — 2020 Production by Source.................................................................................ES-5 Figure ES-3. 2021-2025 Drought Risk Assessment, Supply and Demand Projections...................ES-8 Figure 3-1. City of Pismo Boundary Map.................................................................................................3-2 Figure 3-2. Annual Precipitation from 2010 to 2020............................................................................3-3 Figure 3-3. Pismo Beach Land Use by Customer Type...........................................................................3-6 Figure 6-1. 2000-2020 Production by Source........................................................................................6-2 Figure 6-2. Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Map................................................................................6-6 Figure 6-3. Hydrograph of Deep Well Index Elevation........................................................................6-8 Figure 6-4. Historic Lake Lopez Storage Volume versus LRRP Municipal Diversion Reductions...6-10 Figure 6-5. Central Coast Blue Overview..............................................................................................6-17 Figure 7-1. 2021-2025 Drought Risk Assessment, Supply and Demand Projections....................7-1 1 Figure 8-1. Water Shortage Levels Crosswalk........................................................................................8-4 City of Pismo Beach vi 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents LIST OF TABLES Table ES-1. Past and Current Water Use, AFY.....................................................................................ES-4 Table ES-2. Current and Projected Population......................................................................................ES-4 Table ES-3. Projected Demands for Water, AFY.................................................................................ES-5 Table ES-4. Projected Water Supplies, AFY..........................................................................................ES-6 Table ES-5. Multiple Dry Year Supply and Demand Comparison.....................................................ES-7 Table ES-6. DWR 7-5 Five-Year Drought Risk Assessment Tables to Address Water Code Section 10635(b) .............................................................................................ES-9 Table ES-7. Water Shortage Contingency Plan Conditions.............................................................ES-1 1 Table ES-8. Shortage Response Actions...............................................................................................ES-12 Table 2-1. DWR 2-1 R Public Water Systems..........................................................................................2-2 Table 2-2. DWR 2-2 Plan Identification...................................................................................................2-2 Table 2-3. DWR 2-3 Agency Identification.............................................................................................2-2 Table 2-4. DWR 2-4R Water Supplier Information Exchange.............................................................2-2 Table 2-5. Agency Coordination. Table to be updated upon UWMP completion...........................2-4 Table 3-1. Climate Information for Pismo Beach.....................................................................................3-4 Table 3-2. DWR 3-1 R Current and Projected Population.....................................................................3-5 Table 4-1. Past and Current Water Use, Acre-Feet Per Year (AFY) ..................................................4-2 Table 4-2. Non-Revenue Water.................................................................................................................4-3 Table 4-3. DWR 4-1 R Actual Demands for Water................................................................................4-4 Table 4-4. DWR 4-2R Projected Demands for Water..........................................................................4-4 Table 4-5. DWR 4-3R Total Gross Water Use.......................................................................................4-4 Table 4-6. DWR 4-4R 12 Month Water Loss Audit Reporting.............................................................4-5 Table 4-7. DWR 4-5R Inclusion in Water Use Projections.....................................................................4-5 Table 5-1. DWR 5-1 R Baselines and Targets Summary........................................................................5-2 Table 5-2. DWR 5-2R 2020 Compliance.................................................................................................5-2 Table 6-1. Existing City of Pismo Beach Groundwater Wells..............................................................6-2 Table 6-2. Distribution Zone Summary......................................................................................................6-3 Table 6-3. DWR 6-1 R Groundwater Volume Pumped ..........................................................................6-9 Table 6-4. Initial Prescribed Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP ................6-1 1 Table 6-5. Initial Prescribed Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP..............6-11 Table 6-6. Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Supply Options...................................................6-12 Table 6-7. Projected Wastewater Flows...............................................................................................6-1 3 Table 6-8. DWR 6-2R Wastewater Collected within Service Area in 2020 .................................6-14 Table 6-9. DWR 6-3R Wastewater Treatment and Discharge within Service Area in 2020.....6-14 Table 6-10. RWFPS Alternatives Quantitative Analysis Summary...................................................6-16 City of Pismo Beach vii 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents Table 6-1 1. DWR 6-4R Recycled Water within Service Area in 2020 ..........................................6-18 Table 6-1 2. DWR 6-5R 2015 Recycled Water Use Projection Compared to 2020 Actual.......6-19 Table 6-13. DWR 6-6R Methods to Expand Future Recycled Water Use......................................6-19 Table 6-14. DWR 6-7R Expected Future Water Supply Projects or Programs.............................6-20 Table 6-15. DWR 6-8R Actual Water Supplies...................................................................................6-24 Table 6-1 6. DWR 6-9R Projected Water Supplies.............................................................................6-24 Table 6-17. LWTP 2008 Energy Usage and Costs.............................................................................6-25 Table 7-1 . Factors Affecting Water Supply Reliability........................................................................7-2 Table 7-2. Initial Prescribed Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP ...................7-6 Table 7-3. Initial Prescribed Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP.................7-6 Table 7-4. DWR 7-1 R Basis for Water Year Data (Reliability Assessment): Groundwater...........7-7 Table 7-5. DWR 7-1 R Basis for Water Year Data (Reliability Assessment): Lopez........................7-7 Table 7-6. DWR 7-1 R Basis for Water Year Data (Reliability Assessment): SWP..........................7-8 Table 7-7. DWR 7-2R Normal Year Supply and Demand Comparison.............................................7-9 Table 7-8. DWR 7-3R Single Dry Year Supply and Demand Comparison.......................................7-9 Table 7-9. DWR 7-4R Multiple Dry Years Supply and Demand Comparison...............................7-10 Table 7-10. DWR 7-5 Five-Year Drought Risk Assessment Tables to Address Water Code Section 10635(b) .............................................................................................7-12 Table 8-1 . DWR 8-1 Water Shortage Contingency Plan Levels.........................................................8-3 Table 8-2. Water Shortage Contingency Plan Conditions....................................................................8-4 Table 8-3. Shortage Response Actions......................................................................................................8-6 Table 8-4. DWR 8-2 Demand Reduction Actions.................................................................................8-10 Table 8-5. DWR 8-3 Supply Augmentation & Other Actions............................................................8-17 Table 8-6. Water Shortage Contingency - Mandatory Prohibitions................................................8-19 Table 9-1 . Water Rates for 1" Meter.......................................................................................................9-3 Table 1 0-1. DWR 1 0-1 R Notification to Cities and Counties............................................................ 1 0-2 City of Pismo Beach viii 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents ACRONYMS & ABBREVIATIONS OF Degrees Fahrenheit AF Acre Foot AFY Acre Feet per Year AWWA American Water Works Association CCR California Code of Regulations CIMIS California Irrigation Management Irrigation System City City of Pismo Beach CWC California Water Code Delta Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta District San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District DMM Demand Management Measure DWR California Department of Water Resources ETo Evapotranspiration FAT Full advanced treatment GPCD Gallons per Capita per Day GPM Gallons per Minute Guidebook Urban Water Management Plan Guidebook HCF Hundred Cubic Feet ITL Index Trigger Level Kwh Kilowatt-Hour LWTP Lopez Water Treatment Plant LRRP Low Reservoir Response Plan MG Million Gallons MGD Million Gallons per Day MSL Mean Sea Level NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System OCSD Oceano Community Services District RWFPS Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study SBX7-7 Senate Bill 7 of Special Extended Session 7 SMGB Santa Maria Valley Groundwater Basin UWMP Urban Water Management Plan City of Pismo Beach 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Table of Contents UWMP Act Urban Water Management Planning Act WSCP Water Shortage Contingency Plan WTP Water Treatment Plant WWTP Wastewater Treatment Plant City of Pismo Beach x 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Executive Summary This section summarizes the 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) for the City of Pismo Beach (City). It describes the 2020 UWMP in a manner that is accessible to non-technical readers. This summary describes the fundamental purposes of the UWMP, including water service reliability, future challenges, and strategies for managing risks to water reliability. The City operates and maintains a water system that provides IN THIS SECTION drinking water to more than 8,000 people in San Luis Obispo Outreach and County. This drinking water is used by the City residents, Engagement businesses, and visitors for a variety of purposes including Water Demand health, sanitation, irrigation, and fire suppression. The City's Projections current sources of water include groundwater from the Santa Water Sources and Maria Valley Groundwater Basin (SMGB)and surface water from Uses Lopez Lake and the State Water Project (SWP). The City's Water Supply service area is shown in Figure ES-1 on page 3. Reliability The Urban Water Management Planning Act (UWMP Act) requires an urban water supplier, providing water for municipal purposes to more than 3,000 customers or serving more than 3,000 acre-feet per year (AFY) to adopt an UWMP every five years, demonstrating water supply reliability under normal as well as drought conditions. This UWMP was prepared in compliance with California Water Code (CWC) requirements for UWMPs following guidance from California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and is intended to guide long-term water resources planning for the City. ES-1 Executive Summary Purpose and Organization of the Plan This UWMP provides DWR with a detailed summary of present and future water resources and demands within City's service area and assesses City's water resource needs. Specifically, the UWMP provides water supply planning for a 25-year planning period in five-year increments and identifies water supplies needed to meet existing and future demands. The demand analysis identifies supply reliability under three hydrologic or rainfall conditions: an average (or normal) year, a single dry year, and multiple dry years (drought conditions). This 2020 UWMP serves as an update to the 2015 UWMP and complies with new requirements and regulations. New to the 2020 UWMP, water suppliers are required to prepare a standalone Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP) that can be updated independently of the UWMP. The WSCP documents a supplier's plans to manage and mitigate an actual water shortage condition, should one occur because of drought or other impacts on water supplies. An overview of the WSCP is described in the body of this UWMP, and the WSCP is included as Chapter 8. The WSCP is being proposed for adoption in conjunction with the 2020 UWMP to meet CWC requirements. Outreach and Engagement The City has coordinated with nearby water suppliers and regional public agencies during the preparation of its UWMP. Recognizing that coordinating among other relevant public agencies is a key requirement for its UWMP, the City notified these agencies of plans to develop and update this planning document. The City also provided a public review period for the Draft UWMP and held a public hearing to solicit input from stakeholders and the public. a f 1 Y• i . 7t `la -5-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Sacramento United States bavenport CPe San Francisco San 10se Fremont Fresno ID Las We a e s jive Cities Agencies ,an N"ysLos Angeles Hollywood Santa Ana (� �- Long Beach ?101 :N%. San Diego Sources:Esri,CGEBCO,NOAA,National lid Geographic,Garmin,HERE,Georames.org, and other contributors, Esri,Garmin,GEBCO, NOAA NGDC,and other contributors 0 101 Pismo Beach t ii Arroya Grande Grover Beach Pacific Ocean \ N A Miles 0 0,35 0.7 1.4 7) Legend Five Cities Agency Boundaries Pismo Beach Grover Beach Arroyo Grande Oceano Community Services District Figure ES-(.City Service Area City of Pismo Beach ES-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Water Demands and Uses The City serves potable drinking water to its customers. Potable drinking water demand includes all municipal uses (residential, commercial, and landscape). In 2020, 61% of the total water deliveries were to residential customers (48% to single-family accounts and 13% to multi-family accounts). A summary of the City's water demands over the last five years is shown in Table ES-1. Table ES-1. Past and Current Water Use, AFY 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Single-Family 641 689 747 691 781 Multi-Family 599 207 134 91 214 Commercial 22 367 468 449 392 Landscape 177 175 211 184 225 Other 0 26 21 90 0 Water Loss 207 245 138 272 166 TOTAL USE 1,440 1,465 1,581 1,507 1,612 The Water Conservation Bill of 2009 (SBX7-7) requires individual retail water suppliers to set water conservation targets for 2020 to support an overall State goal of reducing urban potable per capita water use by 20% by 2020.The City's investments in water conservation have helped its customers achieve its 2020 SBX7-7 water use reduction target. The City's 2020 per capita water use target is 204 gallons per capita per day (GPCD)while the actual consumption in 2020 was 185.4 GPCD. The City is continuously implementing demand management measures to continue meeting its SBX7-7 water use target and position for future State-mandated water use efficiency standards that are currently under development by DWR. Future population growth in the City will depend on two factors: re-growth within the current City limits and growth as a result of new developments. The City's General Plan specifies a limit on annual growth of 3%. Based on historic population trends, it is unlikely that the City will experience growth that meets the 3% annual limit. The City anticipates an average annual growth rate of approximate 0.57% based on historic growth trends, and San Luis Obispo Council of Governments' (SLOCOG) San Luis Obispo County 2050 Population, Housing & Employment (Beacon Economics & SLOCOG Staff, June 2017). Table ES-2 provides a summary of current and projected population for the City. Current and projected demands, based on projected water use by customer category are shown in Table ES-3 on page ES-5. Table ES-2. Current and Projected Population POPULATION SERVED 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 City of Pismo Beach 8,559 8,806 9,060 9,321 9,590 9,866 TOTAL 8,559 8,806 9,060 9,321 9,590 9,866 City of Pismo Beach ES-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Table ES-3. Projected Demands for Water, AFY PROJECTED WATER USE USE TYPE 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 Single Family 769 791 814 838 862 Multi-Family 270 278 286 294 302 Commercial 368 379 389 401 412 Landscape 211 217 223 230 236 Other 30 31 32 32 33 TOTAL: 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 Water Supplies The City relies on a combination of Lopez Lake, SWP, and groundwater to meet their demand. Figure ES-2 shows the historical and current water production by source. 2,000 U , - 1,500 a 0 1,000 0 L CL 500 1 1 O r—I N M 1�11 Ln s D t__ M M G r—I N M Ln CD i__ W M C O O O O O O O O O O r—I r—I r—I r—I r—I r—I r—I r—I r—I r—I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N ■ Groundwater ■ Lopez SWP Figure ES-2. 2000— 2020 Production by Source Table ES-4 on page ES-6 lists the projected volume of water supplies for the City service area for potable supplies. Additional detail regarding this analysis is available in Section 6.2. City of Pismo Beach ES-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Table ES-4. Projected Water Supplies, AFY PROJECTED WATER SUPPLY 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 WATER ADDITIONAL DETAIL ON REASONABLY TOTAL RIGHT OR SAFE REASONABLY TOTAL RIGHT OR SAFE REASONABLY TOTAL RIGHT OR SAFE REASONABLY TOTAL RIGHT OR SAFE REASONABLY TOTAL RIGHT OR SAFE SUPPLY WATER SUPPLY AVAILABLE VOLUME YIELD AVAILABLE VOLUME YIELD AVAILABLE VOLUME YIELD AVAILABLE VOLUME YIELD AVAILABLE VOLUME YIELD Purchased or Imported Lopez Lake 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 Water Purchased or Imported State Water 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 Water Groundwater Santa Maria (not 189 700 189 700 189 700 189 700 189 700 desalinated) Groundwater Basin Recycled IPR via groundwater 339 339 339 339 339 Water recharge TOTAL: 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 City of Pismo Beach ES-6 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Water Supply Reliability Every urban water supplier in California is required to assess the reliability of its water service under a normal year, a single dry year, and multiple dry years hydrologic conditions, and specifically to assess the drought risk over the next five years. Water service reliability depends on variability of supplies and availability of infrastructure to meet projected demand. Evaluating the water service reliability is critical for water management as it can help identify potential shortfalls before they occur. Water managers can then take proactive steps to mitigate shortages by encouraging water use efficiency, securing new water supplies, and/or investing in infrastructure. For this 2020 UWMP, the supply reliability assessment considered factors that could limit the expected quantity of current and projected water sources through 2045. Multiple drought scenarios were considered, the quantitative impacts of the aforementioned factors on water supply and demand were evaluated, and possible methods for addressing these issues were identified. The City's water service reliability assessment results indicates that water shortages can be avoided over the next 25 years under normal, single dry, and five consecutive dry years conditions. The long-term five consecutive dry year supply and demand comparison is shown in Table ES-5. Table ES-5. Multiple Dry Year Supply and Demand Comparison 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 First Supply Totals 2,560 2,560 2,560 2,560 2,560 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE: 912 864 816 765 715 Second Supply Totals 2,288 2,288 2,288 2,288 2,306 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE: 640 592 544 493 461 Third2 Supply Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE: 0 0 0 0 0 Fourth3 Supply Totals 1,827 1,827 1,827 1,827 1,845 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE: 179 131 83 32 0 Fifth Supply Totals 2,471 2,471 2,471 2,471 2,471 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE: 823 775 727 676 626 ' Supply includes 339 AFY of Central Coast Blue Phase 1 yield in all years. 2 During the third consecutive dry year,104-172 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY in years 2025-2045. Years 2035-2045 will also leverage 28 AFY-1 29 AFY of stored state water to meet projected demand. 3 During the fourth consecutive dry year in 2045,18 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY. City of Pismo Beach ES-7 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary The Drought Risk Assessment (DRA) is based on an analysis of historical drought data forecasted into the future under various drought conditions, with a focus on the five-year consecutive drought scenario. Table ES-6 on page ES-9 shows the City's projected supplies and demands if there are five consecutive dry years from 2021-2025. The City will be able to meet demand by utilizing their stored state water to address any deficits in the next five years. The City has the ability to store their unused SWP allocation in the San Luis Reservoir for later use during dry years. As of April 2021, the City has 1,078 AF of stored state water that can be used to supplement supply if SWP allocations are less than 50% and/or Lopez Lake has reduced entitlements. Figure ES-3 shows the total water use, plus stored state water, meeting the projected demand if the drought continues. 3,500 3,299 3,027 3,000 • 2,607 ••. 2,500 ++ 2,283 ..� '•. 2,123 • ,•,• .......... .+ 2,000 LL LL d 1,500 1,648 1,648 1,645 1,648 1,000 500 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 �Groundwater Lopez State Water �Stored State water-•-0•• Supplies Available f Demand Figure ES-3. 2021-2025 Drought Risk Assessment, Supply and Demand Projections City of Pismo Beach ES-8 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Table ES-6. DWR 7-5 Five-Year Drought Risk Assessment Tables to Address Water Code Section 10635(b) Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 2,221 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action 573 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2021 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 0 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 573 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 1,949 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action 301 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2022 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 0 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 301 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 1,205 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action -443 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2023 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 4431 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 0 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 1,488 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action -160 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2024 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 1601 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 0 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 2,132 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action 484 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2025 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 0 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 484 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% 1 The City currently has 1,078 AF of stored state water in the San Luis Reservoir for subsequent delivery when needed.This stored state water will be leveraged in 2023 and 2024 to meet the shortfalls in the projected dry year scenario. City of Pismo Beach ES-9 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Water Shortage Contingency Plan The City has developed a comprehensive WSCP to provide reliability during shortage situations. A water shortage occurs when the water supply available is insufficient to meet the normally expected customer water use at a given point in time. A shortage may occur due to several reasons, such as water supply quality changes, climate change, drought, regional power outage, and catastrophic events (e.g., earthquakes). Additionally, the State may declare a statewide drought emergency and mandate that water suppliers reduce demands, as occurred in 2014. The purpose of the WSCP is to conserve the available water supply and protect the water supply's integrity while also protecting and preserving public health, welfare, and safety. Preparation provides the tools to maintain reliable supplies and reduce the impacts of supply interruptions during a water shortage. The WSCP serves as the operating manual that the City will use to respond =---- through proactive, rather than reactive, mitigation strategies to address — water shortages. The WSCP is used to provide guidance to City Council, - _ City staff, and the public by identifying anticipated water shortages and response actions to manage any water shortage with predictability and accountability in an efficient manner. The WSCP is not intended to provide -' absolute direction; rather, it is intended to provide a working framework and options to help guide the City's response to water shortages. The City's WSCP is incorporated into the UWMP as a separate Chapter - that can be modified as needed. The WSCP includes five shortage stages to identify and respond to water shortage emergencies. Table ES-7 on - -�- ` page ES-11 shows the five WSCP shortage stages, which trigger a series �- -- .. of actions that may include measures to reduce demand, augment supply, -� change typical operations, or impose mandatory prohibitions. The actions _ are intended to increase supplies or reduce demand to mitigate the impact of a water shortage condition. As mentioned above, there are long-term and short-term water supply shortages with significant overlap in regard to stages, mandatory prohibitions, and consumption reduction methods. Table ES-8 on page ES-12 summarizes the possible actions identified by City staff to implement - - during a water shortage as well as the criteria that would trigger each water shortage stage. The shortage response actions in gray are from the previous 2015 UWMP and the City's municipal code. This table of actions - is designed as a menu of options; the City is not required to implement = each action for each stage. Actions identified in earlier stages may also be used in later stages (e.g., actions identified in Stages 1-3 may be implemented in Stage 4 as well as other Stage 4 actions, etc.). ES-10 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Table ES-7. Water Shortage Contingency Plan Conditions STAGE CONDITION REDUCTION OBJECTIVE 1 —Normal Water Supply Conditions Average rainfall in the previous No reduction in total water demands 12-24 months from baseline All municipal supplies available Normal weather patterns 2—Moderately Restricted Water Supply Below average rainfall in the previous 1 0-20% reduction in total water Conditions 12-24 months demands from baseline 10%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 3—Severely Restricted Water Supply Below average rainfall in the previous 20-35% reduction in total water Conditions 24-36 months demands from baseline Prolonged periods of low water pressure 10%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather typical of summer months 4—Critical Water Supply Conditions Below average rainfall in the previous 35-50% reduction in total water 36 months demands from baseline Prolonged periods of low water pressure 10%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 5 —Exceptionally Critical Water Supply Below average rainfall in the previous Greater than 50% reduction in total Conditions 36 months water demands from baseline Prolonged periods of low water pressure 15%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather patterns typical of summer months City of Pismo Beach ES-1 1 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary Table ES-8. Shortage Response Actions STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 1 Use of water which causes runoff onto adjacent properties,non-irrigated areas, private and public walkways, roadways,gutters, parking lots,or structures is prohibited. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots,sidewalks,streets,or other such uses except as found necessary by the city to protect the public health or safety. Using water in a fountain or other decorative water feature,except where the water is part of a recirculating system, is prohibited. Outdoor irrigation is prohibited after 10:00 am or before 4:00 pm. Applying water to outdoor landscapes during and within 48 hours after measurable rainfall is prohibited. Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, paved surfaces, buildings,and other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled water devices,which shut off the water immediately when not in use. Unauthorized use of water from any fire hydrant is prohibited. Vehicles may only be washed at commercial carwashes that re-circulate water or by high-pressure/low-volume wash devices. 2 Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. Irrigation of private and public landscaping,turf areas, and gardens is permitted at even-numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays, and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays. All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. Hotels,motels,or other commercial lodging establishments must offer patrons the option to forego the daily laundering of towels,sheets and linens. Potable water may not be used for construction purposes. Non-potable and/or recycled water must be utilized (if available). Require a construction water use plan be submitted to the water supplier that addresses how impacts to existing water users will be mitigated (such as dust control).Must certify that a reduction of the projected average water usage for development of construction projects shall be achieved. Expeditious leak repair(within 48 hrs). In public spaces, reduce irrigation of turf and play areas to minimum levels necessary to protect the health and safety of school children and park visitors. Irrigation of parks,school ground areas, and road median landscaping will not be permitted more than twice a week and only if necessary. Construction meters and fire hydrant meters will be monitored for efficient water use. Construction operations receiving water from a construction meter or water truck shall not use water unnecessarily for any purpose other than those required by regulatory agencies. Construction projects requiring watering for new landscaping materials shall adhere to the designated irrigation requirements. Ornamental landscape or turf that utilizes properly operating water-efficient devices which include, but are not limited to, drip/micro irrigation systems,stream rotor sprinklers, and are operated by a functional irrigation controller,may upon verification by the City, be irrigated for up to 20 minutes per station on the days authorized for landscape irrigation. Require automatic shut off hoses. Adjust sprinklers and irrigation systems to avoid overspray, runoff, and waste. City of Pismo Beach ES-12 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 2 Expand Public Information Campaign re Water Shortage such as website,e-mails, presentations, business placards, school education. Provision of Technical Information to customers on means to promote water use efficiency including customer scorecard, residential assistance,and surveys. Provide Rebates on Plumbing Fixtures and Devices. Provide Rebates for Turf Replacement. Decrease Line Flushing. Reduce System Water Loss. Encourage customers to take advantage of the City's free conservation and rebate programs. Commercial,industrial,institutional equipment must be properly maintained and in full working order. Encourage customers to wash only full loads when washing dishes or clothes. Encourage customers to report water leaks/waste to the City. Irrigation of newly constructed home and building exteriors with potable water is prohibited unless drip or micro- spray systems are used. Irrigation of parks,school ground areas, and road median landscaping will not be permitted more than twice a week and only if necessary. Watering to maintain the level of water in swimming pools shall occur only when essential. Reduce indoor and outdoor water use by specified percentage as determined (based on Shortage Stage). Contact the City for additional tips and techniques to reduce water use. Implement Water Waste Patrols. The use of potable water for service to any properties where buildings are not under construction on the effective date of activation of this stage,even though a valid water connection permit may have been issued for the properties,is prohibited. 3 Emptying and refilling swimming pools and commercial spas is prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to provide for the public health and safety. Prohibit use of potable water for fire drills. Require large users to audit premises and repair leaks. Commercial car wash and laundry systems. Installation of new or replacement non re-circulating water systems in commercial conveyor car wash or commercial laundry systems is prohibited. Use a broom instead of a hose to clean driveways,sidewalks and other hardscape surfaces,except for California Department of Health Services prescribed health or sanitary reasons. Eliminate sprinkler overspray from driveways and sidewalks. Divide irrigation runtimes into multiple cycles to eliminate runoff water that leaves the landscaped area. Use of water for cooling mists is prohibited. Prohibit vehicle washing (including autos,trucks,trailers, motor homes, boats or others) except at facilities using recycled or recirculating water. No new hydrant construction or temporary construction meter permits will be issued by the City. City of Pismo Beach ES-1 3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 3 No replacement water may be provided for ponds or lakes.Aeration equipment should be managed in such a way as to eliminate evaporative loss of water. Tune-up irrigation system by checking for and repairing leaks and damaged sprinklers. Upon the declaration of a water shortage emergency,no new water meters allowed,except for health and safety, unless water demand is offset to a net zero increase. Achieving net zero water increase is when potable water use of proposed development is no greater than current demand within the City's service area prior to installation of the new meters. Maintenance of existing landscaping necessary for fire protection as specified by the Fire Marshal of the local fire protection agency having jurisdiction over the property to be irrigated. If fire protection landscaping is not sustainable by irrigation two (2) days per week,irrigation may be increased to not more than three (3) days per week. Main flushing only on complaint basis. New landscaping limited to native or drought tolerant plants. Display by restaurants and hotels of water conservation signs. Customers with "smart irrigation timers or controllers are asked to set their controllers to achieve specified percentage reduction (depending on the shortage stage) of the ET rate. Limits on watering duration. Watering or irrigating of lawns, landscape or other vegetated area with potable water using a landscape irrigation system or a watering device that is not continuously attended is limited to no more than 15 minutes per day per station. This subsection does not apply to landscape irrigation systems that exclusively use high efficiency irrigation equipment,very low-flow drip type irrigation systems when no emitter produces more than two gallons of water per hour, and weather based controllers or high-efficiency stream rotor sprinklers. 4 Water rationing as required. Irrigation of ornamental turf on public medians with potable water is prohibited. Washing cars by use of a hose is prohibited. Use of a bucket is permitted subject to non-wasteful applications. No new potable water service connections,except under restricted conditions. Expeditious leak repair (within 24 hrs). Issuance of building permits which require new or expanded water service may be limited or withheld,except to protect the public's health,safety,and welfare,or in cases which meet city council adopted conservation offset requirements. Water Emergency tiered pricing will be implemented pursuant to requirements of Proposition 218 in accordance with California Law. Modify customer indoor water use budgets. No outdoor water use budget. Water use for public health and safety purposes only. Customer rationing may be implemented. All landscape and non-essential outdoor water use for all customers in the City's retail water service area shall be prohibited. All dedicated irrigation meters will be locked off by City personnel. In public spaces,eliminate irrigation of decorative landscape. No new permits for pools will be issued. City of Pismo Beach ES-14 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Executive Summary STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 4 No new landscape installations or renovations will be permitted. Decorative water features that use potable water must be drained and kept dry. Previous waivers for watering during an establishment period will be revoked. No new construction meters will be issued. 5 No new connections. Outdoor water budgets reduced to 0. Prohibit all landscape irrigation. No filling of pools or aesthetic water features. No water for commercial car washes.All washing of vehicles is prohibited. *The shortage response actions in gray are from the previous 2015 UWMP and the City's municipal code City of Pismo Beach ES-15 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Introduction and Lay Description This chapter provides a brief overview of the City of Pismo Beach (City) and the purpose of this 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP). It also describes how the UWMP is organized and its relation to other local and regional planning efforts that the City is involved in. The City provides drinking water to more than 8,000 people IN THIS SECTION through a water system comprised of a network of 56 miles of 0 California Water pipes, nine storage tanks, six pumping stations and two Code groundwater wells. Drinking water is used by the City residents, 0 UWMP businesses, and visitors for a variety of purposes including health, Organization sanitation, irrigation, and fire suppression. The City's current sources of water include groundwater from the Santa Maria Valley Groundwater Basin (SMGB) and surface water from Lopez Lake and the State Water Project. Introduction and Lay Description Section 1 1 .1 The California Water Code In 1983, the State of California Legislature (Legislature) enacted the Urban Water Management Planning Act (UWMP Act). The law required an urban water supplier, providing water for municipal purposes to more than 3,000 customers or serving more than 3,000 acre-feet per year (AFY) to adopt an UWMP every five years, demonstrating water supply reliability under normal as well as drought conditions. The UWMP Act applies to wholesale and retail suppliers. Since the original UWMP Act was passed, it has undergone significant expansion, particularly since the City's previous UWMP was prepared in 2015. Prolonged droughts, groundwater overdraft, regulatory revisions, and changing climatic conditions affect the reliability of each water supplier as well as the statewide water reliability overseen by California Department of Water Resources (DWR), the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board), and the Legislature. Accordingly, the UWMP Act has grown to address changing conditions, and the current requirements are found in Sections 10610- 10656 and 10608 of the California Water Code (CWC). DWR provides guidance for urban water suppliers by preparing a 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Guidebook (Guidebook) (California Department of Water Resources, 2021), conducting workshops, developing tools, and providing program staff to help water suppliers prepare comprehensive and useful water management plans, implement water conservation programs, and understand the requirements in the CWC. Suppliers prepare their own UWMPs in accordance with the requirements and submit them to DWR. DWR then reviews the plans to make sure they have addressed the requirements identified in the CWC and submits a report to the Legislature summarizing the status of the plans for each five-year cycle. The Guidebook, finalized in April 2021, was used to complete this 2020 UWMP. The purpose of this UWMP is for the City to evaluate long-term resource planning and establish management measures to ensure adequate water supplies are available to meet existing and future demands. The UWMP provides a framework to help water suppliers maintain efficient use of urban water supplies, promote conservation programs and policies, ensure that sufficient water supplies are available for future beneficial use, and provide a response mechanism during drought conditions or other water supply shortages. The UWMP is a valuable planning tool used for multiple purposes including: Provides a standardized methodology for water utilities to assess their water resource needs and availability. Serves as a resource to the community and other interested parties regarding water supply and demand, conservation, and other water-related information. Provides a key source of information for cities and counties when considering approval of proposed new developments and preparing regional long-range planning documents such as city and county General Plans. Informs other regional and Statewide water planning efforts, such as Integrated Regional Water Management Plans and the California Water Plan. CWC 10632 also includes updated requirements for suppliers to prepare a WSCP. The WSCP documents a supplier's plans to manage and mitigate an actual water shortage condition, should one occur because of drought or other impacts on water supplies. In the 2015 UWMP cycle, the WSCP was part of the UWMP. For the 2020 update, the WSCP is required to be a standalone document so that it can be updated independently of the UWMP but must be referenced in and attached to the 2020 UWMP. The WSCP is provided in Chapter 8 of this UWMP. City of Pismo Beach 1-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Introduction and Lay Description Section 1 1 .2 UWMP Organization The City generally followed DWR's recommended organizational outline in the preparation of its 2020 UWMP. Below is a summary of the information included in the various chapters of the City's 2020 UWMP: Chapter 1 — Introduction and Overview Chapter 6— System Supplies This chapter provides background information This chapter describes and quantifies the current on the UWMP process, new regulatory and projected potable and non-potable water requirements, and an overview of the information supplies. covered throughout the remaining chapters. Chapter 7—Water Supply Reliability Chapter 2 — Plan Preparation This chapter describes the water service This chapter provides information on the reliability through 2045 and includes the Drought processes used for developing the UWMP, Risk Assessment (DRA) for the next five years. including efforts in coordination and outreach. Chapter 8 - Water Shortage Contingency Chapter 3— System Description Plan (WSCP) This chapter describes the City's water system, This chapter includes the standalone WSCP. service area, population demographics, local climate, and land uses. Chapter 9 — Demand Management Measures This chapter describes the City's efforts to Chapter 4 — System Water Use promote conservation and reduce water This chapter describes and quantifies the current demand, including discussions of specific and projected water uses through 2045 within demand management measures. the water service area. Chapter 10 — Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Chapter 5 — Baselines and Targets Implementation This chapter describes the Water Conservation This chapter describes the steps taken to Act of 2009, also known as Senate Bill 7 of prepare the City's 2020 UWMP, hold a public Special Extended Session 7 (SBX7-7), Baseline, hearing, adopt, and submit the 2020 UWMP, and Targets, and 2020 Compliance. implementation of the adopted UWMP. 1 .3 UWMPs in Relation to Other Efforts This UWMP characterizes water use, estimates future demands and supply sources, and evaluates supply reliability for normal, single dry, and five consecutive dry years. The UWMP also requires a standalone WSCP, which is provided in Chapter 8. In addition to the 2020 UWMP, the City is involved in several other internal and external planning efforts and collaborates with a variety of stakeholders to achieve coordination and consistency between various planning documents locally and regionally. City of Pismo Beach 1-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Introduction and Lay Description Section 1 Documents that were leveraged in preparation of this UWMP are: 2016-2020 NCMA Annual Reports 2016-2020 California Electronic Annual Reports 2017-2020 AWWA Water Audits 2019 Central Coast Blue Phase 1 B Hydrogeologic Evaluation 2019 Pismo Beach Development Impact Fee Update Study 2019 San Luis Obispo County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan Update 2020 Pismo Beach Water Master Plan Update 2020 Annual Wastewater Report 2050 Regional Growth Forecast for San Luis Obispo County 1 .4 UWMPs and Grant or Loan Eligibility In order for a water supplier to be eligible for a grant or loan administered by DWR, and potentially other agencies, the supplier must have a current UWMP on file that meets the requirements set forth by the CWC. A current UWMP must also be maintained by the supplier throughout the term of any grants or loans received. The City has prepared the 2020 UWMP under guidance from DWR's 2020 Guidebook. 1 .5 Demonstration of Consistency with the Delta Plan for Participants in Covered Actions The Delta Plan is a comprehensive, long-term, legally enforceable plan guiding how federal, state, and local agencies manage the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta's) water and environmental resources. The Delta Plan was adopted in 2013 by the Delta Stewardship Council. Delta Plan Policy WR P1 identifies UWMPs as the tool to demonstrate consistency with state policy to reduce reliance on the Delta for a Supplier that carries out or takes part in a covered action. A covered action may include activities such as a multi-year water transfer, conveyance facility, or new diversion that involves transferring water through, exporting water from, or using water in the Delta. As a supplier that receives imported water from the Delta through its wholesale supplier, the City is required to submit information as outlined in Appendix C of the DWR 2020 Guidebook. To document and quantify supplies contributing to reduced reliance on the Delta watershed and improved regional self-reliance a number of steps must be taken, which include. • Setting a Baseline • Change in Delivery of Delta Water UWMP WR P1 subsection (c)(1)(B) Consistency Reporting DWR does not review this analysis as part of the UWMP approval process; therefore, this information is attached as Appendix C of this UWMP. City of Pismo Beach 2020 Urban Water Management Plan 2 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT L" Plan Preparation This chapter of the UWMP provides information on the processes used for developing the UWMP, including efforts in coordination and outreach. This UWMP was prepared following guidance from DWR's 2020 IN THIS SECTION Guidebook, DWR UWMP Public Workshops and Webinars, & Basis for Methodologies for Calculating Baseline and Compliance Urban Preparing a Plan Per Capita Water Use (SBX7-7 Guidebook) (California Department 0 Coordination and of Water Resources, February 2016), and the 2020 DWR Review Outreach Sheet Checklist (Appendix A). The 2020 UWMP was prepared in a transparent manner and the City actively engaged stakeholders, cities, counties, water agencies and the public to both seek and distribute water use, supply, and reliability information to strengthen the regions' ability to assess and plan for the region's water future. Details regarding the City's UWMP preparation and the coordination and outreach efforts conducted are provided in this chapter. Plan Preparation Section 2 2.1 Basis for Preparing a Plan As mentioned in Chapter 1, the CWC requires suppliers with 3,000 or more service connections, or those supplying 3,000 AFY or more to prepare an UWMP. Suppliers are required to update UWMPs at least once every five years on or before July 1, in years ending in six and one, incorporating updated and new information from the five years preceding each update. The City's 2020 UWMP must be submitted to DWR by July 1, 2021. The City is preparing an individual UWMP and is not a member of a Regional UWMP or Regional Alliance. In 2020, the City served approximately 8,361 people in its service area, through 4,975 metered connections, and supplied approximately 1,612 AFY of potable water to customers. The City has included all mandatory 2020 data in the development of this UWMP. Throughout this UWMP, water volume is represented in units of AFY, unless otherwise noted, and data is presented on a calendar year basis. Required DWR tables presenting this information are provided in Table 2-1, Table 2-2, and Table 2-3. Table 2-4 details the suppliers the City purchases water from. Table 2-1. DWR 2-1 R Public Water Systems PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM NUMBER OF MUNICIPAL VOLUME OF WATER NUMBER PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM NAME CONNECTIONS 2020 SUPPLIED 2020 CA4010008 Pismo Beach Water Department 4,975 1,612 TOTAL: 4,975 1,612 Table 2-2. DWR 2-2 Plan Identification MEMBER OF REGIONAL NAME OF RUWMP OR TYPE OF PLAN MEMBER OF RUWMP ALLIANCE REGIONAL ALLIANCE Individual UWMP No No Not Applicable Table 2-3. DWR 2-3 Agency Identification TYPE OF SUPPLIER YEAR TYPE FIRST DAY OF YEAR UNIT TYPE DD MIA Retailer Calendar Year Ol 01 Acre Feet(AF) Table 2-4. DWR 2-4R Water Supplier Information Exchange WHOLESALE WATER SUPPLIER NAME Zone 3 SLO County Water Conservation and Flood Control District City of Pismo Beach 2-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Plan Preparation Section 2 2.2 Coordination and Outreach The City coordinated with multiple neighboring and stakeholder agencies to prepare the 2020 UWMP. The coordinated efforts were conducted to 1) inform these agencies of the City's efforts and activities; 2) gather high quality data for use in developing this UWMP; and 3) coordinate planning activities with other related regional plans and initiatives. CWC Section 10621 requires that Suppliers notify cities and counties to which they serve water that the UWMP and WSCP are being updated and reviewed. The CWC specifies that this must be done at least 60 days prior to the public hearing. To fulfill this requirement, the City sent letters of notification of preparation of the 2020 UWMP and 2020 WSCP to the surrounding cities and counties 60 days prior to the public hearing as indicated in Table 2-5 on page 2-4 and attached as Appendix B. On March 8, 2021, the City notified the surrounding cities and counties of their intent to update the UWMP and WSCP by July 1, 2021. This notification served as the 60-day noticing required by the CWC. A copy of this letter is included in Appendix B to this UWMP. Per Government Code 6066, the public hearing was noticed in the local newspaper on May 27, 2021 and noticed again on June 3, 2021. The hearing notices are attached as Appendix D. The public hearing was held on June 15, 2021 at the City Council meeting prior to the UWMP and WSCP adoption. In addition, the City maintained a copy of the 2020 UWMP and WSCP at City Hall and at https://www.pismobeach.org prior to the public hearing. The City's Final 2020 UWMP and WSCP were formally adopted by the City Council on June 15, 2021. A copy of the Adoption Resolution is included in Appendix E. A hard copy of the City's Final 2020 UWMP and WSCP were sent to the California State Library, DWR (electronically using the WUEdata reporting tool), and all cities and counties within the City's service area within 30 days of adoption. To fulfill the requirements of Water Code Section 10642 of the UWMP Act, the City made the Final 2020 UWMP available online (https://www.pismobeach.org/)and at City Hall, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm, for public review within 30 days of adoption, on July 15, 2021. Should the City need to amend the adopted 2020 UWMP or WSCP in the future, City will hold a public hearing for review of the proposed amendments to the document. The City will send a 60-day notification letter to the surrounding cities and counties and notify the public. Notification to the public with be published twice in the newspaper, the first notice being a minimum of two weeks prior to the public hearing. Once the amended document is adopted, a copy finalized version will sent to the California State Library, DWR (electronically using the WUEdata reporting tool), and all cities and counties within the City's service area within 30 days of adoption. The finalized version will also be made available to the public both online (https://www.pismobeach.orci ) and in person at City Hall during normal business hours. City of Pismo Beach 2-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Plan Preparation Section 2 Table 2-5. Agency Coordination. Table to be updated upon UWMP completion. WAS SENT A NOTICE OF WAS INTENTION TO PARTICIPATED IN ATTENDED CONTACTED WAS NOTIFIED ADOPT 60 DAYS PLAN COMMENTED PUBLIC FOR OF PLAN PRIOR TO AGENCY/ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT ON DRAFT MEETINGS ASSISTANCE AVAILABILITY' PUBLIC HEARING WATER SUPPLIERS Avila Beach Community Services District X x Avila Valley Mutual Water Company X x San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation X x District San Miguelito Mutual Water Company X X Central Coast Water Authority X x City of Grover Beach X x County Service Area 12 x Oceano Community Services District X x Port San Luis Harbor District X x PUBLIC AGENCIES County of San Luis Obispo x x Nipomo Mesa Management Area Technical Group X x Northern Cities Management Area Technical Group X X San Luis Obispo Council of Governments X x South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District X x California Department of Water Resources (DWR) X X California State Library X X 'Was notified of availability of Draft UWMP and directed to an electronic copy of the draft plan on the City's website. City of Pismo Beach 2-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan 3 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN System Description This chapter describes the City's water system, service area, population demographics, local climate, and land uses. General Description IN THIS SECTION The City is located in San Luis Obispo County (County) in the Service Area central coastal region of California (Figure 3-1 on page 3-2). The 0 Current and Cityis considered a art of the area known as "Five Cities" in Projected p Population Southern San Luis Obispo County, which includes the Demographics incorporated cities of Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and the City, as well as the unincorporated Oceano Community Services Land Uses District (OCSD). United States Highway 101 runs from north to south through the City, which serves as the major connecting corridor to San Luis Obispo (approximately 13 miles north), Santa Maria (approximately 20 miles south), and Santa Barbara (approximately 80 miles south). The City is bordered by the Pacific Ocean on the west and Price Canyon on the east. Elevations within the City limits range from zero feet above mean sea level (MSL) to approximately 600 feet above MSL. A portion of the City lies within the Coastal Zone as designated by the California Coastal Act of 1976. Since the City's western border stretches along the Pacific Ocean shoreline for approximately seven miles, the City is required to have a Local Coastal Plan that is certified by the State Coastal Commission; the City's General Plan serves as its Local Coastal Plan. The City has historically been a popular tourist destination, and tourism continues to be the dominant economic sector in the City. Though the City's permanent population (discussed in Section 3.2 on page 3-5) is relatively small, visitors during summer months, special events, and holidays can increase the temporary population by up to two or sometimes three hundred percent (Pismo Beach, 1992). 3-1 System Description Section 3 —Sacramento .%,, United 'Davenport c San Francisco San Jose Fremont Fresno Las ve a e s Five Cities Agencies Van rvuysLos Angeles r ` Z I C;,Hollywood Santa Ana Ling Beach 7101 San Diego Sources:Esri,CGEBCO,NOAA,National Geographic,Garmin,HERE,Geonames.org, and other contributors,Esri,Garmin,GEBC6, NOAA NGDC,and other contributors 11ot t mi ach O 1 1 l Arroyo Grande 'over Beach Pacific Ocean N - AMiles OCSD 0 0,35 0.7 1.4 tj Legend Five Cities Agency Boundaries Pismo Beach C3GroverBeach Arroyo Grande ®Oceano Community Services District Figure 3-1. City of Pismo Boundary Map City of Pismo Beach 3-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan System Description Section 3 3.1 Service Area Climate The climate in the City can be classified as coastal with average rainfall rates of about 11.5 inches per year. Climate data from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), which collects precipitation, evapotranspiration (ETo) and temperature data, was evaluated. Data was collected from station #202 Nipomo for the period of 2006 to 2020 (CIMIS, 2021). Most of the annual precipitation falls from December through April. Table 3-1 on page 3-4 summarizes monthly average ETo rates, rainfall, and temperature. Figure 3-2 shows the annual precipitation collected from the City's rain gauge from 2010 through 2020 and illustrates which years fall above or below the annual average precipitation for this period. As shown by this figure, the area can experience multiple years under the average precipitation, making water management more critical to ensure communities are prepared for the next drought. 35 30 25 V) 20 v t U C 15 10 5 1 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Total Preciptation Average Annual Precipitation Figure 3-2. Annual Precipitation from 2010 to 2020 City of Pismo Beach 3-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan System Description Section 3 Table 3-1. Climate Information for Pismo Beach MONTH AVERAGE PRECIPITATION(INCHES)' AVERAGE ETo(INCHES)2 AVERAGE AIR TEMP(°F)2 January 2.6 2.2 52.8 February 2.0 2.5 52.5 March 2.0 3.5 5 3.9 April 0.9 4.5 54.7 May 0.2 5.0 55.5 June 0.2 4.7 56.4 July 0.3 5.0 58.4 August 0.0 4.4 59.3 September 0.0 3.7 59.7 October 1.2 3.4 60.2 November 1.9 2.4 56.3 December 3.9 1.9 51.9 AVERAGE 16.5 42.0 56.0 Notes: I Data obtained from a City Courtyard rain gauge from 2010-2020. 2 Data obtained from CIMIS Station#202 Nipomo from 2006-2020. The City's temperature ranges, on average, from about 52 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit (OF). The City has mild weather year-round, with typically warm daytime temperatures and cool nighttime temperatures. The City does not have extreme seasonal variations, though the area is subject to normal weather fluctuations often experienced in marine environments. City of Pismo Beach 3-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan System Description Section 3 3.2 Service Area Population and Demographics The City's 2020 population was estimated to be 8,559 in its incorporated areas (Wildan Financial Services, January 2019). Population estimates were based on data from the California Department of Finance. While the City saw moderate annual growth of 1 percent (%) between 1995 and 2000, the City's population declined by 1% annually between 2000 and 2010 and leveled off to a 0.1% annual increase from 2010 to 2015. However, the City's population did see an annual growth of 2% from 2015 to 2020, though this growth spurt is not likely to continue. The reasons for the City's modest population increases are likely due to a number of factors, including the high cost of living, an aging population, an increased number of second or vacation homes, and limited development. Future population growth in the City will depend on two factors: re-growth within the current City limits and growth as a result of new developments. The City's General Plan specifies a limit on annual growth of 3%. Based on historic population trends, it is unlikely that the City will experience growth that meets the 3% annual limit. The City anticipates an average annual growth rate of approximate 0.57% based on historic growth trends, and San Luis Obispo Council of Governments' (SLOCOG) San Luis Obispo County 2050 Population, Housing & Employment (Beacon Economics & SLOCOG Staff, June 2017). The projections chosen are based on the Low Scenario from the SLOCOG Regional Growth Forecast (Wildan Financial Services, January 2019). This UWMPs assumes an annual growth of 0.57%from 2020 on, within the current City limits, and that the City will not reach buildout during the UWMP projected planning period. The City's current and projected population is shown in Table 3-2. Table 3-2. DWR 3-1 R Current and Projected Population POPULATION SERVED 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 City Of Pismo Beach 8,559 8,806 9,060 9,321 9,590 9,866 TOTAL 8,559 8,806 9,060 9,321 9,590 9,866 City of Pismo Beach 3-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan System Description Section 3 3.3 Land Uses within Service Area The majority of the City's distribution system is zoned as residential (single family, multi-family, and mobile home) (34.8%) and public/semi-public space (40.2%). The rest of the land use is split among commercial (14.8%), mixed-use (4.9%), industrial (2.6%), and open space (2.7%). The single-and multi- family residential zones range from low density (1 to 8 units per acre) to high density (16 to 30 units per acre), with much of it zoned as medium density (9 to 15 units per acre). The mobile home park has approximately 515 RV and camping spaces (City of Pismo Beach, April 2014). Figure 3-3 shows the land use by customer type in the City. Shea Rd Pismo - Prese rvr Matti.Rd. Pi—Beach City Limits J P,i<e Canyon Rd - — Cailnmia Coa slat lone Boundary .•`e,. Land Use Slagle-Family Reslden[lal Multl-FamilyResldentlal - �77- Mobile Home Park r 5• '" Ilkt cornmemal Hotel/"el x Publlcl5eml Public A. Open Spme VarantlOEber ' L2,111111 IT • I Figure 3-3. Pismo Beach Land Use by Customer Type In the most recent draft of the Land Use Element Update, which is currently in public review, the City estimates there are approximately 66 underutilized parcels of commercial parcels of land, 139 parcels of high density residential, 32 parcels of medium density residential and 48 parcels of mixed-use land. At full buildout,the City expects a population increase of 1,877 people, a potential increase of 1,112 dwelling units, and a potential increase of 7,350 square-feet non-residential building area. City of Pismo Beach 3-6 2020 Urban Water Management Plan URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Water Use Characterization This chapter describes and quantifies the City's past, current, and projected water uses through 2045. The City provides potable water to all its customers, which are comprised of about 88% residential, 8% commercial, and 4% landscaping accounts. Accurately tracking and reporting current water demands allow a IN THIS SECTION water supplier to properly analyze the use of its resources and Non-Potable vs. conduct good resource planning. Estimating future demand as Potable Water accurately as possible allows water agencies to manage their Use water supply and appropriately plan their infrastructure 0Past and Current Use investments. Assessments of future growth and related water demand, done in coordination with local planning agencies, • Projected Water Demand provide essential information for developing demand projections. • Projected Water This section describes the urban water system demands, including Demand for Lower Income calculating baseline (base daily per capita) water use and interim Households and urban water use targets. It quantifies the current water system Climate Change demand by category and projects them over the planning horizon Impacts of the 2020 UWMP. These projections include metered, and billed water, non-revenue water that is metered and may not be billed and possibly be covered by special agreements, system water losses, as well as water use target compliance. The section also includes a detailed description of how the baseline and targets were calculated. 4-1 Water Use Characterization Section 4 4.1 Non-Potable Versus Potable Water Use Recycled water is addressed comprehensively in Chapter 6 of this UWMP. Chapter 4 addresses potable water demand and also provides for the reporting of raw water demand for the year 2020 projected to 2045, which is reported in Table 4-5 on page 4-4. 4.2 Past, Current, and Projected Water Use by Sector The City serves potable water for a variety of uses, as summarized in Table 4-1. In 2020, 61% of the total water deliveries were to residential customers (48% to single-family accounts and 13% to multi- family accounts. 4.2.1 Water Use Sectors in Addition to Those Listed in Water Code 4.2.1.1 Transfers Although the City has an emergency connection with the City of Arroyo Grande to deliver water in emergencies, the City does not have any contracts to sell water to other agencies as a wholesaler. Additionally, the City does not plan to sell water to other agencies at this time. 4.2.1.2 Past and Current Water Use Water use over the past five years has notably reduced from pre-drought levels in 2013. Over the last five years, the City used an average of 1,726 AFY. The most recent peak in demand occurred in 2014 with a total demand of 1,949 AFY. It is anticipated that the City's customers will continue to implement conservation behaviors and keep demands lower than pre-drought levels. Table 4-1. Past and Current Water Use, Acre-Feet Per Year (AFY) 2016 2018 2019 2020 Single-Family 641 689 747 691 781 Multi-Family 599 207 134 91 214 Commercial 22 367 468 449 392 Landscape 177 175 211 184 225 Other 0 26 21 90 0 Water Loss 207 245 138 272 166 TOTAL USE 1,440 1,465 1,581 1,507 1 All 2 4.2.2 Distribution System Water Losses Table 4-2 on page 4-3 shows the amount of non-revenue water(NRW)for the City for the past five years based on billed consumption. NRW is defined as the water losses plus authorized unbilled (metered and unmetered) water consumption. City of Pismo Beach 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Use Characterization Section 4 The City used the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Free Water Audit Software in 2020 to perform a water audit of the City for the one-year period beginning July 2019 and ending June 2020 (Appendix F). The AWWA Water Audit results showed that NRW in the City was 172.71 AFY for the July 2019 through June 2020 period. Though the current NRW is under 10%, NRW is projected to be approximately of production going forward (2026-2045) based on the average NRW percentage for 2015-2020. The City will need to discuss plans to maintain reasonably low water loss amounts in the future. Table 4-6 on page 4-5 shows the historical water loss from the City's AWWA Water Audits. Table 4-2. Non-Revenue Water 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-revenue Water,AFY* 207 245 138 272 166 Percentage of Losses 1 2.6% 14.3% 8.1% 15.3% 9.3% *Values shown here were calculated as water losses plus authorized unbilled water consumption. 4.2.3 Projected Water Use Demands were estimated using a Gallons Per Capita Per Day (GCPD) method. The total demand was estimated by multiplying the GPCD by the projected populations for 2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, and 2045. Projected populations are described in Chapter 3. Table 4-4 on page 4-4 present projected demands through 2045. Table 4-3 on page 4-4 shows the 2020 demands for comparison. Demand projections are based on the assumption that the current GPCD will continue at the selected target of 204 GPCD and stay constant thereafter. Chapter 5 describes the methodology used to develop SBX7-7 baseline and targets in detail. Since 1995, per capita water usage varied from a high of 252 GPCD to a low of 169 GPCD. Overall, per capita consumption has decreased, which is most likely due to the recent drought, state mandated water use reduction targets, more efficient appliances and plumbing, and conservation efforts made by the City and its customers. While the 2020 GPCD was below the SBX7-7 target, future demand could increase due to a variety of factors and for this UWMP the conservative 204 GPCD demand is used for projections to proactively develop water resources management strategies to account for these potential future demands. Additionally, the City is aware that future water use standards are under development by DWR, which will supersede SBX7-7 standards and will likely require demands to be lower than the SBX7-7 target. Therefore, the City plans to continue encouraging efficient water use and implementing water use efficiency measures to support meeting future water use standards and to enhance resiliency for drought and other water shortage conditions as described in Chapter 7, Chapter 8, and Chapter 9. 4.2.4 Characteristic Five-Year Water Use In addition to past and projected uses, the UWMP more closely analyzes anticipated conditions for the next five years (2021 — 2025). In the next five years, the City anticipates that demands may increase by approximately 36 AFY from current conditions. This increase is based on normal year conditions representing a "rebound"from current 2020 use, which is likely lower than typical unconstrained demand as many of the City's residents continue to conserve water after the most recent drought that ended in 2017. Details on an analysis for the next five years are discussed in Chapter 7. City of Pismo Beach 4-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Use Characterization Section 4 Table 4-3. DWR 4-1 R Actual Demands for Water LEVEL OF TREATMENT 2020 USE TYPE WHEN DELIVERED VOLUME Single Family Drinking Water 781 Multi-Family Drinking Water 214 Commercial Drinking Water 392 Landscape Drinking Water 225 Other Drinking Water 0 TOTAL: 1,612 Table 4-4. DWR 4-21Z Projected Demands for Water PROJECTED WATER USE USE TYPE 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 Single Family 769 791 814 838 862 Multi-Family 270 278 286 294 302 Commercial 368 379 389 401 412 Landscape 211 217 223 230 236 Other 30 31 32 32 33 TOTAL: 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 Table 4-5. DWR 4-311 Total Gross Water Use 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 Potable and Raw Water 1,612 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 From Table 4-1 R and 4-21? Recycled Water Demand' From Table 6-41? TOTAL WATER USE 1,612 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 Recycled Water Demand does not include demand associated with Central Coast Blue,an IPR project,since the demand is met using treated wastewater effluent and not potable water City of Pismo Beach 4-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Use Characterization Section 4 Table 4-6. DWR 4411 12 Month Water Loss Audit Reporting REPORT PERIOD START DATE MM YYYY VOLUME OF WATER LOSS' 07 2017 114 07 2018 113 07 2019 168 ' Taken from the field"Water Losses(a combination of apparent losses and real losses)from the AWWA worksheet. 4.3 Water Use for Lower Income Households Changes to the CWC section 10631.1 since 2005 require demand projections to include projected water use for single-family and multi-family residential housing needed for lower income households. Low- income households are defined as households making less than 80% of the statewide median household income. The Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) determines the housing needs in each jurisdiction over the planning period. SLOCOG current RHNA planning period is from January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2028. For this planning period, one hundred and eighty-four (184) new low- and very low-income units are projected to be needed in the City by 2028 (SLOCOG, 2019). It is important to note that the RHNA requirement is to have land zoned for the projected low-income housing need but not necessarily build the units. The low-income deliveries projections are included in the City's total projected water deliveries as part of the GPCD demand projection calculation, as shown in Table 4-7. Table 4-7. DWR 4-51Z Inclusion in Water Use Projections Are Future Water Savings Included in Projections? No Refer to Appendix K of UWMP Guidebook. Are Lower Income Residential Demands Included in Projections? Yes 4.4 Climate Change Considerations Higher temperatures decrease the amount of precipitation available for groundwater recharge and from surface water sources while increasing water use, especially for outdoor use. Impacts on future water supply due to impacts associated with climate change are discussed in Section 6.2.10.1 on page 6-23. City of Pismo Beach 4-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, 5 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN SBX7-7 Baseline, Targets and 2020 Compliance This chapter describes the Water Conservation Act of 2009, also known as SBX7-7, Baseline, Targets, and 2020 Compliance. The goal of this chapter is to demonstrate compliance with the 2020 targeted water-use reduction of 20%. SBX7-7 was incorporated into the UWMP Act in 2009 and IN THIS SECTION requires that all water suppliers increase water use efficiency with . Target and the overall goal to decrease per-capita water consumption within Baseline Method the state by 20% by the year 2020. SBX7-7 required DWR to Summary develop certain criteria, methods, and standard reporting forms 0Baselines& Targets through a public process that water suppliers could use to establish their baseline water use and determine their water SBX7-7 Forms and Tables conservation targets. • 2020 Compliance SBX7-7 and DWR's Methodologies for Calculating Baseline and Compliance Urban Per Capita Water Use (California Department of Water Resources, February 2016) specify methodologies for determining the baseline water demand, 2015 interim urban water use target and the 2020 urban water use target for the City as described in the following sections. The SBX7-7 Verification Forms, which are required to be submitted to DWR to demonstrate compliance with the SBX7-7 requirements, are presented in Appendix G. This section also demonstrates that the City achieved its 2020 water use target. SBX7-7 Baseline, Targets and 2020 Compliance Section 5 5.1 SBX7-7 Forms and Tables The SBX7-7 Verification Form was submitted as part of the City's 2015 UWMP to establish the baseline and 2020 water use target, which remains valid because there are no changes to the service area. A summary of the SBX7-7 Verification Form is presented in Table 5-1. The City selected SBX7-7 Method 4, which was calculated as the baseline water use minus the total savings (residential indoor, CII, landscape, and water loss, and meter savings). In the City's case, the calculated 2020 target water use of 204 GPCI was selected. As part of the 2020 UWMP, the City must demonstrate compliance with its 2020 water use target by completing SBX7-7 2020 Compliance Form. This form is an abbreviated version of the SBX7-7 Verification Form solely for 2020 compliance calculations. A summary of the 2020 SBX7-7 2020 Compliance Form is shown in Table 5-2. The City first met the 2020 compliance target in 1995 and continues to reduce GPCD use overall. The City has consistently met the 2020 SBX7-7 target since 2015 and will continue to work towards reducing GPCD use. A copy of the completed SBX7-7 Forms is included in Appendix G. Table 5-1. DWR 5-1 R Baselines and Targets Summary BASELINE PERIOD START YEAR END YEAR AVERAGE BASELINE GPCD* CONFIRMED 2020 TARGET 10-15 Year 2000 2009 237 204 5 Year 2004 2008 245 *All values are in GPCD. *All cells in this table are populated manually from the supplier's SBX7-7 Verification Form. Table 5-2. DWR 5-2R 2020 Compliance OPTIONAL ADJUSTMENTS TO 2020 GPCD SUPPLIER ACHIEVED 2020 GPCD* TARGETED ACTUAL EXTRAORDINARY ECONOMIC WEATHER TOTAL ADJUSTED (ADJUSTED IF REDUCTION 2020 GPCD* EVENTS* ADJUSTMENT* NORMALIZATION* ADJUSTMENTS* 2020 GPCD* APPLICABLE) IN 2020 185.4 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes *All values are in GPCD. *All cells in this table are populated manually from the supplier's SBX7-7 Verification Form. City of Pismo Beach 5-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan 6 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Water Supply Characterization This chapter describes and quantifies the sources of water available to the City's supply portfolio, and actions that are anticipated to meet future water demands. This section describes the existing and projected water supply IN THIS SECTION sources for the City. The City currently receives water from three 0 Water Supply sources: Lopez Lake, the State Water Project (SWP), and Analysis groundwater. A description of the City's planning efforts for 0 Projected recycled water are also included within this section of the UWMP. Recycled Water Use Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.1 Water Supply Analysis Overview The City relies on a combination of Lopez Lake, SWP, and groundwater to meet their demand. 6.1 .1 Water Supply Facilities The City's groundwater is obtained from two wells that pump water from the SMGB. Table 6-1 describes the existing well supply capacity of the two groundwater wells currently in use by the City. Table 6-1. Existing City of Pismo Beach Groundwater Wells WELL CASING DEPTH PRODUCTION CAPACITY NUMBER LOCATION YEAR INSTALLED (FEET) (GPM) 5 8th Street and Grand Avenue 1973 500 600 23 900 Block of Huber Street 1990 395 950 TOTAL(GPM) 1,550 *Table adapted from Table 5-1 in the City's Water Master Plan(2004). The City's total groundwater pumping capacity is 1,550 gallons per minute (gpm; 2,502 AFY). Therefore, the firm groundwater pumping capacity, which is defined as the pumping capacity with the largest well out of service, is 600 gpm. The City's other supply sources (surface water from Lopez Lake and the SWP) utilize facilities that are not managed by the City, but by the San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (District). Specifically, the District manages the Lopez Reservoir and delivery of Lopez Entitlements to the City and the other Flood Control and Water Conservation District Zone 3 (Zone 3) members. Zone 3 was formed to fund operations of the Lopez Project, which includes Lopez Lake and Dam, Lopez Terminal Reservoir, Lopez Water Treatment Plant and Distribution System. The District also manages the SWP contract through which the City receives its State Water allocation. The City's historical production by source is shown in Figure 6-1. 2,000 1,500 c a U a 1,000 v a 500 I 0 N m ,t Ln tD r- oo m O N m Ln %o r- oo m O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -41� 1� 1� 1-4 N C7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C7 C7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C7 C7 N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N ■Groundwater ■Lopez ■SWP Figure 6-1. 2000-2020 Production by Source City of Pismo Beach 6-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.1 .2 Distribution System and Storage The City's current water distribution system consists of 11 pressure zones within nine distribution zones, nine storage reservoirs, four Lopez Pipeline turnouts, six booster pump stations, and over 56 miles of distribution mains. The City's distribution zones accommodate customers located across over seven miles of coastline, with elevations ranging from sea level to over 600 feet above MSL (Water Systems Consulting, 2020). Table 6-2 provides a summary of the distribution zones, including the zone's water supply source and reservoir, if applicable. The City's water supply distribution system is rather complex and is described in more detail in the City's 2020 Water Master Plan. Table 6-2. Distribution Zone Summary MAXIMUM SUPPLY SOURCE STORAGE2 HYDRAULIC BOOSTER DISTRIBUTION ZONE GRADE(FEET) FROM STATION RESERVOIR SIZE(GALLONS) Bello Turnout Well #5 Charles Street 420,000 Main 176 Well #23 Bello 470,000 Pismo Oaks Turnout Pismo Oaks 339 Main Pismo Oaks Pismo Oaks 800,000 Pacific Estates 384 Main Pacific Estates Pacific Estates 1 350,000 Pacific Estates 2 850,000 Heights 1 459 Main Bello Heights 1 220,000 Heights 2 220,000 Bello 291 Heights 1 N/A --- --- Dell Court 243 Heights 1 N/A --- --- Heights 2 875 Main Heights 2 --- --- 527 Main Shell Beach 1 222 Vista Del Mar Turnout Bay Street Shell Beach 1 1,000,000 323 Shell Beach 1 Shell Beach 2 265 Sunset Palisades Shell Beach Shell Beach 2 1,000,000 Turnout City of Pismo Beach 6-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.2 UWMP Water Supply Characterization This section provides narratives that further quantifies water supply availability for the City as required under the California Water Code. 6.2.1 Purchased or Imported Water For the SWP, DWR periodically compiles a report on the supply reliability of State Water under current _ and projected water conditions. DWR's 2019 - Delivery Reliability Report describes the historical and projected deliveries to the State Water Contractors during normal years and over various drought-year periods. Although the relative percent deliveries included in the 2019 Delivery Reliability Report apply specifically to State Water Contractors allocations, these percentages correspond to percent reduction that the City may experience in drought conditions. For the Basis of Water Year analysis, the average year is consistent with the projected average delivery of 58% Table A allocations from the 2019 Delivery Reliability " ver Interstate 5 in the Central Valley Report. The 58% allocation combined with the City's ' drought buffer will allow the City to receive 1,140 , AFY under average year conditions. SWP supplies for Single dry year deliveries were calculated using the minimum historical Table A allocation from 2000-2020. SWP supplies for consecutive dry years were calculated using the minimum 5-year average historical Table A allocations from 2000-2020. The average, single dry year, and consecutive dry years are shown in Table 7-6 on page 7-8 in Chapter 7. Since SWP makes up largest share of the City's water supply, the base years for SWP were also used for the other water supplies. 6.2.2 Groundwater The City's right to pump groundwater from the SMGB is defined within the Adjudicated Judgement (Appendix H), which states that the Northern Cities (including the City) have a paramount right to withdraw 4,330 AFY (including Agricultural conversion credits) from the Northern Cities area of the SMGB. The City is entitled to 700 AFY of this total, as indicated in the Gentlemen's Agreement with other water purveyors in the Northern Cities Area (Appendix 1), however, recent groundwater modeling indicates that the full allocations of NCMA groundwater entitlement cannot be pumped by municipal agencies during extended drought conditions without inducing seawater intrusion (Geoscience, 2019). It is important to note that the City has made and continues to make planning efforts to reduce its reliance on groundwater supplies. In addition, with recent detections of groundwater elevations below sea level and subsequent threat of seawater intrusion, the City realizes the importance of maintaining its groundwater supplies and following a sustainable pumping plan. Therefore, the City considers and will continue to consider minimizing its impact to groundwater resources. In an effort to protect the SMGB, the City has partnered with the City of Arroyo Grande, City of Grover Beach, and OCSD to design Central Coast Blue, an indirect potable reuse project that will help to recharge the SMGB and protect against seawater intrusion. Central Coast Blue was developed in response to recent droughts that highlighted vulnerabilities in the City's water supply portfolio and the seawater intrusion risks faced by the SMGB. The Project will improve the reliability of the City's water City of Pismo Beach 6-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 supply portfolio by repurposing treated wastewater flows from the Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), treating the water to drinking water standards, and injecting it into the SMGB. Central Coast Blue will provide a drought-resistant, sustainable local water supply for the City while also improving and protecting the water quality in the SMGB, therefore enhancing the health of the larger watershed. Since the flow of wastewater is typically reliable even during dry years, the City anticipates that it will be able to provide significant enhancement of groundwater supplies and protection of groundwater resources when threatened by drought conditions. 6.2.2.1 Basin Description For planning purposes, DWR has subdivided the State of California into ten separate hydrologic regions, corresponding to the State's major drainage basins. The SMGB (Number 3-12 as described in DWR Bulletin 118) underlies the Santa Maria Valley in the coastal portion of northern Santa Barbara and southern San Luis Obispo Counties. The SMGB also underlies Nipomo and Tri-Cities Mesas, Arroyo Grande Plain, and Arroyo Grande and Pismo Creek Valleys, of which the City draws from the Tri-Cities Mesa portion of the SMGB. The SMGB is bounded by the San Luis and Santa Lucia Ranges on the north, the San Rafael Mountains on the east, and Solomon Hills and San Antonio Creek Valley Groundwater Basin on the south, and the Pacific Ocean on the west. The SMGB is approximately 288 square miles (184,000 acres). This basin was adjudicated in 2008. Groundwater is found in alluvium, sand dunes, and the Orcutt, Paso Robles, Pismo, and Careaga formations. Groundwater is unconfined throughout most of the SMGB except in the coastal portion where it is confined. Specific yield of sediments in the SMGB ranges from 3% to 21%, with a mean specific yield of approximately 12% for parts of the SMGB in San Luis Obispo County. Historically, DWR estimated the safe yield of the Tri-Cities Mesa — Arroyo Grande Plain Hydrologic subarea to be between 4,000 AFY and 5,600 AFY (Carollo Engineers, City of Pismo Beach 2010 Urban Water Management Plan, September 2011). Natural recharge in the basin comes from seepage losses from major streams, percolation of rainfall, and subsurface flow. Percolation of flow in Arroyo Grande Creek, controlled by releases from Lopez Dam, provides recharge for the Tri-Cities Mesa, Arroyo Grande Plain, and Arroyo Grande Valley portions of the SMGB. Incidental recharge results from deep percolation of urban and agricultural return water, treated wastewater return, and septic tank effluent. Some subsurface flow comes from consolidated rocks surrounding the SMGB and from the neighboring San Antonia Creek Valley Groundwater Basin. A 2007 Water Balance Study of the Northern Cities Management Area (NCMA) (described below) estimated a total average annual recharge of 8,535 AFY, and an average annual groundwater production of 5,569 AFY between 1986 and 2004. According to DWR Bulletin 118, the total storage capacity of the portion of the SMGB in San Luis Obispo County is estimated to be approximately 4,000,000 AF, with about 784,000 acre-feet (AF) of the total capacity residing above MSL. A 1968 storage capacity evaluation estimated that the total storage capacity of the SMGB to be approximately 14,900,000 AF. Groundwater in storage for the San Luis Obispo County portion of the SMGB was estimated to be 3,870,000 AF by DWR in 1969. According to a DWR 2002 estimate, groundwater in storage in the NCMA portion of the SMGB is estimated to have been 3,411,100 AF in 1985 and 3,399,700 AF in 1995. Groundwater storage above MSL was estimated to have been 231,100 AF in 1985 and 219,700 AF in 1995 (Resources, California's Groundwater Bulletin 118 Update 2003, October 2003). A map of the SMGB is shown below as Figure 6-2 on the next page. City of Pismo Beach 6-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 • ,gyp �Okki L 0 Legend NCMA Agency Boundaries Pismo Beach t Grover Beach Arroyo Grande I=Oceano SMGB Adjudication Areas NMMA i NCMA ^# SMVMA DWR Bulletin 118 Boundary e I •)P,Gero e,Earthstar Geographics,CNES1A�b ■ y SMGB GP swisstop.o,,andtheGIS;Us mm erCou E, ■ I Idi M �o It N i s ":nd the GI er or Figure 6-2. Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Map City of Pismo Beach 6-6 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.2.2.2 Groundwater Management Plan A formal groundwater management plan has not been prepared for the City or the NCMA. In the future, the City may consider coordination with other agencies within the SMGB to develop a more comprehensive groundwater management plan. The City's underlying groundwater basin is adjudicated, so allowable withdrawals from the SMGB are limited by law. A copy of the Adjudication Judgment and Gentlemen's Agreement, which is what the management of the NCMA in the Adjudication Judgment was based on, are provided in Appendix H. As a requirement of the Adjudicated Judgment, the City participates in the Northern Cities Monitoring Program, which is comprised of local entities that have a vested interest in responsibly managing the surface and groundwater resources of the region. The goal of the Northern Cities Monitoring Program is to help preserve the long-term integrity of water supplies in the NCMA. The program includes joint efforts from the City as well as the City of Arroyo Grande, City of Grover Beach, OCSD (collectively, the Northern Cities), San Luis Obispo County, the District, and local landowners. The Northern Cities and partnered agencies have established six objectives for ongoing NCMA groundwater management, including: • Share groundwater resources and manage pumping, • Monitor supply and demand, and share information, Manage groundwater levels and prevent seawater intrusion, Protect groundwater quality, Manage cooperatively, Encourage water conservation. NCMA agencies are required by the Adjudicated Judgment to prepare and submit annual reports for the monitoring program, which include collection and analysis of data pertaining to the water supply and demand of the region, including land and water uses in the SMGB, supply sources, and groundwater conditions. 6.2.2.3 Groundwater Levels and Historical Trends The Northern Cities conduct groundwater monitoring in the NCMA, which represents the northernmost portion of the SMGB. The NCMA groundwater monitoring program utilizes collected data from three primary sources: (1) groundwater elevation data collected by the San Luis Obispo County, (2) water quality and elevation data from a network of sentry wells in the NCMA, and (3) water quality data from the Division of Drinking Water. The NCMA 2020 Annual Monitoring Report is included in Appendix J for reference, including a boundary map of the NCMA, historic annual precipitation, groundwater elevation contours, and selected hydrographs of NCMA monitoring wells. Regular monitoring of water elevations in clustered sentry wells located along the coast are monitored quarterly as part of the sentry well monitoring program, which comprises an essential tool for tracking critical groundwater elevation changes. As shown by the hydrographs in Appendix J, the sentry wells provide a long history of groundwater elevations. Measured water elevations in these wells reflect the net effect of changing groundwater recharge and discharge conditions in the primary production aquifer. Averaging the groundwater elevations from the three deep sentry wells provides a single, representative index, called the deep well index, for tracking the status and apparent health of the basin. Previous groundwater studies and NCMA Monitoring Annual Reports have suggested a deep well index value of 7.5 feet above MSL as a minimum threshold, below which the basin is at risk for sea water intrusion. Historical variation of this index is represented by the average deep sentry well elevations shown in Figure 6-3 on page 6-8. City of Pismo Beach 6-7 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 20 m 19 co 17 Deep Well Index Elevation > 16 (Wells 24BO3, 30F03 and 30NO2) Z 14 m 13 O 10 9 > 8 0) 6 'Deep Well Index Threshold:7.5 feet w 5 x 4 3 2 1 -0 c _3 Deep Well Index is the average of groundwater elevations in the deep wells of Sentry Weil clusters 0 -4 2413,30F,and 30N(see Figure 3 for locations of -5 monitoring wells and Figure 4 forwell depths). 800 700 J 17) 600 well 3ONO2 500 Well24B03 (D 400 We11301`03 p 300 C3 200 100 0 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Figure 6-3. Hydrograph of Deep Well Index Elevation As described in the Northern Cities 2020 Annual Report, groundwater below MSL indicates a potential for seawater intrusion into fresh groundwater supplies. The area with lowest groundwater elevations encompasses municipal well fields and represents a relatively broad and shallow pumping trough exacerbated by drought conditions. In 2020, the deep well index started the year above the 7.5-foot threshold value with an index number in January of more than 10 feet. The deep well index continued to rise through the winter and early spring, reaching a high of more than 12 feet in April, and then began a steady decline into and throughout the summer season, as is typical. The index value dropped down to the 7.5-foot threshold value briefly in mid-October and then immediately began to rise. The index value continued to rise throughout the end of the year and finished 2020 at about 9 feet NAVD 88. Hydrographs produced through the sentry well monitoring program indicate that groundwater elevations have historically varied above and below about 20 feet above MSL. Historical hydrographs show that groundwater elevations recover to levels similar to 2006(a wet water year)and significantly decline during dry years like 2013. These groundwater level decreases, and recovery cycles illustrate the relationship between times of the drought and increased pumping, and times of recovery with increased rainfall and decreased pumping. The three years of very low rainfall (2013-2015) resulted in water levels throughout the area declining 10 to 20 feet. City of Pismo Beach 6-8 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.2.2.4 Groundwater Overdraft Overdraft is the condition of a groundwater basin in which the amount of water withdrawn by pumping exceeds the amount of water that recharges the basin. By definition, overdraft is not a measure of annual fluctuations in groundwater storage volume. Rather, overdraft is a measure of the long-term trend associated with annual fluctuations. Overdraft is characterized by groundwater levels that decline over a period of years and never fully recover, even in wet years (Resources, California's Groundwater Bulletin 118 Update 2003, October 2003). DWR has identified the Central Coast Hydrologic Region to be in a state of overdraft. However, DWR also states that overdraft in this region is expected to decline as supply sources shift from groundwater to imported SWP surface water (Resources, California Water Plan Update Bulletin 160-98, November 1998). A primary concern for the City and for the SMGB in general is seawater intrusion from the coastal zone into fresh groundwater supply. Total groundwater pumping in the NCMA (urban, agriculture, and rural domestic) was 3,064 AF in 2020, which is 32.3% of the calculated 9,500 AFY safe yield of the NCMA portion of the basin. However, even with the reduced pumping, water levels across the aquifer decreased indicating a decrease of groundwater in storage. During the period of April 2019 to April 2020, the NCMA portion of the SMGB experienced a net decrease of groundwater in storage. The net decrease in groundwater levels represented a decrease of groundwater in storage from April 2019 to April 2020 of approximately 500 AF; that is, there was approximately 500 AF less groundwater stored in the NCMA portion of the SMGB in April 2020 than in April 2019. Typically, when pumping is less than the safe yield, the remaining volume of groundwater results in increased groundwater in storage, which is then manifested by rising water levels. The current condition, with groundwater pumping at 32.3% of the safe yield and declining water elevations, illustrates the impacts of the ongoing severe drought that has significantly reduced recharge. Reduced recharge likely also illustrates the impacts of reduced subsurface inflow recharge from the east (Nipomo Mesa). This condition of declining water levels in the NCMA, even though total pumping is currently 32.3% of the basin safe yield, will likely be exacerbated if the NCMA agencies are required to increase groundwater withdrawals due to reduction in local surface water supplies or State Water project deliveries (Fugro Consultants, April 2016). 6.2.2.5 Past Five Years As shown in Table 6-3 below, the City has reduced groundwater production since 2016 in an effort to protect the SMGB and allow the deep well index to recover. Table 6-3. DWR 6-1 R Groundwater Volume Pumped GROUNDWATER TYPE LOCATION OR BASIN NAME 2019 2020 Alluvial Basin Santa Maria Groundwater Basin 276 205 53 44 55 TOTAL 276 205 53 44 55 City of Pismo Beach 6-9 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.2.3 Surface Water The supply reliability of the City's surface water allocation from Lopez Lake is determined by the District and based on reservoir storage, historical production, and delivery volumes in average, single dry, and - consecutive dry year conditions. According to the Zone 3 2020 UWMP, the Lopez Reservoir is a very reliable source of water with an annual safe yield of 8,730 AFY. The Low - Reservoir Response Plan (LRRP) was adopted in December 2014 and enacted in s .. April 2015 when storage reached below " 20,000 AF. Historical Lopez Lake storage is shown in Figure 6-4. The enactment of Stage = ar,aerial view of Lopez rake 2 of the LRRP resulted in a 10% decrease in municipal and downstream releases as shown in Table 6-4 on page 6-11 and Table 6-5 on page 6-11. The District projects that municipal entitlements will remain constant at 4,530 AFY through 2035, and that it will be able to supply all contracted agencies with their requested allocations in full for the first three of five consecutive dry years. For the purposes of this UWMP, the District anticipates delivering 90% of municipal entitlements, based on reservoir capacity, during the fourth and fifth year of consecutive dry years. Therefore, it is assumed that water supply from Lopez Lake during dry water years will meet the City's full allocation of 892 AFY except during the fourth and fifth year of consecutive dry years. 60,000.0 50,000.0 40,000.0 LL a a E 30,000.0 — 0 7 m Y [o J 20,000.0 — 10,000.0 0.0 mori NM �v]w r-w mo.i Nm � v]kO r-oc m on Nm �LnkD r-com o �i Nm-t v]kD ncom on Nrn-It LnW rl-Dom o orr rr rrr rr rco co co 0o 0o 0o co co 0o 0o mm mm m m m m m m o o 000 00 oo o .-i rI r-IHH H1-i H H H N m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ei ri rl rl eil ei ei ri rl ei ei ei ri ri eil eil ei ri ri rl eil ei ei ei ri rl ei ei ei ri eil N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a aaaaaaaaa¢ aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ¢aaa Figure 6-4. Historic Lake Lopez Storage Volume versus LRRP Municipal Diversion Reductions City of Pismo Beach 6-10 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-4. Initial Prescribed Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP AMOUNT OF WATER IN STORAGE(AF) MUNICIPAL DIVERSION REDUCTION MUNICIPAL DIVERSION(AFY)l 20,000 0% 4,530 15,000 10% 4,077 10,000 20% 3,624 5,000 35%I�1 2,941 4,000 100% 0 1 The actual amount of water diverted may vary as agencies extend the delivery of their Lopez Entitlement. z The 35%reduction provides sufficient water to supply 55 gallons per capita per day(gpcd)for the estimated population of the Zone 3 agencies(47,696 in 2010 per the 2010 Zone 3 UWMP).55 gpcd is the target residential indoor water usage standard used in California Department of Water Resource's 2010 UWMP Method 4 Guidelines. Table 6-5. Initial Prescribed Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP AMOUNT OF WATER IN STORAGE(AF) DOWNSTREAM RELEASE REDUCTION DOWNSTREAM RELEASES(AFY)t 20,000 9.5% 3,800 15,000 9.5% 3,800 10,000 75.6% 1,026 5,000 92.9% 300 4,000 100.0% 0 These downstream releases represent the maximum amount of water that can be released. Actual releases may be less if releases can be reduced while still meeting the needs of the agricultural stakeholders and addressing the environmental requirements.(Zone,December 16,2014) 6.2.3.1 Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Supply Options Evaluation In late 2015 and early 2016, the Zone 3 member agencies and the District collaborated to identify, evaluate, and develop recommendations for emergency water supply options that could be implemented in the event that current drought continued for an extended period. These agencies are continuing to monitor drought conditions and plan for the implementation of these emergency measures, should they become necessary. The emergency supply options evaluated by Zone 3 member agencies and the District are outlined in Table 6-6 on page 6-12. City of Pismo Beach 6-1 1 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-6. Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Supply Options CLOUD SEEDING Investigate opportunities to utilize cloud seeding to enhance rainfall within the Lopez Watershed. This could involve cooperative agreement with Santa Barbara County. SWP MAXIMIZATION Maximize importation of District State Water Project(SWP)supplies,including subcontractor and "Excess Entitlement"supplies. UNSUBSCRIBED Investigate transfer/exchange opportunities to obtain unsubscribed Nacimiento water for the Zone 3 NACIMIENTO agencies (i.e.,exchange agreements with the City of San Luis Obispo and the Chorro Valley pipeline SWP subcontractors). WATER MARKET Investigate opportunities to obtain additional imported water and deliver it to the Zone 3 agencies PURCHASES through the SWP infrastructure (e.g., Exchange agreements with San Joaquin/Sacramento Valley farmers,Water broker consultation,Groundwater Banking Exchange Agreements,etc.). MORRO BAY DESAL Investigate opportunities to obtain SWP water from Morro Bay by providing incentives for Morro Bay to fully utilize its desalination plant capacity. Evaluate potential agreements with local agriculture representatives to offer financial incentives to LAND FALLOWING fallow land within the Arroyo Grande and Cienega Valleys and make that water available for municipal use. LOPEZ RESERVOIR Investigate feasibility of extracting water from Lopez Reservoir below the 4,000 AF minimum pool MINIMUM POOL level. This may require utilization of emergency pumps to deliver the water to the Lopez Water Treatment Plant. ENCHANCED Evaluate opportunities for enhanced water conservation by the Zone 3 agencies beyond the CONSERVATION Governor's Mandatory Water Conservation Order (e.g.,water rationing,no outdoor watering, agriculture water restrictions,etc.) to preserve additional water. DIABLO DESAL Utilize excess capacity from the Diablo Power Plant's Desalination Facility to supply water to the Zone 3 agencies through a connection to the Lopez Pipeline. Complete design of pipeline that would connect the Nacimiento Pipeline to the California Men's NACIMIENTO/CMC Colony (CMC) Water Treatment Plant. Investigate opportunities for Zone 3 agencies to purchase INTERTIE Nacimiento Water and utilize exchange agreements and existing infrastructure to deliver additional water to Zone 3 through the Coastal Branch pipeline. EMERGENCY IPR Investigate opportunities to develop an Indirect Potable Reuse (IPR) Groundwater Recharge System, under emergency permits,to provide a supplemental supply for the Zone 3 Agencies. EMERGENCY DESAL Investigate opportunities to develop a desalination facility,under emergency permits,to provide a supplemental supply for the Zone 3 Agencies. PRICE CANYON Investigation into opportunities to recover and utilize produced water from ongoing oil operations in PRODUCED WATER Price Canyon. UPPER LOPEZ WELLS Investigate potential water storage in aquifers upstream of Lopez Reservoir and evaluate opportunities to obtain this water supply. 6.2.4 Stormwater Stormwater runoff is regulated under the federal Clean Water Act via the National Pollution Discharge Elimination (NPDES) Program. The City is subject to the Phase II General Permit NO. CAS000004 for Municipal Stormwater (General Permit). The General Permit requires municipalities to prepare and submit Stormwater Management Programs to the RWQCB. The City's Stormwater Management became enrolled in the General Permit in June 2009. 6.2.5 Wastewater and Recycled Water The UWMP Act requires that the UWMP address the opportunities for development of recycled water, including the description of existing recycled water applications, quantities of wastewater currently being treated to recycled water standards, limitations on the use of available recycled water, an estimate of City of Pismo Beach 6-1 2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 projected recycled water use, the feasibility of projected uses, and practices to encourage the use of recycled water. 6.2.5.1 Wastewater Collection, Treatment, and Disposal Wastewater Treatment Facilities The City WWTP is owned and operated by the City. The WWTP receives wastewater from the City's wastewater collection system and serves a population of residential and commercial customers entirely within the City limits. The WWTP was originally constructed in 1955. In 2000, the City adopted its Wastewater Treatment Plan Master Plan (WWTP Master Plan), which proposed upgrades to increase treatment capacity and treatment level to provide advanced secondary treatment. The current design flow capacity of the WWTP is 1.9 million gallons per day (MGD), or 2,130 AFY. Prior to upgrades, the WWTP consisted of a headworks structure with a manual bar screen and an aerated grit chamber, primary treatment via two clarifiers, and secondary treatment via three aeration tanks and secondary clarifiers. Solid's handling included two anaerobic digesters, a dissolved-air flotation thickener, and a belt press. The effluent was disinfected with sodium hypochlorite. WWTP upgrades were completed in 2006 and include the following: Headworks' structure, primary clarifiers, secondary clarifiers, and chlorine contact basin were all demolished or taken out of service. A new headworks structure, operations center/laboratory building, oxidation ditches, secondary clarifiers, and sludge pumping station were built. Existing aeration basins were converted to the new chlorine contact basin. Effluent pump station was upgraded. Effluent from the WWTP is currently discharged through an outfall to the Pacific Ocean. The ocean outfall has a total capacity of 8.5 MGD (Carollo Engineers, City of Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant Collection System Master Plans, February 2000), of which the City is entitled to 44% (Beach, September 2010). The WWTP operates under Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR) Order No. R3-2015-0016. Among other water quality limitations, the WDR states that discharge to the ocean outfall from the City's WWTP is not to exceed a monthly average of 1.9 MGD. Wastewater Flow Projections The future average annual wastewater flow was determined by using the projected population growth rate to project the wastewater flows from the 2020 actual flows. The resulting historical flow and average annual flow projections are summarized in Table 6-7. Also, the volume of wastewater collected and treated in 2020 is shown in Table 6-8 and Table 6-9 on page 6-14. Table 6-7. Projected Wastewater Flows TYPE OF WASTEWATER 2020 2025 2035 2040 2045 Wastewater collected &treated in service area (AFY)' 1,037 1,067 1,097 1,129 1,162 1,195 ' Flows were projected based on projected population growth estimates as per the 2019 Development Impact Fee Update Study. City of Pismo Beach 6-13 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-8. DWR 6-21Z Wastewater Collected within Service Area in 2020 Percentage of 2020 service area covered by wastewater collection system (optional): 100% Percentage of 2020 service area population covered by wastewater collection system (optional): 1 00% WASTEWATER COLLECTION RECIPIENT OF COLLECTED WASTEWATER NAME OF WASTEWATER WASTEWATER VOLUME WASTEWATER VOLUME COLLECTED FROM NAME OF WASTEWATER AGENCY RECEIVING WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT LOCATED WWTP OPERATION CONTRACTED TO A COLLECTION AGENCY METERED OR ESTIMATED UWMP SERVICE AREA IN 2020 COLLECTED WASTEWATER NAME WITHIN UWMP AREA THIRD PARTY City of Pismo Beach Metered 1,037 City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach Wastewater Yes No Treatment Plant TOTAL 1,037 Table 6-9. DWR 6-31Z Wastewater Treatment and Discharge within Service Area in 2020 2020 VOLUMES PLANT TREATS WASTEWATER DISCHARGED RECYCLED INSTREAM FLOW WASTEWATER DISCHARGE LOCATION DISCHARGE LOCATION WASTEWATER DISCHARGE METHOD OF GENERATED OUTSIDE THE WASTEWATER TREATED RECYCLED WITHIN OUTSIDE OF PERMIT TREATMENT PLANT NAME NAME OR IDENTIFIER DESCRIPTION ID NUMBER DISPOSAL SERVICE AREA TREATMENT LEVEL TREATED WASTEWATER SERVICE AREA SERVICE AREA REQUIREMENT Pismo Beach Wastewater Ocean Outfall Ocean Ocean outfall No Secondary, Disinfected - 1,037 1,037 - - - Treatment Plant 2.2 TOTAL 1,037 1,037 - - - *Units of measure are in AF. City of Pismo Beach 6-14 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.2.5.2 Recycled Water System Description The City's WWTP currently treats its effluent to an advanced (disinfected) secondary treatment level, as defined by California Code of Regulations Title 22 requirements. The 2015 UWMP projected potential recycled water use for 2020, which was dependent upon WWTP upgrades and future development projects that did not occur, is in Table 6-11 and Table 6-12 on page 6-18 and page 6-19, respectively. In 2015, the City completed the Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study (RWFPS) to investigate alternatives for constructing a recycled water system that will enable the City to produce and beneficially use recycled water to enhance its water supply portfolio. The City developed goals and objectives for recycled water through numerous meetings held with potential stakeholders, partner agencies and City staff, considering information presented in prior water supply and recycled water studies, and based on direction given by the City Council. The resulting recycled water goals and objectives are summarized as follows: Offset potable water uses to the extent practicable. Further diversify the City's water supply portfolio by developing a local, sustainable, and highly reliable water supply. Provide a new source of recharge to the SMGB. Relieve increased water demand due to proposed development. Develop a viable recycled water project in a timely manner to facilitate regional use of recycled water in South County. • Secure outside funding and/or financing to support the development of the City's recycled water system. As described below and in Table 6-10 on page 6-16, four alternatives were identified to be further developed and evaluated in the RWFPS: • Alternative 1: Providing recycled water at Disinfected Secondary-23 standards for restricted reuse. • Alternative 2: Providing recycled water at Disinfected Tertiary standards for unrestricted landscape irrigation. • Alternative 3a: Full advanced treatment (FAT) providing recycled water that meets the standards for groundwater recharge for injection as a coastal seawater intrusion barrier. • Alternative 3b: FAT providing recycled water that meets the standards for groundwater recharge for injection directly into the inland aquifer. City of Pismo Beach 6-15 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-10. RWFPS Alternatives Quantitative Analysis Summary ALTERNATIVE 1 ALTERNATIVE 2 ALTERNATIVE 3A ALTERNATIVE 3B SECONDARY-23 TERTIARY FAT FOR COASTAL FAT FOR INLAND ALTERNATIVE IRRIGATION IRRIGATION INJECTION INJECTION Total Capital Cost $4,963,000 $20,679,000 $27,045,000 $29,708,000 Annual O&M Cost $44,000 $236,000 $598,000 $628,000 Total Recycled Water Used (AFY) 17 214 930' 930' Annualized Cost($/AF)2 $15,900 $5,400 $1,900 $2,100 Estimated % Recoverable 100% 100% 70% 75% Estimated AFY Recoverable 17 214 651 698 Annualized Cost($/AF $15,900 $5,400 $2,700 $2,800 Recoverable) 'Based on estimate of actual recycled water production at buildout. 2 The annualized unit cost is calculated by adding the annual payment for borrowed capital costs to the annual O&M cost and dividing by the annual project yield. Annual payment for borrowed capital is based on an interest rate of 5%over a payback period of 30 years. The alternatives analysis concluded that groundwater recharge is the most favorable alternative. For the purposes of the RWFPS, Alternative 3b for inland recharge was the recommended alternative. The alternative has since become known as Central Coast Blue, previously the Regional Groundwater Sustainability Project. The RWFPS was adopted by the City Council on April 21, 2015 and was endorsed by all NCMA agencies. The City has completed the Environmental Impact Report for Central Coast Blue and will begin design for the Advanced Treatment Facility and distributed infrastructure that will allow it and potential regional partners to inject advanced purified water into the groundwater basin. This project will provide additional recharge for the basin and provide a drought-proof source of supply for the region. It is anticipated that the entire WWTP recycled water production volume of 1,120 AFY can be injected in five inland injection wells. Recent modeling done for the project indicate that the Advanced Treatment Facility flows will provide a total benefit of 1,613 AFY after injection by creating a seawater intrusion barrier while also recharging the SMGB (Geoscience, 2019). 6.2.5.3 Potential, Current, and Projected Recycled Water Uses The City currently discharges the treated effluent from its WWTP through a pipeline that conveys the wastewater to the South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District's (SSLOCSD)WWTP, where effluent from both plants is discharged to the ocean through a shared outfall as shown in Figure 6-5 on page 6- 17. As described previously, the City is evaluating an Advanced Treatment Facility which will be located between the two plants along the effluent pipeline. A second phase of Central Coast Blue is being considered which would include treatment of WWTP flows from SSLOCSD in addition to flows from the City WWTP. Phase 2 of Central Coast Blue could provide up to 2,779 AFY of additional water supply for groundwater recharge and a seawater intrusion barrier. Table 6-14 on page 6-20 shows the City's share of the Central Coast Blue yield once the project is implemented. City of Pismo Beach 6-16 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Treatment Facility&Wells 3 Advanced Treatment Pismo Beach Facility V O Injection Wells O Monitoring Wells iL �+ Pipelines WTP to Advanced E !�. Treatment Facility Purified Water to i Injection Wells Outfall to Advanced .�. Treatment Facility Concentrate Discharge to Pismo Beach Outfall Existing Facilities Wastewater Treatment Plant Wastewater Discharge MW-1C/1D to Ocean IW-1 MW-1A/1B Production Wells k • City of Arroyo Grande O City of Grover Beach MW-2A/2B/2C. -,:`' �"r O City of Pismo Beach t. Oceano Community `t` - O Services District IW-24 MW-2D/2E/2F MW-1C/1D ' Itr tjj MW-1A/1B r' MW-2A/2B/2C f�aitnn A i MW-3A/36 " IW-2B ' IW 3D-3 LJ MW-3C/ f I4 %' - s'; y� IW-2A MW-2D/2E/2F 00 MW-4A/4B VW-3A/3B F--- Ar MAW, Ir IW-3 JMW-3C/3D ') M-4 MW-4C/4D MW-4A/4B }. IW-4 MW4C/4D y ` MW-5D/5E/5F w► MW-5 D/5 E/5 F SSLOCSD MW-5A/5B/5C SSLOCSD � IW-5A&-5B I MW-5A/5B/5C \, IW-5A&-5B Figure 6-5. Central Coast Blue Overview City of Pismo Beach 6-17 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-1 1. DWR 6-411 Recycled Water within Service Area in 2020 Name of Supplier Producing (Treating)the Recycled Water: The City of Pismo Beach Name of Supplier Operating the Recycled Water Distribution System: The City of Pismo Beach Supplemental Volume of Water Added in 2020: 0 AFY Source of 2020 Supplemental Water: n/a AMOUNT OF POTENTIAL BENEFICIAL USES OF POTENTIAL USES OF GENERAL DESCRIPTION BENEFICIAL USE TYPE RECYCLED WATER RECYCLED WATER OF 2020 USES LEVEL OF TREATMENT 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 Agricultural irrigation Landscape irrigation (ex: golf courses) Golf course irrigation Commercial use Industrial use Geothermal and other energy production Seawater intrusion barrier Recreational impoundment Wetlands or wildlife habitat Groundwater recharge (IPR) Advanced Water Treatment and 1 Advanced 339 339 339 339 339 Injection Wells Reservoir water augmentation (IPR) Direct potable reuse Other TOTAL - 339 339 339 339 339 Internal Reuse (Not included in Statewide Recycled Water Volume). *IPR-Indirect Potable Reuse City of Pismo Beach 6-1 8 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-12. DWR 6-511 2015 Recycled Water Use Projection Compared to 2020 Actual BENEFICIAL USE TYPE 2015 PROJECTION FOR 2020 2020 ACTUAL USE Agricultural Irrigation Landscape Irrigation (excludes golf courses) Golf Course Irrigation Commercial Use Industrial Use Geothermal and Other Energy Production Seawater Intrusion Barrier Recreational Impoundment Wetlands or Wildlife Habitat Groundwater Recharge (IPR)* 645 - Surface Water Augmentation (IPR)* Direct Potable Reuse TOTAL 645 - 6.2.5.4 Actions to Exchange and Optimize Future Recycled Water Use Central Coast Blue will provide additional recharge for the basin and provide a drought-proof source of supply for the region. The project is discussed in Section 6.2.5.2 on page 6-15. The yields for Central Coast Blue are shown in Table 6-13. The yield assumes 21% of project yield will benefit the City directly. The rest of the 1,613 AFY will be shared with the City's regional partners. Table 6-13. DWR 6-611 Methods to Expand Future Recycled Water Use PLANNED IMPLEMENTATION EXPECTED INCREASE OF NAME OF ACTION DESCRIPTION YEAR RECYCLED WATER USE IPR Central Coast Blue - Groundwater Recharge 2024 3391 TOTAL 339 'Yield assumes 144%recovery and 21%of yield for the City.The rest of the 1,613 AFY will be shared between the Cities of Arroyo Grande and Grover Beach. 6.2.6 Desalinated Water Opportunities The District, in coordination with PG&E, performed an assessment of the feasibility to deliver desalinated water from the Diablo Canyon Power Plant near Avila Beach, California, to the current Zone 3 member agencies, along the Lopez Pipeline. Preliminary estimates indicate that between 500 AFY to 1,300 AFY City of Pismo Beach 6-19 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 could be delivered from the project. Additional analysis regarding this opportunity is on hold due to the scheduled closure of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. 6.2.7 Water Exchanges and Transfers 6.2.7.1 Exchanges The City currently does not exchange water with its neighboring water suppliers. 6.2.7.2 Transfers The Los Robles del Mar property purchased 100 AFY of SWP water from the City. The City also had the opportunity to reallocate 40 AFY of SWP water for City use since the Pismo 98 LLC property did not have a need for the water. This leaves the City will a SWP allocation of 1,140 AFY as of 2020. the City does not have short term plans to make any other water exchanges or transfers. 6.2.7.3 Emergency Interties The City has an emergency intertie with the City of Arroyo Grande that allows for the transfer of water during emergency conditions. The Lopez Project is connected to the SWP Pipeline which allows Zone 3 to deliver SWP water to the City in the event of a supply interruption or water treatment plant failure at Lopez Lake. 6.2.8 Future Water Projects As discussed in Section 6.2.5.3 on page 6-16, the City is initiating design for Phase 1 of Central Coast Blue. This project will provide additional recharge for the SMGB and will provide a drought-proof source of supply for the region. Phase 1 of Central Coast Blue will treat effluent flows from the City WWTP. There is also the potential to expand the Advanced Treatment Facility to treat and inject flows from the SSLOCSD WWTP. Phase 2 could contribute an additional 2,779 AFY to the SMGB. See Table 6-14 for the City's share of the Phase 2 yields from Central Coast Blue. Table 6-14. DWR 6-7R Expected Future Water Supply Projects or Programs EXPECTED NAME OF FUTURE JOINT PROJECT PLANNED PLANNED FOR INCREASE IN PROJECTS OR WITH OTHER IMPLEMENTATION USE IN YEAR WATER SUPPLY PROGRAMS SUPPLIERS AGENCY NAME DESCRIPTION YEAR TYPE TO SUPPLIER Advanced Central Coast Cities of Grover Water Blue - Phase 2 Yes Beach and Arroyo Treatment 2026 All Year Types 6021 Grande and Injection Wells Water supply increase is 21%of the phase 2 yield after injection into the groundwater basin City of Pismo Beach 6-20 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.2.9 Summary of Existing and Planned Sources of Water The City's current and projected water supply sources are summarized in Table 6-15 and Table 6-16 on page 6-24. The City projected water supply sources include local groundwater (Section 6.2.2 on page 6-4), Lopez Lake (Section 6.2.3 on page 6-10), SWP (Section 6.2.1 on page 6-4), and recycled water (Section 6.2.5 on page 6-12). While the City does not currently have the treatment abilities or conveyance system to create or distribute recycled water, the City is pursuing implementation of an Advanced Treatment Facility for potable reuse. In the event of an emergency or need for stand-by water, the City has an emergency connection with the City of Arroyo Grande and has the opportunity to purchase water allocations from the District and other SWP subcontractors through its SWP contract. As a SWP contractor, the District may sell a portion of its excess SWP allocation to the City. Other entities in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties are also contractors of the Coastal Branch of the SWP. Therefore, the possibility exists for the City to purchase water from other State Water contractors in the area as well. 6.2.9.1 Description of Supplies Groundwater The City currently extracts groundwater from the Arroyo Grande Plain of the subbasin of the SMGB. The SMGB is an adjudicated basin as described in further detail in Section 6.2.2 on page 6-4. The City has an allocation of 700 AFY of groundwater from the SMGB Subbasin based on the Adjudicated Judgment of the SMGB. Recent groundwater modeling and groundwater monitoring observations indicate that the actual amount of water that can be pumped on a long-term consistent basis without inducing seawater intrusion is approximately 27% of NCMA Entitlements (Geoscience, 2019). Therefore, for projecting average available groundwater supplies in this UWMP 189 AFY is assumed for the City's groundwater supply availability. However, during drought conditions the City may pump up to its Entitlement(700 AFY) to meet demands and reduce pumping during wet conditions, when ample surface water is available. Lopez Project Lopez Lake is managed by the District. The reservoir's total capacity is 51,990 AF with a storage capacity of 49,388 AF. Storage at the end of 2020 was 19,826 AF, or 40%, of total storage capacity. Out of the 4,530 AFY of entitlements, the Lopez Project currently provides a contractual supply of up to 892 AFY to the City. However, the enactment of Stage 2 of the LRRP resulted in a 10% decrease in municipal and downstream releases in 2015 and 2016. More information about the LRRP is provided in Section 6.2.3 on page 6-10. State Water Project The SWP, operated by the DWR, provides treated surface water to the region through the Coastal Branch of the aqueduct at the Lopez turnout. The District is a primary contractor of the SWP and serves as the entity through which the City receives its SWP allocation. The Central Coast Water Authority treats and distributes the water directly to contracted retailers, such as the City. The City's current contractual water delivery allocation, commonly referred to as "Table A" water, is 1,140 AF. In addition to its Table A allocation, the City holds 1,240 AFY of additional allocation with the District, usually referred to as a "drought buffer". Drought buffer water is water that has no pipeline capacity for delivery. Rather, it is used to increase deliveries during times of drought when Table A allocations are less than 100%. Throughout every year DWR sets allocations as a percentage of contracted volumes for SWP Contractors based on consideration of hydrologic and climatic data and modeling. Historically, percentage allocations have ranged from 5% to 100%. For example, if Table A allocations were 40% of contracted amounts, without a drought buffer the City would receive 456 AF of water considering the City of Pismo Beach 6-21 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 City's subcontracts, and with a drought buffer of 1,240 AF the City would receive an additional 496 AF for a total of 952 AF. In any given year, however, under its current contracts the City's total SWP deliveries cannot exceed 1,240 AF and the amount that can be stored in San Luis Reservoir follows the methodology described in the following section. Stored SWP Water During years when the City has access to SWP water in excess of 1,240 AF a portion of that water can be stored in San Luis Reservoir for subsequent delivery in future years. However, there are limitations on the amount of water that can be stored. Additionally, water stored in San Luis Reservoir can be lost due to spills or interference with SWP operations. The calculations that DWR uses to determine how much water the City can place in storage are outlined below. Where: A = Available Water B = Drought Buffer A = (T+B)D T = Table A Water D = Delivery Percentage S = Storage Amount For deliveries from 0% to 50% the maximum storage allowed is 25% of the available water as shown in Equation 1. Equation 1 0 <_ D <_ 50%, S <_ 0.25 x A For deliveries from 51%to 74%the maximum storage allowed is 25% plus 1%for every percentage point over 50% that is delivered as shown in Equation 2. Equation 2 For 50% < D < 75%, S <_ [(D-50%) + 0.25] x A For deliveries 75% and over the maximum storage allowed is 50% of the available water as shown in Equation 3. Equation 3 For D >_ 75%, S = 0.50 x A Sample Calculations: D = 20% Maximum Storage, S = 0.25A Equation 1 S = 0.25[(T+B)x0.20] S = 0.25[(1,240+1,240)x0.20] S = 0.25(496) S = 124AF D = 62% Maximum Storage, S = [(D-50%) + 0.251 x A Equation 2 S = [(D-50%) + 0.251 x [(T+B)D] S = [(62%-50%) + 0.25] x [(1,240+1,240)0.62] S = (0.12 + 0.25) x [(2,480)0.62] S =.37 x 1,537.6 S = 568.9 AF City of Pismo Beach 6-22 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 D = 85% Maximum Storage, S = 0.50A Equation 3 S = 0.50(T+B)D S = 0.50(1,240+1,240).85 S = 0.50(2,108) S = 1,054 It should be noted that the calculations above use 1,240 AF. Even though others have a subcontract with the City for a total of 100 AF, the maximum the City can store is based upon the contract with the District. For example, when the SWP is delivering 100% of Table A allocations, the City can take delivery of 1,240 AF, 100 AF of which belongs to others, and can store 1,240 AF (50% of the total water available under the contract). If the SWP deliveries are 65%, the City would have available 806 AF (65 AF of which is owned by others) plus 806 AF of drought buffer for a total of 1,547 AF. This would allow the City to take delivery of 1,240 AF (the amount allowed by the City's portion of the SWP pipeline capacity) and store 307 AF, or the City could deliver a lesser amount and store up to 644.8 AF (see equations above). Additionally, since the District has a higher Table A amount than its contracted treatment and conveyance capacity in the Coastal Branch, they can use this "excess allocation" of 15,273 AFY of Table A Water to make additional SWP water available to the existing subcontractors. However, future availability of the District's excess allocation for subcontractors is unknown and thus should not be relied upon for long term water supply planning purposes. 6.2.9.2 Qualification of Supplies The DWR actual and projected supply tables are shown as Table 6-15 and Table 6-16 on page 6-24 and page 6-24, respectively. 6.2.10 Special Conditions 6.2.10.1 Climate Change Effects Zone 3 recently completed climate change modeling that evaluated the impacts of climate change on inflows to Lopez Reservoir, evaporation, and other conditions (Western Hydrologics, 2021). The modeling scenarios were developed using the data product from the California Water Commission's dataset and performed with historical meteorology and climate change adjusted meteorology using climate change assumptions centered at the year 2070. The results indicated an increase in inflow of approximately 1,500 AFY to Lopez Reservoir. City of Pismo Beach 6-23 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 Table 6-15. DWR 6-81Z Actual Water Supplies 2020 WATER SUPPLY ADDITIONAL DETAIL ON WATER SUPPLY ACTUAL VOLUME WATER QUALITY TOTAL RIGHT OR SAFE YIELD Purchased or Imported Water Lopez Lake 1,137' Drinking Water 892 Purchased or Imported Water State Water 677 Drinking Water 1,240 Groundwater (not desalinated) Santa Maria Groundwater Basin 55 Drinking Water 700 TOTAL 1,869 2,832 In 2020 the City used their surplus Lopez Lake water to receive more than their 892 AFY of Lopez Lake allocation Table 6-16. DWR 6-91Z Projected Water Supplies PROJECTED WATER SUPPLY 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 REASONABLY REASONABLY REASONABLY REASONABLY REASONABLY ADDITIONAL DETAIL ON WATER AVAILABLE TOTAL RIGHT OR AVAILABLE TOTAL RIGHT OR AVAILABLE TOTAL RIGHT OR AVAILABLE TOTAL RIGHT OR AVAILABLE TOTAL RIGHT OR WATER SUPPLY SUPPLY VOLUME SAFE YIELD VOLUME SAFE YIELD VOLUME SAFE YIELD VOLUME SAFE YIELD VOLUME SAFE YIELD Purchased or Imported Water Lopez Lake 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 892 Purchased or Imported Water State Water 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 Groundwater (not desalinated) Santa Maria Groundwater Basin 189 700 189 700 189 700 189 700 189 700 Recycled Water IPR via groundwater recharge 339 339 339 339 339 TOTAL 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 2,560 2,732 City of Pismo Beach 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Supply Characterization Section 6 6.3 Energy Intensity Water supplies from Lopez Lake are treated at the Lopez Water Treatment Plant (LWTP) before being delivered to the City and other Zone 3 contract agencies, via gravity. The LWTP is a 6 MGD water treatment facility that was upgraded in 2007 from a gravity multimedia filtration system to a low-pressure membrane filtration process. The membrane filtration process requires a considerably greater amount of energy than the pre-existing gravity multimedia filtration process. LWTP currently receives energy from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) under PG&E's E19S rate schedule. The rate schedule is a time-of-use schedule that is depended on time of year and time of day of energy usage. In 2008, the District completed a Solar Energy Evaluation due to the availability of $2 million in stimulus grants for solar energy implementation in the County. The solar energy evaluation for LWTP indicated that during normal operations the plant required more than 1.5 million kilowatt-hours (Kwh) of electricity, costing the District over $200,000. A summary of LWTP energy costs for the 2008 calendar year are provided in Table 6-17. The evaluation found that implementing solar energy was not feasible unless there was available funding to complete the purchase and installation of a solar energy power generation plant, or the District was able to acquire stimulus grant funds to reduce costs of the power purchase agreement energy rates. Zone 3 is currently considering a battery storage project that would be used to reduce peak usage at the LWTP. The battery storage project is still in the early stages of development and is unknown as to whether or not it would be a feasible option to reduce peak power usage. Table 6-17. LWTP 2008 Energy Usage and Costs LWTP FLOW ENERGY USAGE (KWH) ENERGY COSTS Average Daily 4,185 $560 Peak Daily 4,910 $688 Average Monthly 127,302 $17,026 Peak Monthly 147,300 $20,651 TOTAL YEAR 1,527,619 $204,307 The City energy costs associated with their Water Enterprise Fund were approximately $1 17,000 in 2020 which equates to approximately 484 Kwh/AFY of water delivered by the City. This does not include the energy cost of treating and delivering Lopez Lake or SWP water to the City's distribution system. City of Pismo Beach 6-25 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, 7 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment This section considers the City's water supply reliability during normal, single dry, and multiple dry water years over the planning horizon. A Drought Risk Assessment of the next five years is also included. The supply reliability assessment discusses factors (i.e., climatic, IN THIS SECTION environmental, water quality and legal) that could potentially limit water service the expected quantity of water available from the City's current and Reliability projected sources of supply through 2045. Multiple drought Assessment scenarios are considered and the quantitative impacts of the Drought Risk Assessment aforementioned factors on water supply and demand are discussed, as well as possible methods for addressing these issues. The management tools that the City has implemented to maximize current resources, identify supplemental sources of supply, and minimize the need to import water from other regions is also discussed. Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 7.1 Water Service Reliability Assessment 7.1 .1 Constraints on Water Sources There are a variety of factors that can impact water supply reliability. Factors impacting the City's supply sources are indicated as appropriate in Table 7-1. A brief discussion on each of these factors is provided below. A fundamental factor that affects water supply reliability is the hydraulic capacity of supply and distribution system facilities (e.g., groundwater wells, treatment facilities, transmission mains). However, as the City continues to grow it will construct the additional supply and distribution system facilities necessary to accommodate the increased water demands associated with this growth. For this reason, the physical capacity of the City's supply facilities is assumed to not be a limiting factor affecting the reliability of the City's supply in the future and is not listed in Table 7-1. Table 7-1. Factors Affecting Water Supply Reliability WATER SUPPLY SOURCES LEGAL ENVIRONMENTAL WATER QUALITY CLIMATIC State Water Project X X Lopez Reservoir X X X Groundwater X X X 7.1 .1.1 Legal Factors The legal factors affecting supply reliability apply to the City's entitlement to groundwater from the Subbasin, within the SMGB. Since the SMGB is adjudicated, the City is entitled only to 700 AFY of groundwater from the Subbasin, as dictated by the Gentlemen's Agreement (Appendix 1) and 2008 Adjudicated Judgement (Appendix H). The Adjudicated Judgement suggests that the allocated groundwater rights may be decreased in the future if drought and/or overdraft conditions persist. Therefore, if groundwater supplies are limited or reduced in this area, the City's entitlement may be reduced. Once implemented, Central Coast Blue will help to protect groundwater resources, enhance supply, and minimize the impacts due to seawater intrusion. Additionally, the District is in the process of updating its expired existing water rights permit by filing an extension of time with the State Water Resources Control Board. This extension will allow the District to file a change petition to pursue needed changes to the permit that will reflect actual operations of the Dam in terms of direct diversions, diversions to storage and re-diversions. 7.1 .1.2 Environmental Factors Environmental factors affecting water supply reliability typically include concerns over protection of ecosystems, particularly for fish and wildlife resources. To date, the City's groundwater supply has not been impacted by any environmental factors, and the City does not anticipate future disruption of groundwater supply as a result of environmental factors. The City's surface water supply from the SWP has the potential to be affected by environmental issues, particularly involving the Delta Smelt in the Delta issues. SWP pumping capacities were reduced as a result of the May 2007 federal court ruling to protect Delta smelt. However, the City has a drought buffer and stored state water which helps protect the City from reduced SWP supplies. The stored state water City of Pismo Beach 7-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 comes from the District's maintenance of excess, unused SWP entitlement. Therefore, even when SWP supplies are decreased, the District's excess SWP entitlement provides a buffer so that contracted volumes to water purveyors, like the City, may still be provided in full. However, it is possible that the Delta's fragile ecosystem, along with severely decreased precipitation patterns, may affect SWP supply reliability for the City to a greater degree at some point in the future (Fugro Consultants, April 2016). Additionally, at some point in the future the District's excess allocation may be sold to other parties and not available to the existing subcontracts for supply reliability. Surface water from the Lopez Reservoir, managed by the District, is a generally reliable water supply source for the City. However, deliveries have the potential to be affected by the presence of steelhead trout and the California red-legged frog that utilize the Arroyo Grande Creek watershed downstream of Lopez Dam, and are considered threatened species under the Federal Endangered Species Act. The Endangered Species Act permits non-federal entities to obtain incidental take authorization for protected species by developing a Habitat Conservation Plan. As of February 2015, the District initiated a new draft of the Habitat Conservation Plan that incorporates an updated model. This work is still underway and current efforts include the development of an integrated surface/groundwater model for the Arroyo Grande Creek Watershed. The updated model will be a key tool to allow Zone 3 and the Contract Agencies to better understand the relationship between downstream release and groundwater pumping on the availability of habitat in lower Arroyo Grande Creek. It is envisioned that the model will allow for the development of a new downstream release program that will be proposed to the environmental regulatory agencies. The updated downstream release program and the Habitat Conservation Plan are intended to provide a plan for the operation of Lopez Reservoir that fulfills the contractual water supply obligations to the Zone 3 contractors and provides releases for downstream agricultural users, and habitat enhancement for steelhead, red-legged frog, and other environmentally sensitive biota in lower Arroyo Grande Creek. 7.1 .1.3 Water Quality Factors The primary water quality factor affecting supply reliability for the City is the threat of seawater intrusion into fresh groundwater aquifers. Under natural and historical conditions, a net outflow of freshwater from the groundwater basin towards the ocean has kept the seawater/freshwater interface from moving onshore. However, the NCMA monitoring event of 2009 indicated coastal groundwater elevations that were below MSL and detect water quality constituents consistent with seawater intrusion. Affected coastal cities (including the City) implemented water conservation methods and reduced groundwater pumping, ultimately resulting in significant recovery of groundwater elevations to above MSL in 2010 and 2011. However, during the extended drought of 2012 - 2016, the groundwater levels in the NCMA sentry wells have dropped to levels similar to those seen in 2009, even with the continued reduced municipal pumping. To further evaluate the continued threat of seawater intrusion, a groundwater model was developed and utilized to evaluate potential future pumping scenarios and their impact on the basin. The results of these scenarios indicate that NCMA agencies cannot pump the full groundwater entitlements on a consistent basis without creating the potential for seawater intrusion (Geoscience, 2019). To improve waters supply reliability for their groundwater supplies, the City is leading Central Coast Blue, an indirect potable reuse project that will create a seawater intrusion barrier through injection of advanced purified wastewater. The City is required by the Safe Drinking Water Act to prepare an annual Consumer Confidence Report, which is an annual water quality report. The purpose of the Consumer Confidence Report is to raise customers' awareness of the quality of their drinking water, where there drinking water comes from, what it takes to deliver water to their homes, and the importance of protecting drinking water sources. The City has treated its delivered water to meet state and federal standards. City of Pismo Beach 7-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 7.1 .1.4 Climatic Factors Climatic factors affecting the reliability of a given water supply system generally are a function of seasonal precipitation and runoff characteristics. As such, limited recharge and/or drought conditions pose threats to availability of both surface water and groundwater supplies. California has experienced below-average precipitation and runoff since approximately 2006, resulting in reduced storage in SWP reservoirs. In response, DWR has continued to limit SWP allocations to contractors. However, the City's Drought Buffer and the District's current condition of excess allocation has buffered the City from the effects of minimal Table A allocations such as in in 2020 when the allocation was 5%. The natural groundwater hydrology of the area underlying the City results in limited aquifer storage capacity and a higher sensitivity to drought conditions. When yearly precipitation is low, groundwater recharge is not sufficient to meet pumping demands and still maintain a safe yield. Therefore, the City's groundwater supplies will likely be negatively affected in future drought conditions with below-average rainfall and recharge. The adjudication judgment (Appendix H) and Gentlemen's Agreement (Appendix 1) regarding the City's groundwater entitlement does not specify reductions in allocations during drought conditions or decreased groundwater supply. However, working collaboratively with its NCMA partners, the City has reduced its groundwater pumping over the last 10 years to help reduce the threat of seawater intrusion during ongoing drought conditions. 7.1 .1.5 Response to Factors In response to the legal, environmental, water quality, and climatic factors mentioned above that could potentially impact the availability of the City's existing water supply in the future, the City is implementing Central Coast Blue and advocating continued conservation. Central Coast Blue will provide a drought-resistant, sustainable local water supply for the City while also improving and protecting the water quality in the SMGB, therefore enhancing the health of the larger watershed. Since the flow of wastewater is typically reliable even during dry years, the City anticipates that it will be able to provide significant enhancement of groundwater supplies and protection of groundwater resources when threatened by drought conditions. 7.1 .2 Year Type Characterization 7.1 .2.1 Types of Years This section considers the City's water supply reliability during three climate-related water scenarios, or water year types: average year, single dry year, and consecutive dry years. These water year types are defined by DWR as follows: • Average Year: The average or normal year is a year or an averaged range of years in the historical sequence that most closely represents mean rainfall and recharge levels and patterns. • Single Dry Year: This is defined as the year with the minimum useable supply. The supply quantities for this condition are derived from the minimum historical annual yield. • Five-Consecutive Year Drought: the driest five-year historical sequence for the supplier, which may be the lowest average water supply available for five years in a row. Water systems are more vulnerable to these droughts of long duration because they deplete water storage reserves in local and state reservoirs and in groundwater basins. The supply quantities for this condition are derived from the actual supplies available during the minimum historical five-year running average yields. City of Pismo Beach 7-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Historical SWP supplies were examined to establish a basis of historical average, single dry, and consecutive dry years. The base years for Groundwater, Lopez Lake, and SWP are shown in Table 7-4 on page 7-7, Table 7-5 on page 7-7, and Table 7-6 on page 7-8, respectively. For the purposes of this report, the year 2019 is classified as an "average" year, the year 2014 is classified as a "single dry" year, and the years 2012 to 2016 are classified as "consecutive dry" years. 7.1 .2.2 Sources for Water Data The City has a historical record of water use per source. The NCMA also produces annual reports describing groundwater, Lopez Lake, and SWP supply and demands for the NCMA agencies, including the City. Both of these databases were used to identify the historical supplies available to the City during the average year, single dry year, and consecutive dry years. Groundwater The City's right to pump groundwater from the SMGB is defined within the Adjudicated Judgement (Appendix H), which states that the NCMA agencies (the City included) have a paramount right to withdraw 4,330 AFY (including Ag conversion credits) from the NCMA Area of the SMGB. The City is entitled to 700 AFY of this total, as indicated in the Gentlemen's Agreement with other water purveyors in the NCMA (Appendix 1). The judgment also states that the court may exercise its equity powers in the condition that the SMGB becomes over drafted. However, there is no current language in the adjudication judgment that stipulates the amount that supply allocations may be reduced. However, it is important to note that the City has made and continues to make planning efforts to limit its groundwater pumping to within sustainable amounts due to the threat of seawater intrusion. Therefore, as described in Section 6.2.2 on page 6-4, the City intends to implement Central Coast Blue to enhance groundwater supply reliability. Central Coast Blue will be supplied with recycled water from the City's wastewater treatment plant. Since the flow of wastewater is typically reliable even during dry years, the City anticipates that it will be able to provide significant enhancement of groundwater supplies and protection of groundwater resources when threatened by drought conditions. See Table 7-4 on page 7- 7 for the groundwater water year data. Due to the threat of seawater intrusion, it is assumed that the City will not pump its full Entitlement during average year conditions, but would have access to full entitlement during drought conditions, if needed. It is additionally assumed that Central Coast Blue will provide additional groundwater protection and supply availability during normal and dry year conditions. Lopez Reservoir The supply reliability of the City's surface water allocation from the Lopez Project is determined by the District and based on reservoir storage, historical entitlements in average, single dry year, and consecutive dry year conditions. According to the Zone 3 2020 UWMP, the Lopez Reservoir is a very reliable source of water with an annual safe yield of 8,730 AFY. However, during extended drought conditions entitlements may be reduced as part of the LRRP. In December 2014, the LRRP was adopted and enacted in 2015 and 2016 when storage reached below 20,000 AF. The enactment of Stage 2 of the LRRP resulted in a 10% decrease in municipal and downstream releases as shown in Table 7-2 and Table 7-3 on page 7-6. The District projects that municipal entitlements will remain constant at 4,530 AFY through 2045 during normal years. The District also projects that it will be able to supply all contracted agencies with their requested allocations in full during the first three of five consecutive dry years, with a 10% reduction in allocations during single dry years and the fourth and fifth of five consecutive dry years. For the purposes of this UWMP, the District anticipates delivering 90% of municipal allocations in the third and fourth year of five consecutive dry years period, based on actual available entitlements during the base years. Therefore, it is assumed that water supply from Lopez Lake during dry water years will meet the City's full allocation of 892 AFY except for during the third and fourth year of a consecutive dry year period. See Table 7-5 on page 7-7 for the Lopez Lake water year data. City of Pismo Beach 7-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Table 7-2. Initial Prescribed Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP AMOUNT OF WATER IN STORAGE(AF) MUNICIPAL DIVERSION REDUCTION MUNICIPAL DIVERSION(AFY)1 20,000 0% 4,530 15,000 10% 4,077 10,000 20% 3,624 5,000 35%I2I 2,941 4,000 100% 0 1 The actual amount of water diverted may vary as agencies extend the delivery of their Lopez Entitlement. z The 35%reduction provides sufficient water to supply 55 gallons per capita per day(gpcd)for the estimated population of the Zone 3 agencies(47,696 in 2010 per the 2010 Zone 3 UWMP). 55 gpcd is the target residential indoor water usage standard used in California Department of Water Resource's 2010 UWMP Method 4 Guidelines. Table 7-3. Initial Prescribed Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP AMOUNT OF WATER IN STORAGE(AF) DOWNSTREAM RELEASE REDUCTION DOWNSTREAM RELEASES(AFY)l 20,000 9.5% 3,800 15,000 9.5% 3,800 10,000 75.6% 1,026 5,000 92.9% 300 4,000 100.0% 0 'These downstream releases represent the maximum amount of water that can be released. Actual releases may be less if releases can be reduced while still meeting the needs of the agricultural stakeholders and addressing the environmental requirements.(Zone,December 16,2014) State Water Project For the SWP, DWR periodically compiles a report on the supply reliability of State Water under current and projected future water conditions. DWR's 2019 Delivery Reliability Report describes the historical and projected deliveries to the State Water Contractors during normal years and over various drought- year periods. Although the relative percent deliveries included in the 2019 Delivery Reliability Report apply specifically to State Water Contractors allocations, these percentages correspond to percent reduction that the City may experience in drought conditions. Table A allocations from the 2019 Delivery Reliability Report projected an average delivery of 58% (California Department of Water Resources, 2020). The 58% allocation combined with the City's drought buffer will allow the City to receive 1,140 AFY under average year conditions. Factoring in this projected average, 2019 was selected as a representative average year because the City's full allocation of 1,140 was available due to their drought buffer. SWP supplies for single dry year deliveries were calculated using the minimum historical Table A allocation from 2000-2020. SWP supplies for consecutive dry years were calculated using the minimum 5-year average historical Table A allocations from 2000-2020. Since SWP makes up largest share of the City's water supply, the base years for SWP were also used for the other water supplies. See Table 7-6 on page 7-8 for the SWP water year data. City of Pismo Beach 7-6 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Table 7-4. DWR 7-1 R Basis for Water Year Data (Reliability Assessment): Groundwater AVAILABLE SUPPLY IF YEAR TYPE REPEATS PERCENT OF AVERAGE YEAR TYPE BASE YEAR VOLUME AVAILABLE SUPPLY Average Year 2019 189 27% Single Dry Year 2014 189 27% Consecutive Dry Years 1 st Year 2012 189 27% Consecutive Dry Years 2nd Year 2013 189 27% Consecutive Dry Years 3rd Year 2014 189 27% Consecutive Dry Years 4th Year 2015 189 27% Consecutive Dry Years 5th Year 2016 189 27% *Multiple versions of Table 7-1 are being used.This table is displaying the basis of water year for groundwater. Table 7-5. DWR 7-1 R Basis for Water Year Data (Reliability Assessment): Lopez AVAILABLE SUPPLY IF YEAR TYPE REPEATS YEAR TYPE BASE YEAR VOLUME AVAILABLE PERCENT OF AVERAGE SUPPLY Average Year 2019 892 100% Single Dry Year 2014 892 100% Consecutive Dry Years 1 st Year 2012 892 100% Consecutive Dry Years 2nd Year 2013 892 100% Consecutive Dry Years 3rd Year 2014 892 100% Consecutive Dry Years 4th Year 2015 803 90% Consecutive Dry Years 5th Year 2016 803 90% *Multiple versions of Table 7-1 are being used.This table is displaying the basis of water year for Lopez water. City of Pismo Beach 7-7 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Table 7-6. DWR 7-1 R Basis for Water Year Data (Reliability Assessment): SWP AVAILABLE SUPPLY IF YEAR TYPE REPEATS PERCENT OF AVERAGE YEAR TYPE BASE YEAR VOLUME AVAILABLE SUPPLY Average Year 2019 1,140 100% Single Dry Year 2014 124 1 1% Consecutive Dry Years 1 st Year 2012 1,140 100% Consecutive Dry Years 2nd Year 2013 868 76% Consecutive Dry Years 3rd Year 2014 124 1 1% Consecutive Dry Years 4th Year 2015 496 44% Consecutive Dry Years 5th Year 2016 1,140 100% *Multiple versions of Table 7-1 are being used.This table is displaying the basis of water year for State Water. *The City's State Water allocation was 1,240 AFY during the 2015 UWMP.Los Robles del Mar purchased 100 AFY of the City's 1,240 AFY Table A allocation leaving the City with 1,140 AFY of Table A Allocation.The City retained the full 1,240 AFY of SWP delivery capacity which means that they can still deliver 1,240 AFY of State Water through use of their Drought Buffer supplies when needed.However,to be conservative, 1,140 AFY was used for this evaluation. 7.1 .3 Water Service Reliability Results of the water supply and demand analysis for normal, single dry, and five-year consecutive droughts are shown in the following tables. The City expects to meet demands under all water year scenarios. In order to alleviate pressure on the SMGB, the City plans to implement Central Coast Blue to provide a local and drought-resistant water supply while also promoting continued water conservation to ensure reliability for the City's water users throughout the future. 7.1 .3.1 Water Service Reliability — Normal Year The normal year water demands through 2045 are estimated based on the per capita water use targets summarized in Section 5.1 on page 5-2 and populations are presented in Section 3.2 on page 3-5. The projected normal water year water supply and demand projections are provided in Table 7-7. The available supplies during a normal year represent 100% of SWP allocations and Lopez Lake entitlements and 27% of the City's groundwater entitlement. Recent groundwater modeling indicates that only 27% of groundwater entitlement can be pumped on a long-term consistent basis by the municipal agencies without potentially inducing seawater intrusion so this was chosen as the average year supply (Geoscience, 2019). City of Pismo Beach 7-8 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Table 7-7. DWR 7-2R Normal Year Supply and Demand Comparison 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 Supply Totals' 2,560 2,560 2,560 2,560 2,560 From Table 6-9R Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 From Table 4-31Z DIFFERENCE: 912 864 816 765 715 ' Supply includes 339 AFY of Central Coast Blue Phase 1 yield. 7.1 .3.2 Water Service Reliability — Single Dry Year The projected single dry year water demands through 2045 are based on the minimum SWP allocation which occurred in 2014. For years 2025 to 2045, the supply numbers include the addition of 339 AFY from Central Coast Blue.As shown in Table 7-8, the City's supplies meet projected demands even during single dry year conditions. Without the supplemental supply from Central Coast Blue, the City can meet their demands by implementing conservation. Table 7-8. DWR 7-311 Single Dry Year Supply and Demand Comparison 2025 2030 2040 - Supply Totals'-2 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE: 0 0 0 0 0 ' Supply includes 339 AFY of Central Coast Blue Phase 1 yield. 2 During the single dry year scenario,104-172 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY in years 2025-2045. Years 2035-2045 will also leverage 28 AFY-129 AFY of stored state water to meet projected demand. 7.1 .3.3 Water Service Reliability — Five Consecutive Dry Years The projected consecutive dry year water demands through 2045 are based on the minimum 5-year average SWP allocations which occurred in years 2012-2016. The anticipated supply decrease during a multiple dry year period, compared to a normal year, is based on the actual water supply availabilities during the identified base years. All years include 339 AFY of Central Coast Blue Phase 1 yield as part of the supplies. During the third consecutive dry year, 104-172 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY in years 2025-2045. Years 2035-2045 will also leverage 28- 129 AFY of stored state water to meet projected demand. Because the City has the ability to store their unused SWP allocation in the San Luis Reservoir for later use during dry years, they can leverage this supply to meet demand when needed. During the fourth consecutive dry year in 2045, 18 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY. As shown in Table 7-9 on page 7-10, the City's supplies will meet the projected demands even during consecutive dry year conditions when supplemental supplies from Central Coast Blue and stored state water are included. Without the supplemental supply from Central Coast Blue or stored state water, the City can also adapt to reduced supplies by implementing conservation. City of Pismo Beach 7-9 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Table 7-9. DWR 7411 Multiple Dry Years Supply and Demand Comparison 2030 2035 2040 2045 First Supply Totals 2,560 2,560 2,560 2,560 2,560 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE 912 864 816 765 715 Second Supply Totals 2,288 2,288 2,288 2,288 2,306 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE 640 592 544 493 461 Third2 Supply Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE 0 0 0 0 0 Fourth3 Supply Totals 1,827 1,827 1,827 1,827 1,845 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE 179 131 83 32 0 Fifth Supply Totals 2,471 2,471 2,471 2,471 2,471 Year Demand Totals 1,648 1,696 1,744 1,795 1,845 DIFFERENCE 823 775 727 676 626 ' Supply includes 339 AFY of Central Coast Blue Phase 1 yield in all years. 2 During the third consecutive dry year, 104-172 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY in years 2025-2045. Years 2035-2045 will also leverage 28 AFY-1 29 AFY of stored state water to meet projected demand. 3 During the fourth consecutive dry year in 2045, 18 AFY of groundwater will be pumped in addition to the baseline supply of 189 AFY. 7.1 .4 Descriptions of Management Tools and Options The City is currently working on Central Coast Blue to create a local and drought-resistant water supply. A key step to reducing imports will be to bolster local groundwater reliability by creating a seawater intrusion barrier and enhancing recharge to the groundwater basin. Additionally, improving water conservation and utilizing recycled water sources will allow the City to reduce its reliance on imported SWP demands. Additional information regarding the City's water conservation efforts is available in Chapter 8. City of Pismo Beach 7-10 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 7.2 Drought Risk Assessment The Drought Risk Assessment (DRA) is based on an analysis of historical drought data forecasted into the future under various drought conditions, with a focus on the five-year consecutive drought scenario. The DRA analyzes historical data to assess patterns and more reliably determine if there could be any water shortages within the next five years. If demands cannot be met by the expected available supply, shortage response actions from the City's WSCP may be implemented. Details on the City's WSCP are provided in Chapter 8. 7.2.1 Data, Methods, and Basis for Water Shortage Condition The data, methods, and basis for a water shortage condition were identified using the DRA tool developed by DWR. The DRA looks at historical consumption data by customer class, populated from billing records, and historical supply data by source from production reports. Based on this data, historical consumption was projected based on population growth and was compared to the historical production during the consecutive dry base years (2012-2016). 7.2.2 DRA Water Source Reliability and Total Water Supply and Use Comparison The City demand totals assumed the current drought-reduced production will increase slightly with population growth but the gallons per capita per day will not return to pre-drought levels. The demand totals do not include the recycled water that will be used for Central Coast Blue because the project is intended used treated wastewater to improve the reliability of existing groundwater supplies and therefore will not add to the potable water demand. Table 7-10 on page 7-12 shows the City's projected supplies and demands if there are 5 consecutive dry years from 2021-2025. The City will be able to meet demand by utilizing their stored SWP water to address any deficits in the next 5 years. The City has the ability to store their unused SWP allocation in the San Luis Reservoir for later use during dry years. As of April 2021, the City has 1,078 AF of stored state water that can be used to supplement supply if SWP allocations are less than 50% and/or Lopez Lake has reduced entitlements. Figure 7-1 on page 7-11 shows the total water use, plus stored state water, meeting the projected demand if the drought continues. 3,500 3,299 3,027 3,000 2,607 2,500 2,283 ......• ,. 2,123 2,000 4 1,500 1,000 500 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 �Groundwater Lopez State Water �Stored State Water...O—SuppheSAvallable ♦Demand Figure 7-1. 2021-2025 Drought Risk Assessment, Supply and Demand Projections City of Pismo Beach 7-1 1 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Service Reliability and Drought Risk Assessment Section 7 Table 7-10. DWR 7-5 Five-Year Drought Risk Assessment Tables to Address Water Code Section 10635(b) Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 2,221 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action 573 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2021 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 0 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 573 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 1,949 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action 301 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2022 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 0 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 301 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 1,205 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action -443 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2023 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 443' WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 0 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 1,488 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action -160 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2024 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 160' WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 0 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% Gross Water Use 1,648 Total Supplies 2,132 Surplus/Shortfall without WSCP Action 484 PLANNED WSCP ACTIONS(USE REDUCTION AND SUPPLY AUGMENTATION) 2025 WSCP (Supply Augmentation Benefit) 0 WSCP (Use Reduction Savings Benefit) 0 Revised Surplus/Shortfall 484 Resulting Percent Use Reduction from WSCP Action 0% I The City currently has 1,078 AF of stored state water in the San Luis Reservoir for subsequent delivery when needed.This stored state water will be leveraged in 2023 and 2024 to meet the shortfalls in the projected dry year scenario. City of Pismo Beach 7-12 2020 Urban Water Management Plan 8 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Water Shortage Contingency Plan This Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP) is a detailed plan for how the City will identify and respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. A water shortage occurs when the water supply is reduced to a level that cannot support demand at any given time or reduction in demand is needed to support the environmental needs. The WSCP is used to provide guidance to City Council, staff, and IN THIS SECTION the public by identifying anticipated water shortages and response 0 Water Supply actions to allow for efficient management of any water shortage with Reliability predictability and accountability. The purpose of the WSCP is to . Shortage conserve the available water supply and protect the integrity of the Response Stages and Actions water supply, with particular regard for domestic water use, sanitation, and fire protection; and to protect and preserve public health, welfare, and safety. Proper preparation and planning are critical to maintain reliable supplies and reduce the impacts of supply interruptions due to a range of conditions including extended drought, production capacity limitations, catastrophic supply interruptions, groundwater overdraft, or other unforeseen shortages. In 1985, the City Council adopted a Water Operational Policy that established that the City had overcommitted its water supply for future development.As a result, the City developed a conservation plan that would potentially save 10 to 15% of total water use in the event that sufficient supply from the Lopez Reservoir was not available. A primary component of this policy was a conservation program aimed at instituting demand management measures before a substantial supply deficit occurred, therefore continually maintaining a reliable water supply. Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 In 1990, the City adopted a Mandatory Water Conservation Ordinance that details four water supply conditions of the City. The purpose of the water conservation ordinance is to give the City Council the authority to declare varying stages of water use restriction based on water supply availability. In addition, the City has implemented a development conservation plan that requires all new development to meet rigid standards for both indoor and outdoor water use. In 1992, the City adopted a WSCP, which addresses availability of water supplies for the City and includes the City's Water Contingency Plan, which outlines steps that the City will take to augment water supplies and reduce the level of rationing. The primary goal of the City's water conservation program is to eliminate water waste by using water more efficiently, which has a positive impact on the City's water supply resources. The specific objectives of the water conservation program are: Educate and inform water customers on short-term and long-term water supply conditions and the importance of efficient water use. • Replace old pumping hardware with water efficient plumbing hardware. • Evaluate water customers' indoor and outdoor water usage and provide specific recommendations for improved efficiency. Analyze water efficiency programs for cost effectiveness. • Develop new water efficiency programs. • Monitor and enforce water conservation municipal codes. In 2015, the City adopted an ordinance amending Pismo Beach Municipal Code by adding Chapter 15.50, Water-efficient Fixture Standards and Requirements, to Title 15, Buildings and Construction. The ordinance requires waterless urinals in new and existing construction, waterless urinal retrofits within the City, faucet aerator retrofits in publicly accessible restrooms to no more than 0.5 gallons per minute, and sub-meters in new construction. 8.1 Water Supply Reliability Analysis As part of the 2020 UWMP requirements, Chapter 7 includes a supply reliability analysis for the following scenarios: normal year, single dry year, and five-year consecutive dry years. The City expects to meet demands under all water year scenarios. Chapter 7 also includes a required Drought Risk Assessment(DRA)to analyze supply reliability for 2021- 2025. The DRA analyzes historical data to allow the City to view patterns and more reliably determine if there could be any water shortages within a given time frame. The DRA looks at historical consumption data by customer class, populated from billing records, and historical supply data by source from production reports. Next, future demand and supply estimates for the planning period are analyzed to determine if there are any gaps between supply and demand. As mentioned above, the City does not anticipate a supply shortage. This chapter describes the shortage response actions that will help the City adapt to water shortages. The City is committed to promoting conservation and pursuing other supply sources to increase its supply portfolio and subsequent reliability as described in Chapter 7. City of Pismo Beach 8-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 8.2 Annual Water Supply and Demand Assessment Each year City staff assesses their current water supply and estimates the available future supply based on their SWP Table A allocation, the SMGB levels, and storage levels at Lopez Lake. If the projected supply will not meet demand, then City staff presents status to the City Council and makes recommendations to enact shortage response actions and building restrictions as needed to accommodate the reduced supply. 8.3 Water Shortage Levels The City's water conservation ordinance describes five stages of rationing that may be invoked during water supply shortages. Each stage includes a water reduction objective, in percent of normal water demands, which may vary based on the nature of the water supply emergency. The WSCP is dependent on the cause, severity, and anticipated duration of the water supply shortage. A combination of voluntary and mandatory water conservation measures would be used to reduce water usage in the event of water shortages. Table 8-1 on page 8-3 shows the five stages and their representative shortages. Table 8-2 on page 8-4 shows the conditions and objectives associated with each stage. Declarations of water supply conditions occur periodically after evaluation by the City Council. The respective water supply condition dictates the voluntary or mandatory water conservation measures in effect at any particular time in the City. In addition to the conditions specified in Section 13.24.050 of the City's municipal code, the City Council may impose any water rationing requirement as it deems appropriate to protect public health, safety, welfare, comfort, and convenience. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.060). If it appears that the City may be unable to supply the normal demands and requirements of the water customers, the City Council may, by resolution, declare a water supply shortage condition. Table 8-1. DWR 8-1 Water Shortage Contingency Plan Levels SHORTAGE PERCENT SHORTAGE RANGE LEVEL (NUMERICAL VALUE AS A PERCENT) SHORTAGE RESPONSE ACTIONS 1 0% No reduction in total water demands from baseline 2 10 - 20% 1 0-20% reduction in total water demands from baseline 3 20 - 35% 20-35% reduction in total water demands from baseline 4 35 - 50% 35-50% reduction in total water demands from baseline 51 Greater than 50% At least 50% reduction in total water demands from baseline ' One stage in the WSCP must address a water shortage of 50%. City of Pismo Beach 8-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 Table 8-2. Water Shortage Contingency Plan Conditions STAGE CONDITION REDUCTION OBJECTIVE 1 —Normal Water Supply Average rainfall in the previous 1 2-24 months No reduction in total water demands Conditions All municipal supplies available from baseline Normal weather patterns 2—Moderately Restricted Below average rainfall in the previous 1 2-24 months 10-20% reduction in total water Water Supply Conditions 10%or more of municipal supply unavailable demands from baseline Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 3—Severely Restricted Below average rainfall in the previous 24-36 months 20-35% reduction in total water Water Supply Conditions Prolonged periods of low water pressure demands from baseline 10%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather typical of summer months 4—Critical Water Supply Below average rainfall in the previous 36 months 35-50% reduction in total water Conditions Prolonged periods of low water pressure demands from baseline 10%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 5 —Exceptionally Critical Below average rainfall in the previous 36 months Greater than 50% reduction in total Water Supply Conditions Prolonged periods of low water pressure water demands from baseline 15%or more of municipal supply unavailable Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 8.3.1 Water Shortage Levels Crosswalk The CWC Section 10632(a)(3)(A) includes six standard water shortage levels corresponding to progressive ranges of up to 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% shortages and greater than 50% shortage. If the supplier's water shortage levels do not correspond with the six standard levels, then a crosswalk between the supplier's levels and the standard levels is required for compliance. The crosswalk between the City's five levels and the standard water shortage levels is shown in Figure 8-1. SHORTAGE PERCENT SHORTAGE PERCENT LEVEL SHORTAGE RANGE LEVEL SHORTAGE RANGE 1 00 1 10a/a 2 10 - 20M 2 20% 3 20 - 35°a 3 30a/a 4 35 - 50010 � 4 40a/a 5 Greater Ilion 5M,'a r 6 Greater than 50% Figure 8-1. Water Shortage Levels Crosswalk City of Pismo Beach 8-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 8.4 Shortage Response Actions As mentioned above, there are long-term and short-term water supply shortages that will trigger water shortage stages, mandatory prohibitions, and consumption reduction methods as described in the following sections. Table 8-3 on page 8-6 summarizes the possible actions identified by City staff to implement during a water shortage, by stage. The shortage response actions in gray are from the previous 2015 UWMP and the City's municipal code. The other shortage response actions are additional options for the City to use to help meet water shortages. This table of actions is designed as a menu of options; the City is not required to implement each action for each stage. Actions identified in earlier stages may also be used in later stages (e.g., actions identified in Stages 1-3 may be implemented in Stage 4 as well as other Stage 4 actions, etc.). City of Pismo Beach 8-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 Table 8-3. Shortage Response Actions STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 1 Use of water which causes runoff onto adjacent properties,non-irrigated areas, private and public walkways, roadways, gutters, parking lots,or structures is prohibited. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots,sidewalks,streets,or other such uses except as found necessary by the city to protect the public health or safety. Using water in a fountain or other decorative water feature,except where the water is part of a recirculating system, is prohibited. Outdoor irrigation is prohibited after 10:00 am or before 4:00 pm. Applying water to outdoor landscapes during and within 48 hours after measurable rainfall is prohibited. Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, paved surfaces, buildings,and other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled water devices,which shut off the water immediately when not in use. Unauthorized use of water from any fire hydrant is prohibited. Vehicles may only be washed at commercial carwashes that re-circulate water or by high-pressure/l ow-volume wash devices. 2 Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. Irrigation of private and public landscaping,turf areas,and gardens is permitted at even-numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays, and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays.All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. Hotels, motels,or other commercial lodging establishments must offer patrons the option to forego the daily laundering of towels,sheets and linens. Potable water may not be used for construction purposes. Non-potable and/or recycled water must be utilized (if available). Require a construction water use plan be submitted to the water supplier that addresses how impacts to existing water users will be mitigated (such as dust control).Must certify that a reduction of the projected average water usage for development of construction projects shall be achieved. Expeditious leak repair (within 48 hrs). In public spaces, reduce irrigation of turf and play areas to minimum levels necessary to protect the health and safety of school children and park visitors. Irrigation of parks,school ground areas, and road median landscaping will not be permitted more than twice a week and only if necessary. Construction meters and fire hydrant meters will be monitored for efficient water use. Construction operations receiving water from a construction meter or water truck shall not use water unnecessarily for any purpose other than those required by regulatory agencies. Construction projects requiring watering for new landscaping materials shall adhere to the designated irrigation requirements. Ornamental landscape or turf that utilizes properly operating water-efficient devices which include, but are not limited to, drip/micro irrigation systems,stream rotor sprinklers, and are operated by a functional irrigation controller, may upon verification by the City, be irrigated for up to 20 minutes per station on the days authorized for landscape irrigation. Require automatic shut off hoses. Adjust sprinklers and irrigation systems to avoid overspray, runoff, and waste. City of Pismo Beach 8-6 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 2 Expand Public Information Campaign re Water Shortage such as website,e-mails, presentations, business placards, school education. Provision of Technical Information to customers on means to promote water use efficiency including customer scorecard, residential assistance, and surveys. Provide Rebates on Plumbing Fixtures and Devices. Provide Rebates for Turf Replacement. Decrease Line Flushing. Reduce System Water Loss. Encourage customers to take advantage of the City's free conservation and rebate programs. Commercial,industrial,institutional equipment must be properly maintained and in full working order. Encourage customers to wash only full loads when washing dishes or clothes. Encourage customers to report water leaks/waste to the City. Irrigation of newly constructed home and building exteriors with potable water is prohibited unless drip or micro- spray systems are used. Irrigation of parks,school ground areas, and road median landscaping will not be permitted more than twice a week and only if necessary. Watering to maintain the level of water in swimming pools shall occur only when essential. Reduce indoor and outdoor water use by specified percentage as determined (based on Shortage Stage). Contact the City for additional tips and techniques to reduce water use. Implement Water Waste Patrols. The use of potable water for service to any properties where buildings are not under construction on the effective date of activation of this stage,even though a valid water connection permit may have been issued for the properties,is prohibited. 3 Emptying and refilling swimming pools and commercial spas is prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to provide for the public health and safety. Prohibit use of potable water for fire drills. Require large users to audit premises and repair leaks. Commercial car wash and laundry systems. Installation of new or replacement non re-circulating water systems in commercial conveyor car wash or commercial laundry systems is prohibited. Use a broom instead of a hose to clean driveways,sidewalks and other hardscape surfaces,except for California Department of Health Services prescribed health or sanitary reasons. Eliminate sprinkler overspray from driveways and sidewalks. Divide irrigation runtimes into multiple cycles to eliminate runoff water that leaves the landscaped area. Use of water for cooling mists is prohibited. Prohibit vehicle washing (including autos,trucks,trailers,motor homes, boats or others) except at facilities using recycled or recirculating water. No new hydrant construction or temporary construction meter permits will be issued by the City. City of Pismo Beach 8-7 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 3 No replacement water may be provided for ponds or lakes.Aeration equipment should be managed in such a way as to eliminate evaporative loss of water. Tune-up irrigation system by checking for and repairing leaks and damaged sprinklers. Upon the declaration of a water shortage emergency,no new water meters allowed,except for health and safety, unless water demand is offset to a net zero increase.Achieving net zero water increase is when potable water use of proposed development is no greater than current demand within the City's service area prior to installation of the new meters. Maintenance of existing landscaping necessary for fire protection as specified by the Fire Marshal of the local fire protection agency having jurisdiction over the property to be irrigated. If fire protection landscaping is not sustainable by irrigation two (2) days per week,irrigation may be increased to not more than three (3) days per week. Main flushing only on complaint basis. New landscaping limited to native or drought tolerant plants. Display by restaurants and hotels of water conservation signs. Customers with "smart"" irrigation timers or controllers are asked to set their controllers to achieve specified percentage reduction (depending on the shortage stage) of the ET rate. Limits on watering duration. Watering or irrigating of lawns, landscape or other vegetated area with potable water using a landscape irrigation system or a watering device that is not continuously attended is limited to no more than 15 minutes per day per station.This subsection does not apply to landscape irrigation systems that exclusively use high efficiency irrigation equipment,very low-flow drip type irrigation systems when no emitter produces more than two gallons of water per hour, and weather based controllers or high-efficiency stream rotor sprinklers. 4 Water rationing as required. Irrigation of ornamental turf on public medians with potable water is prohibited. Washing cars by use of a hose is prohibited. Use of a bucket is permitted subject to non-wasteful applications. No new potable water service connections,except under restricted conditions. Expeditious leak repair (within 24 hrs). Issuance of building permits which require new or expanded water service may be limited or withheld,except to protect the public's health,safety,and welfare,or in cases which meet city council adopted conservation offset requirements. Water Emergency tiered pricing will be implemented pursuant to requirements of Proposition 218 in accordance with California Law. Modify customer indoor water use budgets. No outdoor water use budget. Water use for public health and safety purposes only. Customer rationing may be implemented. All landscape and non-essential outdoor water use for all customers in the City's retail water service area shall be prohibited. All dedicated irrigation meters will be locked off by City personnel. In public spaces,eliminate irrigation of decorative landscape. No new permits for pools will be issued. No new landscape installations or renovations will be permitted. City of Pismo Beach 8-8 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 STAGE SUGGESTED ACTIONS 4 Decorative water features that use potable water must be drained and kept dry. Previous waivers for watering during an establishment period will be revoked. No new construction meters will be issued. 5 No new connections. Outdoor water budgets reduced to 0. Prohibit all landscape irrigation. No filling of pools or aesthetic water features. No water for commercial car washes. All washing of vehicles is prohibited. *The shortage response actions in gray are from the previous 2015 UWMP and the City's municipal code 8.4.1 Demand Reduction In order to achieve a 50% reduction in water use during the most restrictive stage of a water supply condition, the City will implement and enforce the water prohibitions described in Section 8.4 on page 8-5. Other mandated restrictions in water use for all reductions stages will be determined by the City Council and may include the actions described in Table 8-4 on page 8-10. The reduction methods described in this table are potential reduction methods that the City could implement if faced with an extreme water shortage situation. The estimated water savings potential summarized represent a range based on information from published industry references and based on City staff experiences with previous demand reductions. 8.4.2 Supply Augmentation The City is pursuing Central Coast Blue as a local and drought-resistant supplemental supply, as discussed in Section 6.2.2 on page 6-4 of the 2020 UWMP and shown in Table 8-5 on page 8-16. The City also expects to mitigate water shortages through extensive communication and outreach efforts, demand reduction actions, and operational changes. City of Pismo Beach 8-9 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 Table 8-4. DWR 8-2 Demand Reduction Actions HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT All Stages Landscape - Restrict or prohibit 0-1% Use of water which causes runoff onto adjacent properties, Yes runoff from landscape non-irrigated areas, private and public walkways, roadways, irrigation gutters, parking lots,or structures is prohibited. All Stages CII - Restaurants may only 0-1% Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a Yes serve water upon request specific request by a customer. All Stages Other- Prohibit use of potable 0-1% No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking Yes water for washing hard lots,sidewalks,streets,or other such uses except as found surfaces necessary by the city to protect the public health or safety. All Stages Water Features - Restrict water 0-1% Using water in a fountain or other decorative water feature, Yes use for decorative water except where the water is part of a recirculating system,is features,such as fountains prohibited. All Stages Landscape - Limit landscape 0-1% Outdoor irrigation is prohibited after 10:00 am or before Yes irrigation to specific times 4:00 pm. Applying water to outdoor landscapes during and within 48 hours after measurable rainfall is prohibited. All Stages Other- Require automatic shut 1% Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, paved Yes of hoses surfaces, buildings, and other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled water devices,which shut off the water immediately when not in use. All Stages Other 0-1% Unauthorized use of water from any fire hydrant is prohibited Yes All Stages Other- Prohibit vehicle 0-1% Vehicles may only be washed at commercial carwashes that re- Yes washing except at facilities circulate water or by high-pressure/low-volume wash devices. using recycled or recirculating water Stage 2 & Up Landscape - Limit landscape 1-5% Irrigation of private and public landscaping,turf areas, and Yes irrigation to specific days gardens is permitted at even-numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays,and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays.All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. Stage 2 & Up Other- Customers must repair 1-5% Expeditious leak repair (within 48 hrs). Yes leaks, breaks, and malfunctions in a timely manner City of Pismo Beach 8-10 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT Stage 2 & Up Landscape - Prohibit certain 2-5% In public spaces, reduce irrigation of turf and play areas to Yes types of landscape irrigation minimum levels necessary to protect the health and safety of school children and park visitors. Irrigation of parks,school ground areas, and road median landscaping will not be permitted more than twice a week and only if necessary. Stage 2 & Up Other- Prohibit use of potable 25-40% Construction operations receiving water from a construction Yes water for construction and dust meter or water truck shall not use water unnecessarily for any control purpose other than those required by regulatory agencies. Construction projects requiring watering for new landscaping materials shall adhere to the designated irrigation requirements. Construction meters and fire hydrant meters will be monitored for efficient water use. Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. Require a construction water use plan be submitted to the water supplier that addresses how impacts to existing water users will be mitigated (such as dust control).Must certify that a reduction of the projected average water usage for development of construction projects shall be achieved. Stage 2 & Up Other- Require automatic shut 0-1% Require automatic shut off hoses. Yes of hoses Stage 2 & Up Expand Public Information 0-30% Expand Public Information Campaign regarding Water Yes Campaign Shortage such as website,e-mails, presentations, business placards,school education. Encourage customers to take advantage of the City's free conservation and rebate programs. Stage 2 & Up Offer Water Use Surveys 0-1% Provision of Technical Information to customers on means to Yes promote water use efficiency including customer scorecard, residential assistance and surveys. Stage 2 & Up Provide Rebates on Plumbing 8-30% Yes Fixtures and Devices Stage 2 & Up Provide Rebates for Turf 8-30% Yes Replacement Stage 2 & Up Decrease Line Flushing 0-1% Yes City of Pismo Beach 8-1 1 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT Stage 2 & Up Reduce System Water Loss 3% Yes Stage 2 & Up CII - Other CII restriction or 0-1% Commercial,industrial,institutional equipment must be properly Yes prohibition maintained and in full working order. Stage 2 & Up Landscape - Other landscape 0-1% Irrigation of newly constructed home and building exteriors Yes restriction or prohibition with potable water is prohibited unless drip or microspray systems are used. Ornamental landscape or turf that utilizes properly operating water-efficient devices which include, but are not limited to, drip/micro irrigation systems,stream rotor sprinklers,and are operated by a functional irrigation controller,may upon verification by the City or its representative, be irrigated for up to 20 minutes per station on the days authorized for landscape irrigation. Adjust sprinklers and irrigation systems to avoid overspray, runoff, and waste. Stage 2 & Up Other water feature or 0-1% Watering to maintain the level of water in swimming pools Yes swimming pool restriction shall occur only when essential. Stage 2 & Up Other 0-1% Reduce indoor and outdoor water use by specified percentage Yes as determined (based on Shortage Stage). Contact the City for additional tips and techniques to reduce water use. The use of potable water for service to any properties where buildings are not under construction on the effective date of activation of this stage,even though a valid water connection permit may have been issued for the properties,is prohibited. Encourage customers to wash only full loads when washing dishes or clothes. Prohibit all runoff. Encourage customers to report water leaks/waste to the City. Stage 2 & Up Increase Water Waste Patrols 0-1% Implement Water Waste Patrols. Yes Stage 3 & Up Other water feature or 1% Emptying and refilling swimming pools and commercial spas is Yes swimming pool restriction prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to provide for the public health and safety. Stage 3 & Up Other- Customers must repair 0-1% Require large users to audit premises and repair leaks. Yes leaks, breaks, and malfunctions in a timely manner City of Pismo Beach 8-1 2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT Stage 3 & Up Other- Prohibit vehicle 3-5% Commercial car wash and laundry systems. Installation of new Yes washing except at facilities or replacement non re-circulating water systems in commercial using recycled or recirculating conveyor car wash or commercial laundry systems is prohibited. water Stage 3 & Up Other- Prohibit use of potable 0-1% Use a broom instead of a hose to clean driveways,sidewalks Yes water for washing hard and other hardscape surfaces,except for California surfaces Department of Health Services prescribed health or sanitary reasons. Stage 3 & Up Landscape - Restrict or prohibit 0-1% Eliminate sprinkler overspray from driveways and sidewalks. Yes runoff from landscape Divide irrigation runtimes into multiple cycles to eliminate runoff irrigation water that leaves the landscaped area. Stage 3 & Up Other 0-1% Use of water for cooling mists is prohibited. Yes No new hydrant-construction or temporary construction meter permits will be issued by the City. Prohibit use of potable water for fire drills. Stage 3 & Up Other- Prohibit vehicle 3-5% Prohibit vehicle washing (including autos,trucks,trailers, motor Yes washing except at facilities homes, boats or others) except at facilities using recycled or using recycled or recirculating recirculating. water Stage 3 & Up Water Features - Restrict water 0-1% No replacement water may be provided for ponds or lakes. Yes use for decorative water Aeration equipment should be managed in such a way as to features,such as fountains eliminate evaporative loss of water. Stage 3 & Up Other- Customers must repair 0-1% Tune-up irrigation system by checking for and repairing leaks Yes leaks, breaks, and malfunctions and damaged sprinklers. in a timely manner Stage 3 & Up Moratorium or Net Zero 0-1% Upon the declaration of a water shortage emergency,no new Yes Demand Increase on New water meters allowed, except for health and safety,unless Connections water demand is offset to a net zero increase.Achieving net zero water increase is when potable water use of proposed development is no greater than current demand within the District's service area prior to installation of the new meters. The District will separately develop a "Net Zero Water Increase Program."The objective of the Program shall be to provide a means to continue sustainable growth during continuing water shortage conditions. City of Pismo Beach 8-1 3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT Stage 3 & Up Landscape - Limit landscape 0-1% Maintenance of existing landscaping necessary for fire Yes irrigation to specific times protection as specified by the Fire Marshal of the local fire protection agency having jurisdiction over the property to be irrigated. If fire protection landscaping is not sustainable by irrigation two (2) days per week,irrigation may be increased to not more than three (3) days per week. Stage 3 & Up Decrease Line Flushing 3% Main flushing only on complaint basis. Yes Stage 3 & Up CII - Lodging establishment 0-1% To operate a hotel, motel or other commercial lodging Yes must offer opt out of linen establishment without offering patrons the option to forego the service daily laundering of towels,sheets and linens. Stage 3 & Up Landscape - Other landscape 1 1% New landscaping limited to native or drought tolerant plants. Yes restriction or prohibition Stage 3 & Up CII - Other CII restriction or 0-1% Display by restaurants and hotels of water conservation signs. Yes prohibition Stage 3 & Up Landscape - Other landscape 0-2% Customers with "smart" irrigation timers or controllers are Yes restriction or prohibition asked to set their controllers to achieve specified percentage reduction (depending on the shortage stage) of the evapotranspiration (ET) rate. Limits on watering duration. Watering or irrigating of lawns, landscape or other vegetated area with potable water using a landscape irrigation system or a watering device that is not continuously attended is limited to no more than 15 minutes per day per station.This subsection does not apply to landscape irrigation systems that exclusively use high efficiency irrigation equipment,very low-flow drip type irrigation systems when no emitter produces more than two gallons of water per hour, and weather based controllers or high-efficiency stream rotor sprinklers. Stage 4 & up Other 0-1% Water rationing as required. Yes Modify customer indoor water use budgets. No outdoor water use budget. Washing cars by use of a hose is prohibited. Use of a bucket is permitted subject to non-wasteful applications. Previous waivers for watering during an establishment period will be revoked. Water use for public health and safety purposes only. Customer rationing may be implemented. City of Pismo Beach 8-14 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT Stage 4 & up Landscape - Prohibit certain 0-1% Irrigation of ornamental turf on public medians with potable Yes types of landscape irrigation water is prohibited. Stage 4 & up Moratorium or Net Zero 0% No new potable water service connections,except under Yes Demand Increase on New restricted conditions. Connections Stage 4 & up Other- Customers must repair 2% Expeditious leak repair (within 24 hrs). Yes leaks, breaks, and malfunctions in a timely manner Stage 4 & up Other- Prohibit use of potable 0-1% Issuance of building permits which require new or expanded Yes water for construction and dust water service may be limited or withheld,except to protect the control public's health,safety and welfare,or in cases which meet city council adopted conservation offset requirements. No new construction meters will be issued. Stage 4 & up Implement or Modify Drought 7.3-25% Water Emergency tiered pricing will be implemented pursuant Yes Rate Structure or Surcharge to requirements of Proposition 218 in accordance with California Law. Stage 4 & up Landscape - Prohibit all 0-1% All landscape and non-essential outdoor water use for all Yes landscape irrigation Customers in all areas of the City's retail water service area shall be prohibited. In public spaces,eliminate irrigation of decorative landscape. Stage 4 & up Landscape - Other landscape 0-1% All dedicated irrigation meters will be locked off by City Yes restriction or prohibition personnel. No new landscape installations or renovations will be permitted. Stage 4 & up Other water feature or 0-1% No new permits for pools will be issued. Yes swimming pool restriction Stage 4 & up Water Features- Restrict water 0-1% Decorative water features that use potable water must be Yes use for decorative water drained and kept dry. features,such as fountains Stage 5 Moratorium or Net Zero 0% No new connections. Yes Demand Increase on New Connections Stage 5 Other 0-1% Outdoor water budgets reduced to 0. Yes No water for commercial car washes.All washing of vehicles is prohibited. City of Pismo Beach 8-15 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO PENALTY,CHARGE,OR SHORTAGE LEVEL DEMAND REDUCTION ACTIONS REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION OR REFERENCE OTHER ENFORCEMENT Stage 5 Landscape - Prohibit all 0-1% Yes landscape irrigation Stage 5 Other water feature or 1% No filling of pools or aesthetic water features. Yes swimming pool restriction *Termination of water service until violations of the water conservation ordinance is corrected. *Criminal misdemeanor for any person who knowingly and willfully violates the provisions in the City's Municipal code. City of Pismo Beach 8-16 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 Table 8-5. DWR 8-3 Supply Augmentation & Other Actions SUPPLY AUGMENTATION METHODS AND OTHER HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO ADDITIONAL EXPLANATION SHORTAGE LEVEL ACTIONS BY WATER SUPPLIER REDUCE THE SHORTAGE GAP? OR REFERENCE All Stages New recycled water 339 IPR - 21%of Central Coast Blue yield 8.4.3 Operational Changes The City will implement operational changes as needed to adapt to water shortages. These operational changes are included in Table 8-3 on page 8-6 and are summarized below. • Expeditious leak repair • Decrease Line Flushing Reduce System Water Loss 8.4.4 Guidelines For Building Restriction During An Extended Drought The City Council adopted guidelines to limit building in the City should there be extended drought conditions. The guidelines are based on a three-tiered system with the triggers for each tier a function of the health of the SMGB and surface supplies from the SWP and Lopez Lake. Please note that the SWP trigger shall not be in effect in cases where San Luis Obispo County delivers its stored state water in an amount greater than the trigger. On May 1 of each year the City evaluates their water positions and if the total water supply is greater than 15% of the previous year's production then none of the restrictions are put in place regardless if the other triggers were met. The following are the triggers for each tier: Tier I —Any one of the following: • Total water supply at or below 1,630 AF • Lopez Lake at or below 10,000 AF of storage SWP deliveries below 20% SMGB below the index trigger level (ITL) of 7.5 feet for three of the previous four quarters Tier II —Any one of the following: Total water supply at or below 1,130 AF Lopez Lake at or below 5,000 AF of storage SWP deliveries below 15% • SMGB below the ITL of 7.5 feet for six consecutive quarters Tier III —Any one of the following: • Total water supply at or below 850 AF • Lopez Lake at or below 4,000 AF of storage • SWP deliveries below 10% • SMGB below the ITL of 7.5 feet for ten consecutive quarters City of Pismo Beach 8-17 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 The actions to be taken during each tier are as follows: Tier I • Existing planning permit applications as of the date of the resolution will be processed and building permits will be issued for these projects. • New planning permit applications for vacant parcels will be accepted and processed, however building permits for these projects will not be issued until Tier I declared over. • New commercial/retail use of existing buildings will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be less than or equal to the existing or most recent water demand. • Redevelopment of existing buildings (commercial, retail, residential, hotel, etc.) will be allowed, but only such that the proposed water demand if less than or equal to the current water use of the existing building. Tier II • No outdoor water use will be allowed. o "Cash for Grass"will remain in effect. (see "Cash for Grass" program in Section 9.1.7.1 on page 9-4). o Irrigation controller and irrigation retrofit rebates will be suspended. • Existing planning permit applications as of the date of the resolution will be processed; however, no building permits will be issued until water supply exceeds Tier 11 Triggers, and Council approves the issuance of the building permit. New planning permit applications for vacant parcels will be accepted and processed, however building permits for these projects will not be issued until Tier I is declared over. • New commercial/retail use of existing building will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 15% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period — including if there was no water use during that time (for example if a parcel had no water use over the past 24 months new use of the building would not be allowed to use water). • Redevelopment of existing buildings (commercial, retail, residential, hotel, etc.) will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 15% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period — including if there was no water use during that time. Municipal reduction of irrigation will be no less than 50%. Tier III • No outdoor water use will be allowed. o "Cash for Grass" will remain in effect. o Irrigation controller and irrigation retrofit rebates will be suspended. • Existing planning permit applications as of the date on the resolution will be processed; however, no building permits will be issued until water supply exceeds Tier 11 Triggers, and Council approves the issuance of the building permit. • New planning permit applications for vacant parcels will be accepted and processed, however building permits for these projects will not be issued until Tier I is declared over. • New commercial/retail use of existing buildings will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 30% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period — including if there was no water use during that time. City of Pismo Beach 8-1 8 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 • Redevelopment of existing buildings (commercial, retail, residential, hotel, etc.) will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 30% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period — including if there was no water use during that time. • No Municipal irrigation will occur, except at the direction of the City Council. Planning applications will be accepted and processed to conclusion (approval or denial) at all tiers and discretionary approvals delayed by a building restriction shall be granted an extension of time to inaugurate or activate the approval equal to the amount of time the restriction was in place. Tier I restrictions are not intended to apply to the development of one single family home in a neighborhood consisting of single-family homes built by an individual owner. Enactment by the Council of any of the tiers would take place as follows: On May 1st of each year if water supplies are less than less than 15% of the previous year's production, staff will bring an agenda item for City Council's consideration, which will include the City's current water deliveries, current water production numbers, and a resolution to enact the given tier. Once a tier is enacted, City staff will return once a month to provide the City Council with an update on the City's water supply and demand so the City Council can determine if it is appropriate to keep the tier enacted. 8.4.5 Additional Mandatory Restrictions In the event of a critical water supply shortage, the City may implement mandatory compliance measures to induce water conservation. Mandatory compliance measures enacted during a water shortage are more severe than voluntary measures, produce greater savings, and are less costly to the utility. The principal drawback to these measures is the customer resentment if the measures are not seen as equitable. Therefore, such measures should be accompanied by a public relations campaign. The City's Municipal Code includes prohibition on various wasteful water uses during a declared water supply shortage. These mandatory prohibitions are implemented during all stages and are listed in Table 8-6. During a Stage 4 and 5 water supply shortage, the City Council may impose any water rationing requirement that it deems appropriate to protect public health, safety, welfare, comfort, and convenience. For example, in 2015 the City adopted an ordinance requiring waterless urinals in new and existing construction, waterless urinal retrofits within the City, faucet aerator retrofits in publicly accessible restrooms to no more than 0.5 gallons per minute, and sub-meters in new construction. Table 8-6. Water Shortage Contingency- Mandatory Prohibitions PROHIBITIONS MANDATORY PROHIBITION STAGE Outdoor irrigation resulting in excessive gutter runoff. STAGE 1 All use of water which results in excessive gutter runoff. STAGE 2 Use of water for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots,sidewalks,streets,or other such STAGE 2 uses except as necessary to protect public health or safety. Outdoor irrigation after 10 AM and before 4 PM. STAGE 2 Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities. STAGE 2 Emptying and refilling of swimming pools and commercial spas is prohibited except to STAGE 3 prevent structural damage and/or to protect public health or safety. Washing cars by use of a hose. STAGE 4 City of Pismo Beach 8-19 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 8.4.6 Emergency Response Plan The City has described its emergency response plan in Title 2, Chapter 2.32 — Emergency Services of the City's Municipal Code. The City has developed a response plan and has organized its emergency efforts with applicable relief agencies and municipalities in the area. San Luis Obispo County also completed a comprehensive Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan in 2019 that identified potential hazards and associated risk levels and economic impacts for agencies within the county, including the City. Annex F in the Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan builds upon the previous version of the Local Hazard Mitigation Plan that the City adopted in July 2014. 8.4.7 Seismic Risk Assessment and Mitigation Plan According to the 2019 Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan for San Luis Obispo County, there are no mapped active or potentially active faults in the City. The inactive Pismo fault presents a very low potential fault rupture hazard. The nearby Cities of Arroyo Grande and Grover Beach are transected by the Wilmar Avenue fault which is considered potentially active. Based on the USGS Quaternary Faults layer, however, nearby faults systems like the San Luis Range and Edna Fault Zones exist. As such, significant ground shaking would be possible near the City (Wood Environment and Infrastructure Solutions, Inc., 2019). Annex F in the Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan describes the seismic risks and associated mitigation measures for the City. 8.4.8 Shortage Response Action Effectiveness The City has estimated the effectiveness of shortage response actions when data pertaining to such actions is available. Estimates of the effectiveness for demand reduction shortage response actions is quantified in Table 8-4 on page 8-10. It is expected that response actions effectiveness is also a result of successful communication and outreach efforts. Although not all shortage response actions for supply augmentations and operational changes are quantifiable, the City expects to mitigate water shortages through a combination of demand reduction measures and operational changes, as well as continued public education and outreach efforts. 8.5 Compliance and Enforcement, Monitoring and Reporting, and Communication Protocols In the event of a declaration of a water shortage condition or emergency, the administration of a water conservation program would involve coordination of the City's established emergency services committee. As described in the City's Municipal Code (§2.32 Emergency Services), the City Manager will have the responsibility of acting as the director of emergency services and developing and organizing disaster plans. In addition, an emergency services coordinator, chiefs of emergency services and departments, and other applicable City or emergency services representatives will each provide assistance in an emergency response, as appropriate. The major elements to be considered in administering and implementing the program include: Identifying the City staff members to fill the key roles on the water shortage management team. It is anticipated that the City Manager would designate the appropriate individuals, including the program coordinator. City of Pismo Beach 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 Intensifying the public information program to provide comprehensive information on the water shortage and necessary actions that must be undertaken by the City and by the public. The scope of the public information program can be developed by reviewing published references, especially those published by the Department of Water Resources (DWR) and researching successful aspects of the current programs conducted by neighboring water agencies. A public information hotline may be advisable to answer any questions regarding the program. Monitoring program effectiveness. Ongoing monitoring will be needed to track supply availability and actual water user reductions. This procedure will allow the City to continuously re-evaluate the situation and make informal decisions as to whether another reduction level is needed. The City's primary mechanism of measuring water use and, subsequently, water use reduction, is through the use of water meters and production data. Therefore, to measure actual reductions in water use in the course of carrying out a water supply shortage contingency plan, the City may perform water meter readings for individual connections. Enforcing program requirements. For the 35 to 50% or greater reduction programs, enforcement of water use prohibitions and water use allocations will be more important in achieving the program goals. Inspectors and enforcement personnel could be identified among City staff that is in the community on other business, such as police, street maintenance, meter readers, etc. Any violation of the conservation regulations and restrictions on water use may result in termination of water service until the violation is corrected, and until all appropriate fees and penalties are paid in full. Table 8-6 on page 8-19 lists the specifics of the penalties and in what stages they may occur. Dealing with equity issues that might arise from the mandatory restrictions or higher water rates. Depending on the level of restriction there may be a greater need to address specific concerns of individual customers who might have special conditions or extenuating circumstances and are unduly affected by the program. A procedure should be identified for dealing with such special requests and/or for reviewing specific accounts. • Coordinating with surrounding water management entities. A groundwater shortage supply for the City would likely affect regional groundwater supplies as well. Therefore, if the City is forced to declare a water shortage condition, surrounding water districts may also be affected. Under the influence of a water shortage situation where the WSCP must be implemented, it is critical that the City coordinate its water conservation efforts with surrounding water management entities. Adjusting water rates. Revenues from water sales should be reviewed periodically to determine whether an increase in rates might be needed to cover revenue shortfalls due to the decrease in demand. Addressing new development proposals. During periods of severe water shortage, it may be necessary to impose additional requirements on new development to reduce new demand or to temporarily curtail new service connections. City of Pismo Beach 8-21 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 8.6 Legal Authorities The City Council has the legal authority to declare a water shortage stage. Declarations of water supply conditions occur periodically after evaluation by the City Council. The respective water supply condition dictates the voluntary or mandatory water conservation measures in effect at any particular time in the City. In the event a water shortage emergency is declared by the District Board of Supervisors, the Zone 3 water supply contracts between the District and contract agencies, including the City, allows for water delivery reductions and corresponding notifications to each contract agency of the District's intent. Actual amounts of reduced entitlements would be determined by the LRRP during such drought years. DWR sets SWP allocations as a percentage of contracted Table A allocation. Volumes for SWP allocations are based on consideration of hydrologic and climatic data and modeling. 8.7 Financial Consequences of WSCP The majority of operating costs for most water agencies are fixed rather than a function of the amount of water sold. Despite the majority of costs being fixed, revenue is variable because it is a function of the volume of water sold. As a result, when significant conservation programs are undertaken, it is frequently necessary to raise water rates because the revenue generated is based on lower total consumption while the revenue required is basically fixed. The City's WSCP describes that to counteract the financial impact of conservation, the City may institute an increase in the rate structure so that lower projected water consumption would generate a new rate based on the revenue needed by the City's Water Enterprise fund. 8.8 WSCP Refinement Procedures The WSCP is best prepared and implemented as an adaptive management plan. The City will use results obtained from their monitoring and reporting program to evaluate any need for revisions. Potential changes to the WSCP that may require an update include, but are not limited to, any changes to the shortage stage structure and/or the addition of significant new customer reduction actions. Any prospective changes to the WSCP would need to be presented at a public hearing and adopted by the City Council. Notices for the public hearing date would be published in the local newspaper in compliance with CWC requirements. 8.9 Special Water Feature Distinction The CWC Section 10623 (b) now requires that suppliers analyze and define water features that are artificially supplied with water, including ponds, lakes, waterfalls, and fountains, separately from swimming pools and spas, as defined in subdivision (a)of Section 115921 of the Health and Safety Code. Non-pool or non-spa water features may use or be able to use recycled water, whereas pools and spas must use potable water for health and safety considerations so limitations to pools and spas may require different considerations compared to non-pool or non-spa water features. Currently, the City does not have any special water features within their service area. City of Pismo Beach 8-22 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Water Shortage Contingency Plan Section 8 8.10 Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Availability A draft WSCP will be presented during the at the public hearing scheduled for the June 15, 2021 City Council meeting. On March 8, 2021, the City sent out 60-day notification letters to nearby agencies, cities, and other regional agencies that they were updating their WSCP alongside their UWMP and had planned a public hearing to receive any comments prior to adoption. As the public hearing approached, the City published notices in the local newspaper two weeks in advance. Copies of the 60-day notices and public hearing newspaper notice is provided in Appendix B. The WSCP was formally adopted as part of the 2020 UWMP on June 15, 2021 by the City Council by Resolution 2021-055 and Resolution 2021-056, included in Appendix E. The WSCP was made available to all staff, customers, and any affected cities, counties, or other members of the public within 30 days of the adoption date. The WSCP was also available in the City Council agenda packet for the June 15, 2021 meeting that is available for download at the City's website. The WSCP was submitted to DWR at the same time as the 2020 UWMP, no later than July 1st, 2021. City of Pismo Beach 8-23 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN 9 Demand Management Measures As the water supplier for the community of Pismo Beach, the City continues to aggressively promote water conservation to make the most efficient use the existing local groundwater supplies. This section describes the City's retail Demand Management Measures (DMMs), their implementation over the past five years, and future planned conservation measures that will ensure the City continues to meet or exceed water use reduction goals. The DMM section provides a comprehensive description of the water IN THIS SECTION conservation programs that the City has implemented for the past Demand five years, is currently implementing, and plans to implement in order Management to meet the 2020 urban water use reduction targets. The section of Reporting the CWC addressing DMMs was significantly modified in 2014, Implementation based on recommendations from the Independent Technical Panel (ITP) to the legislature. The ITP was formed by DWR to provide information and recommendations to DWR and the Legislature on new DMMs, technologies and approaches to water use efficiency. The ITP recommended, and the legislature enacted, streamlining the requirements from the 14 specific measures reported on in the 2010 UWMP to six more general requirements plus an "other" category for measures agencies implemented in addition to the required elements. Demand Management Measures Section 9 9.1 Existing Demand Management Measures for Retail Consistent with the requirements of the CWC, this section describes the demand measurement measures that have been implemented in the past five years and will continued to be implemented into the future in order to meet the City's 2020 water use targets pursuant to Section 10608.20 of the CWC. 9.1 .1 Water Waste Prevention Ordinances According to the DWR 2020 Guidebook, a water waste ordinance explicitly states the waste of water is to be prohibited. The ordinance may prohibit specific actions that waste water, such as excessive runoff from landscape irrigation, or use of a hose outdoors with a without a shut off nozzle. In Chapter 13.24 of the City's Municipal Code, water waste prohibitions listed for normal, moderately restricted, severely restricted, and critical water supply conditions. The restrictions include but are not limited to the following: • Use of shutoff nozzles when washing cars, boats, and other similar activities • Excessive runoff from irrigation prohibited • Limited hours of outdoor irrigation • Serving of water in restaurants only by request • No washing of driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, etc. with potable water except to protect public health and safety 9.1 .2 Metering According to the DWR 2020 Guidebook, an agency that is fully metered will state that fact in the UWMP. If an agency is not yet full metered, it will discuss its plans for becoming fully metered in accordance with CWC 527. All of the City's service connections are metered and billed based on volume of use. Meter repairs and replacements are performed on an as-needed basis. The City will continue to require that water meters be installed on new service connections and will perform retrofits to help optimize its metering program. 9.1 .3 Conservation Pricing According to the DWR 2020 Guidebook, retail water agencies need to describe the pricing structure that is used by the water agency. Conservation pricing sends a signal to customers regarding their water use. Conservation pricing is designed to discourage wasteful water habits and encourage conservation. The City applies variable water service rate structures by customer class. Rates based on volume of use encourage water conservation by customers. Table 9-1 on page 9-3 is the water bi-monthly base rate and tiered consumption rates for a standard 1" meter with a unit defined as 100 cubic feet (HCF, 748 gallons). City of Pismo Beach 9-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Demand Management Measures Section 9 Table 9-1. Water Rates for 1" Meter JANUARY 1,2021 JANUARY 1,2022 JANUARY 1,2023 FIXED CHARGE($PER BI-MONTH) FIXED CHARGE($PER BI-MONTH) $46.60 $52.15 $58.36 VARIABLE CHARGE($PER HCF) SINGLE FAMILY TIER 1 -0 TO 10 UNITS $4.45 $4.98 $5.58 TIER 2- 11 TO 16 UNITS $5.07 $5.68 $6.36 TIER 3- 17 TO 32 UNITS $5.81 $6.51 $7.29 TIER 4-OVER 32 UNITS $7.79 $8.72 $9.76 MULTIFAMILY $5.17 $5.79 $6.48 MOBILE HOME $5.25 $5.88 $5.58 COMMERCIAL [A] $6.44 $7.21 $8.07 IRRIGATION $5.70 $6.38 $7.14 CONSTRUCTION $6.56 $7.35 $8.23 9.1 .4 Public Education and Outreach The City has an established public outreach program that includes coordination with media sources for water conservation programs and events, an active website, flyers and brochures, bill stuffers, and public service announcements through local coalitions and on television. The City actively maintains its website and organizes public outreach at community events such as farmers markets, local festivals, school fairs, and other local events. Additionally, the City actively communicates through social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, providing updates up to three times per week. The City has hired the consultant Science Discovery each year, from May 2012 to May 2015, to perform educational outreach to its elementary school program annually. Science Discovery distributed materials and facilitated games geared towards teaching the students about the water cycle,water treatment,water conservation, and other related topics. The elementary school program impacts about 61 students totals each year. Teachers are given additional awards and materials to distribute to students to encourage water conservation and to serve as education for the students' families. Additionally, in the Spring of 2012 through 2016, the City attended a Career Day for 8th grade students, where approximately 250 students were in attendance. Students had the opportunity to interview two presenters from the City, and were given flyers to take home. 9.1 .5 Programs to Assess and Manage Distribution System Real The City operations and maintenance staff have had a program in place for many years to detect and repair leaks within the distribution system. The City also has a capital improvement program in place to systematically replace water mains and services throughout the distribution system. Areas that are either City of Pismo Beach 9-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Demand Management Measures Section 9 prone to leaking, are undersized, or are constructed of materials now considered inferior, are given the highest priority for replacement. The City uses the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Free Water Audit Software to perform and validate water audits in compliance with Senate Bill 555 (see Appendix F —2020 Water Audit). The City will continue to utilize the water audits and validations to assess and prioritize areas for improvements to reduce water loss. 9.1 .6 Water Conservation Program Coordination and Staffing Support One full-time employee dedicates a portion of time to coordinate the City's water conservation efforts with the supervision of the Director of Public Works. This employee promotes water conservation through a variety of social media outlets, coordinates advertisements, communicates with the public, updates the City's two websites, attends special events, and runs the water rebate programs. The Consultant built a brand, Think H2O, and set up a website, and assisted with water conservation outreach while working with the City. Since then, City staff manages the Think H2O brand. 9.1 .7 Other Demand Management Measures The City is committed to implementing cost effective programs that will increase water efficiency Citywide. Though not required, the City has implemented the following demand management measures during the past five year in order to increase the overall water efficiency of the City's customers. 9.1 .7.1 Turf Reduction Program It is estimated that 60% of the City's water is used for irrigation, largely for turf areas. The City's Cash for Grass Program helps property owners convert water-thirsty lawns to water efficient landscape. The City offered rebates for up to $2,500 for the removal of turf to be replaced with drought tolerant plants, permeable hardscapes or other permeable materials. The goal of the program is to encourage a permanent reduction in the amount of water used for landscaping. 9.1 .7.2 Rebate Programs The City offered one plumbing rebate program. This program is as follows: High Efficiency Toilet Rebate Program —The City offered up to a $100 rebate when replacing a 3.5 gallon per flush or higher toilet with a 1.28 gallon per flush toilet. 9.2 Reporting Implementation 9.2.1 Implementation Over the Past Five Years As mentioned above, the City has an extensive rebate program for both residential and commercial customers. 9.2.2 Implementation Achieve Water Use Targets For decades, the City has valued and promoted conservation and will continue to do so. As a result, the City's water use is below target objectives set by the State of California. Despite meeting the targets, the City will continue to implement existing conservation programs and explore additional programs to avoid substantial increases in demands. City of Pismo Beach 9-4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Demand Management Measures Section 9 9.3 Water Use Objectives (Future Requirements) As mentioned in the previous section, the City's customers are efficient and have reduced their gpcd consumption to less than the State target. The City continues to promote conservation and will evaluate additional measures if and when future requirements are established. City of Pismo Beach 9-5 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, 0 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation The following chapter describes the steps taken to adopt and submit the UWMP and to make it publicly available. This chapter will also include a discussion of the agency's plan to implement the UWMP. The City has included all requisite 2020 data in the development of IN THIS SECTION this UWMP and the 2020 WSCP. The following sections detail the 0 Public Hearing notification of the surrounding cities, counties, and water suppliers, Notices notification the public, the public hearing, adoption, and submission . Plan Adoption of the City's 2020 UWMP and WSCP, and the process by which the • Plan Submittal City will amend the UWMP or WSCP should it need to in the future. Plan Availability Amending the UWMP or WSCP Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10 10.1 Notice of Public Hearing 10.1 .1 Notice to Cities and Counties On March 8, 2021, the City notified the surrounding cities and counties of their intent to update the UWMP by July 1, 2021. This letter served as the 60-day noticing required by the Water Code. A copy of this letter is included in Appendix B to this UWMP. A public hearing was held on June 15, 2021 at a City Council meeting prior to the UWMP adoption. Table 10-1 shows the notification provided to the surrounding cities and counties. Table 10-1. DWR 10-1 R Notification to Cities and Counties CITY 60 DAY NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING OTHER City of Grover Beach X X Oceano Community Services District X X Avila Beach Community Services District X X County Service Area 12 X X COUNTY 60 DAY NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING OTHER County of San Luis Obispo X X OTHER 60 DAY NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING OTHER Nipomo Mesa Management Area Technical Group X X Northern Cities Management Area Technical Group X X Port San Luis Harbor District X X San Luis Obispo Council of Governments X X South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District X X Avila Valley Mutual Water Company X X San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water X X San Miguelito Mutual Water Company X X Central Coast Water Authority X X 10.1 .2 Notice to the Public A public hearing to consider adoption of the final UWMP was held by the City Council at City Hall on June 15, 2021. Per Government Code 6066, publication of notice to the public pursuant to this chapter shall be once a week for two successive weeks. The public hearing was first noticed in the local paper on May 27, 2021 and noticed again on June 3, 2021.The hearing notices are attached as Appendix D. City of Pismo Beach 10-2 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10 10.2 Public Hearing and Adoption The 2020 Draft UWMP and WSCP were agendized, noticed, and reviewed in a Public Hearing at the regularly scheduled City Council meeting on June 15, 2021. This hearing provided the cities and counties and other members of the public a chance to review the staff report and attend the hearing to provide comment. The public hearing took place before the adoption allowing opportunity for the report to be modified in response to public input before adoption. Following the public hearing, the 2020 UWMP was adopted by the City Council on June 15, 2021. A copy of the Resolution of Plan Adoption signed by City Council and attached cover letter addressed to DWR is included as Appendix E of the UWMP. The UWMP includes all applicable information necessary to meet the requirements of CWC Division 6, Part 2.6 (Urban Water Management Planning). The 2020 UWMP and WSCP were submitted to DWR by July 1, 2021 (within 30 days of adoption). 10.3 Plan Submittal The City's Final 2020 UWMP and WSCP were formally adopted by the City Council on June 15, 2021. A copy of the Adoption Resolution is included in Appendix E. A hard copy of the Final 2020 UWMP and WSCP were sent to the California State Library, DWR (electronically using the WUEdata reporting tool), and all surrounding cities and counties within 30 days of adoption. 10.4 Public Availability To fulfill the requirements of Water Code Section 10642 of the UWMP Act, the City made the Final 2020 UWMP available online (https://www.pismobeach.orgl) and at City Hall, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm, for public review on July 15, 2021, within 30 days of adoption. 10.5 Amending an Adopted UWMP or Water Shortage Contingency Plan Amendments to the City's 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be made on an as needed basis. Should the City need to amend the adopted 2020 UWMP or WSCP in the future, the City will hold a public hearing for review of the proposed amendments to the document. The City will send a 60-day notification letter to all surrounding cities and counties and notify the public in same manner as set forth in Chapter 2 of this UWMP. Once the amended document is adopted, a copy finalized version will sent to the California State Library, DWR (electronically using the WUEdata reporting tool), and all surrounding cities and counties within 30 days of adoption. The finalized version will also be made available to the public both online on the City's website and in person at City Hall during normal business hours. City of Pismo Beach 10-3 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN References Beach,C.o. (September 2010). Draft Environmental Impact Report on Price Canyon Planning Area,General Plan Update,SOI Change,Annexation and Specific Plan. Beacon Economics& SLOCOG Staff. (June 2017). 2050 Regional Growth Forecast for San Luis Obispo County: Population, Housing,and Employment Projections. California Department of Water Resources. (2020). Final State Water Project Delivery Capability Report 2019. California Department of Water Resources. (2021). Urban Water Management Plan Guidebook 2020. Sacramento:California Department of Water Resources. California Department of Water Resources. (February 2016).Methodologies for Calculating Baseline and Compliance Urban Per Capita Water Use. Carollo Engineers,I. (February 2000). City of Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant Collection System Master Plans. Carollo Engineers,I. (September 201 1). City of Pismo Beach 2010 Urban Water Management Plan. CIMIS. (2021). Retrieved from California Irrigation Management Information System: https://cimis.water.ca.gov/WSNReportCriteria.aspx City of Pismo Beach. (April 2014). City of Pismo Beach General Plan& Local Coastal Program. Pismo Beach. Fugro Consultants,I. (April 2016). Northern Cities Management Area 2015 Annual Montitoring Report. Geoscience. (2019).City of Pismo Beach and South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District Central Coast Blue Phase 1 B Hydrogeologic Evaluation. Pismo Beach,C. o. (1992). General Plan. Resources,C. D. (November 1998). California Water Plan Update Bulletin 160-98. Resources,C. D. (October 2003). California's Groundwater Bulletin 1 18 Update 2003. SLOCOG. (2019,October 2). 2019 Regional Housing Needs Allocation Plan. Retrieved from https://www.dropbox.com/s/stbw4b26apatv3f/_201 9%20R HNA%20PIan_adopted_final.pdf?d I=0 11-1 References Section 11 Water Systems Consulting. (2020). City of Pismo Beach 2020 Water Master Plan Update . San Luis Obispo. Western Hydrologics. (2021). Supplemental Contract Change Modeling. Wildan Financial Services. (January 2019).City of Pismo Beach: Development Impact Fee Update Study. Wood Environment and Infrastructure Solutions,Inc. (2019). San Luis Obispo County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan.San Luis Obispo County. Zone,S. L. (December 16, 2014). Low Reservoir Response Plan. City of Pismo Beach 1 1-0 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Appendix A - DWR Review Sheet Checklist Appendix A-2020 U WMP Checklist Water Code 2020 UWMP Location 2020 Guidebook Location Section Summary as Applies to UWMP Subject (Optional Column for Agency Review Use) A plan shall describe and evaluate sources of supply,reasonable and practical efficient uses, Chapter 1 10615 Introduction and Overview reclamation and demand management activities. Chapter 1 Each plan shall include a simple description of the supplier's plan including water availability, Chapter 1 10630.5 future requirements,a strategy for meeting needs,and other pertinent information.Additionally, Summary a supplier may also choose to include a simple description at the beginning of each chapter. Chapter 1 Section 2.2 10620(b) Every person that becomes an urban water supplier shall adopt an urban water management Plan Preparation Chapter 2.1 Ian within one year after it has become an urban water supplier. Coordinate the preparation of its plan with other appropriate agencies in the area,including Section 2.6 10620(d)(2) other water suppliers that share a common source,water management agencies,and relevant Plan Preparation Chapter 2.2 ublic a encies,to the extent practicable. Provide supporting documentation that the water supplier has encouraged active involvement of Section 2.6.2 10642 diverse social,cultural,and economic elements of the population within the service area prior to Plan Preparation Chapter 2.2 and during the preparation of the plan and contingency Ian. Section 2.6,Section 6.1 10631(h) Retail suppliers will include documentation that they have provided their wholesale supplier(s)- System Supplies Chapter 2.1 if an -with water use projections from that source. Wholesale suppliers will include documentation that they have provided their urban water Section 2.6 10631(h) suppliers with identification and quantification of the existing and planned sources of water System Supplies Not Applicable available from the wholesale to the urban supplier during various water year types. Section 3.1 10631 a Describe the water supplier service area. System Description Chapter 3 Section 3.3 10631(a) Describe the climate of the service area of the supplier. System Description Chapter 3.1 Section 3.4 10631 a Provide population projections for 2025,2030,2035,2040 and optionally 2045. System Description Chapter 3.2 Section 3.4.2 10631(a) Describe other social,economic,and demographic factors affecting the supplier's water System Description Chapter 3.2 management planning. Sections 3.4 and 5.4 10631(a) Indicate the current population of the service area. System Description and Chapter 3.2 Baselines and Targets Section 3.5 10631 a Describe the land uses within the service area. System Description Chapter 3.3 Section 4.2 10631(d)(1) Quantify past,current,and projected water use,identifying the uses among water use sectors. System Water Use Chapter 4.2 Section 4.2.4 10631 d 3 C Retail suppliers shall provide data to show the distribution loss standards were met. System Water Use Chapter 4.2.2 Section 4.2.6 10631(d)(4)(A) In projected water use,include estimates of water savings from adopted codes,plans and other System Water Use Chapter 4.2.3 policies or laws. Section 4.2.6 10631(d)(4)(B) Provide citations of codes,standards,ordinances,or plans used to make water use projections. System Water Use Chapter 4.2.3 Section 4.3.2.4 10631(d)(3)(A) Report the distribution system water loss for each of the 5 years preceding the plan update. System Water Use Chapter 4.2.2&Chapter 4.2.4 Section 4.4 10631.1(a) Include projected water use needed for lower income housing projected in the service area of System Water Use Chapter 4.3 the supplier. Section 4.5 10635(b) Demands under climate change considerations must be included as part of the drought risk System Water Use Chapter 4.4,Chapter 6.2.10, assessment. &Chapter 7.2 Retail suppliers shall provide baseline daily per capita water use,urban water use target, Chapter 5 10608.20(e) interim urban water use target,and compliance daily per capita water use,along with the bases Baselines and Targets Chapter 5 for determining those estimates,including references to supporting data. Chapter 5 10608.24 a Retail suppliers shall meet their water use target by December 31,2020. Baselines and Targets Chapter 5 If the retail supplier adjusts its compliance GPCD using weather normalization,economic Section 5.2 10608.24(d)(2) adjustment,or extraordinary events,it shall provide the basis for,and data supporting the Baselines and Targets Not Applicable adjustment. Retail suppliers'per capita daily water use reduction shall be no less than 5 percent of base Section 5.5 10608.22 daily per capita water use of the 5 year baseline.This does not apply if the suppliers base Baselines and Targets Not Applicable GPCD is at or below 100. Section 5.5 and Appendix E 10608.4 Retail suppliers shall report on their compliance in meeting their water use targets.The data Baselines and Targets Chapter 5&Appendix G shall be reported using a standardized form in the SBX7-7 2020 Compliance Form. Sections 6.1 and 6.2 10631(b)(1) Provide a discussion of anticipated supply availability under a normal,single dry year,and a System Supplies Chapter 6.1&Chapter 7 drought lasting five years,as well as more frequent and severe periods of drought. Provide a discussion of anticipated supply availability under a normal,single dry year,and a Sections 6.1 10631(b)(1) drought lasting five years,as well as more frequent and severe periods of drought,including System Supplies Chapter 6&Chapter 7 changes in supply due to climate change. Section 6.1 10631(b)(2) When multiple sources of water supply are identified,describe the management of each supply System Supplies Chapter 6.2 in relationship to her identified supplies. City of Pismo Beach 1 of 4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Appendix A-2020 UWMP Checklist Water Code 2020 UWMP Location 2020 Guidebook Location Section Summary as Applies to UWMP Subject (Optional Column for Agency Review Use Section 6.1.1 10631 b 3 Describe measures taken to acquire and develop planned sources of water. System Supplies Chapter 6.2 Section 6.2.8 10631(b) Identify and quantify the existing and planned sources of water available for 2020,2025,2030, System Supplies Chapter 6.2 2035,2040 and optionally 2045. Section 6.2 10631(b) Indicate whether groundwater is an existing or planned source of water available to the System Supplies Chapter 6.1&Chapter 6.2 supplier. Indicate whether a groundwater sustainability plan or groundwater management plan has been Section 6.2.2 10631(b)(4)(A) adopted by the water supplier or if there is any other specific authorization for groundwater System Supplies Chapter 6.2.2 management.Include a copy of the plan or authorization. Section 6.2.2 10631 b 4 B Describe the groundwater basin. System Supplies Chapter 6.2.2 Section 6.2.2 10631(b)(4)(B) Indicate if the basin has been adjudicated and include a copy of the court order or decree and a System Supplies Chapter 6.2.2 description of the amount of water the supplier has the legal right to pump. For unadjudicated basins,indicate whether or not the department has identified the basin as a Section 6.2.2.1 10631(b)(4)(B) high or medium priority.Describe efforts by the supplier to coordinate with sustainability or System Supplies Chapter 6.2.2 groundwater agencies to achieve sustainable groundwater conditions. Section 6.2.2.4 10631(b)(4)(C) Provide a detailed description and analysis of the location,amount,and sufficiency of System Supplies Chapter 6.2.2 groundwater pumped by the urban water supplier for the past five years Section 6.2.2 10631(b)(4)(D) Provide a detailed description and analysis of the amount and location of groundwater that is System Supplies Chapter 6.2.2 projected to be pumped. Section 6.2.7 10631(c) Describe the opportunities for exchanges or transfers of water on a short-term or long-term System Supplies Chapter 6.2.7 basis. Describe the quantity of treated wastewater that meets recycled water standards,is being System Supplies Section 6.2.5 10633(b) discharged,and is otherwise available for use in a recycled water project. (Recycled Water) Chapter 6.2.5 Section 6.2.5 10633(c) Describe the recycled water currently being used in the supplier's service area. System Supplies Chapter 6.2.5 (Recycled Water Section 6.2.5 10633(d) Describe and quantify the potential uses of recycled water and provide a determination of the System Supplies Chapter 6.2.5 technical and economic feasibility of those uses. (Recycled Water Describe the projected use of recycled water within the supplier's service area at the end of 5, System Supplies Section 6.2.5 10633(e) 10,15,and 20 years,and a description of the actual use of recycled water in comparison to (Recycled Water) Chapter 6.2.5 uses previously projected. Describe the actions which may be taken to encourage the use of recycled water and the System Supplies Section 6.2.5 10633(f) projected results of these actions in terms of acre-feet of recycled water used per year. (Recycled Water) Chapter 6.2.5 Section 6.2.5 10633(g) Provide a plan for optimizing the use of recycled water in the supplier's service area. System Supplies Chapter 6.2.5 (Recycled Water Section 6.2.6 10631 Describe desalinated water project opportunities for long-term supply. System Supplies Chapter 6.2.6 Describe the wastewater collection and treatment systems in the supplier's service area with System Supplies Section 6.2.5 10633(a) quantified amount of collection and treatment and the disposal methods. (Recycled Water) Chapter 6.2.5 Describe the expected future water supply projects and programs that may be undertaken by Chapter 6.2,Chapter 7.1.1,& Section 6.2.8,Section 6.3.7 10631(f) the water supplier to address water supply reliability in average,single-dry,and for a period of System Supplies Chapter 7.1.3 drought lasting 5 consecutive water years. Section 6.4 and Appendix O 10631.2(a) The UWMP must include energy information,as stated in the code,that a supplier can readily System Suppliers,Energy Chapter 6.3 obtain. Intensity Section 7.2 10634 Provide information on the quality of existing sources of water available to the supplier and the Water Supply Reliability Chapter 7.1 manner in which water quality affects water management strategies and supply reliability Assessment Section 7.2.4 10620(f) Describe water management tools and options to maximize resources and minimize the need to Water Supply Reliability Chapter 7.1.4 import water from other regions. Assessment Service Reliability Assessment:Assess the water supply reliability during normal,dry,and a Water Supply Reliability Section 7.3 10635(a) drought lasting five consecutive water years by comparing the total water supply sources Chapter 7.1 available to the water supplier with the total projected water use over the next 20 ears. Assessment Section 7.3 10635(b) Provide a drought risk assessment as part of information considered in developing the demand Water Supply Reliability Chapter 7.2 management measures and water supply rojects. Assessment Include a description of the data,methodology,and basis for one or more supply shortage Water Supply Reliability Section 7.3 10635(b)(1) conditions that are necessary to conduct a drought risk assessment for a drought period that Assessment Chapter 7.2.1 lasts 5 consecutive years. Section 7.3 10635(b)(2) Include a determination of the reliability of each source of supply under a variety of water Water Supply Reliability Chapter 7 shortage conditions. Assessment Section 7.3 10635(b)(3) Include a comparison of the total water supply sources available to the water supplier with the Water Supply Reliability Chapter 7 total projected water use for the drought period. Assessment City of Pismo Beach 2 of 4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Appendix A-2020 U WMP Checklist Water Code 2020 UWMP Location 2020 Guidebook Location Section Summary as Applies to UWMP Subject (Optional Column for Agency Review Use Include considerations of the historical drought hydrology,plausible changes on projected Water Supply Reliability Section 7.3 10635(b)(4) supplies and demands under climate change conditions,anticipated regulatory changes,and Assessment Chapter 7.1.1 other locally applicable criteria. Chapter 8 10632(a) Provide a water shortage contingency plan(WSCP)with specified elements below. Water Shortage Chapter 8 Contingency Planning Chapter 8 10632(a)(1) Provide the analysis of water supply reliability(from Chapter 7 of Guidebook)in the WSCP Water Shortage Chapter 8.1 Contingency Planning Describe reevaluation and improvement procedures for monitoring and evaluation the water Water Shortage Section 8.10 10632(a)(10) shortage contingency plan to ensure risk tolerance is adequate and appropriate water shortage Chapter 8.8 mitigation strategies are implemented. Contingency Planning Provide the written decision-making process and other methods that the supplier will use each Water Shortage Section 8.2 10632(a)(2)(A) year to determine its water reliability. Contin ncy Planning Chapter 8.2 Section 8.2 10632(a)(2)(B) Provide data and methodology to evaluate the supplier's water reliability for the current year Water Shortage Chapter 8.2 and one dry year pursuant to factors in the code. Contingency Planning Define six standard water shortage levels of 10,20,30,40,50 percent shortage and greater than 50 percent shortage.These levels shall be based on supply conditions,including percent Water Shortage Section 8.3 10632(a)(3)(A) reductions in supply,changes in groundwater levels,changes in surface elevation,or other Contingency Planning Chapter 8.3 conditions.The shortage levels shall also apply to a catastrophic interruption of supply. Suppliers with an existing water shortage contingency plan that uses different water shortage Water Shortage Section 8.3 10632(a)(3)(B) levels must cross reference their categories with the six standard categories. Contin enc PlanningChapter 8.3.1 Suppliers with water shortage contingency plans that align with the defined shortage levels Water Shortage Section 8.4 10632(a)(4)(A) must specifylocal) appropriate supply augmentation actions. Contingency PlanningChapter 8.4 Section 8.4 10632(a)(4)(B) Specify locally appropriate demand reduction actions to adequately respond to shortages. Water Shortage Chapter 8.4.1 Contingency Planning Section 8.4 10632(a)(4)(C) Specify locally appropriate operational changes. Water Shortage Chapter 8.4.3 Contingency Planning Section 8.4 10632(a)(4)(D) Specify additional mandatory prohibitions against specific water use practices that are in Water Shortage Chapter 8.4.4 addition to state-mandated prohibitions are appropriate to local conditions. Contingency Plannin Section 8.4 10632(a)(4)(E) Estimate the extent to which the gap between supplies and demand will be reduced by Water Shortage Chapter 8.4.2 implementation of the action. Contingency Planning Section 8.4.6 10632.5 The plan shall include a seismic risk assessment and mitigation plan. Water Shortage Chapter 8.4.6 Contingency Plan Section 8.5 10632(a)(5)(A) Suppliers must describe that they will inform customers,the public and others regarding any Water Shortage Chapter 8.5 current or predicted water shortages. Contingency Planning Suppliers must describe that they will inform customers,the public and others regarding any 10632(a)(5)(B) Water Shortage Section 8.5 and 8.6 10632(a)(5)(C) shortage response actions triggered or anticipated to be triggered and other relevant Contingency Planning Chapter 8.5 communications. Section 8.6 10632(a)(6) Retail supplier must describe how it will ensure compliance with and enforce provisions of the Water Shortage Chapter 8.5 WSCP. Contingency Planning Section 8.7 10632(a)(7)(A) Describe the legal authority that empowers the supplier to enforce shortage response actions. Water Shortage Chapter 8.6 Contingency Planning Section 8.7 10632(a)(7)(B) Provide a statement that the supplier will declare a water shortage emergency Water Code Water Shortage Chapter 8.6 Chapter 3. Contingency Planning Section 8.7 10632(a)(7)(C) Provide a statement that the supplier will coordinate with any city or county within which it Water Shortage Chapter 8.5 provides water for the possible proclamation of a local emergency. Contingency Planning Section 8.8 10632(a)(8)(A) Describe the potential revenue reductions and expense increases associated with activated Water Shortage Chapter 8.7 shortage response actions. Contingency Planning Section 8.8 10632(a)(8)(B) Provide a description of mitigation actions needed to address revenue reductions and expense Water Shortage Chapter 8.7 increases associated with activated shortage response actions. Contin ency Planning Section 8.8 10632(a)(8)(C) Retail suppliers must describe the cost of compliance with Water Code Chapter 3.3:Excessive Water Shortage Chapter 8.5 Residential Water Use During Drought Contin ency Planning Retail suppliers must describe the monitoring and reporting requirements and procedures that Water Shortage Section 8.9 10632(a)(9) ensure appropriate data is collected,tracked,and analyzed for purposes of monitoring Contingency Planning Chapter 8.5 customer compliance. Section 8.11 10632(b) Analyze and define water features that are artificially supplied with water,including ponds, Water Shortage Chapter 8.9 lakes,waterfalls,and fountains,separately from swimming pools and spas. Contingency Planning Provide supporting documentation that Water Shortage Contingency Plan has been,or will be, Plan Adoption,Submittal, Sections 8.12 and 10.4 10635(c) provided to any city or county within which it provides water,no later than 30 days after the and Implementation Chapter 8.10 submission of the plan to DWR. City of Pismo Beach 3 of 4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan Appendix A-2020 UWMP Checklist Water Code 2020 UWMP Location 2020 Guidebook Location Section Summary as Applies to UWMP Subject (Optional Column for Agency Review Use Section 8.14 10632(c) Make available the Water Shortage Contingency Plan to customers and any city or county Water Shortage Chapter 8.10 where it provides water within 30 after adopted the plan. Contingency Planning Retail suppliers shall provide a description of the nature and extent of each demand Demand Management Sections 9.2 and 9.3 10631(e)(1) management measure implemented over the past five years.The description will address Chapter 9 specific measures listed in code. Measures Chapter 10 10608.26(a) Retail suppliers shall conduct a public hearing to discuss adoption,implementation,and Plan Adoption,Submittal, To be Completed per economic impact of water use targets recommended to discuss compliance). and Implementation Chapter 10.2 Notify,at least 60 days prior to the public hearing,any city or county within which the supplier plan Adoption,Submittal, Section 10.2.1 10621(b) provides water that the urban water supplier will be reviewing the plan and considering and Implementation Chapter 2.2&Chapter 10.1.1 amendments or changes to the Ian.Reported in Table 10-1. Section 10.4 10621(f) Each urban water supplier shall update and submit its 2020 plan to the department by July 1, Plan Adoption,Submittal, Chapter 2.2&Chapter 10.3 2021. and Implementation Sections 10.2.2,10.3,and Provide supporting documentation that the urban water supplier made the plan and contingency Plan Adoption,Submittal, 10.5 10642 plan available for public inspection,published notice of the public hearing,and held a public and Implementation Appendix D hearing about the plan and contingency Ian. Section 10.2.2 10642 The water supplier is to provide the time and place of the hearing to any city or county within Plan Adoption,Submittal, Chapter 10&Appendix B which the supplier provides water. and Implementation Section 10.3.2 10642 Provide supporting documentation that the plan and contingency plan has been adopted as Plan Adoption,Submittal, Appendix E prepared or modified. and Implementation Section 10.4 10644(a) Provide supporting documentation that the urban water supplier has submitted this UWMP to Plan Adoption,Submittal, To be completed per Chapter the California State Library. and Implementation 2.2&Chapter 10.3 Section 10.4 10644(a)(1) Provide supporting documentation that the urban water supplier has submitted this UWMP to Plan Adoption,Submittal, To be completed per Chapter any city or county within which the supplier provides water no later than 30 days after adoption. and Implementation 2.2&Chapter 10.3 The plan,or amendments to the plan,submitted to the department shall be submitted Plan Adoption,Submittal, To be completed per Chapter Sections 10.4.1 and 10.4.2 10644(a)(2) electronically. and Implementation 2.2,Chapter 10.3&Chapter 10.5 Provide supporting documentation that,not later than 30 days after filing a copy of its plan with plan Adoption,Submittal, To be completed per Chapter Section 10.5 10645(a) the department,the supplier has or will make the plan available for public review during normal and Implementation 2.2&Chapter 10.4 business hours. Provide supporting documentation that,not later than 30 days after filing a copy of its water plan Adoption,Submittal, To be completed per Chapter Section 10.5 10645(b) shortage contingency plan with the department,the supplier has or will make the plan available and Implementation 2.2&Chapter 10.4 for public review during normal business hours. Section 10.6 10621(c) If supplier is regulated by the Public Utilities Commission,include its plan and contingency plan Plan Adoption,Submittal, Not Applicable as part of its general rate case filings. land Im lementation Section 10.7.2 10644(b) If revised,submit a copy of the water shortage contingency plan to DWR within 30 days of Plan Adoption,Submittal, To be completed per Chapter adoption. and Implementation 2.2&Cha ter 10.5 City of Pismo Beach 4 of 4 2020 Urban Water Management Plan This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Appendix B — 60 Day Notice Letters G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 MD CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to:Avilacsd@gmail.com Avila Beach Community Services District Brad Hagemann 191 San Miguel Avila Beach, CA 93424 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Hagemann, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f�805.773.4684 MD CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: cimsmmwc@charterinternet.com Avila Valley Mutual Water Company Debra Seifert Manager P.O. Box 2120 Avila Beach, Ca. 93424 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Ms. Seifert, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Storm.water - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 California State Library Government Publications Section 900 N Street Sacramento, CA 95814 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Urban Water Management Plans Coordinator, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to:jlb@ccwa.com Central Coast Water Authority John Brady Deputy Director, Operations and Engineering 255 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Brady, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: gray@groverbeach.org City of Grover Beach Greg Ray 154 S. 8th Street Grover Beach, CA 93433 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Ray, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: idiodati@co.slo.ca.us County Service Area 12 John Diodati 1050 Monterey St. Room 206 San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Diodati, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to:tkeith@co.slo.ca.us County of San Luis Obispo Trevor Keith Director of Planning and Building 976 Osos Street, Room 200 San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Keith, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: idiodati@co.slo.ca.us County of San Luis Obispo John Diodati 1050 Monterey St. Room 206 San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Diodati, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f�805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Department of Water Resources Statewide Integrated Water Management Water Use and Efficiency Branch 901 P Street Sacramento, CA 95814 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Urban Water Management Plans Coordinator, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f�805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: dheimel@wsc-inc.com Northern Cities Management Area Technical Group Daniel Heimel 805 Aerovista Lane, Suite 201 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Heimel, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 MD CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: water@normbrown.com Nipomo Mesa Management Area Technical Group Norm Brown PO Box 6143 Santa Barbara, CA 93160 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Brown, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f�805.773.4684 MD CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: ocsdgm@oceanocsd.org Oceano Community Services District Will Clemens 1655 Front Street Oceano, CA 93445 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Clemens, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 MD CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: andreal@portsanluis.com Port San Luis Harbor District Andrea Lueker 3950 Avila Beach Drive PO Box 249, Pier#3 Avila Beach, California 93424 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Ms. Lueker, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 MD CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: BHagemann@smmwc.com San Miguelito Mutual Water Company Brad Hagemann Manager P.O. Box 2120 Avila Beach, CA 93424-2120 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Hagemann, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to:sdevencenzi@slocog.org San Luis Obispo Council of Governments Steve Devencenzi 1114 Marsh Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Devencenzi, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 CEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater - Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to:Jeremy@sslocsd.us South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District Jeremy Ghent District Administrator 1600 Aloha PI./P.O. Box 339 Oceano, CA 93475 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Ghent, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. oil KWF —. Pride in Service — Integrity in Action I of 2 The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer G'TY 0 City of Pismo Beach Department of Public Works 760 Mattie Road,Pismo Beach,CA 93449 'Ois L� p1805.773.4656 f)805.773.4684 M0 BEP www.pismobeach.org Engineering - Pier/Parks - Water - Wastewater Stormwater - Public Facilities - Fleet Services 3/8/2021 Delivered via Email to: dspiegel@co.slo.ca.us San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District-Zone 3 David Spiegel 1050 Monterey St. Room 206 San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE NOTIFICATION Dear Mr. Spiegel, The City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of the City's UWMP is required every five (5)years. The 2020 UWMP Update will reflect the growth that has occurred since the adoption of the 2015 UWMP, forecasted growth within the City's service area, and the City's plan to reliably meet the water needs within its service area, and compliance with the SB X7-7 2020. As part of the new requirements, the City is also planning on adopting a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP), which must be included as part of the 2020 UWMP.This document will describe how the City will respond to foreseeable and unforeseeable water shortages. Water Code section 10621(b) requires an urban water supplier updating its UWMP to notify cities and counties within its service area of the update at least sixty (60) days prior to holding a public hearing. This letter serves as the Pismo Beach's official notice of preparation and intent to adopt the UWMP and WSCP before the July 1, 2021 deadline. A copy of the Pismo Beach's draft 2020 UWMP and WSCP will be available for review on the Pismo Beach's website in spring of 2021, and the Pismo Beach will subsequently hold a noticed public hearing on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP in advance of its proposed adoption.The City invites you to submit comments and consult with the Pismo Beach regarding these plans. The City's website (https://pismobeach.org) will give updates on the 2020 UWMP and WSCP. If you have any questions, comments, or input, please contact Benjamin A. Fine, Director of Public Works via email at bfine@pismobeach.org or by phone at (805)-773-7037. Sincerely, Benjamin A. Fine, P.E. Director of Public Works/City Engineer This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Appendix C — Delta Reliance Technical Memorandum Technical Memorandum WSC Date: 6/28/2021 To: Benjamin Fine, P.E., City of Pismo Beach CC: None Prepared by: Daniel Heimel, P.E. Project: 2020 Urban Water Management Plan SUBJECT: QUANTIFYING REGIONAL SELF-RELIANCE AND REDUCED RELIANCE ON WATER SUPPLIES FROM THE DELTA WATERSHED 1 Background Under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Reform Act of 2009,state and local public agencies proposing a covered action in the Delta, prior to initiating the implementation of that action, must prepare a written certification of consistency with detailed findings as to whether the covered action is consistent with applicable Delta Plan policies and submit that certification to the Delta Stewardship Council. Anyone may appeal a certification of consistency, and if the Delta Stewardship Council grants the appeal, the covered action may not be implemented until the agency proposing the covered action submits a revised certification of consistency, and either no appeal is filed, or the Delta Stewardship Council denies the subsequent appeal. An urban water supplier that anticipates participating in or receiving water from a proposed covered action such as a multi-year water transfer, conveyance facility, or new diversion that involves transferring water through, exporting water from, or using water in the Delta should provide information in their 2015 and 2020 Urban Water Management Plans (UWMPs) that can then be used in the covered action process to demonstrate consistency with Delta Plan Policy WR P1, Reduce Reliance on the Delta Through Improved Regional Water Self-Reliance (WR P1). WR P1 details what is needed for a covered action to demonstrate consistency with reduced reliance on the Delta and improved regional self-reliance. WR P1 subsection (a) states that: (a) Water shall not be exported from, transferred through, or used in the Delta if all of the following apply: (1)One or more water suppliers that would receive water as a result of the export, transfer, or use have failed to adequately contribute to reduced reliance on the Delta and improved regional self- reliance consistent with all of the requirements listed in paragraph (1)of subsection (c); (2) That failure has significantly caused the need for the export, transfer, or use;and (3)The export, transfer,or use would have a significant adverse environmental impact in the Delta. WR P1 subsection (c)(1) further defines what adequately contributing to reduced reliance on the Delta means in terms of(a)(1) above. 2020 UWMP W SC Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed (c)(1) Water suppliers that have done all the following are contributing to reduced reliance on the Delta and improved regional self-reliance and are therefore consistent with this policy: (A) Completed a current Urban or Agricultural Water Management Plan (Plan) which has been reviewed by the California Department of Water Resources for compliance with the applicable requirements of Water Code Division 6, Parts 2.55, 2.6, and 2.8; (e) Identified, evaluated, and commenced implementation, consistent with the implementation schedule set forth in the Plan, of all programs and projects included in the Plan that are locally cost effective and technically feasible which reduce reliance on the Delta;and (C) Included in the Plan, commencing in 2015, the expected outcome for measurable reduction in Delta reliance and improvement in regional self-reliance. The expected outcome for measurable reduction in Delta reliance and improvement in regional self-reliance shall be reported in the Plan as the reduction in the amount of water used, or in the percentage of water used,from the Delta watershed. For the purposes of reporting, water efficiency is considered a new source of water supply, consistent with Water Code section 1011(a). The analysis and documentation provided below include all the elements described in WR P1(c)(1) that need to be included in a water supplier's UWMP to support a certification of consistency for a future covered action. 2 Methodology As stated in WR P1(c)(1)(C), the policy requires that, commencing in 2015, UWMPs include expected outcomes for improved regional self-reliance and measurable reduction in Delta reliance. WR P1 further states that those outcomes shall be reported in the UWMP as the reduction in the amount of water used, or in the percentage of water used, from the Delta. The expected outcomes for City of Pismo Beach's (City's) regional self-reliance and reduced Delta reliance were developed using the approach and guidance described in Appendix C of DWR's Urban Water Management Plan Guidebook 2020 issued in March 2020 (Guidebook Appendix C). The methodology used to determine the City's improved regional self-reliance and reduced Delta reliance is consistent with the approach detailed in DWR's UWMP Guidebook Appendix C, including the use of narrative justifications for the accounting of supplies and the documentation of specific data sources. Some of the key assumptions include: • All data were obtained from the current 2020 UWMP or previously adopted UWMPs and represent average or normal water year conditions. • All analyses were conducted at the service area level, and all data reflect the total contributions of the City and its customers. To calculate the expected outcomes for improved regional self-reliance and reduced Delta reliance,the outcomes need to be compared to a baseline.This analysis uses a normal water year representation of 2010 as the baseline, which is consistent with the approach described in the Guidebook Appendix C. Data for the 2010 baseline were taken from the City's 2010 UWMP. Consistent with the 2010 baseline data approach,the expected outcomes for improved regional self-reliance and reduced Delta reliance for 2015 and 2020 were taken from City's 2010 and 2015 UWMPs, respectively. Expected 6/28/2021 C-2 2020 UWMP W SC Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed outcomes for 2025-2045 are from the current 2020 UWMP. Documentation of the specific data sources and assumptions are included in the discussions below. 3 Demonstration of Regional Self-Reliance Service Area Demands without Water Use Efficiency In alignment with the UWMP Guidebook Appendix C, this analysis uses normal water year demands, rather than normal water year supplies, to calculate expected outcomes in terms of the percentage of water used. Using normal water year demands serves as a proxy for the amount of supplies that would be used in a normal water year, which helps alleviate issues associated with how supply capability is presented to fulfill requirements of the Urban Water Management Planning Act (Act) versus how supplies might be accounted for to demonstrate consistency with WR P1. Because WR P1 considers water use efficiency savings a source of water supply, water suppliers such as the City that do not explicitly quantify water use efficiency savings in their UWMPs can calculate their embedded water use efficiency savings based on changes in forecasted per capita water use since the baseline. Agencies that explicitly calculate and report water use efficiency savings in their UWMP will need to make an adjustment to properly reflect normal water year demands in the calculation of reduced reliance.As explained in the UWMP Guidebook Appendix C, water use efficiency savings must be added back to the normal year demands to represent demands without water use efficiency savings accounted for; otherwise the effect of water use efficiency savings on regional self-reliance would be overestimated. Table 1 shows the results of this adjustment for City. Supporting narratives and documentation for all the data shown in Table 1 are provided below. Service Area Demands with Water Use Efficiency The service area demands shown in Table 1 represent the total water demands for the City's service area. The demand data shown in Table 1 were collected from the following sources: • Baseline (2010): 2010 UWMP,Table 3.15 • 2015: 2010 UWMP,Table 3.15 • 2020: 2015 UWMP,Table 4-12 • 2025-2045: 2020 UWMP,Table 4-5. DWR 4-3R Service Area Population The population data shown in Table 1 were collected from the following sources: • Baseline (2010): 2015 UWMP,Table 3-3 • 2015: 2015 UWMP,Table 3-3 • 2020-2045: 2020 UWMP,Table 3-2. DWR 3-1R Estimated Water Use Efficiency Since Baseline Calculated using"Potable Service Area Demands with Water Use Efficiency" divided by"Service Area Population" and then calculating Estimated Water Use Efficiency Since Baseline by comparing with 2010 Per Capita Water Use. 6/28/2021 C-3 2020 UWMP W SC Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency Add "Service Area Demands with Water Use Efficiency" to "Estimated Water Use Efficiency Since Baseline." Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance For a covered action to demonstrate consistency with the Delta Plan,WR P1 subsection (c)(1)(C) states that water suppliers must report the expected outcomes for measurable improvement in regional self-reliance. Table 2 shows expected outcomes for supplies contributing to regional self-reliance both in amount and as a percentage. The numbers shown in Table 2 represent efforts to improve regional self-reliance for City's entire service area. Supporting narratives and documentation for all of the data shown in Table 2 are provided below. Water Use Efficiency The water use efficiency information shown in Table 2 is taken directly from Table 1. Water Recycling The water recycling data shown in Table 2 represent projected normal year supply for the City's planned Central Coast Blue,an indirect potable reuse project. Planned uses for recycled water have evolved since the 2010 UWMP, however, there has been no recycled water use to-date. For the 2020 UWMP, it is assumed that recycled water will be utilized for injection to protect the groundwater basin from seawater intrusion. Based on this information, desalination data was estimated from the following sources: • 2025-2045: 2020 UWMP,Table 6-16 Local and Regional Water Supply and Storage Programs The local and regional water supply and storage programs data shown in Table 2 represent average annual supply projections by the City for its Lopez Project supply. Available water from these local sources of supply was estimated from the following sources: • Baseline (2010): 2010 UWMP,Table 4.3 • 2015: 2010 UWMP,Table 4.3 • 2020: 2015 UWMP,Table 5-3 • 2025-2045: 2020 UWMP,Table 6-16 Other Programs and Projects the Contribute to Regional Self-Reliance The Other Programs and Projects the Contribute to Regional Self-Reliance data shown in Table 2 represent groundwater pumping availability estimates by the City. Based on this information, groundwater pumping data was estimated from the following sources: • Baseline (2010): 2010 UWMP,Table 4.3 • 2015: 2010 UWMP,Table 4.3 • 2020: 2015 UWMP,Table 5-3 • 2025-2045: 2020 UWMP,Table 6-16 6/28/2021 C-4 2020 UWMP W SC Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed Conclusions The results shown in Table 2 demonstrate that the City's service area is measurably improving its regional self- reliance, both as an amount of water used and as a percentage of water used.The following provides a summary of the near-term (2025) and long-term (2045) expected outcomes for City's Delta reliance on supplies from the Delta watershed: • Near-term (2025): Normal water year regional self-reliance increased by 412 AF from the 2010 baseline, this represents an increase of 7.7 percent of 2025 normal water year demands without water use efficiency (Table 2). • Long-term (2045): Normal water year regional self-reliance increased by 484 AF from the 2010 baseline, this represents an increase of 0.9 percent of 2045 normal water year demands without water use efficiency(Table 2). 4 Demonstration of Reduced Reliance on the Delta The City's service area reduces reliance on the Delta through investments in non-Delta water supplies, local water supplies, and regional and local demand management measures. For reduced reliance on supplies from the Delta watershed, the data used in this analysis represent the total regional efforts of the City. Calculation of Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed The calculation of reliance on water supplies from the Delta watershed,shown in Table 3,is based on the following assumptions.The City water supplies from the Delta watershed include: • Central Valley Project/State Water Project (CVP/SWP) Contract Supplies CVP/SWP Contract Supplies The supply data shown in Table 3 is for the City's SWP Table A allocation and were collected from the following sources: • Baseline (2010): 2010 UWMP,Table 4.4 • 2015: 2010 UWMP,Table 4.4 • 2020: 2015 UWMP,Table 5-3 • 2025-2045: 2020 UWMP,Table 7-6 Change in Supplies from the Delta Watershed Adds "CVP/SWP Contract Supplies" and "Other Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed" to get total Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed and calculates changes from the 2010 baseline. Percent Change in Supplies from the Delta Watershed Divides"Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed" by"Service Area Demands without Water Use Efficiency"and calculates changes from the 2010 baseline. 6/28/2021 C-5 2020 UWMP W SC Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed Conclusions The results shown in Table 3 show that the City is measurably reducing reliance on the Delta, both as an amount of water used and as a percentage of water used.The following provides a summary of the near-term (2025) and long-term (2045) expected outcomes for the City's Delta reliance on supplies from the Delta watershed: • Near-term (2025): Normal water year reliance on supplies from the Delta watershed decreased by 100 AF from the 2010 baseline, this represents a decrease of 12.8 percent of 2025 normal water year demands without water use efficiency(Table 3). • Long-term (2045): Normal water year reliance on supplies from the Delta watershed decreased by 100 AF from the 2010 baseline, this represents a decrease of 18.3 percent of 2045 normal water year demands without water use efficiency(Table 3). 5 UWMP Implementation In addition to the analysis and documentation described above, WR P1 subsection (c)(1)(B) requires that all programs and projects included in the UWMP that are locally cost-effective and technically feasible,which reduce reliance on the Delta, are identified, evaluated, and implemented consistent with the implementation schedule. WR P1 (c)(1)(B) states that: (8) Identified, evaluated, and commenced implementation, consistent with the implementation schedule set forth in the Plan, of all programs and projects included in the Plan that are locally cost effective and technically feasible which reduce reliance on the Delta[] In accordance with Water Code Section 10631(f), water suppliers must already include in their UWMP a detailed description of expected future projects and programs that they may implement to increase the amount of water supply available to them in normal and single-dry water years and for a period of drought lasting five consecutive years. The UWMP description must also identify specific projects, include a description of the increase in water supply that is expected to be available from each project, and include an estimate regarding the implementation timeline for each project or program. Chapter 6 of the City's 2020 UWMP summarizes the implementation plan and continued progress in developing a diversified water portfolio to meet the region's water needs. 6/28/2021 C-6 Qua UWMP 01 I I I C C Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed `U�I �J J Table 1.Calculation of Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency(UWMP Table C-1 and Table C-2) Table C-1:Optional Calculation of Water Use Efficiency-To be completed if Water Supplier does not specifically estimate Water Use Efficiency as a supply Service Area Water Use Efficiency Demands Baseline 2D45 2010 2015 2424 2425 2030 2035 2044 Acre-Feet ( } o tional Service Area Water Demands with Water Use Efficiency Accounted For 1,944 2,035 1,889 1 1,648 1 1,696 1 1,7441 1,795 1 1,845 Non-Potable Water Demands I - - - - - Potable Service Area Demands with Water Use Efficiency Accounted For 1 1,944 2,035 1 1,889 1 1,648 1 1,696 1 1,7441 1,795 1 1,945 Total Service Area Population Baseline 2Q¢5 I 2015 2020 2425 2030 2435 2040 (Optional) Service Area Population 7,655 7,711 8,559 8,806 9,06D 9,321 9.590 9,866 Water Use Efficiency since Baseline Baseline Z045 2415 2424 2425 2034 2435 2444 (Acre-Feet) (2010) (Optional) Per Capita Water Use(GPCD) 227 236 197 1 167 167 167 167 167 Change in Per Capita Water Use from Baseline(GPCD) 9 (30) (60) (60) (60) (60) (60} Estimated Water Use Efficiency Since Baseline (77)1 285 1 588 1 605 1 623 1 640 1 660 Table F2:Calculation of Service Area Water Demands Without Water Use Efficiency Total Service Area Water Demands Baseline 2D45 2015 2020 2425 2034 2435 204U Acre-Feet (2010) Q tional Service Area Water Demands with Water Use Efficiency Accounted For 1,944 2,035 1,889 1 1,648 1 1,696 1 1,7441 1,795 1 1,845 Reported Water Use Efficiency or Estimated Water Use Efficiency Since Baseline I - (77) 285 1 588 1 605 1 623 1 640 1 660 Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency Accounted For 1,944 1,9581 2,174 1 2,236 1 2,3011 2,367 1 2,435 1 2,505 6/28/2021 D-7 Qua UWMP 01 j I I C C Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed `U'J I �J J Table 2.Calculation of Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance(UWMP Table C-3) Table G3:Calculation of Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance Water Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance Baseline 2045 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 (Acre-Feet) (2010) (Optional) Water Use Efficiency (77) 285 588 605 623 640 660 Water Recycling - - 339 339 339 339 339 Stormwater Capture and Use Advanced Water Technologies - Conjunctive Use Projects Local and Regional Water Supply and Storage Projects 896 896 892 892 892 892 892 892 ,Other Programs and Projects the Contril}ute to Regional Self-Reliance 700 700 70D 189 189 189 189 199 Water Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance 1,596 11 1,519 1 1,877 1 2,005 1 2,025 1 2,043 1 2,060 1 2,080 Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency Baseline 2045 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Acre-Feet (2010) (Opt iona 1 Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency Accounted For 1,944 1,958 2,174 2,236 2,301 2,367 2,435 2,505 Change in Regional Self Reliance Baseline 2045 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Acre-Feet (2010) (Opt iona 1 Water Supplies Co ntri but in g to Regional Self-Reliance 1.596 1,519 1,877 2,008 2,025 2,043 2,060 2,080 Change in Water Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance (77) 281 412 429 1 4471 464 1 484 Percent Change in Regional Self Reliance Baseline 2045 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 (As Percent of Demand w/out WUE] (2010) (Optional) Percent of Water Supplies Contributing to Regional Self-Reliance 92.1% 77.6% 96.3% 89.8%1 88.0%1 86.3%1 94.6%1 83.0% Change in Percent of Water Suppllies Ccntribut1ngto Regional Self-Reliance -4.5% 4.2% 7.7%1 5.9%1 4.2%1 2.5%1 0.9% 6/28/2021 D-8 Qua UWMP 01 � I I C C Quantifying Regional Self-Reliance and Reduced Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed `U�I �J J Table 3. Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed (UWMP Table C-4) Table C-4:Calculation of Reliance on Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed Baseline 2045 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 (Acre-Feet) (2010) (Optional) CVP/SWP Contract Su ppl i e5 1,240 1,740 1,240 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 1,140 Delta/Delta Tributary Diversions Transfers and Exchanges of Supplies from the Delta Watershed Gather Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed Total Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed 1,240 1,740 1 1,240 1,140 1,140 1,140 1j4TF 1,140 Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency Baseline 2D45 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Acre-Feet (2010) (Optional) Service Area Water Demands without Water Use Efficiency Accounted For 1,944 1,958 2,174 2,2361 2,301 1 2,367 1 2,435 1 2,505 Change in Supplies from the Delta Watershed Baseline 2045 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2435 20 40 Acre-Feet ( } D tional Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed 1,240 1,740 1.240 1,140 1,140 1 1,140 1,140 1,140 Change in Water5uppliesfrom the Delta Watershed 500 - (100) (100) (100}1 (100)1 (100} Percent Change in Supplies from the Delta Watershed Baseline 2D45 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2D40 As a Percent of Demand w/out WUE (2010) ❑ ional Percent of Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed 63.8% 88.99E 57.0% 51.0% 49.5%1 48.2%1 46.8%1 45.5% Change in Percent of Water Supplies from the Delta Watershed 25.1% -6.7% -12.8% -14.2% -15.6% -17.09b -18.39E 6/28/2021 D-9 Appendix D — Public Hearing Notices Rebecca Nissley From: Erin Olsen <EOlsen@PismoBeach.org> Sent: Friday, May 28, 2021 8:59 AM To: Avilacsd@gmail.com; cimsmmwc@charterinternet.com; Greg Ray;jdiodati@co.slo.ca.us; tkeith@co.slo.ca.us;water@normbrown.com; Daniel Heimel; ocsdgm@oceanocsd.org; andreal@portsanluis.com; sdevencenzi@slocog.org; DSpiegel; BHagemann@smmwc.com; jeremy@sslocsd.us;jlb@ccwa.com Cc: Rebecca Nissley Subject: Notice of Public Hearing - Urban Water Management Plan Update Attachments: Public Hearing Notice - UWMP.pdf Please see the attached Notice of Public Hearing regarding the City of Pismo Beach's update to its Urban Water Management Plan. Thank you, Erin Olsen Management Analyst, Public Works/Engineering City of Pismo Beach 805.773.7038 (Direct) 805.773.4684(Fax) eolsen@pismobeach.org Y D T H I I '1 O $ 2 Visit www.ThinkH2Onow.com for rebates,mandates,and water conservation tips Visit www.CentralCoastBlue.com for information on our Regional Groundwater Sustainability Project 1 Yo,� PUBLIC HEARING A'SMo �r NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday,June 15,2021 at 6:00 p.m.or as soon thereafter as possible, the Pismo Beach City Council will hold a public hearing for the following purpose: PUBLIC HEARING AGENDA: Project: Urban Water Management Plan Description: The City of Pismo Beach (City) is in the process of preparing and updating its 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) in compliance with the Urban Water Management Planning Act and the Water Conservation Act of 2009, commonly referred to as SBX7-7.An update of The City's UWMP is required every five(5)years. The draft 2020 UWMP and draft Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP) will be made available for public review.The public may request a copy of the draft UWMP and WSCP by emailing Management Analyst Erin Olsen at eolsenla�pismobeach.org, or calling 805- 773-4656.Additionally, the draft UWMP and WSCP will be posted for review online as soon as the document is available,at www.pismobeach.or(i/engineering. Details about ways to participate in this hearing will be provided on the agenda posted for the meeting online at pismobeach.org/ agenda,and on the bulletin board at City Hall.The agenda will be posted in the afternoon of June 10,202 I. You have a right to comment on these projects and their effect on our community. Interested persons are invited to participate in the hearing or otherwise express their views and opinions regarding the proposed projects.Written and voicemail comments are welcomed prior to the hearing. Written comments prepared prior to the hearing may be submitted to the City Clerk's Office by mail or delivery to the utility bill drop box at 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach, CA 93449, by fax at (805)773-7006,or by email at citycounciler)ismobeach. or .Oral comment may be provided prior to the hearing by calling 805-556-8299 and leaving a voice message. Please state and spell your name,and identify your item of interest.Generally,written comment may be submitted by email up until the start of the public comment period during this item. Every effort will be made to provide an opportunity for live public comment during the meeting, but because the City cannot guarantee the quality of internet access or video conferencing facilities for the meeting, live public comment may not be available at every meeting. Please refer to the agenda for this meeting for specific instructions for participation. Staff reports,plans and other information related to these projects are available for public review from the City Clerk's Office, by emailing City Clerk Erica Inderlied at einderlied@pismobeach.org. The meeting agenda and staff report will be available no later than the Thursday before the meeting and may be obtained upon request by mail or by visiting www.pismobeach.org.The Council meeting will be televised live on Charter Cable Channel 20 and streamed on the City's website. PLEASE NOTE: If you challenge the action taken on this item in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice,or in written correspondence delivered to the City of Pismo Beach at,or prior to,the public hearing. For further information, please contact Erica Inderlied, City Clerk, at einderliedna.pismobeach.org or 805-773- 7003. Erica Inderlied City Clerk May 27&June 3,2021 This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Appendix E — Adoption Resolution RESOLUTION NO. R-2021-055 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PISMO BEACH, CALIFORNIA APPROVING THE 2020 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN AND AUTHORIZING ITS SUBMITTAL TO THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES WHEREAS, the City of Pismo Beach has prepared an Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP), in conjunction with Water Systems Consulting, Inc., to satisfy the requirements of the California Water Code sections 10610 et seq. and Urban Water Management Planning Act of 1983 (UWMPA); and WHEREAS, included in the City's UWMP is long-term resource planning to ensure adequate water supplies are available to meeting existing and future demands; and WHEREAS, comparison of the City's future demands and available supplies indicates that the City will have sufficient water supply to meet its demands, even during single and multiple dry-year events; and WHEREAS, staff recommends approving the 2020 UWMP and authorizing its submittal to the Department of Water Resources. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City Council of the City of Pismo Beach hereby approves the 2020 UWMP and authorizes its submittal to the Department of Water Resources. UPON MOTION OF Council Member Blake, seconded by Mayor Pro Tern Reiss, the foregoing resolution was adopted by the City Council of the City of each this 151h day of June 2021, by the following vote: �pG RPOR049 AYES: 5 Blake, Reiss, Guthrie, Newton, WaaT0 y0 NOES: 0 ABSENT: 0 ABSTAIN: 0 RECUSED: 0j�9pR.,25 ,gb6P�Q` Approved: Attest: A Ed Waage, Mayor ica Inde/16 , City Clerk PAGE 1 OF 1 R-2021-055 RESOLUTION NO. R-2021-056 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PISMO BEACH, CALIFORNIA APPROVING THE 2020 WATER SHORTAGE CONTINGENCY PLAN AND AUTHORIZING ITS SUBMITTAL TO THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES WHEREAS, the City of Pismo Beach has prepared a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP) as part of its Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP), in conjunction with Water Systems Consulting, Inc., to satisfy the requirements of the California Water Code sections 10610 et seq. and Urban Water Management Planning Act of 1983 (UWMPA); and WHEREAS, the UWMPA specifies the requirements and procedures for adopting such WSCPs; and WHEREAS, pursuant to recent amendments to the UWMPA, urban water suppliers are required to adopt and electronically submit their WSCPs to the California Department of Water Resources by July 1 , 2021; and WHEREAS, staff recommends approving the 2020 WSCP and authorizing its submittal to the Department of Water Resources. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City Council of the City of Pismo Beach hereby approves the 2020 WSCP and authorizes its submittal to the Department of Water Resources. UPON MOTION OF Council Member Blake, seconded by Mayor Pro Tern Reiss, the foregoing resolution was adopted by the City Council of the City of Pismo Beach this 15th day of June 2021, by the following vote: `OF plSMpe AYES: 5 Blake, Reiss, Guthrie, Newton, Waage POq (C` NOES: 0 ?G 9TF9n ABSENT: 0 Vg O y ABSTAIN: 0 RECUSED: 0 Q Approved: Attest: �25 �F0 Ed Waage, Mayor nca In li City Clerk PAGE 1 OF 1 R-2021-056 This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Appendix F — 2020 Water Audit AWWA Free Water Audit Software: WAS v5.0 Reportiqk��ksh�eet American Water Works Associatil Click to access definition Water Audit Report for:City of Pismo Beach 4010008 0 Click to add a comment Reporting Year: 2019 7/2019-6/2020 Please enter data in the white cells below.Where available,metered values should be used;if metered values are unavailable please estimate a value.Indicate your confidence in the accuracy of the input data by grading each component(n/a or 1-10)using the drop-down list to the left of the input cell.Hover the mouse over the cell to obtain a description of the grades All volumes to be entered as:ACRE-FEET PER YEAR To select the correct data grading for each input,determine the highest grade where the utility meets or exceeds all criteria for that grade and all grades below it. Master Meter and Supply Error Adjustments WATER SUPPLIED <-----------Enter grading in column'E'and'J-----------> Pcnt: Value: Volume from own sources: 39.810 acre-fUyr 00� O acre-fvyr Water imported: 3 1,692.400 acre-ft/yr H 3 O O acre-fUyr Water exported:0 n/a 0.000 acre-ft/yr 0� O acre-ft/yr Enter negative%or value for under-registration WATER SUPPLIED: 1,732.210 acre-f/yr Enter positive%or value for over-registration AUTHORIZED CONSUMPTION Click here: 0 Billed metered:0 1,559.500 acre-ft/yr for help using option Billed unmetered:0 n/a 0.000 acre-f/yr buttons below Unbilled metered:0 n/a 0.000 acre-ft(yr Pcnt: Value: Unbilled unmetered:0 0 5 4.331 acre-f/yr 1 O O 114.331 acre-f/yr AUTHORIZED CONSUMPTION: 1,563,831 acre-fvyr Use buttons to select percentage of water supplied OR WATER LOSSES(Water Supplied-Authorized Consumption) 168.379 acre-f/yr value Apparent Losses Pcnt: i Value: Unauthorized consumption:D0 4.331 acre-ft(yr 1 10 OO 11 acre-ft/yr Enter a positive value,otherwise a default percentage of 0.25%is applied and a grading of 5 is applied but not displayed Customer metering inaccuracies:MMF7]1 15.753 acre-ft/yr 1 1.00% & O acre-f/yr Systematic data handling errors:0 0 1 3.899 acre-f/yr 1 0.25% O O 1 acre-f/yr Default option selected for Systematic data handling errors-a grading of 5 is applied but not displayed Apparent Losses: A 23.982 acre-fUyr Real Losses(Current Annual Real Losses or CARL) Real Losses=Water Losses-Apparent Losses: 144.398 acre-ft(yr WATER LOSSES: 168.379 acre-f/yr NON-REVENUE WATER NON-REVENUE WATER: 172.710 acre-ft(yr =Water Losses+Unbilled Metered+Unbilled Unmetered SYSTEM DATA Length of mains:0 0 e 50.0 miles Number of active AND inactive service connections:0 a 4%2 Service connection density: 98 conn./mile main Are customer meters typically located at the curbstop or property line? Yes (length of service line,beyond the property boundary, Average length of customer service line:0 that is the responsibility of the utility) Average length of customer service line has been set to zero and a data grading score of 10 has been applied Average operating pressure:0007 72.9 psi COST DATA Total annual cost of operating water system:0 0 10 $1,927,840 $/Year Customer retail unit cost(applied to Apparent Losses):0 0 a $4.85 $/100 cubic feet(ccf) Variable production cost(applied to Real Losses):0 0 s $757.93 $/acre-ft ❑Use Customer Retail Unit Cost to value real losses WATER AUDIT DATA VALIDITY SCORE: ***YOUR SCORE IS:53 out of 100*** A weighted scale for the components of consumption and water loss is included in the calculation of the Water Audit Data Validity Score PRIORITY AREAS FOR ATTENTION: Based on the information provided,audit accuracy can be improved by addressing the following components: 1:Water imported 2:Customer metering inaccuracies 3:Variable production cost(applied to Real Losses) AWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0 Reporting Worksheet 1 Appendix G — SBX7-7 Compliance Forms SB X7-7 Table 0: Units of Measure Used in 2020 UWMP* (select one from the drop down list) Acre Feet *The unit of measure must be consistent throughout the UWMP, as reported in Submittal Table 2-3. NOTES: SB X7-7 Table 2: Method for 2020 Population Estimate Method Used to Determine 2020 Population (may check more than one) ❑ 1. Department of Finance (DOF) or American Community Survey(ACS) ❑ 2. Persons-per-Connection Method ❑ 3. DWR Population Tool ❑ 4. Other DWR recommends pre-review NOTES: The population estimates were from the Pismo Beach 2018 Development Impact Fee Update Study by Willdan Financial Services and was based off data from the California Department of Finance. Estimates of residents and housing units in 2040 are consistent with SB X7-7 Table 3: 2020 Service Area Population 2020 Compliance Year Population 2020 8,SS9 NOTES: SB X7-7 Table 4: 2020 Gross Water Use 2020 Deductions 2020 Volume Into Indirect Recycled Process Water Distribution Change in Water This column will System Water 2020 Gross Water y Exported Dist. System Delivered for remain blank This column will Compliance This column will Water Storage** Use remain blank Agricultural until SB X7-7 Year 2020 remain blank until Table 4-D is SB X7-7 Table 4-A (+�-) until SB X7-7 Use* is completed. Table 4-B is completed. completed. 1,777 - - - - d 1,777 * Units of measure (AF, MG,or CCF) must remain consistent throughout the UWMP, as reported in SB X7-7 Table 0 and Submittal Table 2-3. NOTES: SB X7-7 Table 4-A: 2020 Volume Entering the Distribution System(s), Meter Error Adjustment Complete one table for each source. Name of Source State Water Project This water source is (check one): ❑ The supplier's own water source [2] JA purchased or imported source Meter Error Volume Entering Adjustment z Corrected Volume Distribution System Compliance Year 1 Entering 2020 Op(+/-) Distribution System 677 - 1 677 ' Units of measure(AF,MG,or CCF) must remain consistent throughout the UWMP, as reported in SB X7-7 Table 0 and Submittal Table 2-3. 1 Meter Error Adjustment -See guidance in Methodology 1,Step 3 of Methodologies Document NOTES SB X7-7 Table 4-A: 2020 Volume Entering the Distribution System(s) Meter Error Adjustment Complete one table for each source. Name of Source Lopez Lake This water source is (check one): ❑ IThe supplier's own water source [21 JA purchased or imported source Meter Error Volume Entering Adjustment z Corrected Volume Distribution System Compliance Year 1 Entering 2020 Op(t/)al Distribution System 1,045 1,045 ' Units of measure(AF,MG,or CCF) must remain consistent throughout the UWMP, as reported in SB X7-7 Table 0 and Submittal Table 2-3. 2 Meter Error Adjustment- See guidance in Methodology 1,Step 3 of Methodologies Document NOTES: SB X7-7 Table 4-A: 2020 Volume Entering the Distribution System(s), Meter Error Adjustment Complete one table for each source. Name of Source Groundwater This water source is (check one): 0 IThe supplier's own water source ❑ JA purchased or imported source Meter Error Volume Entering Adjustment z Corrected Volume Compliance Year 1 ( Entering 2020 Distribution System Opt/)al Distribution System 55 55 ' Units of measure(AF,MG,or CCF) must remain consistent throughout the UWMP, as reported in SB X7-7 Table 0 and Submittal Table 2-3. 2 Meter Error Adjustment -See guidance in Methodology 1,Step 3 of Methodologies Document NOTES: SB X7-7 Table 4-13: 2020 Indirect Recycled Water Use Deduction (For use only by agencies that are deducting indirect recycled water) 2020 Surface Reservoir Augmentation 2020 Groundwater Recharge Volume Recycled Recycled Discharged Recycled Volume Volume Total Deductible Entering Recycled Volume of Indirect from Percent Water Transmission/ Transmission/ Entering 2020 Compliance Reservoir for Recycled Delivered to Treatment Distribution Water Treatment Distribution Recycled Water 1 System from Pumped by 1 Entering the Year Distribution Water Treatment Loss Losses System from Distribution S System Plant Surface Utility1,2 stem Groundwater y Deliveryl Reservoir Recharge Augmentation 1 Units of measure(AF, MG, or CCF) must remain consistent throughout the UWMP, as reported in SB X7-7 Table 0 and Submittal Table 2-3. Z Suppliers will provide supplemental sheets to document the calculation for their input into "Recycled Water Pumped by Utility". The volume reported in this cell must be less than total groundwater pumped-See Methodology 1, Step 8,section 2.c. Data from this table will not be entered into WUEdata. Instead, the entire table will be uploaded to WUEdata as a separate upload in Excel format. SB X7-7 Table 4-C: 2020 Process Water Deduction Eligibility (For use only by agencies that are deducting process water) Choose Only One Criteria 1- Industrial water use is equal to or greater than 12% of gross water use. ❑ Complete SB X7-7 Table 4-C.1 Criteria 2- Industrial water use is equal to or greater than 15 GPCD. ❑ Complete SB X7-7 Table 4-C.2 El Criteria 3- Non-industrial use is equal to or less than 120 GPCD. Complete SB X7-7 Table 4-C.3 Criteria 4- Disadvantaged Community. Complete SB x7-7 Table 4-C.4 NOTES: The City is not deducting process water. 5B X7-7 Table 5: 2020 Gallons Per Capita Per Day (GPCD) 2020 Gross Water 2020 Population Fm 2020 GPCD Fm 58 X7-7 Table 4 58 X7-7 Table 3 1,777 8,559 185 NOTES: SB X7-7 Table 9: 2020 Compliance Optional Adjustments to 2020 GPCD Enter"0" if Adjustment Not Used Did Supplier Actual 2020 Adjusted 2020 2020 Confirmed Achieve 1 GPCD Extraordinary Weather Economic TOTAL GPCD i Target GPCD 1,2 Targeted 1 1 1 Adjustments' (Adjusted if Reduction for Events Normalization Adjustment applicable) 2020? 185 - - - - 185 204 YES 1 All values are reported in GPCD 2 2020 Confirmed Target GPCD is taken from the Supplier's SB X7-7 Verification Form Table SB X7-7, 7-F. NOTES: This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Appendix H — Adjudicated Judgement i I I L E 3 JAN 2 5 2006 cn' r a1 al mTrOaif�E fe* Supe r►o C nfy of Santa Clam 5 8Y DEPUTY 6 7 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA 9 COUNTY OF SANTA CLARA 10 I 1 SANTA MARIA VALLEY WATER SANTA MARIA GROUNDWATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT. LITIGATION 1? Lead Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 l ; Plaintiff, (CONSOLIDATED FOR ALL 14 PURPOSES) 15 vs. [Consolidated With Case Numbers: CV 784900; CV 785509; CV 785522, 16 CITY OF SANTA MARIA, ET AL., CV 787150; CV 784921; CV 785511; CV 785936; CV 787151; CV 784926; 17 Defendants. CV 785515; CV 786791; CV 7$7152; 1-05-CV-036410] 18 19 San Luis Obispo County Superior 20 AND RELATED CROSS-ACTIONS AND Court Case Nos. 990738 and 990739 ACTIONS CONSOLIDATED FOR ALL JUDGMENT AFTER TRIAL 21 PURPOSES 22 23 24 This matter carve on for trial in five separate phases. Following the third phase of trial, 25 a large number of parties entered into a written stipulation dated June 30, 2005 to resolve their 26 differences and requested that the court approve the settlement and make its terms binding on 27 them as a part of any final judgment entered in this case. Subsequent to the execution of the 28 stipulation by the original settling parties, a nturtber of additional parties have agreed to be bound by the stipulation—their signatures are included in the attachments to this judgment. l Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 .judgment After Trial I The June 30, 2005 Stipulation is attached as Exhibit "1;" and all exhibits to the 2 Stipulation are separately attached as Exhibits 1 A" through "l H". The Stipulating Parties are 3 identified on Exhibit "IA." The court approves the Stipulation. orders the Stipulating Parties 4 only to comply with each and every term thereof: and incorporates the same herein as though set forth in full. No non-stipulating party is bound in any way by the stipulation except as the b court may otherwise independently adopt as its independent judgment a term or terms that are 7 the same or similar to such term or provision of the stipulation, 8 As to all remaining parties, including those who failed to answer or otherwise appear, 9 the court heard the testimony of witnesses, considered the evidence found to be admissible by 10 the court, and heard the arguments of counsel. Good cause appearing, the court Finds and 11 orders judgment as follows. 12 As used in this Judgment, the following terms shall have the meanings herein set forth: 13 Basin — The groundwater basin described in the Phase I and H orders of the court, as 14 modified, with attachments and presented in Exhibit "I B". 15 Defaulting Parties—All persons or entities listed on Exhibit 16 Imported Water — Water within the Basin received from the State Water Project. 17 originating outside the Basin, that absent human intervention would not recharge or be used in 18 the Basin. 19 LOG Parties —All persons or entities listed on Exhibit "2," listed under the subheading 20 "LOG Parties". 21 Non-Stipulating Parties -- All Parties who did not sign the Stipulation, including the 22 Defaulting Parties and the LOG and Wineman Parties. 23 Parties—AlI parties to the above-referenced action, including Stipulating Parties, Non- 24 Stipulating Parties, and Defaulting Parties. 25 Public T'ater Producers — City of Santa Maria, Golden State Water Company, Rural 26 Water Company, the "Northern Cities" (collectively the Cities of Arroyo Grande, Pismo 27 Beach, and Grover Beach. and Occano Community Services District), and the Nipomo 28 Community Services District. 2 Case No. I-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial I Return Flows—All water which recharges the Basin after initial use, through the use of 2 percolation ponds and others means, derived from the use and recharge of imported water _3 delivered through State Water Project facilities. 4 Stipulating Parties—All Parties who are signatories to the Stipulation. 5 Stipulation — The Stipulation dated June 30, 2005 and incorporated herein as Exhibit 6 "1," with each of its Exhibits separately identified and incorporated herein as Exhibits "IA" 7 through "1 H". 8 Storage-Sp — The portion of the Basin capable of holding water for subsequent 9 reasonable and beneficial uses. 10 Wineman Parties — All persons or entities listed on Exhibit "2," under the subheading l 1 "Wineman Parties". 12 The following Exhibits are attached to this Judgment: 1 i 1. Exhibit "1, " June 30, 2005 Stipulation and the following exhibits thereto: 14 a. Exhibit 'VA, " list identifying the Stipulating Parties and the parcels of 15 land bound by the Stipulation. 16 b. Exhibit "IB. " Phase I and II Orders, as modified, with attachments. 17 C. Exhibit "IC, " map of the Basin and boundaries of the three 18 Management Areas. 19 d. Exhibit ''ID, " map identifying those lands as of January 1, 2005: 1) 20 within the boundaries of a municipality or its sphere of influence, or within the process of 21 inclusion in its sphere of influence; or 2) within the certificated service area of a publicly 22 regulated utility; and a list of selected parcels that are nearby these boundaries which are 23 excluded from within these areas. 24 e. Exhibit "IE, " 2002 Settlement Agreement between the Northern Cities 25 and Northern Landowners. 26 f Exhibit "IF " the agreement among Santa Maria, Golden State and 27 Guadalupe regarding Twitchell Project and the Twitchell Management Authority. 28 g. Exhibit ,iG, " the court's Order Concerning Electronic Service of 3 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial I Pleadings and Electronic Posting of Discovery Documents dated June 27, 2000. 2 h. Exhibit "I H, " the form of memorandum of agreement to be recorded. 3 2. Exhibit "2, " List of Non-Stipulating LOG and Wineman Parties and recorded 4 deed numbers of property they owned at the time of trial. 3. Exhibit "3, " List of Defaulting parties. 6 A declaratory judgment and physical solution are hereby adjudged and decreed 7 as follows: 8 1. As of the time of trial, LOG and Wineman Parties owned the real property, 9 listed by assessor's parcel numbers, as presented in Exhibit 2. 10 2. The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company are awarded I 1 prescriptive rights to ground water against the non-stipulating parties, which rights shall be 12 measured and enforced as described below. 13 3. The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company have a right to use 14 the Basin for temporary storage and subsequent recapture of the Retum Flows generated from 15 their importation of State Water Project water, to the extent that such water adds to the supply 16 of water in the aquifer and if there is storage space in the aquifer for such return flows, 17 including all other native sources of water in the aquifer. The City of Santa Maria's Return 18 Flows represent 65 percent of the amount of imported water used by the City. Golden State 19 Water Company's Return Flows represent 45 percent of the amount of imported water used by 20 Golden State in the basin. 21 4. (a) The Northern Cities have a prior and paramount right to produce 7,300 acre- 22 feet of water per year from the Northern Cities Area of the Basin, and (b) the Non-Stipulating 23 Parties have no overlying, appropriative, or other right to produce any water supplies in the 24 Northern Cities Area of the Basin. 25 5. The Groundwater Monitoring Provisions and Management Area Monitoring 26 Programs contained in the Stipulation, including Sections IV(D) (All Management Areas); 27 V(B) (Santa Maria Management Area), VI(C) (Nipomo Mesa Management Area), and Vtl (1) 28 (Northern Cities Management Area), inclusive, are independently adopted by the court as 4 Case No, 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial I necessary to manage water production in the basin and are incorporated herein and made terms 2 of this Judgment. The Non-Stipulating Parties shall participate in, and be bound by, the 3 applicable Management Area Monitoring Program. Each Non-Stipulating Party also shall 4 monitor their water production, maintain records thereof, and make the data available to the 5 court or its designee as may be required by subsequent order of the court. 6 6. No Party established a pre-Stipulation priority right to any portion of that 7 increment of augmented groundwater supply within the Basin that derives from the Twitchell 8 Project's operation. 9 7. The court determines that there is a reasonable likelihood that drought and 10 overdraft conditions will occur in the Basin in the foreseeable future that will require the 11 exercise of the court's equity powers. The court therefore retains jurisdiction to make orders 12 enforcing the rights of the parties hereto in accordance with the terms of this judgment. 13 a. Groundwater 14 i. The overlying rights of the LOG and Wineman Parties shall be 15 adjusted by amounts lost to the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company by lb prescription. The prescriptive rights of the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water 17 Company must be measured against the rights of all overlying water producers pumping in the 19 acquifer as a whole and not just against the LOG and Wineman Parties because adverse 19 pumping by the said water producers was from the aquifer as a whole and not Just against the 20 non-stipulating parties. The City of Santa Maria established total adverse appropriation of 21 5100 acre feet per year and Golden State Water Company established adverse appropriation of 22 1900 acre feet a year, measured against all usufructuary rights within the Santa Maria Basin. 23 The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company having waived the right to seek 24 prescription against the other stipulating parties, may only assert such rights against the non 25 stipulating parties in a proportionate quantity. To demonstrate the limited right acquired by 26 the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company, by way of example, if the 27 cumulative usufructuary rights of the LOG and Wineman Parties were 1,000 acre-feet and the 29 cumulative usufructuary rights of all other overlying groundwater right holders within the 5 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial I Basin were 100,000 acre-feet, the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company 2 would each be entitled to enforce 1% of their total prescriptive right against the LOG and 3 Wineman Parties. That is, Golden State Water Company could assert a prescriptive right of 4 19 annual acre-feet, and the City of Santa Maria 51 annual acre-feet, cumulatively against the 5 LOG and Wineman Parties, each on a proportionate basis as to each LOG and Wineman 6 Party's individual use. 7 ii. The ❑efaulting Parties failed to appear at trial and prove any 8 usufructuary water rights. The rights of the Defaulting Parties, if any, are subject to the 9 prescriptive rights of the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company, as well as the 10 other rights of said parties as established herein. 11 b. Imported Water 12 The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company shall have rights to Return 13 Flows in the amount provided above. 14 C. Northern Cities 15 The rights of all Parties in the Northern Cities Management Area shall be governed as 16 described above on page 4, lines 21 to 24. 17 8. The LOG and Wineman Parties have failed to sustain the burden of proof in 18 their action to quiet title to the quantity of their ground water rights as overlying owners. All 19 other LOG and Wineman party causes of action having been dismissed. judgment is hereby 20 entered in favor of the Public Water Producers as to the quiet title causes of action brought by 21 the LOG and the Wineman Parties. Legal title to said real property is vested in the Log and 22 Wineman Parties and was not in dispute in this action. 23 9. Each and every Party, their officers, agents, employees, successors and assigns. 24 are enjoined and restrained from exercising the rights and obligations provided through this 25 Judgment in a manner inconsistent with the express provisions of this Judgment. 26 10. Except upon further order of the court, each and every Party and its officers, 27 agents, employees. successors and assigns, is enjoined and restrained from transporting 28 groundwater to areas outside the Basin, except for those uses in existence as of the date of this 6 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial i Judgment; provided, however, that groundwater may be delivered for use outside the Basin as 2 long as the wastewater generated by that use of water is discharged within the Basin, or 3 agricultural return flows resulting from that use return to the Basin. 4 11. Jurisdiction, power and authority over the Stipulating Parties as between one 5 another are governed exclusively by the Stipulation. The court retains and reserves 6 jurisdiction as set forth in this Paragraph over all parties hereto. The court shall make such 7 further or supplemental orders as may be necessary or appropriate regarding interpretation and 8 enforcement of all aspects of this Judgment, as well as clarifications or amendments to the 9 Judgment consistent with the law. IO 12. Any party that seeks the court's exercise of reserved jurisdiction shall file a 11 noticed motion with the court. Any noticed motion shall be made pursuant to the court's 12 Order Concerning Electronic Service of Pleadings and Electronic Posting of Discovery 13 Documents dated June 27, 2000. 14 13. The court shall exercise de nova review in all proceedings. The actions or 15 decisions of anv Party. the Monitoring Parties, the TMA. or the Management Area Engineer 16 shall have no heightened evidentiary weight in any proceedings before the court. 17 14. As long as the court's electronic filing system remains available, all court 18 filings shall be made pursuant to court's Order Concerning Electronic Service of Pleadings 19 and Electronic Posting of Discovery Documents dated June 27, 2000, or any subsequent 20 superseding order. If the court's electronic filing system is eliminated and not replaced, the 21 Parties shall promptly establish a substitute electronic filing system and abide by the same 22 rules as contained in the court's Order. 2-11 15. Nothing in this Judgment shall be interpreted as relieving any Party of its 24 responsibilities to comply with state or federal laws for the protection of water quality or the 25 provisions of any permits, standards, requirements, or order promulgated thereunder. 26 16. Each Party shall designate the name, address and e-mail address, if any, to be 27 used for purposes of all subsequent notices and service by a designation to be filed mithin 28 thirty days after entry of this Judgment. This designation may be changed from time to time 7 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial i I by filing a written notice with the court. Any Party desiring to be relieved of receiving notices 2 may file a waiver of notice on a form approved by the count. The court shall maintain at all 3 times a current list of Parties to whom notices are to be sent and their addresses for purposes 4 of service. The court shall also maintain a full current list of names, addresses, and e-mail 5 addresses of all Parties or their successors, as filed herein. Copies of such lists shall be 6 available to any Person. If no designation is made, a Party's designee shall be deemed to be, in 7 order of priority: i) the Party's attorney of record; ii) if the Party does not have an attorney of 8 record, the Party itself at the address specified. 9 17. All real property owned by the Parties within the Basin is subject to this 10 Judgment. The Judgment will be binding upon and inure to the benefit of each Party and their I respective heirs; executors, administrators, trustees, successors. assigns, and agents. Any 12 party, or executor of a deceased party, who transfers property that is subject to this judgment 13 shalI notify any transferee thereof of this judgment and shall ensure that the judgment is 14 recorded in the line of title of said property. This Judgment shall not bind the Parties that 15 cease to own property within the Basin, and cease to use groundwater. Within sixty days 16 following entry of this Judgment, the City of Santa Maria, in cooperation with the San Luis 17 Obispo entities and Golden State, sliall record in the Office of the County Reporter in Santa 18 Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties, a notice of entry of Judgment. 19 The Cleric shall enter this Judgment. 20 21 SO ORDERED, ADJUDGED, AND DECREED, 22 23 Dated: January 25, 2008 Ju ge t e Superior Court 2�1 JACK KOMAR ,6 27 28 8 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial This page intentionally left blank for duplex printing, Appendix I — Gentlemen's Agreement AGREEMENT REGARDING - MANAGEMENT OF THE ARROYO GRANDE GROUNDWATER BASIN A. Parties This Agreement is entered into among the Cities of Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach, Grover Beach and the Oceario Community Services District (collectively referred to hereinafter as "Parties" or"Urban Parties"). B. Recitals WHEREAS, in January 198"), a Technical Advisory Committee consisting of representatives ;r2rroyo Grande, Grover City, Pismo Beach, Oceano Community Services District, Port San Luis Harbor District, the Farm Bureau, Avila Beach County Water District and the County of San Luis Obispo ("Committee") determined in reliance on the 1979 Report of the - Department of Water Resources entitled Ground Water in the Arrovo Grande Area that the safe yield of the Arroyo Grande Groundwater Basin (`Basin") is 9,500 acre feet per year; WHEREAS, in or about February 1983, the Parties agreed to enter into a voluntary groundwater management plan to provide for effective management of groundwater resources in the Basin through which each party was ,given sufficient water to meet its needs as then projected; such needs being met in part by the City of Arroyo Grande foregoing 358 acre feet per year of its historical use and the City of Pismo Beach foregoing 20 acre feet per year of its historical use; - WHEREAS, this management plan provided a reasonable division of the safe yield of the Basin without court imposed groundwater basin adjudication; - WHEREAS, on February 9, 1983, the terms of the management plan were incorporated into Resolution o-. 83-1 of the South San Luis Obispo County Water Association Approving the Recommendations of the Committee relating to the Basin{the "Resolution"}; WHEREAS, each of the Parties have adopted individual resolutions endorsing the provisions of the Resolution; WHEREAS, the Parties have generally complied with the terms and conditions of the - Resolution; and WHEREAS, general compliance with the Resolution has proven to be a fair and efficien, means of managing and protecting groundwater resources in the Basin as confirmed by the revised final draft report prepared by the Department of Water Resources entitled, Water Resources of Arroyo Grande and Nipomo_Mesa. January 2000. . r Gentlemen_s A--reement.DOC GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT NOW, THEREFORE, THE PARTIES AGREE AS FOLLOWS: 1. Division of Safe Yield. a. The Parties agree to a division of the safe yield of the Basin as follows: Applied Irrigation 5,300 acre feet Subsurface flow to ocean 100 acre feet Urban Use: City of Arroyo Grande 1,202 acre feet City of Grover Beach 1,198 acre feet City of Pismo Beach 700 acre feet Oceano Community Services District 900 acre feet b. Any increase or decrease in the safe yield of the Basin attributable to changed operation of the Lopez Reservoir, or any other cause, shall first be divided between the Urban Parties and applied irrigation on a pro rata basis using the formula from the 1983 Gentlemen's Agreement;fifty-seven percent (57%) to applied irrigation and forty-three percent (43%) to the Urban Parties. Thereafter, the first 373 acre feet per year of any increase of safe yield allocated to the.Urban Parties shall be divided between the City of Arroyo Grande and the City of Pismo Beach on a pro rata basis (95% to Arroyo Grande and 5% to Pismo Beach). C. The entitlements of each respective Urban Party may be increased based upon the conversion of irrigated agricultural lands to urban use. An Urban Party to this Agreement may increase its entitlement for urban use by a factor of three (3) acre feet per acre per year minus the calculated urban usage per acre per year upon the conversion of irrigated agricultural land to urban usage. "Irrigated agricultural land" shall be that land within the corporate limits of the party that was identified as irrigated agricultural land in the 1979 Department of Water Resources Report entitled Ground Water in the Arroyo Grande Area. This agricultural conversion factor may be applied to all acreage converted to urban use from January 1, 1983, throughout the life of this Agreement. Such an agricultural conversion factor is in the best interests of the overall Basin in that it will not result in any decline in the groundwater service over time. The Parties agree that no water should be converted to urban use within the Basin without establishing that it was irrigated agricultural land as defined in the 1979 Department of Water Resources Report, Groundwater in the Arroyo Grande Area. d. The Parties agree and understand that the safe yield figures utilized in this Agreement are a product of the 1979 Department of Water Resources Report regarding the Arroyo Grande Basin as adjusted by the 1983 ad hoc Technical Advisory Committee and that the division of the resources is based upon the historical use of each party and a practical accommodation of each Party's needs as they existed.at the time of the adoption of the 1983 Gentlenen_s Agreement.DOC GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT 2 agreement. It is agreed that the Parties will meet and confer on issues related to safe yield and division of existing water resources upon the final adoption of the new Arroyo Grande Basin study performed by the Department of eater Resources, which is currently in draft. 2 Shared Information and Monitoring: The Urban Parties to this Agreement shall freely share information with each other regarding each of their respective uses of groundwater in the Basin, including all pumping data such as amounts of water extracted, well static water levels. and water quality. The Urban Parties to this Agreement shall meet on a quarterly basis to share this information and to discuss water usage and impacts upon the Basin. The Parties shall conduct a review of water usage and the impacts on Basin hydrology in 2010 and 2020. 3. Term: a. :. pis Agreement shall bind the Parties indefinitely absent a significant change of circumstances as to available water, water quality, or hydrogeology of the Arroyo Grande Basin. A significant chang' c of circumstances shall allow any Party to opt out of this Agreement if the significant change of circumstances put that Party at risk of not being able to meet its potable water needs. b. Significant changed circumstances shall include changes within the Basin or outside of the Basin, including but not restricted to, a change in the Lopez Reservoir safe yield or an increase in Lopez Reservoir discharges for conservation purposes that threatens the ability of the Urban Parties to obtain their contractual allotments under their Lopez agreements, or a significant change in groundwater yields or quality, or a reduction in foreign water imported by any Urban Party. The Parties recognize that rainfall within the watershed is the most significant factor affecting the yield of.Lopez Reservoir and the Basin. C. The Parties shall revisit the issue of the allocation of groundwater resources within the Arroyo Grande Basin in 2010 and 2020 in the context of the review provided for in section 2 of this Agreement. The Parties shall make new allocations of groundwater resources at that time if circumstances justify it and if no harm will result to other groundwater users. Priority shall be given to reallocation of historical use of groundwater to Arroyo Grande and Pismo Beach that those agencies chose not to pursue in the entering into of the original Gentlemen's Agreement in 1983 should such new allocations be made. d. A Party may opt out of this Agreement if significant changed circumstances arise - as defined in this section. Such a party shall give all other parties to the agreement not less than six months written notice of its intention to opt out. The written notice shall describe in detail the significant changed circumstances upon which the Party bases its election to opt out of the Agreement. 4. Mediation Agreement: The Parties agree to mediate any disputes that arise out of the Parties' performance under this Agreement, or the interpretation of the terms of this Agreement, prior to instituting any litigation against or between any other Party to this Agreement. Should a Party institute litigation without first offering in good faith to mediate any such dispute, any Party may move for an order compelling mediation and staying the proceedings in the litigation until _.. Gentlemen_s Agreement.DOC GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT 3 after mediation has been completed. The prevailing party on a motion to compel mediation shall be entitled to recover its attorney's fees against any resisting party or any party who filed litigation without first malting a good faith attempt to mediate the dispute. This mediation requirement shall not apply where the health and safety of any of the Parties, or any of the Parties' residents, is threatened and they must seek, and have obtained, preliminary relief for the purposes of preserving health and safety. 5. No Third Partv Beneficiaries: The Parties are entering into this Agreement in order to reasonably allocate cxisting groundwater resources between themselves and not to benefit any third parties. This agreement shall only be enforceable between the Parties themselves. This Agreement does not create any right enforceable by any person or entity that is not a party to this Agreement. d_ Get�eraf'rovisions. a. The Parties warrant that all necessary approvals and authorizations have been obtained to bind them to all terms of this Agreement, and further warrant that the persons signing have authority- to sign on behalf of their respective Parties. b. Written notice under this Agreement shall be given by placing such notice in the first class mail, postage prepaid, or by hand delivery to the current address of the office of any Party to this Agreement. C. No amendment to this Agreement will be binding on any of the Parties unless it is in writing and signed by an authorized representative of all of the Parties. — d. This Agreement will be construed in accordance with, and governed by, the laws of the State of California as applied to contracts that are executed and performed entirely in California. e. If any provision of this Agreement is held invalid or unenforceable by any final judgment, it is the intent of the Parties that all other provisions of this Agreement be construed to remain fully valid, enforceable, and binding on the Parties. f. This Agreement may be executed simultaneously in one or more counterparts, each of which will be considered an original, but all of which together will constitute one and the same instrument. g. The Parties represent that prior to the execution of this Agreement, they consulted independent legal counsel of their own selection regarding the substance of this Agreement. - Gentlemen_s Agreement.DOC GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT 4 L � WHEREFORE, the Parties publicly consent to the terms and conditions of this Agreement by executing the same as set forth below. Dated: jn y , 2002. City of Arroyo Grande r 7 By: l Print Name and Title: !Yl�C P,F,C Dated: 'J Wit , 2002. City of Pismo Beach By: o Print Name and Title: , IJYog RU17}�NATd May 21 Dated: , 2002. City of Grover Beach Attest: By: onna L. McMahon City Clerk Print Name and Title: �YOL� Dated: Aril 24 , , 2002. Oceano Community Services District v' Attest: By: '''. ..�.— Print Name and Title: Board President Francis M. Cooney, Bo d Se etary Gentlemen_s Agreement.DOC GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT 5 Appendix J — 2020 NCMA Annual Report Giro C� Northern ' Cities .� Management = Area f Nipomo Mesa _ f Management � 101 f � Pacific ; Ocean , o IF 1 bspO o ♦ �� Santa Maria Y 4ryfy i �- ♦�. ` Valley ��i♦ �•b ` �, Management Area ♦f � I LEGEND FIGURE 1 Northern Cities Management Area Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Nipomo Mesa Management Area Northern Cities Management Area r Santa Maria Valley Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California _-.'Santa Maria Groundwater Basin (DWR, 2019) County Borders N 0 1 2 3 4 5 VGS1 ww I I I I I I Dace:'a��ary za,zozo Miles data .--DWR.W.,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\006_2019_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure0l_Santa_Maria_Groundwater_Basin.mxd 8 7. �♦�� Pismo �� ` � ► �♦ Beach �, >/ ','c ,f� ♦ ' . y- :�,,, �' r ♦ 101 ♦♦ `� Arroyo..,� Vaiiey . ♦ � � Grande ♦ Grouer :y`_ �. . Arroyo ♦ � Beach - � o Tri-Cities a'g11e 4 ♦ I. h e F i Mesa Los Berros*qvk ' • 1 Yo Grd�a' � � • � Pacific ' ' 00, Oceano Ocean `Y.o��da sahtd ♦!.4+ ' .oAl �ldrf Cienega Valley ♦ 4 a,+ d4jt Nipomo f� 00' Mesa r ` i LEGEND FIGURE 2 Northern Cities Management Area Northern Cities Management Area Nipomo Mesa Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California _-'Santa Maria Groundwater Basin (DWR, 2019) Faults (dashed where inferred) Streams N ° l VGS1 I I Dale:February 26,2020 Miles Dela Sources:DWR,NCMA,USGS,California Geological Survey,ESRI WdterSolutions,Inc. Document Path:YA_nonGISP\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\006_2019_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure02_Northern_Cities_ManagementArea.mxd 9 North Beach • 1 ' ,`• t '� y' �, ".�', ♦ / .6 Campground Wells 32S/12E-24 <- B01, 101 Highway 1 � m •� :,,, � t � _ ,02,03 Wells32S/13E-30 ^- i'•.; .ilk 1 ' Pier Avenue 32S/13E-30 N01,02,03 Oceano CSD e + QFa4/t +� Observation Wells r —r (Green,Blue, e Silver,and Yellow) s Oceano Well Pacific o No.s OceanSahta� County MW#3 v Al a,/a Well12N/35W .� '•4�f R/�QrF 32CO3 dV/t Oceano Dunes t Wells 12N/36W-36 L01,02 = f s Pa t : * { LEGEND FIGURE 3 ® NCMA Monitoring Wells Locations of Monitoring Wells Northern Cities Management Area Northern Cities Management Area Faults (dashed where inferred) San Luis Obispo County, California Streams N Notes: 0 1 CSD-Community Services District VGS1 WWW Date:Febmary26 2020 Miles Data Sources:NCMA,USGS,Califumia G,dNicsl Surrey,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:Y:\_nonGISP\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\006_2019_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure03_NCMA_Monitoring_Wells.mxd 14 North Beach Highway 1 OCSD County MW#3 Oceano Dunes Campground Pier Avenue Green Blue Silver Yellow 24B 30F 30N 36L 31H 32CO3 01 02 03 01 02 03 01 02 03 01 02 H10 1-111 H12 H13 0 XD -100 0o XD =7 00 -200 XD a z XD 4T -300 XD c O m -400 W -500 XD -600 Well Well Screen XD Transducer -700 FIGURE 4. DEPTHS OF MONITORING WELLS GS1 Notes: Management Area NAVD88-North American Vertical Datum of 1988 Northern Cities Mana g V1 OCSD-OceanoCommunityServicesDistrict San Luis Obispo County, California Water Solutions,Inc. 15 Average Precipitation 1950-2020: 15.6 Inches MEN 1 MEN ��► , MINE l�7v►��.lii�. ��ii�����.l� , 1�■ ■�� 1�■ ■■ I =1 ■ ■���� 1�■ ■�� Iw■ ■■ 1110111111 ME 1 ■ 111111� - 1�■ ■�� 1■ ■■ ■■ I ■�1 " Min IMMI111111 . 1■ IN IN ff lVE■1 11■ RM ■■ I I 1 ■ 1 ■ ■1M11110111111 MEN! INININ0INNOIII= II■ 0RI I 10 10 011111101111111 111111 In Ill 1 ■ INN INN 111 ■ 1 INN III IIIEll FMIIIIIIIIN1 IIIIIIII11 ■ � - IIIn1 ■ 1 ■ ■ INN III ■ II■ IIIII ■111 ■11IIIIIIA INN mRIMIl11 ■ 1 ' 111 ■ 1 ■ 1 ■ ■ 111 ■ 111 ■111w111111 ■111 ■111IIIIII11 ■ 1 INN IIIMMInI i11A111111 ■ IIIlllllllll11111111117111 ■1111111111111111 ■ ■ II ■1111111111111111�1I11111111111r1111111111111wi111111111111111 ■ 1111wii1111 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111111 1111 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 A IIIIII P-161111 0 �i Pismo Beach (DRI 046943- Discontinued 101 Oceano (SLO 795) Pacific Ocean f Nipomo T (CIMIS 202, /ew—MEL LEGEND FIGURE 6 Active Weather Station Location of Precipitation Stations Inactive Weather Station Northern Cities Management Area Nipomo Mesa Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California Northern Cities Management Area Santa Maria Valley Management Area N l voJanuaryData Data: 9 Miles Sources:NCMA,NCMA,SLO County,DRI,CIMIS,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc Document Path:YA0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Figure_4_NCMA_Precipitation_Station_Locations.mxd 21 7 ■Average Precipitation(Total-15.6 inches) N � ■2020 Precipitation(Total-10.04 inches) 6 Rreclopitation Stations Used for Assessment: Pismo,1950August2017 County Oceano,2005-Present 5 H s 4 C C M O C O 3 'u a O� a N 2 'i a N N 1 � N � of O o � a m a N o O N N O O O O p O G O O O C O C G January February March April May June July August September October November December 12 30-year Average ET @ Nipomo(Total-43.3 inches) 2020 ET @ Nipomo(Total-43.3 inches) 10 8 au v s V C N C n O 6 vi n a a a m m v a a s v a o � a � m> 4 uN m w m m N M Q m m m � N N r ry M � m m N N N tit 2 0 January February March April May June July August September October November December FIGURE 7. MONTHLY AND AVERAGE PRECIPITATION AND EVAPOTRANSPIRATION V5 Northern Cities Management Area Water Solutions,Inc. San Luis Obispo County, California 22 ---------------- Ct'V 101 ` O O Q 4. `'!�Creek 1 \ p"de � quo y�o Gr O ♦ O � \ ` 1 w�4 4, R W 1 �0;`9 `�9G 1 1 O ► =:ram ``� O ♦ ♦ Sq/V 4 Tq Q ♦♦ � MgRiq R ♦ ��FR F ♦♦ q(4T LEGEND FIGURE 8 Q Sentry Well All Other Features Q Municipal Well a Northern Cities Management Groundwater Elevation Contours Spring 2020 Alluvial Groundwater Contour Area Northern Cities Management Area (feet,NAVD88) Cienega Valley San Luis Obispo County, California Deep Groundwater Contour Interstate ^�(feet,NAVD88) 1 Watercourse Fault(dashed where inferred) N ° VGS1 Notes:NAV088-North American Ven,,l Datum of 1988 I I Dace:Anru a,zozi Miles Data Sources:SLO County,USGS,NCMAantl NMMAAgendes,California Geological5urvey,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:YA0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\007_2020_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure8_NCMA_Water_Level_Contours_April_2020.mxd 28 ---------------- Ct'V 101 ` O O O 4. Creek Cp \ �l • • 1 Y wl 1 1 1 MqR O CD 1 \F 1 O O .qC 0�9ti ���O • 1 1 1 1 • �� ♦ ♦ 1 1 1 `� ♦ 1 1 1 Arroyo Graade`CreeR ♦ u'0 ♦ 1 h � \ 1 FR F 1 AU4T 1 1 1 trl 1 1 1 1 1 1 LEGEND FIGURE 9 Q Sentry Well All Other Features Q Groundwater Elevation Contours Fall 2020 Municipal Well a Northern Cities Management Alluvial Groundwater Contour Area Northern Cities Management Area (feet,NAVD88) Cienega Valley San Luis Obispo County, California Deep Groundwater Contour Interstate ^�(feet,NAVD88) 1 Watercourse Fault(dashed where inferred) N ° VGS1 Notes:NAV088-North American V atum enml D of 1988 I I Dace:Anru a,zozl Miles Data Sources:SLO County,USGS,NCMAand NMMAAgendes,California Geological Survey,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:YA0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\007_2020_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure9_NCMA_Water_Level_Contours_Oct_2020.mxd 29 ■■■■■■■■■■■■ . 1 ■■■■■■■ter:■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■���■ ' ■ ■■■i■�■■■■ice■�i�■iii■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■ • • , • • III 11 1 1 1 1 1 yVr/�=►�,ir�y ��Ik,1,I�Y 20 00 19 Q 18 Deep Well Index Elevation Q 17 16 (Wells 241303, 30F03 and 30NO2) Z 14 a� 13 11 ° 19 8 — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —III — — — — — — — d 6 Deep Well Index Threshold: 7.5 feet W 5 4) 4 -a 3 2 1 -0 d _3 Deep Well Index is the average of groundwater elevations in the deep wells of Sentry Well clusters -4 24B, 30F, and 30N (see Figure 3 for locations of -5 monitoring wells and Figure 4 for well depths). 800 700 J t 600 Well30NO2 E 500 Well24B03 "0 400 Well 30F03 c 300 V 200 100 0 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 FIGURE 12. HYDROGRAPH OF DEEP WELL INDEX ELEVATION voisi Notes: Management Area NAVD88-North American Vertical Datum of 1988 Northern Cities Mana g Water Solutions,Inc. mg/L-milligrams per liter San Luis Obispo County, California 34 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■r- ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Well 241303 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ I North Beach Cam.. .und Deep Well■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Well Depth: 435 feet (Careaga Sand) Deep Well Index ■ y 1 ' ■'�'^ �I^w�"1�' F"wr' AIL F' ALA %ai j■V"■` • DeepWelllndexI�11 ��■L J■AI�l�J■i'"^� ■■�L■■■riles■■■■■■■. ■ Threshold: ■&J■1 V a f"■■I LT" ■■iceM■■■ M■■■■■■■■■■■� ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 • 1 1 Well 30F03 Highway 1 Deep Well Well Depth: 372 feet (Careaga Sand) ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■L NU � L 5.L lm I ■ .�I■■W ail 11■■ III " Deep Well Index _i al, ME, T 1■m"T i • - Deep `` 1■TIPW� I■i'"^' i A■■■ ■■■■■ LA■■■■■■■ ■ Threshold: ■ 1 i i■ '�' 11■S I Y■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■, ■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 • 1 1 A A • • 1 1 �■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Well 30NO2 • ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ _ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ AvenueWell Depth: 255 feet (Paso Robles Formation) MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Deep -• - .. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Deep - •- ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ �Il ■■ \■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■ ■■■■ �'T ■■■ !■w■f' A,,■■■■■■■■■■■■_►�■■f A,. -Imm r 1■■r,J► A A MMM ■a "A. ■■■ MMw w■■■ T7■! MLi �_1■R A w■ff" Jl� ■IL-'w! ■!, y; Imo! 17■� !1■ Amw MR i I'1w.b ML .. WE M`qU-Fm%V1rj ■■■■■■■■■ill■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Sens ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ • 1 1 ■■■■■ ■■■■■.■ measurements• . • Field'that ■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■ •- • • .• ■■■■ ■■■■■■■■ '. • • ■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■ ■MMMMUMM ■■■N■■E■ • • • ■ ■■■ ■■ ■■ 1 1 1 1 1 • 1 1 � 1 • 1 1 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Well 361L01 Oceano Dunes Deep Well Well Depth: 237 feet (Paso Robles Formation) ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■ ■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■ •• •• • • wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww • wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww■wwwwwwwwwwwwwww �www-awww wwww wwww wwww r Iwww wwww wwww wwww .. \ww►\www wwww wwww wwww r 'www wwww wwww r\www ■�w�rwww wwww wwww \www r � www wwww 1r www i.�ww■ ■�w�►wwww wwww wwww r_rwww��www wwww r �www 1■www ■iwa I w www wwww wwww i� www ��\ww rwww i� �w� �► www ■'wr wl www w�■ww ■www ll�w��1�ww ww 101 1M■N Ell www ■=101 M■1 E■w W,i■■ i■■w■EMO M1 I■■■u■N■1 nl■o 1■II 1M■■ ' ww��1�w��ww III�w�1\www���w��w�lww wwww ��Iwo I iil■w■ 01016doW■Rl■W II BMW \\■■E 101 BMW 10M 1■S,a\1■r.001'\\1101001■ • wwww■R I■M,■1 M■N I INMEN 1■1 VMS AMR I■M■MME 1■a 1001101101■ • wwww w�►wr/w1�w� a�wr wl 1■r 1■t'■IH■MME 1■w.IF 1101111001 wwww ws III w��w� wl 7w� w�'wl\■ rn■ wr 1■■ur ■■ i 'mr j wwww■■MA■r I■r■■r Iwr■■r VF■■fir ■ U ■■r I M■a 'SW A wwww wwww wt:.'�I w� AI wt f ww` .J■■1 ■■<w■■L I ■ ■■ - L IF■■■u I■■■U■■■��a wwww■■L i M ■■■MM■■ ■■■rya Well Oceano• , wwww■■■ •. . corrupted -• wwww■ Well Depth: 545 feet (Careaga Sand) EMMMMMM Well 361-02 wwww wwww wwww www■ , , , �wwww wwww wwww wwww . w EMEMEM ■■M■ON MIN wwww■ vU■■NNE wwwMEN �I F■■■■■ wwww■■ ■ wwww■■ .- . . ■ ■wwww■■ME ■■■I■■■MMI I MEE■ wwww wwww■C!��.�������' "' _ ___�■�_�■■ wwww wwww wwww wwww■■�i■■■�i■www w��� • • - Nwi wwww■■ i ■■ i Aw— I ■ wwww 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 • 1 1 A A • • ' • 1 ■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■�_ ■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■wowMM ME! - . ■r�■■■■■■ ■■■■■■ul■m BIN■� ■■■■■■ ■■■■■■10I 1■■■■■■L M ■■ 101 1■1J h 1■■ ■■rl s■■mk 1■■. 11 O■■ . ■i, 11HR I■■ , ■■11 ■■■■t 'SM I J INN ■01l 1■L I■ MEN IF 7� 0011 A■L 10 �1 ■f f■l T-, L. VIP ■■EM■W 1" i■ll■11 L. IRE l■n'lI ri■■L,■■■L i■ J ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ----------------- 101 C S �n Creek V OF `� vus Berros Creek `�� � Arroyo Grande We • f _ Sq N Tq Mq R/q c R/ F RF q U< T h LEGEND FIGURE 19 Contour of Equal Difference in Fault(dashed where IN.,Water Level,feet inferred) Change in Groundwater Elevation, Deep Aquifer System 0 Area of Net Decline Interstate April 2019 to April 2020 0 Area of Net Rise IN.,Watercourse Northern Cities Management Area All Other Features San Luis Obispo County, California Northern Cities Management Area N 0 l IVGS1 Date:January 2g.2021 WW Miles Data Sourcea:SLO County,USGS,NCMA antl NMMAAgenuae,California Geological Survey,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:YA0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\007_2020_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure19_Water Level Change_April_2019_2020_Deep.mxd 42 ----------------- 101 C W' T ,10�9 0 yes Berr os Gre'A Arroy_�reek • V `%% 3 ^O `%% �h _ Sq�Tq Mq R/q Ra q U< T LEGEND FIGURE 20 Contour of Equal Difference in Fault(dashed where inferred) Water Level,feet /N/Interstate Change in Groundwater Elevation, Alluvial Aquifer Area of Net Decline Watercourse April 2019 to April 2020 0 Area of Net Rise Northern Cities Management Area All Other Features San Luis Obispo County, California Northern Cities Management Area N 0 l 1VGS1 w I I Date:January 20,2021 Miles Data Sources:SLO Count',USGS,NCMAantl NMMAAgencies,CaliPornia Geological Survey,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:YA0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\007_2020_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure20_Water Level Change_April_2019_2020_Qal.mxd 43 200 North Beach Campground 100 I Well 241303 200 Well 241302 Highway 1 E =O 100 Well 30F02 W I s a+ Well 30F01 L Well 30F03 V 200 i C Pier Avenue 0N C) as I 100 , Well 303 V Well 30NO2 1 200 Oceano Dunes and 32CO3 000 Well 36L02 100 k4Weill32CO3 Well 36L01 0 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 FIGURE 21. CHLORIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN MONITORING WELLS Voisi Notes: Northern Cities Management Area mg/L-milligrams per liter San Luis Obispo County, California WaterSolutions,Inc. 45 ��� iiWell 30NO3 O Seawater Base V� � �a10 `o �o Well24BO2 V�c �� O Well24BO3 x o 0 x A Well30F02 O CO O ■ Well 30F03 � A Well 30NO2 Well 30NO3 Well36L01 c0 �O OJ Well 36L02 / A Well 31 H11 (Blue) # + Well 32CO3 O 100 N0 �O 100 80 �,o �2 0� 0 80 x V 60 *o 0 'A 60 (� 0 G 40 oo qj� � Qh 40 � 1 20 CR �� �O 1 20 ILL\ + O � 00 -O `PO �o 'moo �'O O o ryo �o 00 00 00 o � Ca C1 Note: Data include "middle" and "deep"wells from 2020 quarterly sampling events. V FIGURE 23. GSA PIPER DIAGRAM OF WATER QUALITY IN SELECT MONITORING WELLS Northern Cities Management Area WaterSolutions,inc. San Luis Obispo County, California 48 40 ' I 101 �1 e N• OBerr Creek O � Pacific S, Arroyo Grande CreeK Ocean s , : '!t* • 1; 7 .a , r } LEGEND City of Arroyo Grande Well Northern Cities Management Area FIGURE 24 Faults (dashed where inferred) Locations of Municipal * City of Grover Beach Well Production Wells Streams City of Pismo Beach Well Northern Cities Management Area * Oceano Community Services District Well San Luis Obispo County, California N ° Miles VGS1 Dale:February28,2020 Data Sources:NCMA Agenaea,USGS,California Geological Survey,ESRI Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:Y:\_nonGISP\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\006_2019_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure24_Locations of Municipal Production Well.mxd 54 101 �sr90 G PISMO BEACH T C-k S o� i GROVER ARROYO !o BEACH GRANDE Los Berro.e Creek r, C orrr(e Creek OCEANO LEGEND FIGURE 25 k. Avocados NCMA Agricultural Land 2020 Rotational Crops Northern Cities Management Area Pstrawberries San Luis Obispo County, California All Other Features Highway Watercourse N allorthern Cities Management Area 0 0.5 1 (�w■� f� Miles l VGS1 Dare:�an�ary 2s,2ort Data Sources:SLO County,NCMA,ESRI,USGS Water Solutions,Inc. Document Path:Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\007_2020_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure25_NCMAAgricultural Land_2020.mxd 59 400 6.50 6.00 350 5.50 300 5.00 a. 4.50 IL N 250 4.00 y � s u u a � 3.50 N � 200 G �j 3.00 ;± Q CL u Q 150 2.50 a 7� � 2.00 O 100 1.50 1.00 50 0.50 0 0.00 Jan F Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Rotational Crops 0 0 3 114 239 320 324 356 244 199 193 0 Strawberries 0 0 0 0 0 43 45 79 62 44 0 0 Avocados 0 0 0 0 0 4 10 10 8 7 5 2 Precipitation(in) 0.55 0.00 6.18 1.34 0.24 0.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.04 0.43 1.22 FIGURE 26. 2020 ESTIMATED AGRICULTURAL WATER DEMAND AND MONTHLY PRECIPITATION AT THE SLO NO. 795 GAUGE Northern Cities Management Area GSI San Luis Obispo County, California Water Solutions,Inc. 63 Pismo Beach Oceano 4,000 4,000 ■SWP Water ■SWP Water 3,500 ■Lopez Water 3,500 ■Lopez Water 3,000 ■Groundwater 3,000 ■Groundwater 2,500 2,500 a d d �z,000 2,000 d w 3 3 1,500 1,500 1,000 1,000 Soo 500 0 0 ffH 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2. .01 2002 2. 2. .05 2001 2. 2. 2009 20. 2011 2012 20. 2014 2015 20. 2017 2016 2019 20. Calendar Year Calendar Year Arroyo Grande Grover Beach 4,000 4,000 ■Lopez Water 3,500 ■Lopez Water 3,500 ■Groundwater ■Groundwater 3,000 3,000 2,500 2,500 u a a 2,000 2,000 ti d 3 1,500 1,500 1,000 1,000 500 500 0 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Calendar Year Calendar Year P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\006-2019 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 27 NCMA Municipal Water Use by Source.grf FIGURE 27. MUNICIPAL WATER USE BY SOURCE �15� Notes: AFY-Acre-feet per year Northern Cities Management Area LA SWP-California State Water Project San Luis Obispo County, California Water Solutions,Inc. 68 12,000 ■SWP Water 11,000 rm Lopez Water Groundwater 10,000 9,000 n 8,000 LL Q 7,000 v h D y 6,000 to 5,000 H 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Calendar Year FIGURE 28. TOTAL WATER USE (URBAN, RURAL, AGRICULTURAL) BY SOURCE Notes: Northern Cities Management Area V"73 SI AFY-Acre-feet per year SWP-California State Water Project San Luis Obispo County, California Water Solutions,Inc. 70 Well 241303 Well 30F03 _ 1■■l11■■lf 1■■l11■■l11 aga Sand) Index Wells - -----0 Well 30NO2 (Paso Robles Formation) • . Robles Formation) 11■■l11■■■��1■■l11■■l11 • ' 0000=0=■■■■■=E ■■■■■ 11■■l11■��! 1■■l11■■l11 • 11 mill 1■■■11■■ Elm 11��11���1!!::i it■ll�'I�ll1 • 1 „ ����■w����������_�__----.��w■■www■■wr ,�.fir► 11 MEN NINE■1■■■mill NINE N■NN■MEN MEN■l■■1 4�1 o■■■■o■■■■o■■■■wool moss■o■■■■o■■■■o■■■■■■■■i 11 MINN MEN Mono MEN MEN MEN MEN MEN MEN�'j ■■■■■loss,loss,M■■■loss,■mono MINE■■■o..■■i■ in 2009A NINENINE■■■■■mill NINE MINI NINE■■• 1 1 will OEM IRMEN wool NINE_will N■■■I FORM SWNiiii 1■l■■m■■■l E...:.g■l MINI MINI imam MO;mum;.■gloom MINE i l,11&15'RFAIIMT 112 . 1 mazn ■w NNE■EEI�■����■MIS 1 F ��11111�11�rq now m■�■■■■■■■■■■■■■■Igloo■i■■■■�iiiNONNIMONO!I 111 1111111111111 111111111111111111���""'" ■ 1 • • 1 • . • . . 1 • • 111 11 1 1 1 1 1 (PasoWell 30NO2 Robles on) 11111111111111111� 1■■■11■■■11 Well - . . - . . 11111111111111111111111111111 11 Well . , (Paso Robles Formation) 111111111111111111111111111111 • ' ■■ Moll IIIII 1111111119 11111111111 • 1111111 1000110001 MM=!!!!!!!_—:::w!r IrItim milli 1 • ' ' iiii::1:::iiiii iiiii ii E__i i WOM 11111 i �►;'AA — ' 111111111111111111111111111111111111111�1�111 ' milli milli milli moll NINON N■■■■milli milli■■■ n N■■■■N■■■ • ' ' milli milli milli will Nonni milli■■■■■■■■■■1p'!!:,ANNE N■■■I ' milli milli milli moll milli milli NEW!=Wi►al■■■1111■■I IN MINI milli milli N■■■■moll NINON ll!!:iiWl■KNEW NEW all,IR,I'■C in milli milli milli w■l!_�m■■■■■■■ M USES Nonni �pi ri f m■■■l milli milli milli MINI Milli!milli■■pid milli■■■lpi ii I1� ■■ :I=::AMEN Rg:w 1■11 z'!:-11OV-11 OW 111 1 1 111 1 �111■■■■■■■ � �� ■■■■■■■■■■�11 11��" �111111 ■■1 I��in�� 1 • • • • . ; • ; • • • . 111 11 1 1 1 1 1