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3.A Attachment 2_Project Description 2021_1_12Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-i Table of Contents Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................ 2-i 2 Project Description ..................................................................................................................... 2-1 2.1 Purpose of the GP/LCP Update ....................................................................................... 2-1 2.2 Project Proponent/Lead Agency ..................................................................................... 2-2 2.3 Project Location .............................................................................................................. 2-2 2.3.1 Geographic Location ....................................................................................... 2-2 2.3.2 Existing Land Form and Pattern ...................................................................... 2-3 2.3.3 Neighborhood Planning Areas ........................................................................ 2-9 2.3.4 Access and Transportation Network ............................................................ 2-13 2.4 Characteristics of the GP/LCP Update .......................................................................... 2-13 2.4.1 Objectives of the GP/LCP Update ................................................................. 2-13 2.4.2 GP/LCP Update Organization ........................................................................ 2-15 2.4.3 GP/LCP Update Goals ................................................................................... 2-16 2.4.4 General Plan Land Use Designations and Density ........................................ 2-18 2.4.5 Key Updates .................................................................................................. 2-18 2.4.6 City Growth/General Plan Buildout .............................................................. 2-18 2.5 Zoning Code and Coastal Implementation Plan Amendments ..................................... 2-22 2.6 Required Discretionary Approvals ................................................................................ 2-23 Tables Table 2-1 Existing Development by Neighborhood Planning Area ................................................. 2-8 Table 2-2 Relationship Between GP/LCP Update Planning Areas and 1992 General Plan Planning Areas ...................................................................................................................................... 2-9 Table 2-3 GP/LCP Update Goals .................................................................................................... 2-16 Table 2-4 Land Use Designations .................................................................................................. 2-19 Table 2-5 Land Use Density/Intensity Limits................................................................................. 2-20 Table 2-6 GP/LCP Update Projected Development at Full Buildout ............................................. 2-22 Figures Figure 2-1 Regional Location ........................................................................................... 2-4 Figure 2-2 Pismo Beach City Limits and Coastal Zone Boundary ..................................... 2-5 Figure 2-3 Pismo Beach City Limits and Sphere of Influence ........................................... 2-6 Figure 2-4 Existing Land Use Pattern ............................................................................... 2-7 Figure 2-5 Neighborhood Planning Areas ...................................................................... 2-10 Figure 2-6 Proposed Land Use Designations ................................................................. 2-21 Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-1 2 Project Description The project analyzed in this Program EIR (PEIR) is the proposed City of Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan (GP/LCP) Update, which includes updates to the Land Use, Safety, Conservation and Open Space, Noise, Facilities, and Parks, Recreation, and Access Elements of the City’s GP/LCP. The GP/LCP Update does not include updates to the Circulation, Design, Growth Management, Housing Elements. This section of the PEIR describes the key characteristics of the General Plan/LCP Update, including the project proponent/lead agency, the geographic extent of the plan, project objectives, required approvals and types and extent of development forecasted under the GP/LCP Update. 2.1 Purpose of the GP/LCP Update The GP/LCP Update is an update of the City’s 1992 General Plan and LCP and presents the community’s vision for Pismo Beach through the GP/LCP horizon (year 2040). The GP/LCP Update was developed through an extensive public outreach and involvement process, including careful analysis by advisory committees, City staff, elected officials, and the community. Each element of the plan addresses different aspects of the community and identifies measurable actions to guide residents, decision-makers, businesses, and City staff toward achieving the community vision. Goals established in the GP/LCP Update are intended to maintain the City’s small beach town character, manage growth effectively, provide a safe community, and enhance the City’s tourist-based economy. The GP/LCP Update establishes overarching City policies and priorities that describe how the community intends to use and manage its physical, social, and economic resources. The GP/LCP Land Use Element guides the future development of Pismo Beach by establishing the allowable distribution, location, and extent of development across the city for residential, commercial, open space, public and semi-public facilities, and other uses. The California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR) recognizes the relationship between General Plans and LCPs for coastal cities and recommends that both requirements be addressed by integrating the General Plan and the LCP. An integrated plan allows the community to apply the vision and requirements for both documents in a comprehensive manner, facilitating a unified and efficient approach to complying with both California general plan law and the California Coastal Act. The majority of Pismo Beach is located in the Coastal Zone. Therefore, the City has found it appropriate to follow OPR’s recommendation and integrate the updated General Plan and LCP. The LCP consists of two parts as required by the Coastal Act: a Land Use Plan (LUP), which was last updated in 1993, and the Implementation Plan, which was last updated in 1983, with several amendments to both documents occurring since. The LUP consists of goals, policies and actions that address the requirements of the Coastal Act and are integrated into applicable elements of the General Plan. The LCP must address priority issues for the California Coastal Commission including:  Public access,  Recreation and visitor serving facilities, City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-2  Water quality protection,  Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Areas (ESHA) and other natural resources,  Agricultural resources,  New development and cultural resources,  Scenic and visual resources,  Coastal hazards,  Shoreline erosion and protective devices, and  Energy and industrial development. The Implementation Plan provides the zoning regulations that implement the LUP goals, policies and actions and serves as the City’s Coastal Zoning Ordinance. New development in the City’s Coastal Zone is required to be consistent with the combined General Plan/LCP and Coastal Zoning Ordinance. The General Plan/LCP may be amended to stay up to date with State laws and to continue to reflect the vision of the community. State law (Government Code Sections 65300 through 65303.4) sets forth the requirement for each municipality to adopt and periodically update its General Plan, and sets the requirement that a General Plan contain the following mandatory subject areas, or “elements”, including Land Use, Circulation, Housing, Open Space, Conservation, Noise, Safety, and Environmental Justice. California adopted Senate Bill 1000 on September 24, 2016 requiring cities to develop an Environmental Justice element, or related environmental justice goals and policies to reduce the unique or compounded health risks in “disadvantaged communities.” Cities are required to incorporate environmental justice goals and policies into their general plan when they update two or more general plan elements on or after January 1, 2018. State law also allows for optional elements that can be organized or combined at the City’s discretion. The General Plan/LCP includes the required subjects/elements as well as three additional elements: Facilities, Design, and Parks, Recreation, and Access, as detailed in Section 2.4.2, General Plan/LCP Update Organization. The environmental justice content required by SB 1000 is reflected in portions of the Land Use, Housing, and Parks, Recreation, and Access Elements of the General Plan/LCP. 2.2 Project Proponent/Lead Agency The City of Pismo Beach is the project proponent and the lead agency for the proposed General Plan/LCP Update. The City’s Planning Division, located at 760 Mattie Road in the City of Pismo Beach, prepared this PEIR with the assistance of Rincon Consultants, Inc. 2.3 Project Location 2.3.1 Geographic Location The City of Pismo Beach is located on the Central Coast of California, midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Pismo Beach is one of seven incorporated cities within San Luis Obispo County (County). The county is frequently divided into four general sub-regions: North Coast, Northeast County, South County, and Central San Luis Obispo. South County includes the incorporated cities of Pismo Beach, Grover City, and Arroyo Grande and the unincorporated communities of Avila Beach, Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-3 Oceano, and Nipomo. Pismo Beach lies within the San Luis Bay Planning Area of the San Luis Obispo County General Plan. Pismo Beach has a total area of 13.5 square miles, the majority of which is located in the Coastal Zone. 9.9 square miles of the City is water and the remaining 3.6 square miles is land area. The GP/LCP Update and this PEIR only focus on the land area of the City. Pismo Beach is bordered by the beach and ocean on the southwest and hills to the northeast. The Cities of Grover Beach and Arroyo Grande are south and east of Pismo Beach and the unincorporated community of Avila Beach is just north of Pismo Beach. The extended planning area for Pismo Beach includes all area within the City limits and Sphere of Influence (SOI). The SOI includes land in Price Canyon and along Oak Park Boulevard and a small area along Mattie Road. The Price Canyon area of the SOI includes four parcels totaling approximately 1,100 acres. The Los Robles del Mar area of the SOI, west of Oak Park Boulevard, includes two separate parcels. One parcel is an approximately 152-acre ownership and the second site is a private school site of approximately 30 acres. A small area located closer to Mattie Road was added to the SOI in 2016 for a Preserve parking lot and restroom facilities. The SOI defines the area to which the City intends to provide municipal services and allow the development of some urban land uses for the lifetime of the General Plan/LCP Update. Figure 2-1 depicts a regional map of the City’s relationship to nearby cities, communities, and the State highway system. Figure 2-2 shows the Pismo Beach City limits and Coastal Zone boundary in the City. Figure 2-3 shows the Sphere of Influence. 2.3.2 Existing Land Form and Pattern Pismo Beach’s existing land use form is shaped by its topography, linear coastal orientation, natural resources and circulation patterns. The City is served by four main arteries: U.S. Highway 101 (U.S. 101), Cabrillo Highway (State Route 1), Shell Beach Road and Price Street, which all run northwest– southeast through the City. Price Canyon Road, Fourth Street, Oak Park Boulevard, and James Way are also main connector roads. Residential and commercial uses are mostly concentrated west of U.S. 101, while open space and industrial uses are clustered mostly east of U.S. 101. Figure 2-4 shows the City’s existing on-the-ground distribution of land use in Pismo Beach. As shown in Figure 2-4, Pismo Beach includes an assortment of residential, commercial, office, public and open space uses. The neighborhood planning areas listed in Table 2-1 are described in detail in Section 2.3.3. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-4 Figure 2-1 Regional Location Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-5 Figure 2-2 Pismo Beach City Limits and Coastal Zone Boundary City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-6 Figure 2-3 Pismo Beach City Limits and Sphere of Influence Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-7 Figure 2-4 Existing Land Use Pattern City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-8 Table 2-1 Existing Development by Neighborhood Planning Area Planning Area Residential (units) Visitor Serving (rooms) Retail, Service, Office (1,000 square feet) Open Space (acres) Single Family Multi- Family Mobile Home Resort Commercial Commercial Industrial Public/ Semi- Public Open Space The Bluffs/Sunset Palisades/South Palisade 478 0 - - 253.5 4 0.8 97 North Spyglass/ Spyglass 108 71 - 298 500.9 - 1.1 7.3 St. Andrews/ Spindrift 228 25 - - 51 - 8.8 9.1 Shell Beach/ Dinosaur Caves 910 44 - 24 321.5 - 9.7 13.6 Motel 79 - - 572 2,028.6 - - 25.2 Downtown Core 512 279 - 596 1,672.7 - 16.4 150.1 Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh 417 141 515 370 2,491.2 142.9 21.7 211.9 Oak Park Heights 1,189 - - 120 1,968.9 1,172.6 207.8 113.4 Pismo Heights 656 46 - - - - 49.2 3.4 Freeway Foothills/ Mattie Road Annex 404 - - - 306.6 - 5.6 177.9 Total 4,981 418 515 1,980 9,594.9 1,315.5 321.1 808.9 Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-9 2.3.3 Neighborhood Planning Areas Pismo Beach is organized into neighborhood planning areas. The 1992 General Plan described 18 planning areas, which are consolidated into 10 planning areas for the General Plan/LCP Update. The 10 neighborhood planning areas in the GP/LCP Update are shown in Figure 2-5. Each of the planning areas is predominantly built-out to its maximum development potential based on the designated land uses and associated density limits, with little developable acreage remaining. As such, infill development and adaptive reuse are encouraged and commonly used practices within the City. Table 2-2 shows the relationship between the planning areas in the GP/LCP Update and the 1992 General Plan planning areas. Table 2-2 Relationship Between GP/LCP Update Planning Areas and 1992 General Plan Planning Areas Planning Area (GP/LCP Update) Planning Areas (1992 General Plan) Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs/ South Palisade Sunset Palisades/Ontario Ridge (Planning Area A) South Palisades (Planning Area B) North Spyglass/Spyglass North Spyglass (Planning Area C) Spyglass (Planning Area D) St. Andrews/Spindrift St. Andrews (Planning Area E) Spindrift (Planning Area F) Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves Terrace Avenue (Planning Area G) Shell Beach (Planning Area H) Dinosaur Caves (Planning Area I) Motel Motel (Planning Area J) Downtown Core Downtown (Planning Area K) Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh Pismo Creek (Planning Area L) Pismo Marsh (Planning Area M) Oak Park Heights Oak Park Heights (Planning Area N) Industrial (Planning Area O) Pismo Heights Pismo Heights (Planning Area P) Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex Freeway Foothills (Planning Area Q) Note: Portions of the Oak Park Heights (Planning Area N) and Freeway Foothills (Planning Area Q) planning areas, as well as all of the Price Canyon Area (Planning Area R) planning area identified in the 1992 General Plan were located within the Pismo Beach SOI but outside the City limits. The Planning Areas identified in the GP/LCP Update are limited to land within the City limits. Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs/South Palisades Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs is an ocean-oriented, low-profile residential neighborhood with a backdrop of the coastal foothills. The planning area is almost totally developed with low-density residential use with a few scattered vacant residential lots. The bluffs atop the Sunset Palisades stretch of coast are under private ownership. South Palisades, south of Sunset Palisades, includes clustered multifamily and single-family residential development. The ocean bluffs range in height from 40 to 50 feet at the north end to 80 feet at the south end of the planning area. San Luis Obispo County has an easement from the toe of the bluff to the mean high tide line. A sandy beach extends for most of the length of the oceanfront in this area. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-10 Figure 2-5 Neighborhood Planning Areas Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-11 North Spyglass/Spyglass The North Spyglass/Spyglass planning area is comprised of resort commercial uses. North Spyglass, located north of Spyglass Drive, consists of three large parcels with three major hotels (the Dolphin Bay Resort, Cliffs Hotel, Spyglass Inn). Key aspects of the area are a 50-foot-wide lateral access at the top of the bluffs, the stairway, and related public parking at the northern barranca. A bluff top trail spans the entire portion of this planning area that provides access to a stairway to the beach adjacent to the Cliffs Hotel and the South Palisades area. At the base of 50-foot bluffs is a narrow sandy beach accessible during normal tide. Bluff erosion is severe in this area. South of Spyglass Drive is the Spyglass community, which is a fully developed residential area with multiple housing types, a small commercial center and the Spyglass Public Park. The area serves as a gateway to Pismo Beach as U.S. 101 on- and off-ramps are located in this area. St. Andrews/Spindrift St. Andrews Tract is comprised of predominantly low-density residential uses, with open space along the northern border, and high-density residential uses and the Pismo Beach Fire Department Station 63 on the northern end of Coburn Lane. South of the St. Andrews Tract area is Spindrift, a planned residential community consisting of multifamily housing uses in the larger southern parcel and single-family residential and open space/recreational uses to the north, west, and east. Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves This Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves planning area is comprised of Shell Beach and the neighboring Terrace Avenue and Dinosaur Caves areas. The Terrace Avenue area is home to Shell Beach Elementary School and a mix of low, medium, and high-density residential uses. South of the Terrace Avenue area is Shell Beach, also known as the Village, which is predominantly medium- density residential, with high-density residential uses between the medium-density residential and the commercial uses bordering the west side of Shell Beach Road. Just south of Cliff Avenue is Dinosaur Caves Park, which offers walking trails, a playground, and ocean views on an 11-acre park. The Dinosaur Caves planning area extends south covering a resort commercial parcel, currently the Inn at the Cove. The City adopted the Shell Beach Design Standards and Guidelines in 2017, which provides additional guidance for future residential, commercial and mixed-use development and redevelopment within the Shell Beach community. Motel District South of the Dinosaur Caves planning area is the Motel District, which is comprised of resort commercial uses (primarily hotel and restaurant) with some medium-density residential uses along Franklin Drive, Wilmar Avenue, and Harbor View Avenue. Downtown Core The Downtown Core has a variety of land uses, including resort commercial, commercial, public/semi-public, open space, high-density residential, and low-density residential uses. This planning area serves as Pismo Beach’s downtown, providing uses like shops, restaurants, cafes, art studios, and the Pismo Beach Pier. The Pismo Beach Pier, plaza, and boardwalk offer ocean views, as well as a space for fishing and walking. The Downtown Core creates a public space for residents and visitors to eat, shop, and recreate in a small beach-town environment. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-12 Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh The Pismo Creek planning area is separated from the Downtown Core by Pismo Creek, is bisected by the railroad tracks, and has no interior road connections to the Downtown Core planning area. This planning area is comprised of mobile home park, commercial, open space, and industrial uses. Along Pismo Creek, this planning area is used as commercial recreational areas in the form of recreational vehicle (RV) parks and mobile homes. The relatively large parcel in the center of the Pismo Creek planning area is a mobile home park. The Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh planning area is comprised of open space in the form of Pismo Marsh, the Monarch butterfly grove, creek open space, walking trails, and campground uses. The commercial area is the home of the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets, which provides a range of retail for residents and visitors. The industrial portions this planning area primarily consist of uses such as a trailer storage and the commercial manufacturing use consists of a shopping center. Oak Park Heights The Oak Park Heights area includes the entire northeast quadrant of the City northeast of U.S. 101, northwest of North Oak Park Boulevard and southeast of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The area consists of the three neighborhood sub-areas of Toucan Terrace, Pismo Oaks, and Pacific Estates. The Land Use Element includes policies for the entire planning area as a whole, including these four sub-areas. The Oak Park Heights planning area contains low- and medium-density residential uses with open space areas surrounding the residential. Additionally, there are commercial areas at the southern boundary of Pismo Beach and along U.S. 101. The commercial uses along the southern City boundary are strip malls and the commercial uses along U.S. 101 are office parks and hotels. Pismo Heights The Pismo Heights planning area is almost completely built out and is comprised of low-density residential uses with some medium-density residential uses in the southern portion of the planning area and high density residential uses along U.S. 101. This planning area includes Francis Judkins Junior High School, the Old City Hall complex, and Boosinger public park. Open space is located east of the low-density residential areas, and public/semi-public uses are located in the southeastern portion of the planning area. On the eastern side of this planning area is the City’s sewage treatment plant, baseball fields, and the Pacific Gas and Electric transport and storage facility. Pismo Creek runs through the planning area, which creates flooding constraints. Other constraints include poor vehicular access to the baseball fields, and the closure of the historic bridge due to structural problems. Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex The Freeway Foothills planning area is located east of U.S. 101 and consists of low and medium density residential neighborhoods, planned residential, a restaurant and small shopping complex, and a small undeveloped parcel at the northern end of the area. This planning area includes the specific plan areas of Baycliff and Spyglass Ridge, and Mattie Road Annexation area. This area is highly visible from U.S. 101 above Shell Beach and Sunset Palisades. The Freeway Foothills provide an important visual and open space backdrop for the northern half of the City. The planning area is physically separated from the other City areas by U.S. 101, with only two cross-highway underpasses connecting to Mattie Road from Shell Beach Road/Palisades Drive and Price Street. These accesses are via freeway underpasses located at Spyglass Drive and just north of the Shorecliff Lodge. Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-13 2.3.4 Access and Transportation Network U.S. 101 traverses through the center of Pismo Beach, providing access to the adjacent cities of Arroyo Grande and Grover Beach, and cities such as San Luis Obispo to the north and Santa Maria to the south. State Route 1 (SR 1) also provides regional access between U.S. 101 and Grover Beach. SR 1 is known as Dolliver Street and the Pacific Coast Highway and is the primary route through downtown Pismo Beach. The downtown area is located in the southern portion of the City, bordered by U.S. 101 on the east, the intersection of Dolliver Street (SR 1) and Price Street on the north, and Pismo Creek on the south. The Shell Beach area, which is part of the City of Pismo Beach, is located in the northern part of Pismo Beach and is predominantly a residential area with local businesses fronting Shell Beach Road. Shell Beach Road runs parallel to U.S. 101, providing frontage access to Shell Beach, and continues as Price Street south into downtown Pismo Beach. U.S. 101 provides nine full or partial access interchanges within the City limits, and only eight roadways provide access across U.S. 101 within the city. Generally, Pismo Beach’s roadway system follows a cardinal grid system within downtown and the Shell Beach areas, which are parallel and perpendicular to U.S. 101. U.S. 101 and the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) are manmade barriers across town, and the coastal mountains northeast of Pismo Beach and Pismo Creek in the southern part of the City are natural barriers. Access across U.S. 101, UPRR, and Pismo Creek is limited. Pismo Creek runs along Price Canyon just south of the mountains and is parallel to Price Canyon Road. Pismo Creek and UPRR are barriers between downtown, the residential areas in the southern part of the City, and the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets. Access across Pismo Creek is only provided via U.S. 101, Dolliver Street, and limited access via Cypress Street. Access across UPRR is limited to U.S. 101 within the City limits, and via SR 1/West Grand Avenue further south in Grover Beach. The Pacific Coast Bike Route runs north-south through Pismo Beach, including SR 1/Dolliver Street. 2.4 Characteristics of the GP/LCP Update The land use classifications included in the General Plan and LCP define the basic categories of land use allowed in the city and are the basis for the zoning districts established in the Zoning Code (Title 17 of the Municipal Code), which contain more specific regulations and standards governing development on individual properties. Under State law, a property’s zoning is required to be consistent with its General Plan land use classification (Government Code §65860). Section 65860(c) of the Government Code requires that when a General Plan is amended in a way that makes the Zoning Ordinance inconsistent with the General Plan, “the zoning ordinance shall be amended within a reasonable time so that it is consistent with the general plan as amended.” 2.4.1 Objectives of the GP/LCP Update The GP/LCP Update is intended to function as a policy document to guide land use decisions within the city planning area through the year 2040. The vision for the city was developed with extensive community input. Based on this community input and in recognition of the state’s planning priorities, a vision and values supporting the vision for the community were developed. The vision and guiding principles of the GP/LCP Update are contained in the Land Use Element and are summarized below. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-14 2.4.1.1 Community Vision The City conducts community outreach and engagement every two years to reconfirm the community’s vision and set City goals that are prioritized and included in the fiscal year budgets for the following two-year cycle. Through this most recent engagement process for the Fiscal Year 2020 and 2021 Budgets, the following vision has been reconfirmed for Pismo Beach that serves to guide the GP/LCP Update:  Provide a safe place  Maintain the City’s small beach town character  Manage growth effectively  Enhance a vibrant tourist-based economy, while becoming a world-renowned tourist destination 2.4.1.2 Guiding Principles With the community vision in mind, the City has developed guiding principles to set the framework for the GP/LCP Land Use Element. The Land Use Element has been drafted to implement the community vision through its goals, policies, and actions, and is built around the following guiding principles: Preserve the Historic Ambiance of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach contains the historic “Classic California” ambiance of the small California beach town. This is particularly evident in the Downtown Core and Shell Beach Village. Although difficult to define, the preservation of this ambiance is important and the City shall encourage its preservation. This ambiance provides an attractive experience by creating a link to the past, a sense of place, and a slower pace. The Land Use Element sets forth the tools for preservation of historic neighborhood character and retention of the classic downtown setting framed by original landmark architecture and character properties. The historic character provides the setting to attract vibrant downtown uses that serve the needs of residents and visitors. Support the Visitor Population While Enhancing the Quality of Life for all Residents The California coast is an extremely desirable place to live, work and recreate that belongs to all the people. As such, congenial and cooperative use by both residents and visitors is recognized. Such use should capture the best attributes of the City and creatively determine the acceptable place, scale, intensity, rate and methods for development consistent with resource protection and public benefit. The Land Use Element provides the tools for an economy built on visitor-serving uses that balances commercial and residential development. Through protection of existing visitor-serving overnight accommodations, promoting the development of new overnight accommodations, and attracting focused retail and services, the City can best support the visiting population that is so essential to the Pismo Beach economy, while also enhancing the quality of life for residents with a healthy year-round economy. In addition to accommodations and retail services, the Land Use Element provides policy for the health and well-being of local residents and visitors alike. These policies strive to be the Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-15 catalyst for healthy and desirable living environments through the use of design guidelines, appropriate zoning, transit accessibility, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Manage Growth Effectively With the focus of this GP/LCP on providing a high quality of life for Pismo Beach citizens and visitors and protecting the community’s natural and coastal resources, the Land Use Element strives to provide a high level of service and infrastructure, and plan for new development that is thoughtfully concentrated within its urban boundaries. Through tools such as enforcement of development fees and annual reporting, the City can effectively manage and maintain its high level of service, valued resources, and the infrastructure needed to complement the City’s growth. The Land Use Element also provides the tools and incentives for the City to direct new development that responsibly concentrates development in areas where infill and adaptive reuse will contribute to a high quality of life for the entire community. Preserve and Protect Natural Resources The ocean, beach and the abutting land are recognized as an irreplaceable national resource to be enjoyed by the entire City and region. The Land Use Element provides the tools to direct new development to preserve and enhance the natural resources of Pismo Beach, including the ocean and beaches, hills, valleys, canyons and cliffs, and the Pismo and Meadow Creek streams, marsh and estuaries. The Land Use Element provides policies that further enhance the requirements provided within the Coastal Act. Land use decisions shall also be made to retain ridgelines, hillsides, open space, and the other unique natural features within Pismo Beach. The Land Use Element guides planning decisions in the Coastal Zone that ensure public coastal access, while maintaining coastal preservation and protection. (See related principles and policies in the Conservation Element and Safety Element.) 2.4.2 GP/LCP Update Organization The GP/LCP Update includes updates to the Land Use, Safety, Conservation and Open Space, and Noise Elements of the City’s GP/LCP. These elements address the topics mandated by the State law and Coastal Commission, as well as additional topics of interest to the City. The elements included in the GP/LCP Update are summarized as follows: Land Use Element. The Land Use Element directs the placement and character of future development in Pismo Beach. This element consists of narrative, goals, policies, and actions, as well as a land use map that outlines the future development of Pismo Beach. It presents the pattern of land uses for the ultimate development of the City for the GP/LCP Update horizon (year 2040) through the land use designations shown on the land use map. This element identifies local goals that present how the pattern of land use development in Pismo Beach will look in 2040 and presents policies that measure progress toward the goals and actions that identify the regulatory tools the City can use to meet those goals. Noise Element. The Noise Element identifies the City’s approach to controlling environmental noise and limiting community exposure to excessive noise levels. This element identifies and analyzes the major noise sources in the community and provides data and guidance to inform a pattern of land uses that minimizes exposure of community residents to excessive noise. The primary goals of the Noise Element are to protect quiet areas of a community from noise and provide a framework for developing implementation measures and strategies to address existing and foreseeable noise problems. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-16 Conservation and Open Space Element. The Conservation and Open Space Element guides the protection of natural, scenic, and cultural resources and conservation areas important to the environment and sustained economic prosperity of Pismo Beach. This element identifies local goals that present how the City’s natural environment will look in 2040 and presents policies that measure progress toward the goals and actions that identify the regulatory tools the City can use to meet those goals. Safety Element. The Safety Element describes each of the hazards to which Pismo Beach is vulnerable, and presents goals, policies, and actions to increase the City’s resilience to hazards through educating citizens, maintaining an effective emergency response, and protecting life, property, and natural landforms in potential hazard areas. The goals, policies, and actions of the Safety Element also address the potential impacts of climate change on each of Pismo Beach’s hazards. Facilities Element. The Facilities Element is a guideline to indicate future facilities needs as the City continues to develop. Facilities and services considered in this element include City administrative, fire, library, police, schools, solid waste, wastewater, and water services. Parks, Recreation, and Access Element. The Parks and Recreation Element is an optional element of the General Plan which also includes an Access Component as required by the Coastal Act. The purpose of Access Component is to implement the state Coastal Act shoreline access polities to ensure the public's right to gain access to the shoreline. The goals and policies considered in this element guide the City in providing parks, open space and trails, and in developing recreational facilities. 2.4.3 GP/LCP Update Goals Based on the community vision, guiding principles, identified major strategies and physical improvements, and input from the community, the GP/LCP Update includes goals in each element to address specific needs, concerns, opportunities, or community desires. Goals are broad in both purpose and aim but are designed specifically to establish positions or directions. The goals in each chapter are listed in Table 2-3. Table 2-3 GP/LCP Update Goals General Plan Chapter Goals Land Use Goal LU-1 A community with a variety of well-regulated land uses that support the diverse needs of both visitors and residents. Goal LU-2 A community with a classic California and small-town beach atmosphere. Goal LU-3 City Design. A functional community that is designed with compatible facades, architectural styles, and colors. Goal LU-4 A community economy built on visitor-serving uses while maintaining services for year-round community members. Goal LU-5 A community that supports the health, safety, and sustainability of all residents, visitors and structures. Goal LU-6 A community that provides and maintains a high level of service and infrastructure to all development. Goal LU-7 A community where growth is concentrated in corridors and neighborhood centers where adaptive land reuse will contribute to a high quality of life for the entire community. Goal LU-8 A community that protects and enhances natural and coastal resources within Pismo Beach. Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-17 General Plan Chapter Goals Land Use – Neighborhood Planning Areas Goal LU-9 Sunset Palisades/The Bluffs/South Palisades. An ocean-oriented residential neighborhood with an emphasis on preservation of natural resources, open space, coastal views and scenic corridors. Goal LU-10 North Spyglass/Spyglass. A planning area with a mix of visitor-serving hotel uses and a variety of housing types, with access to parks, the beach and neighborhood shopping. Goal LU-11 St. Andrews Tract/Spindrift. A residential neighborhood where new additions and replacements are compatible with the scale and character of the existing development and where bluff tops, coastal access, trees and bird habitat are protected. Goal LU-12 Shell Beach/Dinosaur Caves. A planning area focused on conserving the existing housing stock and character and improving the commercial and pedestrian environment of Shell Beach to enhance this beach community. Goal LU-13 Motel District. A planning area that serves as a key focus for Pismo Beach's visitor- serving industry with special consideration given to retaining and upgrading existing motel uses and preserving ocean views and bluff access. Goal LU-14 Downtown Core. A vibrant Downtown area that acts as a destination for all, providing motel and hotel uses, as well as supporting uses such as commercial, mixed use, high- density residential, and recreation. Goal LU-15 Pismo Creek/Pismo Marsh. A planning area oriented to visitor-serving activities, regional commercial uses, mobile home park, industrial and open space with a focus on protecting Pismo Creek, the marsh habitat, and coastal views. Goal LU-16 Oak Park Heights. A planning area with a mix of residential, open space, commercial and resort commercial uses with a focus on preserving open space, ocean views and views of Oak Park Heights. Goal LU-17 Pismo Heights. A planning area with a mix of residential housing types, as well as the Francis Judkins Junior High School, the City Hall complex and Boosinger public park. Goal LU-18 Freeway Foothills/Mattie Road Annex. A planning area with a mix of housing types, open space and commercial uses with an emphasis on preservation of the spectacular views and foothills that provide an important visual and open space backdrop for the entire northern one-half of the City. Noise Goal N-1 A quiet and healthful environment with minimal noise intrusion. Goal N-2 A pattern of land uses that protects residents and other sensitive receptors from excessive noise. Conservation and Open Space Goal COS-1 A community that conserves the important natural resources of Pismo Beach for the community’s health, safety and enjoyment, including air quality, renewable energy, geology and soils, minerals, water quality and supply, and dark skies. Goal COS-2 A community that protects and enhances scenic roadways and vistas. Goal COS-3 A community that provides and protects a variety of conservation areas such as the ocean and beaches, bluffs, dunes, foothills, marshes, creeks, and wetlands that act as suitable coastal and inland habitat, migratory corridors, and ecologically valuable topography. Goal COS-4 A community that celebrates and protects its historical, tribal cultural, archaeological, and paleontological resources. Safety Goal S-1 A well prepared and educated community that can quickly and effectively respond to and recover from a hazardous event. Goal S-2 A community that minimizes damage to the public and private property from hazards. Goal S-3 A community that maintains its unique physiographic character, including its sandy and rocky beaches, to conserve soil resources and prevent excessive erosion due to wind and water. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-18 2.4.4 General Plan Land Use Designations and Density The proposed land use designations establish the type, location and relation of land uses planned in the City. The maximum permitted land use densities and intensities are identified in the GP/LCP Update for these land use designations. The City’s Zoning Ordinance contains more detailed provisions and standards. More than one zoning district may be consistent with a single GP/LCP land use designation. As the standards for each land use designation are applied to future development projects and land use decisions, properties will gradually transition from one use to another, and land uses and intensities will gradually shift to align with the intent of the GP/LCP Update. Within the future SOI area identified on Figure 2-3, future uses may be developed subject to annexation to the City of Pismo Beach in compliance with procedures identified by the San Luis Obispo County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO). Table 2-4 provides a description of the proposed land use designations. Table 2-5 summarizes the density and intensity ranges for each land use designation, as well as the total acreage in each land use category. Figure 2-6 shows the proposed land use designations, which illustrates the distribution of the proposed land use designations in correlation to the street network and natural landscapes in the planning area. 2.4.5 Key Updates The proposed GP/LCP Update includes the following key updates to the existing General Plan and LCP to achieve the community’s vision for Pismo Beach through 2040:  Addressing sea level rise and resiliency throughout;  Encouraging mixed-use, particularly in the downtown area and focused on affordability;  Updates to comply with current State law; and  Address lower-cost visitor-serving accommodations. 2.4.6 City Growth/General Plan Buildout In 2015, the City’s estimated population was 8,068 people, number of housing units was 5,649, and number of jobs was 4,898 (San Luis Obispo Council of Governments [SLOCOG] 2017, Medium Scenario). Table 2-6 identifies the projected development at full buildout associated with the planned distribution of land uses described in the Land Use Element GP/LCP Update. As shown in this table, full buildout of the GP/LCP Update would result in the development of 250 vacant or underutilized properties. Full buildout of the GP/LCP Update would result an estimated 1,112 new housing units and 735,000 square feet of new non-residential building area in Pismo Beach. The GP/LCP Update would represent an estimated population increase of 1,877 people and an employment increase of 597 jobs. Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-19 Table 2-4 Land Use Designations Land Use Designation Description Low-Density Residential The low-density residential land use designation provides for residential development at a density of 1 to 8 units per acre. Medium-Density Residential The medium-density residential land use designation provides for residential development at a density of 9 to 15 units per acre. High-Density Residential The high-density residential land use designation provides for residential development at a density of 16 to 30 units per acre. Very High-Density Residential Overlay The very high-density residential overlay provides for residential development at a density of 20 to 50 units per acre. Mobile Home Park The mobile home land use designation is intended to apply to mobile home parks and mobile home subdivisions. Commercial The Commercial land use designation allows for visitor-serving, neighborhood and regional commercial uses. Resort Commercial The Resort Commercial land use designation is comprised of resort commercial uses (primarily hotel and restaurant). Central Commercial The primary land use focus for the Central Commercial District is commercial, recreational and cultural Mixed-Use The Mixed-use land use designation provides for a wide variety of land uses including visitor lodging, commercial retail, restaurants, service uses, offices, and residential uses through the mixed-use designation and a mixed-use overlay zone. Industrial The Industrial land use designations shall permit nonpolluting, warehousing, distribution, assembly and light manufacturing uses. Public/Semi Public The Public and Semi-Public category designates land in public ownership that should be developed for public use and various public facilities. The Public/Semi-Public designation is intended for uses such as public buildings, schools, family care facilities, community centers and other public facilities. Open Space The Open Space land use designation specifies that open space lands, including public and private parks, shall not be developed intensively with buildings or other structures. City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-20 Table 2-5 Land Use Density/Intensity Limits Land Use Designations Floor Area Ration (FAR)/ Density Height (feet)1,2 Implementing Zones Total Acreage Coastal Zone/Non- Coastal Zone Coastal Zone Low-Density Residential 1 to 8 units per acre 25 R-1, R-R 76.5 Medium-Density Residential 9 to 15 units per acre 25 - 35 R-2, R-R 247.5 High-Density Residential 16 to 30 units per acre 25 R-3, R-R 22.2 Very High-Density Residential Overlay 20 to 50 units per acre 35-453 R-3 1.1 Mobile Home Park Maximum 8 units to the acre - M-H 58.5 Commercial Maximum FAR of 2.0 25 - 42 R-4, R-R, C-R, M-H, C-1, C-2, C-M 32.5 Resort Commercial Maximum FAR of 1.25 35 R-, R-R 73.9 Central Commercial Maximum FAR of 1.25 35 R-4, R-R, MU 66.4 Mixed-Use Residential 1.25 maximum Commercial uses: 2.0 maximum Determined by overlay zone C-2, MU, CD-M 57.2 Industrial Maximum FAR of 0.5 25 C-M 30.2 Public/Semi Public Maximum FAR of 2.0 25 G 468.38 Open Space N/A 15 OS-1, OS-R 32.21 1Coastal height limits are provided to ensure that the scenic and visual qualities of coastal areas are considered and protected consistent with Coastal Act Section 30251. 2Overlay zones may impose additional standards for applicable properties. Please refer to the City of Pismo Beach Municipal Code for additional requirements. 3Buildings may be up to forty-five (45) feet in height where the Planning Commission finds that significant public views to and along the coast and other scenic areas are protected. Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-21 Figure 2-6 Proposed Land Use Designations City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-22 Table 2-6 GP/LCP Update Projected Development at Full Buildout Land Use Number of Vacant or Underutilized Parcels Potential Increase in Dwelling Units Potential Increase in Non-Residential Building Area (sf) Potential Increase in Population Potential Increase in Jobs Commercial 40 - 379,000 - 230 Central Commercial 26 - 248,000 - 33 High Density Residential 139 162 - 185 -12 Mixed Use 48 722 108,000 1,221 272 Medium Density Residential 32 228 - 471 - Total 285 1,112 735,000 1,877 523 With much of the City currently “built out,” or developed, and the preservation of open space a priority, undeveloped land available for development is limited in Pismo Beach. Most of the development over the next 20 years is likely to take place on sites that are currently vacant and or underutilized. In addition, future development may come from expanded development on sites with existing structures or redevelopment of sites and structures that come to the end of their useful life over the next 20 years. There are a number of smaller vacant sites in Pismo Beach, but many of these sites face substantial development constraints. Larger vacant lots are located in the Sunset Palisades, Pismo Heights and Oak Park Heights planning areas, east of planned residential developments. Ultimately, many of these vacant lots are located on steep slopes or face other environmental constraints, limiting development opportunities. Most vacant and underutilized sites outside of constrained areas tend to be in the Downtown Core and along the U.S. 101 corridor in Shell Beach. Much of the growth and change in Pismo Beach over the next 20 years is anticipated to occur in these areas, which are well served with existing public facilities and services, including transportation facilities, and commercial and community uses. 2.5 Zoning Code and Coastal Implementation Plan Amendments To maintain consistency with the GP/LCP Update, the project includes a comprehensive Zoning Code Update which includes the Coastal Implementation Plan. Amendments included as part of the project include:  Updating the allowed uses in all zones as necessary for consistency with the General Plan Land Use Designations.  Establishing new zoning district(s) as necessary to implement the GP/LCP Update.  Updating other development standards as necessary to implement the GP/LCP Update. This will include maximum height, setbacks, design standards and other standards.  Updating administration and permitting to integrate coastal permit processes. Additional coastal-specific issues to be addressed include: ▫ Parking and transportation demand management ▫ Coastal access, beach use, and special events Project Description Administrative Draft Program Environmental Impact Report 2-23 ▫ Visitor-serving uses and tourism ▫ Sea-level rise and coastal resilience ▫ Stormwater management and water quality The Zoning Code Update also addresses other issues, such as neighborhood compatibility and economic development, consistent with direction in the GP/LCP Update. 2.6 Required Discretionary Approvals Following recommendations from the Planning Commission, the Pismo Beach City Council will need to take the following discretionary actions in conjunction with the project:  Certify the Final PEIR  Adopt the proposed GP/LCP Update  Adopt the Zoning Code Update and Coastal Implementation Plan The California Coastal Commission will also need to take the following discretionary actions in conjunction with the project:  Certify the GP/LCP Update  Certify the Zoning Code Update and Coastal Implementation Plan City of Pismo Beach Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Plan Update 2-24 This page intentionally left blank