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3.A Attachment Land Use_FinalDraft_December20201 Land Use and Community Design Element 1. Introduction and Purpose The Land Use Element directs the placement and character of future development, shaping where people will live, work, play, and shop in Pismo Beach. The Land Use Element addresses the community’s values and desires, while providing strategies for managing growth, enhancing quality of life, and adapting to the changing environment and demographics of Pismo Beach. The Land Use Element also addresses topics unique to Pismo Beach such as coastal resources, planned residential redevelopments, overnight coastal accommodations, and historical resource and character sites.1 Buildings of historic, architectural, or cultural interest add to the ambiance of the City and should be honored, preserved, and protected. The Land Use Element consists of narrative, goals, policies, and actions, as well as a Land Use Map that outlines the future development of Pismo Beach. It presents the pattern of land uses for the ultimate development of the City for the GP/LCP horizon (year 2040) through the land use designations shown on the Land Use Map. Text and maps should be considered collectively as project approvals or future amendments are made. The Land Use Element identifies local goals that presents how Pismo Beach’s local environment will look in 2040, policies that measure progress toward the goals, and actions that identify the regulatory tools the City can use to meet those goals. 1.2 Relationship to State Law The Land Use Element is the City’s fundamental land use policy document, and it provides the basic policy direction for the City’s development and conservation for the next 20 years. In accordance with the requirements of State law for General Plans (Government Code Section 65300), the Land Use Element must designate the general distribution, location and extent of land for housing, business, industry, open space, education, public facilities, and other categories of public and private uses of land. It must also include standards of residential density and building intensity for the various areas covered by the General Plan. The Land Use Element must also be consistent with the coastal resource protection policies of the Coastal Act. Coastal Act policies (PRC 30212.5, 30213, 30220-30223 and 30250(c)) require provisions for public and low-cost recreation and visitor serving facilities by requiring that suitable land be designated for these uses and that these uses be given priority. This Land Use Element contains policies and land uses designed to maintain and expand the mixture of both public and private recreational and visitor -serving facilities in the City. 1 The City of Pismo Beach includes one historical place listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the John Price House. The National Register of Historic Places does not list any qualifying or eligible historic places in Pismo Beach. See Policies 2.2 and 2.3 for relevant historic building policies and actions. 2 1.3 Relationship to Other General Plan Elements The Land Use Element has the broadest scope of all the elements and acts as the foundation for setting the goals and development policies for all other elements. By setting the foundation, the Land Use Element is often referred to for a complete understanding of the purposes, intentions, and development requirements throughout the rest of the GP/LCP. The Housing Element of the Pismo Beach General Plan outlines how the City will accommodate Pismo Beach’s regional housing needs assessment (RHNA) as determined by the California Department of Housing (HCD) and Community Development and the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG). The City’s Housing Element was last updated in 2019; it was approved by City Council in 2019 and then certified by HCD in March 2020. The Land Use Element provides the land use designations and policy to support implementation of the Housing Element. The Circulation Element provides the street system, street design and transportation improvements necessary to address the transportation needs resulting from the land use designations defined in the Land Use Element. The Pismo Beach Circulation Element 2 was updated in 2018 and includes goals and policies that will be reinforced and implemented through the Land Use Element, including policies to reduce vehicle miles traveled by enhancing pedestrian, bike and transit infrastructure, and policies that promote transit-oriented developments. In addition, the Parks, Recreation, and Access Element outlines policies to achieve the overall parks and open space system as determined by the Land Use Map contained in this Element. The Parks, Recreation, and Access Element includes an access component required by the Coastal Act, which ensures the continued development and maintenance of public access to the Pismo Beach coastline. The Land Use Element sets forth land use regulations for coastal access and as well as non-coastal recreational access. Pismo Beach currently offers a variety of parks and recreational opportunities; therefore, it is important for the City to maintain a comprehensive park and recreation program, which can be implemented through appropriate zoning. The Safety Element contains goals and policies regarding coastal hazards and the potential impact of hazards on the development covered by this Land Use Element. The policies of the Safety Element ensure that the goals of the Land Use Element are implemented in a manner that ensures safety over the life of the development. The Land Use Element sets forth the land use regulations for areas vulnerable to certain hazards. For example, the Land Use Element sets limitations on the types of development proposed in a floodplain. In imposing any restrictions, it is the intent of the GP/LCP to protect the public health, safety and welfare and to minimize a development’s exposure to hazards consistent with the Coastal Act. 2 The updated Circulation Element was approved by the CCC in 2018 with suggested modifications related to the extension of Mattie Road, which were later accepted by the City. 3 The Conservation and Open Space Element provides the framework for protecting biological and ecological coastal resources. The conservation issues focus on the natural resources of Pismo Beach including air, water, biology, archaeology and physical geography. The intent of the Conservation and Open Space Element is to guide the management of these resources to enhance the quality of life of residents and visitors and to prevent waste, exploitation, destruction, or neglect. The Land Use Element establishes the open space designation, which contains regulations that help conserve the resources further addressed in the Conservation and Open Space Element. When viewed with this Land Use Element, the goals and policies work to create a vibrant community that protects and enhances its natural resources, one of the many aspects that make Pismo Beach a desirable community for its residents and visitors. The Noise Element ensures that residents, businesses, and workers in the City, as well as visitors to the City, will not be subjected to excessive levels of noise. Further, the Noise Element aims to protect the long-term values of both public and private investment by preventing the deterioration of properties as a result of incompatible noise intrusion. The Land Use Element applies these methods to land use planning and zoning decisions. The Land Use Element aims to reduce incompatible land uses that would result in noise intrusion. Together, the GP/LCP Elements form an integrated, internally consistent plan, providing goals, policies and actions that reinforce each other and work together towards achieving the community vision. 1.3 Relationship to Community Vision Consistent with the Community Vision described in the introductory chapter, the City has developed guiding principles to set the framework for this Land Use Element. The Land Use Element strives to implement the community vision through its goals, policies, and actions, and is built around the following guiding principles: Preserve the Historic Ambiance of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach contains the historic “Classic California” ambiance of a small California beach town. This is particularly evident in the Downtown Core and Shell Beach Village. Although difficult to define, the preservation of this ambiance is important, and the City shall encourage its protection. This ambiance provides an attractive experience by creating a link to the past, a sense of place, and a slower pace. The Land Use Element sets forth the tools for preservation of historic neighborhood character and retention of the classic downtown setting framed by original landmark architecture and character properties. The historic character provides the setting to attract vibrant downtown uses that serve the needs of residents and visitors. Support the Visitor Population While Enhancing the Quality of Life for all Residents The California coast is an extremely desirable place to live, work and recreate that belongs to all the people. As such, congenial and cooperative use by both residents and visitors is recognized. Such use should capture the best attributes of the City and creatively 4 determine the acceptable place, scale, intensity, rate and methods for development consistent with resource protection and public benefit. The Land Use Element provides the tools for an economy built on visitor-serving uses that balances commercial and residential development. Through protection of existing visitor-serving overnight accommodations and promotion of the development of new retail and service businesses, the City can best support the visiting population that is so essential to the Pismo Beach economy, while also enhancing the quality of life for residents with a healthy year-round economy. In addition to accommodations and retail services, the Land Use Element provides policy for the health and well-being of local residents and visitors alike. These policies strive to be the catalyst for healthy and desirable living environments through the use of design guidelines, appropriate zoning, transit accessibility, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Manage Growth Effectively With the focus of this GP/LCP is on providing a high quality of life for Pismo Beach citizens and visitors and protecting the community’s natural and coastal resources, the Land Use Element strives to provide a high level of service and infrastructure, and plan for new development that is thoughtfully concentrated within its urban boundaries. Through tools such as enforcement of development fees and annual reporting, the City can effectively manage and maintain its high level of service, valued resources, and the infrastructure needed to complement the City’s growth. The Land Use Element also provides the tools and incentives for the City to direct new development that responsibly concentrates development in areas where infill and adaptive reuse will contribute to a high quality of life for the entire community. Preserve and Protect Natural Resources The ocean, beach and the abutting land are recognized as an irreplaceable natural resource to be enjoyed by the entire City and region. The Land Use Element provides the tools to direct new development to preserve and enhance the natural resources of Pismo Beach, including the ocean and beaches, hills, valleys, canyons and cliffs, and the Pismo and Meadow Creek streams, marsh and estuaries. The Land Use Element provides policies that further enhance the requirements provided within the Coastal Act. Land use policies shall retain ridgelines, hillsides, open space, and the other unique natural features within Pismo Beach. The Land Use Element guides planning decisions in the Coastal Zone that ensures public coastal access, while maintaining coastal preservation and protection. (See related principles and policies in the Conservation Element and Safety Element.) 5 2. City Structure and Neighborhood Form 2.1 Existing Land Use Form and Pattern Pismo Beach’s existing land use form is shaped by its topography, linear coastal orientation, natural resources and circulation patterns. The City is served by four main arteries: Highway 101, Cabrillo Highway (Highway 1), Shell Beach Road and Price Street, which all run northwest–southeast through the City. Residential and commercial uses are mostly concentrated west of Highway 101, while open space and industrial uses are clustered mostly east of Highway 101. Price Canyon Road, Fourth Street, Oak Park Boulevard, and James Way are also main connector roads. Figure LU-1 shows the City’s existing land use form and pattern as of 2020 and Figure LU-2 presents a map of the City’s existing land use conditions. As depicted in Figure LU-2, the majority of the City lies within the Coastal Zone. Pismo Beach offers many opportunities to use and enjoy the coast, including the many public beaches, the iconic Municipal Pier, the Pismo Beach State Beach and campground, several oceanfront and bluff-top parks, and numerous public access trails that link the community with the Pacific Ocean. Pismo Beach also offers a range of overnight accommodations including hotels, motels, State campground and privately owned RV sites, and short-term vacation rentals. These uses are important for sustaining the tourist industry of Pismo Beach while also supporting visitor access to coastal resources. An inventory of these uses as of 2019 is presented in Table LU-1, including the total number of units and their price ranges. Table LU-1 Overnight Accommodations1 Accommodation Number of Units Price Range (per night)2 Campground and RV parks 515 $35-55 Hotel and motel 1,980 $66 – 391 Short-term vacation rentals Approx. 3403 $65 – 1,114 1 Source: City of Pismo Beach 2019. City of Pismo Beach Low-Cost Visitor Accommodation Technical Memorandum. October 29, 2019. https://pismobeach.org/DocumentCenter/View/53764/LCVSA-Study-. 2 The prices shown for campground and RV parks and hotel and motel categories reflect the least expensive options available for that date, as some hotels and motels surveyed have multiple price levels. 3 A search of STR websites with no dates of stay entered produced 334 available STRs. 6 Figure LU-1, Built Form and Land Use Pattern 7 Figure LU-2, Existing Conditions 8 The following sections describe the City’s existing land uses at the neighborhood planning scale, as well as the City’s sphere of influence. Table LU-2, Existing Development by Neighborhood Planning Area, provides a breakdown of the land uses contained within each Planning Area. As shown Table LU-2, the City of Pismo Beach includes an assortment of residential, commercial, office, public and open space uses. Table LU-2 Existing Development by Neighborhood Planning Area (2019) Planning Area Residential (units) Visitor Serving (rooms) Retail, Service, Office (1,000 square feet) Open Space (acres) Single Family Mobile Home Multi-Family Resort Commercial Commercial Industrial Public/Semi-Public Open Space Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs/South Palisades 478 0 0 0 253.5 0.0 0.8 97.0 North Spyglass/Spyglass 108 0 71 298 500.9 0.0 1.1 7.3 St. Andrews/Spindrift 228 0 25 0 51.0 0.0 8.8 9.1 Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves 910 0 44 24 321.5 0.0 9.7 13.6 Motel 79 0 0 572 2028.6 0.0 0.0 25.2 Downtown Core 512 0 279 596 1,672.7 0.0 16.4 150.1 9 Table LU-2 Existing Development by Neighborhood Planning Area (2019) Planning Area Residential (units) Visitor Serving (rooms) Retail, Service, Office (1,000 square feet) Open Space (acres) Single Family Mobile Home Multi-Family Resort Commercial Commercial Industrial Public/Semi-Public Open Space Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh 417 515 141 370 2,491.2 142.9 21.7 211.9 Oak Park Heights 1,189 0 0 120 1,968.9 1,172.6 207.8 113.4 Pismo Heights 656 0 46 0 0.0 0.0 49.2 3.4 Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex 404 0 0 0 306.6 0.0 5.6 177.9 Total 4,981 515 418 1980 9,594.9 1,315.5 321.1 808.9 2.1.1 Neighborhood Planning Areas Pismo Beach is organized into neighborhood planning areas, each with its own name and unique characteristics. The first General Plan in 1992 contained 18 planning areas, which are consolidated into 10 planning areas for this updated GP/LCP, described briefly below. All these planning areas are predominantly built-out to their maximum development potential based on their designated land uses and associated density limits, with little to no developable acres remaining. As such, infill development and adaptive reuse are encouraged and commonly used practices within the City. Figure LU-3 presents a map of these neighborhood planning areas. The current approximate development within each planning area is provided in Table LU-2 above. 10 Figure LU-3, Neighborhood Planning Areas 11 Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs/South Palisades The Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs portion of this planning area is an ocean-oriented, low-profile residential neighborhood with a backdrop of coastal foothills. The Bluffs/Sunset Palisades areas are almost totally developed with low-density residential use and only a few scattered vacant residential lots. It includes the Ontario Ridge area, now known as The Bluffs, which was annexed to the City in 1990 and has been developed since 1992. The bluff-top area long the ocean fronting The Bluffs subdivision consists of a 9-acre open space/recreational parcel under ownership of The Bluffs homeowner’s association, but with public access rights. The base of this bluff area includes an intertidal habitat and natural resource area, which should be protected. There is not public access to this sensitive habitat area. Damage by wave conditions is possible and bluff erosion is an ongoing process. Fifty-three acres of land on the upper slopes of The Bluffs are in permanent open space. The Sunset Palisades neighborhood extends from Highway 101 to the ocean and comprises land on both sides of Shell Beach Road, 6 acres of private open space in a gated community, and the 5.7-acre Palisades public park. Archaeological resources are evident in this area. The property between Shell Beach Road and U.S. Highway 101 has historically been utilized as open space with limited residential development. This area is subject to high noise levels from both Highway 101 and Shell Beach Road. The bluffs along the Sunset Palisades stretch of coast are primarily under private ownership. Homes along these ocean-fronting bluffs have provided their own stairways to small beaches. Some of these have been damaged in past storms. Seawalls have also been constructed in the area to protect structures from damage. South of Sunset Palisades, South Palisades includes clustered multifamily and single-family residential development. Each parcel in this area includes 60% of open space, preservation of views from U.S. Freeway 101 to the ocean, and a 100-foot-wide lateral access dedication to the City for public parks and open space along the entire cliff. The ocean bluffs range in height from 40–50 feet at the north end to 80 feet at the south end of the planning area. San Luis Obispo County has an easement from the toe of the bluff to the mean high tide line. A sandy beach extends for most of the length of the oceanfront in this area. See the Public Access and Recreation Element for the locations of coastal access points. 12 North Spyglass/Spyglass This planning area comprises resort commercial uses. North Spyglass, located north of Spyglass Drive, consists of three large parcels with three major hotels (the Dolphin Bay Resort, Cliffs Hotel, Spyglass Inn). A key aspect of the area includes a 50-foot-wide lateral access at the top of the bluffs, a beach access stairway, and related public parking at the northern barranca. A bluff-top trail spans the entire portion of this pl anning area that provides access to the beach adjacent to the Cliffs Hotel and the South Palisades area. At the base of 50-foot bluffs is a narrow sandy beach accessible during normal tide. Bluff erosion is severe in this area. South of Spyglass Drive is the Spyglass community, which is a fully developed residential area with multiple housing types, a small commercial center and the Spyglass Public Park. The area serves as a gateway to Pismo Beach as both Highway 101 on- and off-ramps are located in this area. St. Andrews/Spindrift St. Andrews Tract is comprised of predominantly low-density residential, with open space along the northern border and high-density residential and the Pismo Beach Fire Department Station 63 on the northern end of Coburn Lane. South of the St. Andrews Tract area is Spindrift, a planned residential community consisting of multifamily housing uses in the larger southern parcel and single-family residential and open space/recreational uses to the north, west, and east. Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves This planning area covers Shell Beach and the neighboring Terrace Avenue and Dinosaur Caves areas. The Terrace Avenue area is home to Shell Beach Elementary School and a mix of low, medium, and high-density residential uses. South of the Terrace Avenue area is Shell Beach, also known as the Village, which is predominantly medium-density residential, with high-density residential between the medium-density residential and commercial uses bordering the west side of Shell Beach Road. The Village residential neighborhoods were developed around the original commercial area along what was once the old highway and consist of a large collection of single-story homes constructed between 1920 and 1950. These homes provide a framework of small-scale development that lends to the small-town character of this beach community. Just south of Cliff Avenue is Dinosaur Caves Park, which offers walking trails, a playground, and ocean views on an 11-acre park. The Dinosaur Caves planning area extends south covering a resort commercial parcel, currently the Inn at the Cove. The Shell Beach Streetscape Project is a City-led project that includes plans to reconstruct an 18-block section of Shell Beach Road in Downtown Shell Beach between Cliff Avenue and Terrace Avenue, with a multipurpose trail, signage, and lighting, with the intent on making the area more multimodal. Additionally, the City adopted the Shell Beach Design Standards and Guidelines in 2017, which provides additional guidance to protect the existing Village character with future residential, commercial, and mixed-use development and redevelopment within the Shell Beach community. 13 Motel District South of the Dinosaur Caves planning area is the Motel District, which is comprised of resort commercial uses (primarily hotel and restaurant) with some medium-density residential uses along Franklin Drive, Wilmar Avenue, and Harbor View Avenue. Downtown Core This planning area has a variety of land uses, including resort commercial; commercial; public/semi-public; open space; high-density reside ntial, including condominium and multi-family apartments; and low-density residential uses. This planning area serves as Pismo Beach’s downtown that provides uses like shops, restaurants, cafes, art studios, and the Pismo Beach Pier. The Pismo Beach Pier, plaza, and boardwalk offer stunning ocean and sunset views, as well as recreational fishing and walking. The Downtown Core creates a public hub for residents and visitors to eat, shop, and recreate in a small beach-town environment. The Pier Plaza Project is a City-led project that includes reconstruction of the entire pier parking lot and pier plaza areas with the addition of new features for public recreation and beach access, including restrooms, seating areas, and children’s play area. This project include s a full reconfiguration of the parking lot into a more inviting, revitalized area. Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh The Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh planning area is separated from the Downtown Core planning area by Pismo Creek and bisected by the railroad tracks; it has no interior road connections to the Downtown Core area. This planning area is composed of mobile home park, commercial, open space, and industrial uses. Along Pismo Creek, this planning area is currently used as commercial recreational areas in the form of recreational vehicle (RV) parks. The relatively large parcels in the center of the Pismo Creek planning area are residential mobile home parks. The Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh planning area comprises open space in the form of Pismo Marsh, the Monarch butterfly grove, creek open space, walking trails, and campground uses. The commercial area is the home of the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets, which provides a range of retail for local and regional residents and visitors. The industrial uses in this planning area are non-polluting uses, such as a trailer storage, and the commercial manufacturing use consists of a shopping center. Oak Park Heights The Oak Park Heights area includes the entire northeast quadrant of the City lying northeast of the 101 Freeway, northwest of North Oak Park Boulevard and Southeast of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The area consists of the three neighborhood sub-areas of Toucan Terrace, Pismo Oaks, and Pacific Estates. The Land Use Element includes policies for the entire area as a whole, including these four sub-areas. The Oak Park Heights planning area contains low- and medium-density residential uses with open space areas surrounding the residential. Additionally, there are commercial areas at the southern boundary of Pismo Beach and along Highway 101. The commercial uses along the southern City boundary contain mixed commercial centers and medical centers, and the commercial uses along Highway 101 are office parks and hotels. 14 Pismo Heights The Pismo Heights planning area is comprised of low-density residential with some medium-density residential in the southern portion and high density residential along Highway 101. The Pismo Heights planning area is almost completely built out and provides many with dramatic views. The area includes Francis Judkins Junior High School, the Old City Hall complex and Boosinger public park. Open space is located east of the low-density residential and public/semi-public uses are located in the southeastern portion of the Pismo Heights area. On the eastern side of this planning area is the City’s sewage treatment plant, baseball fields, and the Pacific Gas and Electric transport and storage facility. Pismo Creek runs through the planning area which creates flooding constraints. Other constraints in this area include poor vehicular access to the baseball fields, and the closure of the bridge due to structural problems. Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex The Freeway Foothills planning area is located east of Highway 101, and consists of low and medium density residential neighborhoods, planned residential, a restaurant and small shopping complex, and a small undeveloped parcel at the northern end of the area. The Freeway Foothills planning area includes the specific plan areas of Baycliff, and Spyglass Ridge, and other residential development associated with the Mattie Road Annexation area. This area is highly visible from U.S. Highway 101 above Shell Beach and Sunset Palisades. The Freeway Foothills provide an important visual and open space backdrop for the entire northern one-half of the City. The planning area itself has spectacular ocean views. The planning area is physically separated from the other City areas by U.S. Highway 101. Only two cross-highway accesses exist which connect to Mattie Road from Shell Beach Road/Palisades Drive and Price Street. These accesses are via freeway underpasses located at Spyglass Drive and just north of the Shorecliff Lodge. 15 2.1.3 Sphere of Influence and Extended Planning Area The Cortese/Knox/Hertzberg Local Government Reorganization Act of 2000 (CKH Act) requires the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) to update the Spheres of Influence (SOI) for all applicable jurisdictions in the County. A SOI is defined by Government Code 56425 as “…a plan for the probable physical boundary and service area of a local agency or municipality.” The SOI generally considers a 20-year, long-range planning tool, which bears relation to an incorporated area and represents its potential future maximum extent. If a jurisdiction is reasonably capable of providing needed resources and basic infrastructure to disadvantaged unincorporated communities within the sphere of influence or contiguous to the SOI, it is important that such findings of infrastructure and resource availability occur when revisions to the SOI and annexations are proposed by the agency or property owners. It is prudent for LAFCO to analyze present and long-term infrastructure demands and resource capabilities of the City of Pismo Beach. LAFCO accomplishes this by evaluating 1) the resources and services that are currently available, and 2) the ability of the City to expand such resources and services in line with increasing demands. California planning law requires the City to adopt a general plan within its City limits and also for any land outside its boundaries that in its judgment bears relation to its plann ing. This is a means by which the City can communicate its concerns for the future of lands under the jurisdiction of the County or neighboring cities. One way to do this is through the designation of an "extended planning area," which may extend beyond the City limits and the SOI area. The City adopted a Sphere of Influence Update in September 2019, which provides a service review with written determinations that address the required legislative factors. Based upon the information contained in this review, the LAFCO determined that the Pismo Beach SOI be updated as shown in Figure LU-4. The decision is consistent with the Memorandum of Agreement agreed to by the City and County. The SOI includes land in Price Canyon and along Oak Park Boulevard and a small area along Mattie Road. The Price Canyon area of the SOI includes four parcels totaling approximately 1,100 acres. The Los Robles del Mar area of the SOI, west of Oak Park Boulevard, includes two separate parcels. One parcel is an approximately 152-acre ownership and the second site is a private school site of approximately 30 acres. A small area located closer to Mattie Road was added to the SOI in 2016 for a Preserve parking lot and restroom facilities. The SOI defines the area to which the City intends to provide municipal services and allow the development of some urban land uses for the lifetime of this document. The Land Use Element strives to take a proactive role to planning the areas within the SOI, as well as provide its citizens quality levels of service from the City by using local controls. These local controls include restrictions on land uses and parcel sizes in the SOI. 16 Figure LU-4, Sphere of Influence boundaries 17 2.2 Land Use Designations and Density The following land use designations, shown in Figure LU-5, Land Use Map, are meant to be broad enough to give the City flexibility in implementing the GP/LCP, but clear enough to provide sufficient direction regarding the expected type, location and relation of land uses planned in the City. See Land Use Policies LU-1.1 through LU-1.7 for more information on each land use designation. The City’s Zoning Ordinance contains more detailed provisions and standards. More than one zoning district may be consistent with a single GP/LCP land use designation. Pismo Beach Land Use Designations • Low-Density Residential • Medium-Density Residential • High-Density Residential • Very High-Density Residential Overlay • Mobile Home Park • Commercial • Resort Commercial • Central Commercial • Mixed Use • Industrial • Public/Semi-Public • Open Space Pismo Beach Land Use Densities The density/intensity standards regulate how much development is permitted on a site. For non-residential uses, development intensity is controlled by a measure known as Floor Area Ratio (FAR), which refers to the ratio between a building’s total floor area and the total area of the site. For instance, a one-story building occupying one-half of a parcel has an FAR of 0.5; a two-story building occupying a quarter of the same parcel also has an FAR of 0.5. For residential uses, the density standards are expressed as the number of housing units per gross acre (dwelling units/acre, or DU/A); FAR and slope are also used to determine the intensity in some residential districts. Density and FAR are standard measures of site intensity that are used to evaluate development and during the site planning review process. FAR applies to the entire development on a site, inclusive of any residential component; however, any parking garage space is not required to be included in the FAR calculation, although parking garages are subject to various other development standards and design guidelines. Table LU-3, Land Use Density/Intensity Limits, summarizes the density and intensity ranges for each land use designation, as well as the total acreage in each land use category. As established by the Zoning Ordinance or use permit, height limitations shall comply with whichever standards require the greatest restrictions for heights. 22 Table LU-3 Land Use Density/Intensity Limits Land Use Designations FAR or Density Height*Height 1,2 Implementing Zone(s) Total Acreage Coastal Zone/Non-Coastal Zone Coastal Zone Low-Density Residential 1 to 8 units per ac. 25 feet R-1, R-R 76.5 Medium-Density Residential 9 to 15 units per ac. 25 - 35 feet R-2, R-R 247.5 High-Density Residential 16 to 30 units per ac. 25 feet R-3, R-R 22.2 Very High-Density Residential Overlay 20 to 50 units per ac. 35 - 45 feet3 R-3 1.1 Mobile Home Park Maximum 8 units to the acre M-H 58.5 Commercial Maximum FAR of 2.0 25 - 42 feet R-4, R-R, C-R, C-1, C-2, C-M 32.5 Resort Commercial Maximum FAR of 1.25 35 feet RR, R-4, and CR 73.9 Central Commercial Maximum FAR of 1.25 35 feet R-4, R-R, MU 66.4 Mixed-Use Residential 1.25 maximum Commercial uses: 2.0 maximum Determined by overlay zone C-1, C-2, MU 57.2 Industrial Maximum FAR of 0.5 25 feet C-M 30.2 Public/Semi Public Maximum FAR of 2.0 25 feet G 468.38 Open Space N/A 15 feet OS-1, OS-R 32.21 1 Coastal height limits are provided to ensure that the scenic and visual qualities of coastal areas are considered and protected consistent with Coastal Act Section 30251. 2 Overlay zones may impose additional standards for applicable properties. Please refer to the City of Pismo Beach Municipal Code for additional requirements. 3 Buildings may be up to forty-five (45) feet in height where the Planning Commission finds that significant public views to and along the coast and other scenic areas are protected. 23 Figure LU-5, Land Use Map 24 2.3 General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Buildout Likely development under the GP/LCP is referred to as buildout. Table LU-4 provides the projected development at full buildout of the GP/LCP. The GP/LCP has a 2040 horizon; however, the plan does not specify or anticipate when buildout will occur, as long-range demographic and economic trends are difficult to predict. The designation of a site for a certain use also does not necessarily mean that the site will be developed or redeveloped with that use during the planning period, as most development will depend on property owner initiative. With much of the City currently “built out,” or developed, and the preservation of open space a priority, undeveloped land available for development is limited in Pismo Beach. Most of the development over the next 20 years is likely to take place on sites that are currently vacant and or underutilized, where the value of the land is worth substantially more than the value of the structure on the land. In addition, future development may come from expanded development on sites with existing structures or redevelopment of sites and structures that come to the end of their useful life over the next 20 years. There are a number of smaller vacant sites in Pismo Beach, but many of these sites face significant development constraints. Many of the larger vacant lots are located in the Sunset Palisades, Pismo Heights and Oak Park Heights planning areas, east of planned residential developments. Ultimately, many of these vacant lots are located along the outskirts of the City boundary, on steep slopes or face other environmental constraints, so development opportunities are limited. Most of the vacant and underutilized sites not located in limiting areas in Pismo Beach tend to be in the Downtown Core planning area and along the Highway 101 corridor in the Shell Beach planning area. The sites located in these areas may be appropriate for different types of development, depending on their land use designation, parcel size, and other factors. It is likely that much of the growth and change in Pismo Beach over the next 20 years will occur in these areas, which are well served with existing public facilities and services, including transportation facilities, and commercial and community uses. Given the large number of adjacent underutilized and vacant sites in the Downtown Core planning area, this area in particular is a good candidate to experience growth and change in the coming years. 25 Table LU-4 Projected Development at Full Build Out Land Use Number of Vacant or Underutilized Parcels Potential Increase in Population Potential Increase in Dwelling Units Potential Increase in Jobs Potential Increase in Non-Residential Building Area (1,000 square feet) Commercial 40 N/A N/A 230 379 Central Commercial 26 N/A N/A 33 248 High Density Residential 139 185 162 -12 - Mixed Use 48 1,221 722 272 108 Medium Density Residential 32 471 228 0 - Total 285 1,877 1,112 523 735 2.3.1 Jobs-Housing Balance Jobs-housing balance refers to the condition in which a single community offers an equal supply of jobs and housing, which theoretically would reduce the need for people to commute in or out of town for work. In reality, the match of education, skills and interests is not always accommodated within the boundaries of one community. Still, matching the jobs-housing balance to the workforce needs to availability of housing types/prices can potentially reduce commute travel. To measure a community’s jobs-housing balance, it is typical to look at employed residents rather than housing units. A jobs-to-employed residents’ ratio of 1.0 would indicate parity between jobs and employed residents, although because of regional interdependencies, inter-City commuting will still result. Pismo Beach has been primarily established as a residential tourist community, with smaller commercial and employment centers, and, traditionally, many residents have commuted out of the City for work. SLOCOG’s 2015 Regional Land Use Model estimated that Pismo Beach contains 4,898 jobs, which comprises 4% of the region’s jobs. Pismo Beach contains 5,649 housing units, which is 4.7% of the region’s housing units. Therefore, Pismo Beach’s jobs/housing ratio is 0.86, meaning for every housing unit there is approximately 0.86 jobs (SLOCOG 2019 RHNA). As shown in Table LU-5, SLOCOG’s 2019 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) estimates Pismo Beach’s housing supply to increase to 6,364 units by 2030 and jobs to increase to 5,309 by 2030. Therefore, Pismo Beach’s 2030 estimated jobs/housing ratio is 0.83. 26 Table LU-5 Pismo Beach Jobs and Housing Units Year Jobs Housing Units Employment/Housing Ratio 2015 4,898 5,649 0.86 2030 5,309 6,364 0.83 Data sources: SLOCOG 2050 Regional Growth Forecast (Beacon Economics and SLOCOG, 2017) 2.3.2 Growth Management Section 30250(a) of the Coastal Act requires new residential, commercial, or industrial development to be located near existing developed areas, where it will not have significant adverse impacts, either individually or cumulatively on coastal resources. Coastal Act policies already reflect many Smart Growth 1 principles by requiring, for example: that new development be concentrated in areas able to serve it (PRC 30250), that public works facilities be designed and limited to accommodate needs generated by development (30254), that urban-rural limit lines be established (PRC 30241) and that new development minimize energy consumption and vehicle miles traveled (PRC 30253d). However, other Coastal Act policies must also be addressed in new development and land use plans to further smart growth. For example, the conversion of visitor serving land uses to a higher density mixed-use residential/visitor serving use may be appropriate in limited circumstances where it can be demonstrated that priority visitor serving uses are adequately provided for within the local jurisdiction factoring in future demand for these uses. This Land Use Element reinforces measures to concentrate residential, commercial and related development within areas where services and infrastructure are already provided and where growth will not have significant adverse impacts on coastal resources. Furthermore, this Land Use Element continues to prioritize land uses in the Coastal Zone that are coastal-dependent and provide lower cost visitor and recreational coastal facilities. Smart Growth tools to promote and incentivize sustainable urban development, including transit-oriented development, are included in the goals, policies and actions of this Element, while protecting and accommodating priority uses and protecting public access and sensitive habitat, scenic, archaeological and other coastal resources. Furthermore, the GP/LCP buildout does not exceed available public services. 1 Smart Growth is an approach to development that encourages a mix of building types and uses, diverse housing and transportation options, development within existing neighborhoods, and community engagement. 27 3. Goals, Policies, and Actions The goals, policies, and actions of this section of the Land Use Element along with the GP/LCP Land Use Map constitute the physical framework that implements the community vision and guiding principles as provided in the Introduction to the GP/LCP. CITYWIDE POLICIES The following goals, policies, and actions apply to all land within City limits, including all planning areas and land in the Coastal Zone. A community with a variety of well-regulated land uses that support the diverse needs of both visitors and residents. Variety of Residential Uses. The City shall include land use designations to accommodate all income groups and a wide variety of densities and housing types. Range of Housing Types. In order to provide a variety of housing choices for all income groups, the City shall modify the zoning code to ensure the available zoning is consistent with the latest adopted Housing Element, and create residential areas with a wide variety of densities and housing types. Clustered Development. Encourage clustered developments in new projects to increase and protect open space, improve visual qualities, and potentially decrease cost of municipal services. Density Bonus. The City shall comply with density bonus requirements required by State law, while protecting coastal resources. Protection of Existing Mobile Home Park. The City shall retain the ordinance to protect the existing mobile home park in the Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh planning area in order to retain its lower cost housing. Commercial Uses. The City shall include land use designations that allow for visitor-serving, neighborhood and regional commercial uses. Attractive and Stimulating Surroundings. The Commercial land use designations shall allow visitor-serving, neighborhood and regional commercial uses. Commercial areas should be enjoyable places in which to shop and work. This means providing pedestrian scaled design, landscaping of building and parking lots, street trees, screening of storage areas and the banning of out of scale advertising. See LU-2.1e. 28 Secondary Residential Uses Encouraged. Where appropriate, residential uses are encouraged on upper floors in all commercial areas within the Downtown Core and Shell Beach planning areas, with active ground-floor commercial uses on Shell Beach Road, Price Street, Dolliver Street, Cypress Street, Main Street, Pomeroy Avenue, and Hinds Avenue. See also policies under Goal LU-7, for related policies and actions. Thoroughfares. The more intensive commercial uses, such as supermarkets, malls, and visitor-serving uses, shall be encouraged to locate along the major thoroughfares. Drive-Thru Services Prohibited. In order to maintain and promote a more pedestrian-oriented beach community character, as well as to reduce the high volume of vehicle trips attracted by drive-thru establishments, the City shall prohibit any new development of drive-thru services in restaurants, banks, dry cleaners and other business establishments in the Downtown Core and Shell Beach Planning Areas. All Income Levels. Where resort commercial uses are allowed, visitor-serving accommodations for all income levels shall be promoted through appropriate zoning and the policies included under Policy LU-4.2, Protection of Visitor-Serving Overnight Accommodations. R.V. Parks Restricted. R.V. parks shall be restricted to the Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh planning area. Non-Visitor-Serving Uses. In resort-commercial zones, residential and/or non-visitor-serving commercial uses may be permitted on lands designated within this category only if one of the following findings is made: 1. The size, shape or location of the parcel make it inappropriate for a visitor-serving use; or 2. The use is low-or moderate-income housing that is clearly subordinate and accessory to an on-site hotel or motel use and is established for, and limited to occupancy by, employees of the hotel, motel or other nearby visitor-serving establishments. Uses that shall be specifically prohibited include office space for general or medical businesses, and non-retail commercial services. Condominium Hotels/Timeshares. The conversion of hotels, or other overnight visitor accommodations except short-term rentals, into airspace condominium units, also known as timeshares or fractional-ownership hotels, may be allowed through a coastal development permit approved by the City Council, provided that such units are clearly designed as hotel rooms or suites rather than dwelling units, are restricted to occupancy on a transient basis, and appropriate mitigation or in-lieu fees for the loss of visitor-serving accommodations is provided. Approval of any such conversion shall be subject to conditions that will assure the development functions primarily as visitor-serving accommodations. Such conditions shall require recordation of enforceable deed restrictions limiting occupancy by any individual to a maximum of 30 calendar days per year, cumulative; compel participation in a rental program open to the general public on the same basis as non-condominium hotels; and discourage design features that would 29 be characteristic of long-term occupancy. Mitigation or in-lieu fees shall be required commensurate with the loss or impact to the existing visitor-serving accommodation being converted. Mixed-Use Designation. Provide for a wide variety of land uses including visitor lodging, commercial retail, restaurants, service uses, offices, and residential uses through the mixed-use designation and a mixed-use overlay zone. Mixed-Use Designation and Overlay Zone. Focus the mixed-use designation within the Downtown Core and create a mixed-use overlay zone for other areas appropriate for mixed-use as directed by this Element. Downtown mixed-use shall be beach visitor-serving-focused incorporating services, businesses, and multifamily units in a pedestrian-oriented community character along the primary beach area. Variety in Configuration. The City shall allow for a variety in configurations of mixed-use development while providing a strong relationship to the street and supporting a pedestrian-oriented setting. Priority of Uses. When considering mixed-use development projects, active commercial uses shall, at a minimum, be located on the first floor. Affordable residential uses shall be encouraged. Transitional Areas. Mixed-Use designations should be designed to promote transitional areas between core commercial areas and residential zoning, and to foster new commercial and mixed-use development in proximity to transit access. Non-Polluting Industrial Uses. The Industrial land use designations shall permit nonpolluting, warehousing, distribution, assembly and light manufacturing uses. Pismo Creek and Pismo Marsh Impacts. Industrial development shall not adversely impact the sensitive habitats of Pismo Creek or Pismo Marsh. Industrial Standards. Industrial uses shall comply with industrial regulations and standards, including air pollution, noise, waste disposal, access for delivery vehicles and light and glare. These uses should be designed to present a pleasant appearance and shall include appropriate landscaping. Open Storage Yards. With exception to Recreational Vehicle storage facilities, open storage yards of material and equipment are discouraged and subject to design review, and may be prohibited. Public/Semi-Public. The Public and Semi-Public category shall designate land in public ownership that should be developed for public use and various public facilities. 30 Intended Uses. The Public/Semi-Public designation is intended for uses such as public buildings, schools, family care facilities, community centers and other public facilities. Preserve Open Space. Open space lands, including public and private parks, shall not be developed intensively with buildings or other structures. Height Limit. The City shall not permit buildings and structures that exceed 15 feet within Open Space designations. Retain Ridgelines and Hillsides. Retain ridgelines and prominent hillsides as open space through appropriate clustering and/or transfer of density to other parts of a development site. Citywide Open Space Network. The City shall include the lake, creeks, and marsh as part of a Citywide and regional network of open space, parks, and – where appropriate – trails, all fostering understanding, enjoyment, and protection of the natural landscape and wildlife. Permanent Open Space. The area between Shell Beach Road and the 101 Freeway shall remain in permanent open space. No further land divisions shall be approved in this area. View Corridors. Through appropriate zoning, open space shall be arranged to maximize view corridors from public viewing areas to protect and maintain views of both the ocean and coastal foothills, as well as the visual sense of the coastal terrace landform. Accordingly, common open space shall have continuity throughout the Coastal Zone and shall not be interrupted by fences or other structures. Freeway Underpass Open Space. The open hills on the eastern end of the Spyglass underpass of Highway 101 shall remain in permanent open space. Fire and Drought Tolerant Vegetation. In landscaped open space areas, the City shall require the use of drought and fire-tolerant vegetation. Barrancas. A barranca is a narrow, deep gully or arroyo with steep sides. Pismo Beach’s barrancas are located perpendicular to the coastal bluffs. The barrancas shall be left in natural open space and used as view corridors to the ocean. See GP/LCP Element Public Recreation and Access for policies regarding access requirements in open space areas. 31 A community with a classic California and small-town beach atmosphere. Neighborhood Preservation. The City shall preserve, protect, and enhance the City’s neighborhoods and strive to preserve and enhance their identity. Priority Land Uses. Coastal-dependent uses shall have priority over other uses on or near the shoreline. Pismo Beach’s coastal dependent uses shall include but not be limited to tideland, beaches, the pier, commercial fishing, and recreational boating. Non-coastal-dependent uses that shall be prioritized, but not over coastal-dependent uses, on or near the shoreline shall include visitor-serving uses and accommodations, commercial recreation facilities and public open space. Special Communities. New development shall, where appropriate, protect special communities and neighborhoods that, because of their unique characteristics, are popular visitor destination points for recreational uses. Context-Sensitive Development. Modify the zoning ordinance to include bulk and scale regulations consistent with existing community character. These regulations should protect coastal views, encourage appropriate building articulation, and avoid domineering over other development in the adjacent vicinity. Compatible Uses. Enforce buffers and screening techniques to reduce the impact of noise, air pollution, traffic, or other nuisances from industrial or certain commercial uses. Pedestrian Scale. Enforce pedestrian-focused design guidelines and zoning standards, including setbacks, landscaping, and urban design features for pedestrian corridors leading to commercial, recreational, or coastal areas. In mixed-use areas, ground-floor uses should be active commercial uses for all properties facing Highway 1, Dolliver Street, Hinds Avenue, Pomeroy Avenue and Shell Beach Road. Other commercial uses that are not public, active commercial uses, shall have a transparent and aesthetically pleasing façade that invites pedestrian activity by design. Coastal Views Protection. The scenic and visual qualities shall be considered and protected. All development shall be sited and designed to protect views to and along the ocean and coastal areas; minimize alteration of natural landforms; be of low scale, limited heights, and appropriate building articulation; be visually compatible with the character of the surrounding area; and, where feasible, restore and enhance visual quality in visually degraded areas. Building heights shall be limited to the applicable height provided in the Zoning Ordinance. 32 Side Yard View Corridors. Where side yards provide a view from the street to the ocean or a view to attractive hills and valleys, the side yards should be maintained as open visual access corridors the width of the required side yard setback. These areas shall be open to the sky and free from all visual obstructions including trees and shrubs (except for a see-through gate or fence) from the front property line to the rear property line. Design review shall be required to implement this recommendation. Existing structures are exempted from this policy. Scenic Views Adjacent to the City. The City shall encourage the County to retain the Ontario Hill and the hillsides adjacent to U.S. Highway 101 and Price Canyon Road as open space or grazing land and prohibit development on slopes over 30%. Landscaping. In order to keep a certain high visual quality throughout Pismo Beach, the City shall enforce landscape standards that enhance views and structures lacking interest or variation. Street Trees. The City shall review and amend, as appropriate, its comprehensive Preferred Street Tree List and Identifying Zones for the Planting of Said Trees (Pismo Beach Resolution No R-94-95) to ensure that the street trees list maximize shade, add a sense of enclosure to the streets and address die-off and replacement strategies. In addition, street trees shall be located adjacent to the curb with the sidewalk between the trees and the buildings. This provides a pedestrian scale to the street and creates a psychologically safe and pleasant walking area. Street trees shall generally be required every 35-50 feet per street side. Trees shall be relatively mature, 24- inch box minimum. Parking Lots and Large Asphalt Areas. Parking lots and large asphalt areas such as gas stations shall be extensively landscaped with trees in order to remove the harsh visual impact and create a more friendly pedestrian-oriented scale. The City shall develop incentives to encourage the owners of large pre-existing parking lots and asphalt areas to install extensive landscaping. Such incentives could include design advice or assistance, certificate or awards, public recognition, or assistance from various nonprofit organizations. Large Buildings. Large public and private buildings and structures shall be heavily landscaped with trees and shrubs to break up the massive scale and create a more friendly pedestrian-oriented environment. 33 Special Tree Preservation. A number of special and important trees or tree grouping exist within Pismo Beach which shall be preserved. The types of trees that shall be preserved include: 1. Oak Trees 2. Monterey Pines and Monterey Cypress 3. Eucalyptus Trees 4. Monkey Trees 5. Sycamore Trees Freeway Landscaping. The U.S. Highway 101 cut and fill banks and median strips shall be landscaped. The City shall develop jointly with Caltrans a landscaping design and implementation program for these areas. Tree Maintenance. A Landscaping Program for each new subdivision and commercial development shall be required. The program shall include the maintenance of mature trees and conditions for their removal. The Landscaping Program shall include best landscaping practices that consider compatibility with soils, climatic conditions, topography, existing developments, appearance and maintenance as well as resistance to disease, shape, life span, availability and height in relation to scenic obstruction. Native and Drought Tolerant Landscaping. The City shall require native and drought tolerant landscaping with drip irrigation within all new development and redevelopment that requires discretionary approval in conformance to City water conservation policies. Special Landscape Features. Special landscape features shall be preserved including but not limited to: • The large rock in the U.S. Highway 101 center divide • Rock formations in the Judkins School and Boosinger Park areas, including donated hillside lots • Dinosaur Caves 34 Historic Ambiance. Preserve and enhance the historic ambiance that is most apparent in the Downtown Core and Shell Beach planning areas. Local Historic Inventory. Create and maintain an inventory of buildings of historic, architectural or cultural interest and adopt appropriate programs for recognition and preservation of such structures as local landmarks. Historic buildings shall be defined as over 50 years and deemed of importance to the history, architecture, or culture of the City or region. The buildings included in this inventory shall be publicly announced when a conditional use or demolition of that building is being considered by the City. Special Landmarks. Major buildings in the Downtown Core and Shell Beach Planning Areas should be identified as local landmarks and encouraged to be restored and preserved. As these local landmarks age or show sign or aging, the City shall support the facial and structural upkeep of these landmarks through façade improvement programs or similar programs. See Action LU-2.4b, Historic Resources, for additional policy related to historic ambiance. Funding for Preservation Projects. Work with local nonprofits, preservation groups, and the private sector to establish funding partnerships to raise local funds for preservation projects. State Historical Building Code. The City shall enforce the State Historical Building Code in permitting repairs, alterations and additions necessary for the preservation, rehabilitation, relocation, related construction, and change of use or continued use of a qualified historical building. Historic Resources. Inform owners of historic resources of the Rehabilitation Tax Credit and the benefits of the Certified Local Government program such as grant funding available through the California Office of Historic Preservation, via flyers, brochures, or City-linked webpages. Mills Act. The Mills Act acts as an economic incentive for restoration and preservation of qualified historic buildings by private and property owners. The City shall investigate the costs/benefits of applying limited use of the Mills Act within the City. Should the City find value in this pursuit, the City shall establish criteria and determine how many contracts the City will allow in Pismo Beach’s jurisdiction, then administer and implement tax abatement for qualifying building restoration and preservation. Archaeological Overlay Zone. Continue to implement the Archaeological Overlay Zone to preserve, protect, and maintain land and water areas, structures and other sites that have significant historical, archaeological or cultural importance and provide for the designation of areas that may be of unique value for scientific or educational purposes. 35 City Design. A functional community that is designed with compatible facades, architectural styles, and colors. Building Site Design. Enforce design criteria for new development within the City. Zoning Ordinance Modifications. To allow for creative site planning, the City shall allow modifications to the Zoning Ordinance so long as modifications are consistent with the GP/LCP goals and policies. Minimum access standards for emergency vehicles shall be maintained at all times. Specific criteria and findings shall be developed for when these modifications would be permitted. Entrances. Entrances to residential buildings, to individual dwelling units within the building, and to commercial structures should be readily identifiable from the street, parking area, or semipublic areas and designed to be of a pedestrian scale. Curb Radius. Curb radius shall be established by City street standards and specific local conditions. The goal shall be to reduce curb radius as much as possible to shorten the pedestrian route across the street and lessen the car dimensions of the intersection. Walls and Facades. Architectural features shall be consistent throughout a development, even when a portion of the development is hidden from public view. Project perimeter walls should complement surrounding architecture and neighborhood environment and should avoid monotony by utilizing elements of horizontal and vertical articulation. Special Design Considerations. Special design considerations shall be made for areas of the City where special concern for urban design is necessary. These sites and features shall be included and addressed in the Zoning Ordinance, Architectural Review Overlay Zone. These areas may incl ude, but are not limited to, places where preserving views and minimizing view impairment is a concern. Colors. Maintain visually pleasing, natural colors that blend with the landscape throughout the City. Multifamily Residential Design Criteria. The City shall enforce the following criteria for multifamily development: 36 1. Unit's Relation to Street. Generally the street frontage should consist of residential units with windows, doors, balconies and porches facing and in reasonably close proximity to the street, both in terms of height (i.e., units at street level, rather than raised) and in distance from the street (minimum setback). This type of orientation reinforces the traditional beach, active street environment and also increases street safety with "eyes" on the street. Whenever possible street level frontage should consist of residential units rather than parking lots or parking structures. 2. Architectural Elements. Architectural elements such as porches, bay windows, balconies, entrances and windows all signal human habitation and are essential ingredients in creating street-level interest and human scale and shall be required in new developments on all stories. 3. Building Articulation. Building surfaces shall be articulated by creating changes in plane or height or shape to break down the bulk and scale of larger building masses and create a respectful transition between the existing neighborhood context and the new structure. Offsets should be meaningful in relation to the size of the building and shall normally not be less than 2 feet. Street facades limited to two stories shall be required where such a limit reinforces the existing neighborhood character. Upper stories, when allowed, should be set back from the front facade of the lower story. 4. Utilities. Utilities such as gas meters, electrical meters and panels, fire control panels, telephone, CATV panels, and similar devices shall normally be screened from conspicuous public view in a manner which does not conflict with City and safety regulations. Mechanical equipment, tanks, ducts, elevator enclosures, cooling towers, or mechanical ventilators shall be contained within an enclosed penthouse or other portion of a building having walls and roofs with construction and appearance similar to the main building. A community economy built on visitor-serving uses while maintaining services for year-round community members. Balanced and Blended Land Uses. Maintain an appropriate balance between visitor-serving uses and neighborhood- supporting commercial uses. Balanced Commercial and Residential Development. Through careful and appropriate zoning, blend and balance commercial and residential development within the City to provide services for residents and visitors. Support for Local Businesses. Work with local business groups and associations, to promote local businesses to local residents, and to encourage local residents to support Pismo Beach businesses. 37 Protection of Visitor-Serving Overnight Accommodations. Provide for, protect, and encourage a range of visitor- serving overnight accommodations in the City. Lower-cost visitor and recreational facilities shall be protected, encouraged, and, where feasible, provided. Developments providing public recreational opportunities are preferred. Promotion of Visitor-Serving Overnight Accommodations, Especially Lower-Cost. Promote overnight accommodations in the Coastal Zone for visitors of all income levels. Overnight accommodations are reserved for transient uses only (30 days or less). Encourage new overnight visitor accommodation developments to provide a range of rooms and room prices in order to serve all income ranges. Conversion Prevention and Mitigation. Conversion of low-cost visitor-serving lodging or overnight accommodations to other non-visitor-serving types of uses or high-cost overnight visitor accommodations shall be prohibited unless the cost of rehabilitation is greater than 50% of the market value of the structure or the City finds, based upon supporting data, that the existing use can no longer be made economically viable. Where conversion or demolition is allowed, the City shall mitigate the loss with the order of priority being onsite replacement, offsite replacement, and then in-lieu fees. Survey of Accommodations. Perform a survey in the City every 5 years or at the time of a new hotel, motel, inn, RV park, or campground application approval (whichever occurs first after the previous most recent survey) for all hotels, motels, inns, RV parks, or campgrounds. The survey should include documentation of the number of accommodations (for 2- to 4-person occupancy), type, ownership, and their average costs, as well as a map. Upon completing the survey, use the City classification threshold to determine what proportion of hotels, motels, inns, RV parks, and campgrounds can be considered low-cost visitor serving accommodations. This process will be completed using a search for peak season dates to reflect realistic prices for the most popular times for visitors. The City’s dollar amount threshold should also be updated at the time of the survey using the Consumer Price Index to adjust for inflation. Affordability Classification. Prior to approval of new development involving overnight accommodations, establish a classification method to define whether the proposed facility providing overnight accommodations is lower, moderate, or higher cost within the Pismo Beach hotel submarket. Classification criteria may include Average Daily Rate (ADR) during peak summer season and per person value. Mitigation for New Higher-Cost Overnight Accommodations. In the Implementation Plan, require new high-cost overnight accommodations to provide 25% of the units at a lower-cost rate with the order of priority being onsite provision, offsite provision, or in-lieu fees. 38 In-Lieu Fee Program. Specific detailed information regarding calculation and use of any required in-lieu fees as part of a mitigation program for project impacts to the availability of low-cost visitor-serving accommodations within the City shall be included as a condition of approval of the Coastal Development Permit (CDP) for the visitor accommodations. Fees shall be adequate to cover the cost of mitigation proportionate to the impact of the development for which the CDP is issued. All in-lieu fee payments shall be deposited into a fund established by the City that shall be in an interest-bearing account and shall only be used for the provision of new lower-cost overnight accommodations within the City’s Coastal Zone. The fee shall be determined in the Local Coastal Program Implementation Plan (IP). Funds may be used for activities including land acquisition, construction, and/or renovation that will result in additional low-cost visitor accommodations or other visitor facilities, as well as permitting costs. The specific low-cost requirements for any project funded by the in-lieu fee program shall be determined through the CDP process of the in-lieu fee funded project. Regular Updates to Development Fees. Continue to enforce and regularly update development fees, including the Commercial Impact Fee, which requires new commercial development and hotels to pay an impact fee to the City’s Rental Housing Fund. The funds shall continue to be used to assist housing for low- and very low–income households. Access to Day-Use Facilities. In areas of the City where retail, restaurants, and recreational uses are not located within a 10 minute walk, the City shall require that new mid-price hotel and motel projects that do not have lower-cost accommodation options to incorporate non-overnight facilities and amenities, either within or as a component of the development, which will be generally available for passive public use. Such amenities may include public plazas and spaces, restaurants, retail units, gardens, viewing areas, free Wi-Fi, bike parking facilities, or other day-use features that may be used by the general public at no or relatively low cost. The quality and quantity of amenities will be considered in the Coastal Development Permit review process. This policy does not prohibit a new hotel or motel project from charging a user fee or resort fee for active amenities, such as pool and spa access, recreation activities and equipment, or organized group activities on the property. Range of Pricing. The City shall in no event (1) require that overnight room rental be fixed at an amount certain for any privately owned and operated hotel, motel, or other similar visitor-serving facility located on either public or private land; nor (2) establish or approve any method for the identification of low or moderate income persons for the purpose of determining eligibility for overnight room rentals in any such facilities. Feasibility Analysis. Require an analysis of the feasibility of providing low cost visitor accommodations for any application involving the expansion, reduction, redevelopment, demolition, conversion, closure, cessation, or new development of any project involving visitor overnight accommodations, with the exception of short-term rental lodging that is within residential units. If the proposed rates are not lower cost, the feasibility study shall explain why providing lower cost accommodations on site as part of 39 the project is not feasible, or whether the proposed project includes amenities that would serve as a lower cost option for families (e.g., additional beds per unit, suite facilities, kitchen facilities, etc.). This explanation shall address the land value, development costs, a breakdown of the estimated annual revenues (including average daily rate and occupancy rates), a breakdown of the estimated operating costs, and any other information necessary to address the feasibility of providing lower cost accommodations on site. The feasibility analysis shall be prepared at the applicant’s expense. Lodging Business Improvement District. Maintain and continue to enhance the Pismo Beach Lodging Business Improvement District (LBID) with the purpose of providing revenue and defraying the costs of services, activities, and programs promoting lodging operations in the LBID. Maintenance of Campgrounds and RV Parks. Regularly maintain and improve campgrounds and RV parks. This may include improvements to accessibility, trails, and amenities. Regulation of Short-Term Rentals: Continue to allow and regulate short-term rentals and homestays, defined as the renting (for 29 days or less) of dwelling units, without discretionary review in the Downtown Core, Single-Family Residential, Planned Residential, Open Space Natural Resources Protection, and other Commercial zoning districts in the City. Public Recreational Opportunities. Coastal areas suited for water-oriented recreational activities that cannot readily be provided at inland water areas shall be protected. Oceanfront land suitable for recreational use shall be protected for recreational use and development unless present and foreseeable future demand for public or commercial recreational activities that could be accommodated on the property is already adequately provided for in the area. Upland areas necessary to support coastal recreational uses shall be reserved for such uses, where feasible. Protect Public Beaches and Parks. Continue to provide and protect public beaches and parks as a means of providing free and lower-cost recreational opportunities. Beach Recreational Uses. Minimize development on the beach in order to prevent loss of sandy beach area and maintain the beach as primarily open space for public access and recreation. Reserve sandy beach areas for low intensity recreational activities that do not require intensive development. Recreational uses that can be accommodated elsewhere shall be discouraged on the sandy beach (i.e., sport courts and similar facilities permanently displacing sandy beach). Non-sandy, beach-dependent active recreational activities shall be discouraged and accommodated elsewhere. Priority of Public Recreational Facilities. The use of private lands suitable for visitor-serving commercial recreational facilities designed to enhance public opportunities for coastal recreation shall have priority over private residential, general industrial, or general commercial development, but not over agriculture or coastal-dependent industry. 40 Shopping and Service Needs. Retain and attract businesses such as outlets and hotels that meet the shopping and service needs of the City and area-wide residents and visitors. Shopping and Services Strategy. Conduct a market analysis to identify and attract the types of businesses that will meet the shopping and service needs of Pismo Beach and area-wide residents. Locally Produced Retail. Focus on attracting local retail, as opposed to national retail chains, including outlets, specializing in Central Coast-produced food and other regional products, such as San Luis Obispo County-produced agriculture. See Policy LU-14.1a, Local Signage Program, which will assist residents and visitors in locating local retail. A community that supports the health, safety, and sustainability of all residents, visitors and structures. Complete Neighborhood. Provide well-connected and complete neighborhoods that enable healthy lifestyles and provide for the daily needs of residents. Mixed-Use Neighborhoods. Create a mixed-use overlay zone to allow for mixed-use-residential areas within proximity and walking distance of commercial, office, recreation, and public uses. Furthermore, identify opportunities to provide a mix of commercial- and recreation uses within walking distance of residential neighborhoods to enable and encourage walking and biking between uses. Walkable Neighborhoods. Update the zoning to provide residential uses within a 10 to 15-minute walking distance to recreational uses and commercial services that provide for the needs of residents, such as grocery stores and health care offices. Transit Accessibility Locate and design all new commercial and high-density residential development to facilitate provision or extension of transit service to the development to the extent feasible. Major employment, retail, visitor-serving facilities, and entertainment districts and major coastal recreational areas should be well served by public transit and easily accessible to pedestrians and people who bike. Noise Requirements. The City shall require all new development to meet the noise requirements of the compatibility guidelines in the Noise Element. For areas where the noise environment is conditionally acceptable for a particular land use, development shall be allowed only after noise mitigation has been incorporated into the design of the project to reduce noise levels to levels specified in the Noise Element. 41 Pedestrian Orientation and Safety. Through appropriate zoning and discretionary approvals, strive to create safe, walkable environments that include elements such as good lighting, safe crosswalks, and street trees that allow people of all ages and abilities to exercise and safely access public transportation, community centers, recreation, schools, and goods and services. Access to Recreation. Require discretionary projects adjacent to natural recreational opportunities such as the Pacific Ocean, Pismo Creek, or foothills to install public pedestrian access, where feasible. Pedestrian-Oriented Development. Discourage new “strip” commercial development with large street-fronting parking lots, and work with property owners on a streetscape plan and design guidelines to provide a pedestrian orientation. Guidelines should address enhancing the pedestrian environment through buildings oriented and accessible from the sidewalk, transparent ground-floor facades, pedestrian lighting and pedestrian-scaled buildings. Access Assessment. Conduct an assessment for pedestrian access along the extent of Highway 1/Price Street/Shell Beach Road within the City and identify areas where pedestrian access and safety are of high priority. Ground Floor Commercial. In pedestrian-oriented environments, require commercial uses to be located on the ground floor of mixed uses to provide convenience and visibility for customers. Pedestrian-Scaled Street Lights. Pedestrian-scaled streetlights shall be used throughout the community in new developments except for safety lighting used for intersection lighting. The City shall also consider a pedestrian scaled streetlight program for each planning area, as done for the Shell Beach planning area. See also LU-5.1b: Walkable Neighborhoods for pedestrian level of service, and see Circulation Element for traffic calming and complete street measures that increase pedestrian safety. Sustainable Community Strategies. Ensure land uses decisions and community strategies are designed to reduce energy and water consumption, waste and noise generation, air quality impacts; and support multimodal transport for a sustainable Pismo Beach. Sustainable Infrastructure. The City shall: 1. Promote infrastructure expansion where it will be more efficient and effective and does not promote growth inducement or result in adverse impacts to coastal resources. See Goal LU-7 for policies and actions related to growth management. 2. Focus infrastructure improvements in designated growth areas and contiguous to existing development. 42 Sustainable Design Incentive Program. Consider the feasibility of providing incentives for new and renovated projects that incorporate sustainable design features such as the construction of new buildings that reduce energy demand though natural features, such as green roofs and walls or energy efficiency above and beyond the current building code. Inform applicants of the benefits and incentives for green building practices and pursuit of LEED certification. Trail and Bikeway System. Update and expand the trail and bikeway system to connect residential uses to commercial uses, and workplace and recreation nodes. Such trails and bikeways shall consider following natural features like Pismo Creek and the shoreline, while avoiding adverse impacts to the natural features. Transit-Oriented Development. Support the development of multifamily residential and mixed-use projects around high-frequented transit stops, including the City’s transit station, by allowing a reduction in the parking requirements or other development standards, and require new development to incorporate or improve pedestrian, bicycle, and where applicable, transit facilities. Mobility Capital Improvement Projects. Consider long-term capital improvement projects that improve mobility infrastructure when updating land use and zoning designations. Urban Heat Effects. Reduce heat effects of urban development by requiring new development to incorporate, as appropriate, features such as reduced hardscape, light or heat reflective roofing, and shade trees. See Circulation Element for goals, policies, and actions relating to planned vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian improvements. Civil Engagement and Public Participation. Proactively and meaningfully engage community residents in the planning and development process. Culturally Appropriate Channels. Allow for proper civil engagement through the use of culturally appropriate and accessible channels, including providing appropriate language services; holding meetings, focus groups, and/or listening sessions at a variety of venues throughout the community; and using participatory facilitation techniques. See also the Conservation and Open Space Element for policies and actions related to tribal cultural correspondence. 43 A community that provides and maintains a high level of service and infrastructure to all development. Community-Serving Facilities. Ensure adequate community-serving facilities such as senior centers, recreational facilities, childcare facilities, places of worship, and educational institutions to serve current and future residents. Density Bonus. The City may grant a density bonus or provide other incentives for developers of commercial or industrial projects to include a childcare facility within their project. Senior Housing and Facilities. The City shall explore participation in or promotion of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) rental housing programs, the Senior Citizens’ Ordinance, and the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program, to protect and maintain existing senior housing and facilities, and promote new senior housing in Pismo Beach that is available for all income levels. Placement of Community-Serving Facilities. Through appropriate zoning, allow for community-serving facilities to be developed near residential uses and transit stops. Community-Serving Capital Improvement Projects. Consider long-term capital improvement projects that improve community-serving facilities and services when updating land use and zoning designations. Maintenance of Infrastructure. Continue to regulate new and existing development and infrastructure so as not to overburden the City’s infrastructure. Infrastructure for New Development. To balance the residential and commercial long-term needs, require new development to pay the full cost of additional infrastructure (sewer, water etc.) needed to support the new development either directly or through development impact fees. Annual Reporting. Require the Department of Public Works to prepare an annual or biannual report for the City’s water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure capacity. Regional Infrastructure Capacity. Coordinate with regional utility services when assessing Pismo Beach’s growth capacity and zoning. 44 Agency Coordination. Pismo Beach shall work to achieve mutually beneficial goals with the County, other cities in the County area, and various interested agencies in addressing area-wide or regional issues of concern, such as traffic, water supply, transit, waste management, air quality, and others. SLOCOG Compliance. Continue compliance with the goals and policies of the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) Regional Transportation Plan. Infrastructure Improvements. The City shall give preference to infrastructure improvements that support or enhance desired land uses and projects and ensure that those improvements are consistent with Coastal Act and GP/LCP policies. A community where growth is concentrated in corridors and neighborhood centers where adaptive land reuse will contribute to a high quality of life for the entire community. Growth Areas. Prioritize growth in areas that complement adjacent neighborhoods, consider market and policy demand for housing and commercial needs, and revitalize economically obsolete uses. Existing Developed Areas. New residential, commercial, or industrial development shall be located within, contiguous with, or in close proximity to existing developed areas able to accommodate it or, where such areas are not able to accommodate it, in other areas with adequate public services and where it will not have significant adverse effects, either individually or cumulatively, on coastal resources. In addition, land divisions, other than leases for agricultural uses, outside existing developed areas shall be permitted only where 50% of the usable parcels in the area have been developed and the created parcels would be no smaller than the average size of surrounding parcels. Incentives for Infill. Incentivize infill projects in areas that preserve the existing neighborhood character through expedited entitlement, increased density allowances in a mixed-use overlay zone, reduced parking requirements and other incentive programs to optimize investments in infrastructure and community facilities and increase housing diversity. See also Policy 5.3d, Transit-Oriented Development, for additional policy related for focusing development in proximity to transit. Adaptive Reuse. Support and incentivize adaptive reuse of buildings and sites to utilize existing infrastructure while enhancing the character of the community. LU-6.2b: Incentivize Adaptive Reuse. Incentivize adaptive reuse projects through expedited and discounted permitting and density bonuses, where appropriate. 45 Proactive Growth Planning. Proactively maintain and plan for areas in the City as well as the sphere of influence. Project Review in SOI. Continue to review all proposals affecting the sphere of influence (SOI) (as shown in Figure LU-4) and communicate the City's position on the future use of the SOI to the applicable decision-making body. San Luis Obispo County shall be requested to refer all planning studies and applications for development permits located in the SOI to the City of Pismo Beach prior to taking any action. Extended Planning Area/Sphere of Influence. Continue to identify areas outside the SOI to be included in the SOI in the future and identify these areas as “Extended Planning Areas.” 1. The City shall comprehensively evaluate the boundaries and potential land uses of the SOI at least every 10 years, but more often if appropriate. Such evaluations shall address, among other factors, whether the supply of land is adequate to accommodate projected housing needs allocated by the San Luis Obispo Council of Government (SLOCOG). 2. At each periodic comprehensive evaluation, the City Council shall determine whether the public interest would be served by designating additional lands to be provided municipal services and developed with urban uses. SOI Amendments. An amendment of the SOI to include additional lands shall be subject to environmental review pursuant to CEQA. 1. Any landowner of property within an Extended Planning Area may request the City to consider an amendment of the SOI boundary to add their lands to the SOI. Any such proposal shall also identify the requested land use designation and any other necessary or appropriate amendments to the various Elements of the General Plan. In considering such requests, the City Council shall determine whether the public interest would be served by designating additional lands to be provided municipal services and developed with urban uses. 2. A proposal to amend the SOI to include additional lands may be considered concurrently with an annexation request. Such requests for concurrent processing shall be subject to the provisions under Action LU-6.3d: Annexations. Annexations. All annexations of land into the City of Pismo Beach shall comply with the following requirements and criteria: 1. Annexation Study and Procedures: The City, or experts under contract to the City, shall prepare a detailed annexation study addressing ail of the items identified herein. The costs of preparing the annexation study, including City administrative costs, shall be borne by the property owner(s) requesting the City to consider the annexation. 46 a. A Comprehensive Study of Fiscal Impacts to the City: A comprehensive and detailed analysis of the fiscal impacts of the annexation shall be prepared, addressing the full range of revenues and expenditures. Onetime capital costs of facilities as well as recurring operating costs and revenues shall be evaluated. b. Study of Fiscal Effects on Other Governmental Entities/Tax Agreements The effects of the annexation upon other taxing entities should be analyzed. Proposed tax-sharing agreements will be prepared. c. General Plan Amendment: An accompanying amendment of the Land-Use Element, and other Elements if necessary, shall be prepared for review and adoption, which states detailed City policies for the following: • The distribution, location and extent of the proposed uses of the land within the annexation territory, including open space; • Standards for density and building intensity; • Parks, open space, and conservation of natural resources; • The proposed distribution, location, phasing and extent of major components of traffic circulation, wastewater collection and treatment, water sources, drainage, schools, and other public services and facilities appropriate to serve development within the annexation territory; • Phasing of future development, indicating how development will be accommodated within the City’s 3% annual growth limit, and standards and criteria by which development will proceed. d. Analysis of the City's Capacity to Provide Facilities and Services: The study shall assess the ability of the City to provide the various municipal facilities and services that will be necessary to accommodate the proposed annexation and planned development therein. These should include wastewater collection and treatment; storm-water management; water supply and distribution; streets and circulation; fire protection; police services; parks; and others as appropriate. e. Pre-zoning Ordinance: A detailed pre-zoning ordinance shall be prepared for review and adoption which addresses the following: • Zoning district designations for the territory • Any special zoning district regulations and standards • Applicable overlay zones • Any special development standards • Any special design criteria for future development 2. Environmental Document: An environmental document pursuant to CEQA shall be prepared by the City or by an expert under contract to the City. 47 3. Specific Plan: The City Council shall determine whether a Specific Plan shall be required to be prepared. If required, the Council shall decide if the Specific Plan will be prepared and considered at the same time as the annexation request or following completion of the annexation. 4. Policy Criteria for Approvals of Annexations: The following policy criteria, shall be employed by the City in, reviewing and taking action on annexation requests: a. Positive or neutral fiscal impact to the City b. Compliance with existing General Plan policies a. Capacity of City to provide services and Infrastructure to Accommodate Proposed Development b. Availability of service/infrastructure concurrent with need. 5. City request to LAFCO: Following City Council approvals of the annexation study, general plan amendment, pre-zoning ordinance, and the related environmental document pursuant to CEQA, the City shall transmit the annexation request to LAFCO for its consideration. Roadway Distances. Areas proposed for future growth should address roadway distances that would connect the new areas of development together with the existing City and would promote maximum connectivity between different land uses through walkways, bike paths, transit, or other means. Adjacent Development. Any proposals within the SOI shall be phased such that properties adjacent to the existing City Limits are developed as part of the first phase of development. Residential Growth Rate. The City's residential growth rate shall be managed to assure that the amount of new development annually is commensurate with the availability of public services and infrastructure and will not result in a deterioration of the quality of service to existing or new residents. The issuance of building permits for new residential units shall not exceed 3% per year, based on the number of units estimated by the California Department of Finance to exist within the City as of January 1 of the preceding year. Required Plans. The City shall not allow development of any newly annexed private land until the City has adopted a specific or development plan for land uses, open space protection, roads, utilities, the overall pattern of subdivision, and financing of public facilities for the area. Land Divisions. Land divisions, including lot line adjustments, shall be designed to minimize impacts to coastal resources and public access. A land division shall only be approved if the created parcels are consistent with the associated land use 48 designation, maximum density or intensity designated by the Land Use Map, contain an identified building site that could be developed or redeveloped consistent with all of the policies and provisions of the Land Use Plan and the City of Pismo Beach Municipal Code. See policies and actions under Goal LU-8 for regulation on new development to avoid or minimize adverse impacts on coastal resources. A community that protects and enhances natural and coastal resources within Pismo Beach. Natural Resources Compatibility. Require all land use proposals to respect, preserve and enhance, to the maximum extent feasible, the sensitive habitats, natural landforms, scenic resources, and other coastal resources of Pismo Beach. Development shall only be authorized when the proposed use is allowed per the applicable land use designation, and when it meets all applicable GP/LCP policies and standards. Identify and Map Natural Resources. The City shall prepare and maintain geographic information systems-based maps of the City, identifying the natural resources such as wildlife habitats and open space, viewsheds, terrain, and hillsides. The natural resource map shall also show development constraints such as flood hazard areas, geological hazard areas, soil hazard areas (subsidence, liquefaction), and Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones. The maps shall provide the basis of determining where urban development is most appropriate, and where other needs of the community, or requirements to protect coastal resources, outweigh the desire or need for urban development. As a result of the findings of these maps, the City shall re-evaluate its land use designations and future plans for undeveloped areas and revise the Land Use Map accordingly. Any revisions to the land use designations or Land Use Map shall require a GP/LCP amendment certified by the CCC. Coastal Resources. New development and improvements to existing development shall be sited and designed to avoid adverse impacts on coastal resources, including environmentally sensitive habitat areas, wetlands, and other areas of the City of biological or natural significance. Development shall be consistent with the resource protection policies of the GP/LCP, including the Conservation and Open Space Element. Reduce Adjacent Density. Prohibit land divisions within, or immediately adjacent to, environmentally sensitive habitat to keep development intensity as low as possible immediately adjacent to the sensitive habitat. Watershed Planning. Protect and enhance the Pismo Creek through maintaining an up-to-date comprehensive Pismo Creek/Edna Area Watershed Management Plan. Floodplain Overlay Zone. Continue to implement the Floodplain Overlay Zone to restrict, prohibit or condition development within hazardous floodplain areas to assure that the type and intensity of use are consistent with the protection and 49 preservation of people, property and significant resources and consistent with all policies of the GP/LCP, including but not limited to the policies of the Safety Element. Special Environmental Conditions. Due to the sensitive nature of the South Palisades area and North Spyglass area, include in all development applications archaeological analysis, surface water runoff and erosion analysis, and U.S. Highway 101 noise mitigation, as applicable. Geologic reports for development near the bluffs shall also be required consistent with the requirements of the GP/LCP. Maximizing Public Access. Ensure that public accessways and public recreation areas are maintained and enhanced and continue to play an important cultural, social, and economic role within the City of Pismo Beach. Public Access for New Development. Public access from the nearest public roadway to the shoreline and along the coast shall be provided in new development projects except where (1) it is inconsistent with public safety, military security needs, or the protection of fragile coastal resources; (2) adequate access exists nearby; or (3) agriculture would be adversely affected. Dedicated accessways shall not be required to be opened to public use until a public agency or private association agrees to accept responsibility for maintenance and liability of the accessway. Coastal Access Overlay Zone. Continue to implement the Coastal Access Overlay Zone to specify the area subject to coastal appeal to protect public access and ensure new developments provide public access through public easements, deed restrictions, dedications. Public Parking and Access. Public parking in the form of both off-street and street parking, shall be required in conjunction with vertical and lateral public coastal access ways pursuant to the GP/LCP Public Access Element and land use plan. The number of spaces shall be determined by the relevant sections of the GP/LCP land use plan and shall be based on safety considerations, carrying capacity of the beach, view potential or other pertinent considerations. Public Parking and Wayfinding. Maintain all existing public on-street and off-street parking spaces and provide adequate wayfinding signage notifying the public of the public parking opportunities and identifying the location of the access way. Permitted Development. Development permitted in the areas zoned for public beach access or open space recreation shall be limited to structures and facilities designed to accommodate passive recreational use of the area, including but not limited to stairways, benches, tables, refuse containers, restrooms, bicycle racks and public parking facilities. In no case shall any development except public access paths and public stairways be permitted within the bluff setbacks. 50 Maintenance and Enhancement of Public Areas. The location and amount of new development should maintain and enhance public access to the coast by (1) facilitating the provision or extension of transit service, (2) providing commercial facilities within or adjoining residential development or in other areas that will minimize the use of coastal access roads, (3) providing non-automobile circulation within the development, (4) providing adequate parking facilities or providing substitute means of serving the development with public transportation, (5) assuring the potential for public transit for high intensity uses, and by (6) assuring that the recreational needs of new residents will not overload nearby coastal recreation areas by correlating the amount of development with local park acquisition and with the provision of on-site recreational facilities to serve new development. Land Use Plan Designations. Figure LU-5, Land Use Map, shall officially designate land uses for the Coastal Zone. Where there are conflicts between the policies set forth in this GP/LCP and those set forth in the City’s zoning, or any other ordinance, the policies of the GP/LCP shall take precedence. Any proposed changes to the land use designations defined here or shown on Figure LU-5 shall require a GP/LCP amendment approved by the CCC. Legal Non-Conforming Structures and Uses. Require new development to meet all current development standards. Structures legally built prior to the effective date of this GP/LCP that do not conform to the GP/LCP shall be considered legal non-conforming structures. 51 NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AREAS Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs/South Palisades An ocean-oriented residential neighborhood with an emphasis on preservation of natural resources, open space, coastal views and scenic corridors. Figure LU-6, Sunset Palisades 52 Height of Structures. El Portal Drive, Indio Drive. No structure shall exceed 15 feet in height when measured from the highest point of the site natural grade to the highest point of the structure; nor shall any such structure exceed 25 feet in height when measured from the highest point of the roof above the center of the building footprint to the elevation of the natural grade directly below that point. Remainder of Sunset Palisades Area. No structure shall exceed 15 feet in height as measured from the height of the center of the finished building pad grade as designated in the final tract Grading Plan at the time of recordation. Open Space. Maintain the area between Shell Beach Road and the 101 Freeway as permanent open space. No further land divisions shall be in this approved area. Open Space Character. Require that any development approved on site maintain the open space character. The amount of site area that may be developed with improvements shall not exceed 5,000 square feet or 60% of gross site area whichever is lesser. Bluff-Top Access and Protection. Protect the bluffs, coastal tidal and subtidal areas, and access points in this planning area, consistent with all policies of the GP/LCP, including but not limited to the policies of the Safety Element. Vertical Access. Limit vertical access-ways to the rocky beach and inter-tidal areas in order to protect the coastal tidal and subtidal areas Sunset Palisades Beach Access and Bluff Protection. Lateral beach access dedication shall be required as a condition of approval of discretionary permits on oceanfront parcels consistent with the Parks, Recreation, and Access Element. No new public or private beach stairways shall be allowed. Damaged, non-conforming stairways utilized for ocean emergencies, animal rescue, fire-fighting access, or public safety may be repaired if a hazardous condition results from the damage. Any damaged stairway shall be assessed by a City inspector to determine the presence of a hazardous condition. South Palisades Bluff-top and Access Dedication. Increase the width of the lateral bluff-top conservation/open space and access dedication requirement set forth in the Parks, Recreation, and Access Element to a distance equal to the sum of the bluff retreat line over the anticipated lifespan of the proposed development when considering sea level rise, and a 1.5 factor of safety, and an additional 100 feet for all development on the shoreline in the South Palisades area. The bluff retreat line and 1.5 factor of safety shall be determined based on the results of site-specific hazard and geotechnical analyses conducted in conformance with the requirements of the GP/LCP. Acquire funding through new development for the future park improvements and trail/bicycle path 53 amenities in this area. See Policy LU-8.2, Maximizing Protection of Coastal Resources, and the Safety Element, for additional guidance on coastal access and recreation. Topaz Street and Encanto Street Viewpoints. Develop the Topaz Street and Encanto Street undeveloped accesses as coastal viewpoints rather than as stairways. Low-lying drought tolerant prickly vegetation, which will deter undesignated access paths, should be planted at the top of the bluff. Park benches are recommended to encourage use of these areas as viewpoints, sited and designed to minimize impacts on views. Attractive railings that minimize impacts on views and do not result in bluff instability should be used to protect the bluffs rather than chain link fencing. The Topaz cul-de-sac may be eliminated in favor of a pocket park or expanded viewpoint. The access points should be maintained so that the landscaping of abutting properties does not intrude on them. 54 North Spyglass/Spyglass A planning area with a mix of visitor-serving hotel uses and a variety of housing types, with access to parks, the beach, and neighborhood shopping. Figure LU-7, Spyglass 55 Bluff-Top Access and Protection. Protect the bluff-top open space and coastal access areas in this planning area. North Spyglass Dedication Requirement. Increase the width of the lateral bluff-top conservation/open space and access dedication requirement set forth in the Parks, Recreation, and Access Element to a distance equal to the sum of the bluff retreat line over the anticipated lifespan of the proposed development when considering sea level rise, and a 1.5 factor of safety, and an additional 50 feet for the North Spyglass portion of this planning area. The lateral blufftop access dedication requirement shall not be applicable to the Spyglass portion of this planning area. Access Path. Require that future development of the Spyglass Inn include a requirement for a path between Spyglass Drive and the public lateral access, through the existing parking lot. As such, an easement would be granted to the City for lateral public access. Spyglass Bluff Setback and Protection Require bluff-top setbacks for new development and substantial redevelopment in Spyglass consistent with the requirements outlined in the Public Safety Element. Reduced front yard setbacks shall comply with California Building Code. Side Yard Views. Protect side-yard views on properties on the west side of Spyglass Drive consistent with Action LU-2.1g, Side Yard View Corridors. Design and Safety Guidelines. Protect open space areas and improve the streetscape and walking environment for pedestrians. Freeway Underpass Open Space Area: Support the San Luis Obispo County requirements for the open hills on the eastern end of the Spyglass underpass of the 101 Freeway to remain in permanent open space. Underground Utilities. Place overhead utilities on Shell Beach Road underground. Landscaping. Require that new development, including additions or upgrading of existing development, be fully landscaped and complementary to the Shell Beach Road frontage. Extensive landscaping shall be required for large asphalt areas such as gasoline service stations and parking lots. The east side of Shell Beach Road adjacent to the Spyglass interchange should be landscaped to present an inviting entry area into the City. Spyglass Interchange Pedestrian Underpass. Work with Caltrans to develop a sidewalk at the Spyglass interchange underpass. 56 Improved Beach Access from Spyglass Park. Improve the beach access from Spyglass Park for pedestrian access to the beach below Spyglass Park consistent with the Parks, Recreation, and Access Element and the Safety Element. 57 St. Andrews Tract/Spindrift A residential neighborhood where new additions and replacements are compatible with the scale and character of the existing development and where bluff tops, coastal access, trees and bird habitat are protected. Figure LU-8, St. Andrews Tract/Spindrift 58 Compatible Development. Protect the scale and character of existing housing. St. Andrews Tract Front-yard Setback. Limit the front yard setback for additions and reconstruction of existing homes or construction of a new home to the garage or furthest extent of existing home. Bluff-Top Open Space and Access. Protect the bluff-top open space and coastal access areas in this planning area. Sprindrift Lateral Access. Require the lateral bluff-top conservation/open space and access dedication of the Parks, Recreation, and Access Element to be increased to a distance equal to the sum of the bluff retreat line over the anticipated lifespan of the proposed development when considering sea level rise; a 1.5 factor of safety, consistent with the Safety Element; and an additional 50 feet. Development of Estates in Sprindrift. Discourage any further development of the estates fronting the ocean; however, if further development is proposed, give special attention to public access, view corridors, mature trees, and bird habitat. Public Access. Require public access in the lateral bluff-top open space. And, to protect the bluff top, require public access improvements and landscaping compliant with geologic report recommendations. View Corridors. Special attention shall be given to preserving view corridors to the ocean. . 59 Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves A planning area focused on conserving the existing housing stock and character and improving the commercial and pedestrian environment of Shell Beach to enhance this beach community. Figure LU-9, Shell Beach /Dinosaur Caves 60 Access and Mobility. Address coastal access and pedestrian mobility issues and opportunities within the Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves planning area. Shell Beach Access. Limit access and driveways on Shell Beach Road. Require a pedestrian easement for development approvals in the Shell Beach portion of the planning area for properties between Shoreline Drive and Ocean Boulevard for access to the Eldwayen Ocean park stairs to the beach. The City shall consider purchasing a 20-foot pedestrian access easement over its 20-foot wide sewer easement running between Terrace Avenue and Vista Del Mar Avenue to allow for public pedestrian and bicycle access. Lateral Access at Ocean Boulevard. Pursue opportunities to create lateral pedestrian pathways connecting Ocean Boulevard to Shoreline Drive to the north and to Boeker Avenue and Windward Avenue to the south. This requirement shall be implemented as part of project approval, private gifts or dedications or possibility through public acquisition. Dinosaur Caves Site Public Access Facilities and Bluff Top Erosion. Design and construct public access facilities to be easily moved to a more landward location if they become endangered by bluff erosion. For the purpose of this policy, public access facilities mean, and is limited to, public paths, walkways, restrooms, bicycle racks, observation decks or platforms, benches, and picnic tables and landscaping. Any facilities shall be a safe distance from the edge of the bluff, as determined by the geological study. See also the Safety Element for guidance on bluff-top setbacks. Sidewalks. Maintain sidewalks from the Spyglass Highway 101 interchange to Shell Beach School in the Shell Beach Planning area shall be maintained and improved for safe pedestrian and handicapped access. View Protection. Protect side-yard views on properties on the west side of Shoreline Drive and views from U.S. Highway 101. Design Guidelines. Implement the design guidelines of the Design Element with respect to side-yard view corridors, including but not limited to D-18 View Corridor Protection, D-38 Side Yard View Corridors, and D-39 Focal Point Sites. Ocean View Protection. Ensure that the height, bulk and scale of any development on the Dinosaur Caves property shall not detract from the ocean view from U.S. Highway 101. Shell Beach Shoreline Qualities. Protect the unique shoreline qualities of Shell Beach. 61 Bluff-Top Parks. Pursue all available sources to provide the necessary funds to improve and maintain the parks along the Shell Beach bluffs. Marine Life. Institute measures, such as signing and policing, to prohibit removal of tide-pool marine life. Boeker Street Vista Point. Designate the vista point at the end of Boeker Street as a bird observation area and leave it in its natural state for neighborhood use. Drainage and Landscaping. Make drainage pipes in the park areas as inconspicuous as possible and landscaping park areas with drought resistant, low maintenance plants. Erosion and Animal Control. Continue the program of erosion and animal control to protect the park areas. Commercial Revitalization. Continue to improve Shell Beach Road commercial strip. Shell Beach Road Streetscape Plan. Continue to implement and update when appropriate the Shell Beach Road Streetscape Plan for improved signage, street trees, sidewalk improvements, pedestrian scale streetlights, public parking, and public art. Require that new developments are consistent with the Shell Beach Streetscape Plan during the plan review process. Revitalization Grants. Consider the use of grant funds to provide for the plan and for low interest loans for commercial revitalization. 62 Motel District A planning area that serves as a key focus for Pismo Beach's visitor-serving industry with special consideration given to retaining and upgrading existing motel uses and preserving ocean views and bluff access. Figure LU-10, Motel District 63 Lateral Bluff-Top Access and Open Space. Access Dedication. Require that the width of the lateral bluff-top access dedication be up to 25 additional feet beyond the sum of the bluff retreat line over the anticipated lifespan of the proposed development when considering sea level rise and a 1.5 factor of safety consistent with the Safety Element, depending upon the size of the parcel and the location of existing structures. It shall be the intent to develop a continuous bluff-top path within the lateral open space area; development approvals shall require installation of pathway segments in a manner that connects with adjacent segments. Access Conditions of Approval. Require vertical and lateral public access-ways to the beach and along the bluff-top, respectively, as a condition of development permits if not already adequately provided, except where the configuration of the bluff makes vertical access infeasible, or satisfactory vertical access is already provided nearby. More frequent vertical access-ways may be required to serve particular concentrations of hotel and motel units. Views. Ensure that new development protects ocean views and that the barrancas be preserved as natural view corridors. Views from Highway 101. New structures should be carefully sited and designed to provide ocean corridor and/or over- views from U.S. Highway 101. A visual analysis for such views shall determine the extent of building height for properties fronting Price Street Views from Barrancas.2 The barrancas shall be left in natural open space and used as view corridors to the ocean. Underground Utilities. Underground the existing overhead utilities on Price Street. 2 Barrancas, meaning finger canyons, line the surface of the hills, adding visual texture as well as valuable habitat to the foothills. 64 Downtown Core A vibrant D owntown area that acts as a destination for all, providing motel and hotel uses, as well as supporting uses such as commercial, mixed -use, high-density residential, and recreation. Figure LU-11, Downtown Core 65 Downtown Focus for Residents and Visitors. Protect Downtown Pismo Beach as a City focal point with a blend of cultural, commercial, professional, residential and recreational uses catering to both visitors and residents of all ages. Local Signage Program. Establish and give emphasis to a distinctive local character in Pismo Beach retailing through a comprehensive local signage program. Oceanfront Boardwalk. Maintain a continuous pedestrian boardwalk along the ocean frontage to Pismo Creek. This boardwalk shall include pedestrian amenities such as, but not limited to, seating, lighting and landscaping. Properties adjacent to the future boardwalk location shall be required to dedicate up to 20 feet of the ocean frontage of the property for the boardwalk. Installation of the boardwalk may be required as a condition of approval of development projects. The amount of dedication shall be subject to the size of the ocean-facing parcels and the area required to minimize bluff erosion identified in geologic studies submitted with development applications. The boardwalk will connect into the Pismo Creek trail. Pismo Creek Trails. A creekside trail system shall be developed on both sides of Pismo Creek from its mouth at the ocean, to an inland location deemed to be feasible and reasonable within this planning area, based on agreements with landowners. Public improvements such as trashcans and seating may be included with the development of the creek trails. Dedication of a portion of properties adjacent to Pismo Creek for a public pathway shall be required with new development applications. These dedications shall include the buffer zone as identified in the Conservation and Open Space Element. Interpretive Panels or Signage. Appropriate interpretive panels shall be provided for the pier, boardwalk and Pismo Creek trail. These may be required as a condition of approval of development projects. Funding should be sought from a variety of sources. 66 Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh A planning area oriented to visitor-serving activities, regional commercial uses, mobile home park, industrial and open space with a focus on protecting Pismo Creek, the marsh habitat, and coastal views. Figure LU-12, Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh 67 Pismo Creek. Preserve Pismo Creek in its natural state with special attention given to preserving scenic, recreational and education resources. Riparian Woodland. Protect and enhance the riparian woodland along Pismo Creek for the purpose of improving the scenic quality as well as its ecological value. As stated in LU-1.3a, industrial development shall not adversely impact the sensitive habitats of Pismo Creek or Pismo Marsh. Acquisition of Property. Collaborate with property owners and the State for easements and dedication of trails on property adjacent to Pismo Creek mouth and those portions of properties located within the creek channel. Public Trails. Develop public trails along the entire length of Pismo Creek from State Highway 1 to Ocean Boulevard on the Addie Street side. Public Amenities. Provide benches, paved paths, and signs for the Pismo Creek trail area as soon as the access to these areas is established. As stated in LU-1.3g, R.V. parks shall be restricted to the Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh planning area. Route 1 Improvements and City Entrance. Improve this planning area as an aesthetic entrance into the City and Route 1 as a complete street. Landscaping. Request the State to include a coordinated landscaping plan for both sides of State Highway 1 in conjunction with plans for the widening of State Highway 1 (see Circulation Element). Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements. Request Caltrans to include curbs, gutters, and pedestrian and bicycle pathways consistent with the City’s complete streets plan in conjunction with the plan to widen State Highway 1 (see Circulation Element). Right-of-Way Improvement. Landscape and curb the right-of-way at the intersection of Cypress and Dolliver Street to prohibit informal parking. Eucalyptus Grove and Butterfly Habitat. Enter into an agreement between Pismo Beach, Grover Beach, and the Southern Pacific Railroad to preserve the eucalyptus grove and butterfly habitat at the entrance to Pismo Beach and Grover Beach. 68 RV Storage Area Screening. RV storage areas should be attractively fenced, and their street frontages planted with trees. See also Circulation Element for policy related to State Highway 1 and bicycle and pedestrian improvements. Mobile Home Park. Retain the existing mobile home park since it provides lower cost housing. Mobile Home Park Ordinance. Retain the ordinance to protect this mobile home park use. Tree Plantings. Encourage the owners of this park to plant street trees to improve the appearance and livability of the park. Fourth Street Vacant Parcel. Preserve the vacant one-acre parcel lying between Fourth Street and the Pismo Marsh as the only remaining parcel within the City that has good visual and physical access to Pismo Marsh. In addition to providing public parking and signage, the City could lease the remainder of the site for a restaurant and/or low- and moderate-income housing. City Entrance. Retain and improve the Fourth Street entrance to the City in its natural open space appearance. New Welcome Sign. To create a more pronounced, modern gateway into Pismo Beach, the City shall consider a new “Welcome to Pismo Beach” sign, along with gateway trees. Improved Pismo Marsh Sign. Create an improved Pismo Marsh sign. Screen Shopping Center. Provide screening of the back of the Pismo Outlets shopping center with trees. Access to Marsh. Provide access to the marsh for viewing purposes from N 4th Street. 69 Pismo Coast Shopping Center. Encourage redevelopment of the Pismo Coast Shopping Center with retail, mixed use, and housing opportunities. See also actions under Policy LU-1.4, Mixed Use Designation. 70 Oak Park Heights A planning area with a mix of residential, open space, commercial and resort commercial uses with a focus on preserving open space, ocean views and views of Oak Park Heights. Figure LU-13, Oak Park Heights 71 View Preservation. Preserve public views from Oak Park Heights to the ocean and views of Oak Park from the freeway. Require Architectural Review. For development in Oak Park Heights, ensure that public views are protected from Oak Park to the ocean and of Oak Park from the freeway during City staff review of coastal development permit applications, where applicable. Landscaping. Oak Park Boulevard is the dividing line between Pismo Beach and Arroyo Grande and also serves as the southern entry to the City. The City shall maintain the existing variety of trees species in the median and along the sidewalk of Oak Park Boulevard. Any replacement trees shall be tall (35 feet on center) and narrow such as Monterey cypress or Canary Island pine for the most dramatic effect. See also Conservation and Open Space Element for related policy regarding scenic resources and highways. Open Space. Preserve the open space area in its natural state with a minimum of human-made structures and changes to the natural slope, fauna and flora. Parks. Open space land use designations include public parks and private lands intended to remain in open space or private parks. Open space lands shall not be developed intensively with buildings or other structures. Price Canyon Adobe Area. The Price Canyon Adobe area should be acquired by or dedicated to a public agency for use as a natural park and local museum. A master plan should be prepared for the Pismo Creek area and adobe including trails and public facilities, potentially including educational opportunities. In addition, areas designated to be private open space shall be maintained by the future owners. Non-sensitive and non-hazard areas so designated may be developed for open recreational purposes. Open Space Preservation. Maintain the hillside between Reef Court, Coral Court and the railroad as open space, not to be used for a road access; steep slopes, canyons and oak woodlands shall also be retained in open space. See also Conservation and Open Space Element for related policy regarding preservation of open space. 72 Housing Opportunities. Allow a diversity of residential and mixed-uses within certain areas to enable additional housing opportunities in a mixed-use environment. Pacific Coast Plaza Shopping Center. Permit high-density residential uses in this shopping center, on upper levels or over parking lots. 73 Pismo Heights A planning area with a mix of residential housing types, as well as the Francis Judkins Junior High School, the City Hall complex and Boosinger public park. Figure LU-14, Pismo Heights 74 Archaeological Sites. Protect known archaeological sites in the planning area. County Property. Ensure that development on County property adjacent to Pismo Heights is coordinated with the City. County/City Coordination. Coordinate between the County and City any development outside the City limits but adjacent to Pismo Heights because of its possible effect on Pismo Heights. Residential Restrictions. Restrict residential uses in steep slope areas to protect open space and reduce wildfire risk to homes. Residential Restrictions. Prohibit creation of new lots above Stratford and Longview Streets and ensure that new development complies with slope best management practices in conformance with the Conservation Element. 75 Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex A planning area with a mix of housing types, open space and commercial uses with an emphasis on preservation of the spectacular views and foothills that provide an important visual and open space backdrop for the entire northern one-half of the City. Figure LU-15, Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex 76 Foothill View Preservation. Ensure development is designed to minimize the impacts on views to the foothills from public view areas (including U.S. Highway 101, lateral beach access ways, public beaches and the City pier) and the visual intrusion of the development into the adjacent U.S. Highway 101 coastal travel corridor. Minimize Development. Development in the Freeway Foothills planning area shall seek to maximize scenic values while paying special attention to minimizing erosion hazards. Retaining the designated open space land uses as open space and minimizing development within the open space designation shall be encouraged through bonuses and transfer densities. Development Guidelines. Review new development projects to require that the size, location and massing of structures, including sound walls, shall not obscure the scenic backdrop provided by the foothills to visitors, passing motorists, and residents or detract from the ocean vista and coastal landforms. To accomplish these design objectives, the following development standards shall be incorporated into General Plan Amendments or Updates within the Freeway Foothills planning area: • All development shall be on or into existing grades. Multi-parcel residential site terracing and similar mass grading will not be allowed. Each permitted structure shall provide for individual adaptation to the existing landform, rather than modification of the landform to accommodate a particular design. • Residential units shall be clustered and located off the top of ridges, knolls or hummocks a sufficient distance to retain the silhouette profile of the topographic feature. • A minimum of 60% of the planning area shall be retained in open space. A scenic or open space easement prohibiting any development above the 200-foot contour shall be required to be dedicated to the City as a condition of approval of any development below the 200-foot contour. • No buildings or grading shall be permitted on slopes over 30%. The areas over 30% shall be retained as permanent public or private open space. Development may be permitted on slopes with existing natural gradients up to 30%; however, in no case shall development be permitted above a footprint elevation of 200 feet above mean high tide. Density may be calculated on land up to the 200-foot contour, but in no case on lands with existing natural slopes greater than 30%. • Transfer of density may be permitted within this planning area to retain areas of open space, provided that the total number of permitted units is not increased. • Colors used on building and structures should be earth tone to blend in with the foothills. • The right-of-way, open space and fences along Mattie Road shall be landscaped and improved to enhance the views in this area. • Development of the commercial area shall include provisions for a bus turnout and shelter. 77 Recreation and Open Space. Provide public hiking trails linked to Pismo Creek Trail and Pismo Preserve. Hiking Trail. Provide a public hiking trail in the canyon south of the Spyglass interchange as part of any adjacent future development, and if possible locate the trail to facilitate a future hillside or ridgetop connection to the Pismo Creek trail corridor via the Pismo Beach Coastal Ridge Path and Pismo Preserve.