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NCMA Annual Report 2018 Northern Cities Management Area 2018 Annual Monitoring Report Prepared for The Northern Cities Management Area Technical Group City of Arroyo Grande City of Grover Beach Oceano Community Services District City of Pismo Beach April 24, 2019 Prepared by NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ii - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - iii - Northern Cities Management Area 2018 Annual Monitoring Report This report was prepared by the staff of GSI Water Solutions, Inc., in collaboration with GEI Consultants, Inc., under the supervision of professionals whose signatures appear below. The findings or professional opinion were prepared in accordance with generally accepted professional engineering and geologic practice. Paul A. Sorensen, PG, CHg Nathan R. Page, PG (Utah) Principal Hydrogeologist Consulting Hydrogeologist Project Manager GEI CONSULTANTS, INC. Samuel W. Schaefer, PE Senior Engineer NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - iv - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - v - CONTENTS Page Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... 1  Groundwater Conditions ................................................................................................... 1  Groundwater Levels ................................................................................................. 1  Change in Groundwater in Storage .......................................................................... 3  Groundwater Quality ................................................................................................ 3  Water Supply and Production/Deliveries ........................................................................... 3  Threats to Water Supply ................................................................................................... 4  1. Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 6  1.1 Description of the NCMA Technical Group............................................................ 3  1.2 Coordination with Management Areas .................................................................. 3  2. Area Description ................................................................................................................ 5  2.1 Setting ................................................................................................................... 5  2.2 Precipitation ........................................................................................................... 5  2.3 Evapotranspiration ................................................................................................ 6  3. Groundwater Conditions ................................................................................................... 7  3.1 Geology and Hydrogeology ................................................................................... 7  3.2 Groundwater Flow ................................................................................................. 7  3.3 Groundwater Monitoring Network .......................................................................... 8  3.4 Groundwater Levels ............................................................................................ 10  3.4.1 Groundwater Level Contour Maps .............................................................. 10  3.4.2 Historical Water Level Trends ..................................................................... 10  3.4.3 Sentry Wells ................................................................................................ 11  3.5 Change in Groundwater in Storage ..................................................................... 13  3.6 Water Quality ....................................................................................................... 13  3.6.1 Quarterly Groundwater Monitoring ............................................................. 14  3.6.2 Analytical Results Summary ....................................................................... 14  4. Water Supply and Production/Delivery ........................................................................... 17  4.1 Water Supply ....................................................................................................... 17  4.1.1 Lopez Lake ................................................................................................. 17  4.1.2 State Water Project ..................................................................................... 20  4.1.3 Groundwater ............................................................................................... 21  4.1.4 Developed Water ........................................................................................ 22  4.1.5 Total Water Supply Availability ................................................................... 23  4.2 Water Use ........................................................................................................... 24  4.2.1 Agricultural Water Supply Requirements .................................................... 24  4.2.2 Rural Use .................................................................................................... 29  4.2.3 Urban Production for Potable Use .............................................................. 30  NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - vi - 4.2.4 2018 Groundwater Pumpage ...................................................................... 31  4.2.5 Changes in Water Production ..................................................................... 33  5. Comparison of Water Supply v. Water Production .......................................................... 35  6. Threats to Water Supply ................................................................................................. 37  6.1 Threats to Local Groundwater Supply ................................................................. 37  6.1.1 Declining Water Levels ............................................................................... 37  6.1.2 Seawater Intrusion ...................................................................................... 38  6.1.3 Measures to Avoid Seawater Intrusion ....................................................... 38  6.2 Threats to State Water Project Supply ................................................................ 39  6.3 Threats to Lopez Lake Water Supply .................................................................. 39  7. Management Activities .................................................................................................... 41  7.1 Management Objectives ...................................................................................... 41  7.1.1 Share Groundwater Resources and Manage Pumping .............................. 44  7.1.2 Enhance Management of NCMA Groundwater .......................................... 46  7.1.3 Monitor Supply and Demand and Share Information .................................. 47  7.1.4 Manage Groundwater Levels and Prevent Seawater Intrusion .................. 48  7.1.5 Protect Groundwater Quality ...................................................................... 50  7.1.6 Manage Cooperatively ................................................................................ 51  7.1.7 Encourage Water Conservation .................................................................. 52  7.1.8 Evaluate Alternative Sources of Supply ...................................................... 57  8. References ...................................................................................................................... 61  Tables Page Table 1. NCMA TG Representatives ............................................................................................ 3  Table 2. Lopez Lake (FCWCD Zone 3 Contractors) 2018 Water Allocation (AFY) .................... 17  Table 3. Lopez Lake Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Low Reservoir Response Plan .. 18  Table 4. Lopez Lake Downstream Release Reduction Strategy ................................................ 18  Table 5. 2018 Lopez Lake Deliveries .......................................................................................... 19   Table 6. 2018 NCMA SWP Deliveries ........................................................................................ 20  Table 7. NCMA Groundwater Pumpage from Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, 2018 ............... 22  Table 8. Baseline (Full Allotment) Available Urban Water Supplies (AFY) ................................. 23  Table 9. 2018 Available Urban Water Supply, (AF) .................................................................... 24  Table 10. 2018 NCMA Crop Acreages and Calculated Evapotranspiration ............................... 26  Table 11. 2018 IDC Model Results of Monthly Applied Water .................................................... 29  Table 12. Estimated Rural Water Production .............................................................................. 30  Table 13. Urban Water Production for Potable Use (Groundwater and Surface Water, AF) ...... 31  Table 14. NCMA Groundwater Pumpage from Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, 2018 (AF) ..... 32  Table 15. Total Water Use (Groundwater and Surface Water, AF) ............................................ 33  Table 16. 2018 Water Production by Source (AF) ...................................................................... 35  NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - vii - Figures (all figures are presented at the end of the report) Figure 1. Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Figure 2. Northern Cities Management Area Figure 3. Annual Precipitation 1950 to 2018 Figure 4. Location of Precipitation Stations Figure 5. Monthly 2018 and Average Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Figure 6. Locations of Monitoring Wells Figure 7. Depths of Monitoring Wells Figure 8. Groundwater Elevation Contours Spring 2018 Figure 9. Groundwater Elevation Contours Fall 2018 Figure 10. Selected Hydrographs Figure 11. Sentry Well Hydrographs Figure 12. Hydrograph of Deep Well Index Level Figure 13. Water Elevation, Conductivity, and Temperature, Well 24B03 Figure 14. Water Elevation, Conductivity, and Temperature, Well 30F03 Figure 15. Water Elevation, Conductivity, and Temperature, Well 30N02 Figure 16. Water Elevation, Conductivity, and Temperature, Well 36L01 Figure 17. Water Elevation, Conductivity, and Temperature, Well 36L02 Figure 18. Water Elevation, Conductivity, and Temperature, Well 32C03 Figure 19. Change in Groundwater Elevation, April 2017 to April 2018 Figure 20. Chloride Concentrations in Monitoring Wells Figure 21. Total Dissolved Solids Concentrations in Monitoring Wells Figure 22. Piper Diagram of Water Quality in Select Monitoring Wells Figure 23. Locations of Municipal Production Wells Figure 24. NCMA Agricultural Land 2018 Figure 25. 2018 NCMA Estimated Agricultural Water Demand and Monthly Precipitation at the SLO No. 795 Gauge Figure 26. Municipal Water Use by Source Figure 27. Total Water Use (Urban, Rural, Ag) by Source Figure 28. Historical TDS, Chloride and Sodium, Index Wells and 30N03 Figure 29. Historical TDS, Chloride and Sodium, Wells 30N02, MW-Blue and 36L01 Appendices Appendix A NCMA Sentry Well Water Level and Water Quality Data NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - viii - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ES-1 - Executive Summary The 2018 Annual Monitoring Report for the Northern Cities Management Area (NCMA; Annual Report) is prepared pursuant to the requirements of the Stipulation and Judgment After Trial (Judgment) for the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Adjudication. The Annual Report provides an assessment of hydrologic conditions for the NCMA based on data collected during the calendar year of record. As specified in the Judgment, the NCMA agencies, consisting of the City of Arroyo Grande, City of Grover Beach, City of Pismo Beach, and Oceano Community Services District (OCSD), regularly monitor groundwater in the NCMA and analyze other data pertinent to water supply and demand, including:  Land and water uses in the basin  Sources of supply to meet water demand  Groundwater conditions (including water levels and water quality)  Amount and disposition of NCMA water supplies that are not groundwater Results of the data compilation and analysis for calendar year 2018 are documented and discussed in this Annual Report. Groundwater Conditions During 2018, water elevations generally declined slightly throughout most of the NCMA portion of the Basin in response to below average rainfall in late 2017 and throughout 2018. The exception to this were slightly increased coastal water elevations, perhaps indicating the tail end of the remnant westward (ocean)-bound ‘slug’ of water from the relatively wet 2016-17 rainfall year. The relatively dry rainfall year might normally have resulted in greater declines in groundwater elevation than was experienced; the generally observed minor decline in water levels throughout most of the area can be attributed to ongoing efforts by all NCMA agencies to minimize groundwater extraction and maximize surface water supply sources while maintaining the water conservation attitudes and requirements of the recent drought. Groundwater Levels The best indicator of whether the NCMA portion of the basin can prevent seawater intrusion is the water elevation in the NCMA “sentry wells” near the coastline. The average water elevations of three of the key sentry wells make up the “Deep Well Index.” That index was developed by the NCMA in 2007 to gauge the health of the basin. A Deep Well Index value above 7.5 feet above sea level generally indicates that sufficient freshwater flow occurs from the east to the coastline to prevent seawater intrusion. History has shown that a prolonged period with the Deep Well Index level below 7.5 feet develops groundwater conditions at risk of seawater intrusion.  Spring 2018. In the mostly urbanized areas north of Arroyo Grande Creek, groundwater contours in the spring of 2018 generally showed a westerly to southwesterly groundwater flow (see Figure 8). These positive groundwater gradients have been developed and maintained primarily because the NCMA agencies have collaborated on water NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ES-2 - management and conservation efforts. Those efforts have been in response to changes in the Deep Well Index to ensure that flow to the ocean continues to prevent seawater intrusion. Because of a limited number of wells and water level data in the southernmost portion of the area dominated by sensitive-species dunes and State Parks land, the groundwater gradient and flow are generally inferred on the basis of historical records and trends, and water level data from the Nipomo Mesa Management Area (NMMA) farther east. In the central portion of the NCMA, the Cienega Valley south of Arroyo Grande Creek, agricultural groundwater production resulted in a broad pumping trough. The water elevations in the Cienega Valley are in the range of 6 to 13 feet NAVD881. These data show a slight decrease in water elevations of 1.5 to 2.2 feet from April 2017 to April 2018. Prior to 2017, the subdued pumping trough exhibited in the Cienega Valley usually manifested itself as a closed depression, with groundwater elevations generally below “sea level” (NAVD88) in the center of the depression. Also in recent years, a second pumping depression has often formed north of Arroyo Grande Creek, in the area of concentrated municipal pumping, but that historical pumping depression has not formed since 2017. April 2018 water levels in the main production zone along the coast ranged from 7.6 to 11 feet NAVD88.  Fall 2018. Groundwater level contours for October 2018 are presented in Figure 9. Groundwater elevations in October 2018 were 4 to 29 feet lower than elevations in April 2018. The October 2018 groundwater elevations exhibited a return to the previously prevalent pumping depression in the Cienega Valley, with groundwater elevations as deep as (-)16 feet NAVD88. The groundwater elevation in the pumping depression in October 2018 was approximately 3 feet lower than was present in October 2017. October 2018 groundwater elevations in the main production zone along the coast ranged from 5.4 to 7.7 feet NAVD88.  Deep Wells. In 2018, the Deep Well Index started the year above the trigger value with an index value of over 9 feet in January. It continued to rise, reached a high over 11 feet in mid-March, and then began to decline. The index value dropped below the 7.5-foot threshold in early July. For more than 4 months, the Deep Well Index remained below the index trigger value, reaching an index value of approximately 6.5 feet in late October. In early November, the Deep Well Index began to rise and by late November 2018, it rose above the threshold value where it remained through the end of the year. The index value finished 2018 at about 9 feet NAVD88.  NCMA/NMMA Boundary. The water elevation in the San Luis Obispo County monitoring well installed to monitor basin conditions along the NCMA/NMMA boundary typically exhibits regular seasonal fluctuations. Similar to 2017, the water elevation in the well remained above sea level throughout all of 2018, in contrast to the 2013 through 2016 1 North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88). Note that NAVD88 is 2.72 feet lower than mean sea level, as recorded at the Port San Luis tide station datum. https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/datums.html?id=9412110 NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ES-3 - period when the water levels in the NCMA/NMMA boundary area typically dropped below sea level in August and remained at a low elevation until early October. Change in Groundwater in Storage The change in groundwater in storage in the NCMA portion of the basin between April 2017 and April 2018 was estimated on the basis of a comparison of water level contour maps created for these periods. Comparison of the April water levels was chosen to comply with the California Department of Water Resources reporting requirements under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) to calculate an annual change of groundwater in storage. The April-to- April period used to calculate change in groundwater storage is required under SGMA A decrease of groundwater in storage is a reflection of a net decrease in water levels across the basin. During the period of April 2017 to April 2018, the NCMA portion of the basin experienced a net decrease of groundwater in storage. The net decrease in groundwater levels represented a decrease of groundwater in storage from April 2017 to April 2018 of approximately 600 acre feet (AF) that is, there was approximately 600 AF less groundwater stored in the aquifer in April 2018 than in April 2017. This time period does not represent change in storage for the 2018 calendar year. Groundwater Quality Analytical results of key water quality data (chloride, total dissolved solids [TDS], and sodium) in 2018 were generally consistent with historical concentrations and observed ranges of constituent concentrations. In general, no water quality results were observed that are a cause of concern. None of the water quality results from monitoring wells throughout 2018 indicate an incipient episode or immediate threat of seawater intrusion. Incipient seawater intrusion was indicated in 2009 by elevated concentrations of TDS, sodium, and chloride (i.e. “water quality degradation”) in wells 30N02, 30N03, and MW-Blue, all of which are screened in the Paso Robles Formation. No indications of seawater intrusion have been observed in wells screened in the underlying Careaga sandstone. Since TDS, sodium, and chloride concentrations declined following the 2009-2010 seasons, the location and inland extent of the seawater-fresh water interface is unknown. Water Supply and Production/Deliveries  Total water use in the NCMA in 2018, including urban use by the NCMA agencies as well as agricultural irrigation and private pumping by rural water users, was 8,672 AF. Except for the water usage in 2016 and 2017, this is the lowest estimated total water use in the past 30 years or more. Of this amount, Lopez Lake deliveries were 4,873 AF, State Water Project deliveries totaled 242 AF, and groundwater pumping from the NCMA portion of the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin (SMGB) accounted for approximately 3,558 AF. This is the lowest production volume from the SMGB in more than 20 years except for 2016 and 2017. There was no municipal groundwater pumping from the Pismo Formation, outside the SMGB, in 2018. The breakdown is shown in Table ES1 (following page).  Urban water use in 2018 among the NCMA agencies was 5,878 AF. That is the third lowest urban water use in the past 20 years (second only to 2016 and 2017, at 5,477 and NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ES-4 - 5,860 AF, respectively). Urban water use has ranged from 5,477 AF (2016) to 8,982 AF (2007). Water use generally declined from 2007 to 2016, with only slight increases in the trend in 2012 and 2013, and has only increased slightly since 2017. The decline in pumpage since 2013 was in direct response to a statewide order by the governor to reduce the amount of water used in urban areas by 25%, which was achieved locally by conservation activities implemented by the NCMA agencies.  Agricultural acreage has remained fairly constant. Thus, the annual applied water requirement for agricultural irrigation has been relatively stable though it varies with weather conditions. Acknowledging the variability resulting from weather conditions, agricultural applied water is not expected to change significantly given the relative stability of applied irrigation acreage and cropping patterns in the NCMA. Changes in rural domestic pumping have not been significant. Table ES1. 2018 Water Production by Source (AF) Urban Area Lopez Lake (AF) State Water Project (AF) SMGB Groundwater (AF) Other Supplies1 (AF) Total (AF) Arroyo Grande 2,163 0 49 0 2,212 Grover Beach 804 0 416 0 1,221 Pismo Beach 1,426 242 53 0 1,720 Oceano CSD 480 0 246 0 725 Urban Water Use Total 4,873 242 764 0 5,878 Agricultural Irrigation Applied Water 0 0 2,651 0 2,651 Rural Water Users 0 0 81 0 81 Non-potable Irrigation by Arroyo Grande 0 0 62 0 62 Total 4,873 242 3,558 0 8,672 Notes: 1 “Other Supplies” includes groundwater pumped from outside the NCMA boundaries (which was zero in 2018) AF = acre-feet, SMGB = Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, CSD = Community Services District Threats to Water Supply  Total groundwater pumping from the SMGB in the NCMA (urban, agriculture, and rural domestic) was 3,558 AF in 2018, which is 37 percent of the calculated 9,500 acre feet per year (AFY) long-term basin yield of the NCMA portion of the SMGB.  When pumping is less than the yield of an aquifer, groundwater in storage increases as evidenced by rising water levels. Groundwater elevations throughout the NCMA portion of the basin should rise significantly with several consecutive years of groundwater pumping at 30 to 40 percent of the safe yield. Although groundwater levels increased some during NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ES-5 - 2017 as a result of the relatively wet rainfall year, the data show that the basin is in a tenuous position. The fragile health of the basin is illustrated by water elevations at just a few feet above sea level, coupled with the formation of a pumping depression in the Cienega Valley just west of the NCMA/NMMA boundary, which indicates that the basin has very little ability to withstand droughts, any increase in regional pumping, or any other changes that reduces recharge, either directly or through subsurface inflow from the east (Nipomo Mesa).  The well-documented pumping depression within the NMMA to the east appears to have reduced or eliminated the historical groundwater divide between the NCMA and the NMMA (as documented in NMMA annual reports). With the loss of this divide there has been a reversal of groundwater gradients and the apparent development of a landward gradient in the southern portion of the NCMA. This elimination of the groundwater divide likely reduces the historic recharge volume of subsurface inflow into the NCMA and creates conditions more favorable for seawater intrusion in the NCMA and NMMA.  During 2018, there were no indications of seawater intrusion. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - ES-6 - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 1 - 1. Introduction The 2018 Annual Monitoring Report (Annual Report) summarizes hydrologic conditions for calendar year 2018 in the Northern Cities Management Area (NCMA) of the Santa Maria River Valley Groundwater Basin (SMGB) in San Luis Obispo County (County), California. This report was prepared on behalf of four public agencies collectively referred to as the Northern Cities, which includes the City of Arroyo Grande (Arroyo Grande), City of Grover Beach (Grover Beach), City of Pismo Beach (Pismo Beach) and the Oceano Community Services District (OCSD; Oceano CSD) (NCMA agencies). These agencies, along with local landowners, the County, and the San Luis Obispo County Flood Control & Water Conservation District (FCWCD) have managed local surface water and groundwater resources in the area since the late 1970s to preserve the long-term integrity of water supplies. The rights to pump groundwater from the SMGB has been in litigation (adjudication) since the late 1990s. The physical solution set forth in the 2005 Stipulation and the 2008 final order established requirements and goals for the management of the entire Santa Maria Basin. The Court established three separate management areas, including the NCMA, the Nipomo Mesa Management Area (NMMA), and the Santa Maria Valley Management Area (SMVMA). The Court mandated that each management area form a technical group to monitor the groundwater conditions of its area, to continuously assess the hydrologic conditions of each area, and to prepare an Annual Report each year to provide the Court with a summary of the previous year’s conditions, actions, and threats. The requirements of the annual report, as directed by the Court in the Stipulation (June 30, 2005 Version, paragraph IV.D.3), stated that: Within one hundred and twenty days after each Year end, the Management Area  Engineers will file an Annual Report with the Court. The Annual Report will summarize  the results of the Monitoring Program, changes in groundwater supplies, and any  threats to Groundwater supplies. The Annual Report shall also include a tabulation of  Management Area water use, including Imported Water availability and use, Return  Flow entitlement and use, other Developed Water availability and use, and  Groundwater use. Any Stipulating Party may object to the Monitoring Program, the  reported results, or the Annual Report by motion.  This 2018 Annual Report, satisfies the requirements of the Court. The Annual Report for each calendar year (January 1 to December 31) is submitted to the Court by April 30 of the following calendar year, pursuant to the Stipulation. As a result of legislation passed by the State of California related to the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) that requires submittal of annual reporting and attendant supporting information for each adjudicated groundwater basin by April 1 of each year, the NCMA Annual Report is also published to the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) adjudicated basin reporting website. The collaborative water supply management approach of the NCMA agencies was recognized by the Court in the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement (which was based on the 1983 “Gentlemen’s Agreement”), formalized in the 2002 Settlement Agreement between the NCMA NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 2 - agencies, Northern Landowners, and Other Parties (2002 Settlement Agreement), and incorporated in the 2005 Stipulation for the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Adjudication (Stipulation). On June 30, 2005, the Stipulation was agreed upon by numerous parties, including the NCMA agencies. The Stipulation included the 2002 Settlement Agreement. The approach then was adopted by the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, in its Judgment After Trial, entered January 25, 2008 (Judgment). Although appeals to that decision were filed, a subsequent decision by the Sixth Appellate District (filed November 21, 2012) upheld the Judgment. On February 13, 2013, the Supreme Court of California denied a petition to review the decision. Pursuant to the Court’s continuing jurisdiction, Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach, and Grover Beach filed a motion on September 29, 2015, requesting that the Court impose moratoriums on certain water extraction and use by stipulating parties within the NMMA. Judge Kirwan denied the motion without prejudice. He did, however, order the parties to meet and confer to address the issues raised in the motion by the NCMA agencies. The meet and confer process continued throughout 2018. The order by the Court precipitated a series of meetings and collaborative actions between the NCMA and NMMA management areas, including the tentative formation of a Seawater Intrusion Working Group to discuss the threat and potential solutions for possible seawater intrusion. The Judgment orders the stipulating parties to comply with all terms of the Stipulation. As specified in the Judgment and as outlined in the Monitoring Program for the Northern Cities Management Area (Todd Groundwater, Inc. [Todd], 2008; NCMA Monitoring Program), the NCMA agencies are to conduct groundwater monitoring of wells in the NCMA. In accordance with requirements of the Judgment, the agencies comprising the NCMA group collect and analyze data pertinent to water supply and demand, including:  Land and water uses in the basin  Sources of supply to meet those uses  Groundwater conditions (including water levels and water quality)  Amount and disposition of other sources of water supply in the NCMA The Monitoring Program requires that the NCMA gather and compile pertinent information on a calendar year basis; this is accomplished through data collected by NCMA agencies (including necessary field work), the FCWCD, and requests to other public agencies. Periodic reports, such as Urban Water Management Plans (UWMP) prepared by Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and Pismo Beach, provide information about demand, supply, and water supply facilities. Annual data are added to the comprehensive NCMA database and analyzed. Results of the data compilation and analysis for 2018 are documented and discussed in this Annual Report. As shown in Figure 1, the NCMA represents the northernmost portion of the SMGB, as defined in the adjudication and by DWR (DWR, 1958) as the Santa Maria River Valley Groundwater Basin (Basin 3-12). Adjoining the NCMA to the south and east is the NMMA; the SMVMA encompasses the remainder of the groundwater basin. Figure 2 shows the locations of the four NCMA agencies within the NCMA. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 3 - 1.1 Description of the NCMA Technical Group Pursuant to a requirement within the Stipulation, the NCMA Technical Group (TG) was formed (Paragraph IV.C and Paragraph VII). The TG is composed of representatives of each of the NCMA agencies (Table 1). Table 1. NCMA TG Representatives Agency Representative Arroyo Grande Bill Robeson Public Works Director Shane Taylor Utilities Manager Grover Beach Gregory A. Ray, PE Director of Public Works/City Engineer R.J. (Jim) Garing, PE Consulting City Engineer for Water and Sewer Pismo Beach Benjamin A. Fine, PE Director of Public Works/City Engineer Oceano CSD Paavo Ogren General Manager Tony Marracino Utility Systems Supervisor Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach, and Grover Beach contract with Water Systems Consulting, Inc. (WSC) to serve as staff extension to assist the TG in its roles and responsibilities in managing the water supply resources. The full TG contracts with GSI Water Solutions, Inc. and its sub-consulting partner, GEI Consultants, Inc., to conduct the quarterly groundwater monitoring and sampling tasks, evaluate water demand and available supply, identify threats to water supply, and assist the TG in preparation of the Annual Report. 1.2 Coordination with Management Areas Since 1983, management of the NCMA was based on cooperative efforts of the four NCMA agencies in continuing collaboration with the County, FCWCD, and other local and state agencies. Specifically, the NCMA agencies have limited their pumping and, in cooperation with the FCWCD, invested in surface water supplies so as to not exceed the accepted safe yield of the NCMA portion of the SMGB. In addition to the efforts discussed in this 2018 Annual Report, cooperative management occurs through many means including communication by the NCMA NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 4 - agencies in their respective public meetings, participation in the FCWCD Zone 3 Advisory Committee and TG (related to the management and operation of Lopez Lake), and participation in the Water Resources Advisory Council (the County-wide advisory panel on water issues). The NCMA agencies are active participants in current and ongoing IRWM efforts and participated in preparation and adoption of the 2007 San Luis Obispo County Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (2007 County IRWMP) as well as the 2014 update of the County IRWMP. The IRWMP promotes integrated regional water management to ensure sustainable water uses, reliable water supplies, better water quality, environmental stewardship, efficient urban development, protection of agriculture, and a strong economy. Since the 2008 Judgment, the NCMA TG has taken the lead in cooperative management of its management area. The NCMA TG has met monthly for many years and continued to do so throughout 2018. The TG also participated in the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin Management Area (SMGBMA) technical subcommittee, which formed in 2009. The purpose of the SMGBMA technical subcommittee is to coordinate efforts among the three management areas (NCMA, NMMA, SMVMA) such as sharing data throughout the year and during preparation of the Annual Report, reviewing and commenting on technical work efforts of other management areas, standardization of monitoring protocols, consideration of projects and grant opportunities of joint interest and benefit, and sharing of information and data among the managers of the three management areas. The outcomes of the motion that Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach, and Grover Beach filed on September 29, 2015 include increased discussion and collaboration between the NCMA and NMMA. One of the initiatives was the formation of an NCMA-NMMA Management Coordination Committee that met several times in 2018 to discuss items of mutual concern and develop strategies for addressing the concerns. Another area of increased mutual collaboration between the NCMA and NMMA was the formation in 2016 of a technical team to collaboratively develop a single data set of water level data points to prepare a consistent set of semiannual water level contour maps for the NCMA and NMMA. That allows the maps from each management area to present a mutually agreed upon condition at the NCMA/NMMA boundary. Those efforts continued into and throughout 2018 and resulted in the development of consistent water level contouring (and enhanced understanding of groundwater conditions) throughout the NMMA and NCMA. An NCMA Strategic Plan was developed in 2014 to provide the NCMA TG with a mission statement to guide future initiatives, providing a framework for identifying and communicating water resource planning goals and objectives, and formalizing a 10-year work plan for implementation of those efforts. Several key objectives were identified that are related to enhancing water supply reliability, improving water resource management, and increasing effective public outreach. Implementation of some of these efforts continued throughout 2018 and are described in detail in Section 7.1. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 5 - 2. Area Description 2.1 Setting The SMGB as defined in the adjudication has three jurisdictional or management areas. As shown in Figure 1, the NCMA represents the northernmost portion of the SMGB. Adjoining the NCMA to the south and east is the NMMA, and the SMVMA encompasses the remainder of the groundwater basin within the Santa Maria Valley. The northern portion of the NCMA is dominantly urban (residential/commercial). The Cienega Valley, a low-lying coastal stream and valley regime, is the area south of Arroyo Grande Creek in the central part of the area and is predominantly agricultural. The southern and southwestern portions of the area are composed of beach dunes and small lakes. That area is primarily managed by California Department of Parks and Recreation as a recreational area and a sensitive species habitat. 2.2 Precipitation Each year, climatological and hydrologic (stream flow) data for the NCMA are added to the NCMA database. Annual precipitation from 1950 to 2018 is presented in Figure 3. Historical rainfall data are compiled on a monthly basis for the following three stations:  Desert Research Institute (DRI): Western Regional Climate Center Pismo Station (Coop ID: 046943) for 1950 through August of 2017 (after which data collection at this station was discontinued)  DWR California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) Nipomo Station (No. 202) for 2006 to present  San Luis Obispo County-operated rain gauge (No. SLO 795) in Oceano for 2000 to present The locations of the three stations are shown in Figure 4. In recent years, it was noted that the CIMIS Nipomo station may have been recording irrigation overspray as precipitation and the precipitation data from the station may not be reliable. However, the evapotranspiration data is still considered reliable. For this reason and because the DRI station was discontinued in 2017, the County gauge (No. SLO 795) was the sole source of precipitation data used in this 2018 Annual Report. Figure 3 is a composite graph combining data from the DRI and County stations and illustrating annual rainfall totals from available data from 1950 through 2018 (on a calendar year basis). Annual average rainfall for the NCMA is approximately 15.6 inches. Monthly rainfall and evapotranspiration (ET) for 2018 as well as average monthly historical rainfall and ET are presented in Figure 5. During 2018, below-average rainfall occurred in 11 months. Above-average rainfall occurred only in the month of March. The total for the year was 11.2 inches, more than 4 inches less than the average annual rainfall for the area. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 6 - Figure 3 illustrates annual rainfall and shows several multi-year drought cycles (e.g., 6 years, 1984-1990) followed by cycles of above-average rainfall (e.g., 7 years, 1991-1998). With the exception of 2010, the period 2007 through 2015 (8 years) experienced below-average annual rainfall indicating a “dry” hydrologic period. This pattern continued into late-2016, when the hydrologic pattern appeared to have broken the serious drought that the area (and state) experienced for the previous 5 years. While the rainfall year of 2017 continued to bring hope that the drought cycle had transitioned to a relatively wet period, as Figure 5 illustrates, rainfall year 2018 has returned to below average conditions. 2.3 Evapotranspiration CIMIS maintains weather stations in locations throughout the state to provide real time wind speed, humidity, and evapotranspiration data. The nearest CIMIS station to the NCMA is the Nipomo station (see Figure 4). The Nipomo station has gathered data since 2006. While this station may have been subject to irrigation overspray in recent years (noted in the precipitation section above), the apparent irrigation overspray does not have a significant impact on the measurements used for calculating ET. The monthly ET data for the Nipomo station is shown in Figure 5 for 2018 and average (10 years) conditions. ET rate affects recharge potential of rainfall and the amount of outdoor water use (irrigation). NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 7 - 3. Groundwater Conditions 3.1 Geology and Hydrogeology The current understanding of the geologic framework and hydrogeologic setting is based on numerous previous investigations, particularly Woodring and Bramlette (1950), Worts (1951), DWR (1979, 2002), and Fugro (2015). The NCMA overlies the northwest portion of the SMGB. Groundwater pumped from the sedimentary deposits comprising the main municipal production aquifer underlying the NCMA is derived principally from the Paso Robles Formation. However, the underlying Careaga Sandstone also is an important producing aquifer. Quaternary-age alluvial sediments fill the alluvial valleys and form the alluvial aquifer primarily utilized by the agricultural interests in the Cienega Valley. Several faults either cross or form the boundary of the NCMA, as identified by DWR (2002), Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E; PG&E, 2014), and others. The Oceano Fault (USGS, 2006) trends northwest-southeast across the central portion of NCMA and has been extensively studied by PG&E (2014). Offshore, the Oceano Fault connects with the Hosgri and Shoreline fault systems several miles west of the coast. Onshore, the Oceano Fault consists of two mapped fault splays, including the main trace of the Oceano Fault as well as the Santa Maria River Fault, which diverges northward of the Oceano Fault through the Cienega Valley before trending into and across the Nipomo Mesa. It is unknown the extent to which the Oceano and Santa Maria River faults impede groundwater flow within the aquifer materials. However, movement on the faults, as mapped by PG&E (2014), may suggest a possible impediment to flow with the Careaga Formation and possibly the Paso Robles Formation. PG&E (2014) suggests that the existence of the Santa Maria River Fault is “uncertain.” However the water elevation contour maps of the NCMA (Figures 8 and 9, discussed in more detail in Section 3.3.1) may suggest that the Santa Maria River Fault plays a potential, but unknown, role in groundwater flow across the NCMA. The Wilmar Avenue Fault generally forms the northern boundary of the NCMA, apparently acting as a barrier to groundwater flow from the older consolidated materials north of the fault southward into the SMGB. There is no evidence, however, that the Wilmar Avenue Fault impedes alluvial flow in the Pismo Creek, Meadow Creek, or Arroyo Grande Creek alluvial valleys. 3.2 Groundwater Flow The groundwater system of the NCMA has several sources of recharge including precipitation, agricultural return flow, seepage from stream flow, and subsurface inflow from adjacent areas. In addition, some return flows occur from imported surface supply sources including Lopez Lake and the State Water Project (SWP). Discharge in the region is dominated by groundwater production from pumping wells, but minor discharge certainly occurs through phreatophyte consumption and surface water outflow. Historically, groundwater elevations in wells throughout the NCMA and resulting hydraulic gradients show that subsurface outflow discharge occurs westward from the groundwater basin to the ocean. This subsurface outflow is an important control to limit the NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 8 - potential of seawater intrusion. This westward gradient and direction of groundwater flow still is prevalent throughout the northern portion of NCMA, although there is some evidence recently that the westward gradient may have reversed in the area of Cienega Valley. The following descriptions of the boundary conditions of the NCMA are derived primarily from Todd (2007). The eastern boundary is coincident with the FCWCD Zone 3 management boundary and with the northwestern boundary of the NMMA. Aquifer materials of similar formation, provenance, and characteristics are present across the majority of this boundary, which allows subsurface flow to occur between the NCMA and NMMA. The northern and northwestern boundary, established by the Court during the adjudication, is coincident with the Wilmar Avenue Fault, which is located approximately along Highway 101 from Pismo Creek to the southeastern edge of the Arroyo Grande Valley. There is likely insignificant subsurface flow from the consolidated materials (primarily Pismo Formation) north of the Wilmar Avenue Fault across the boundary into the SMGB; however, basin inflow occurs within the underflow associated with alluvial valleys of Arroyo Grande and Pismo creeks. The southern boundary of the NCMA is an east-west line, roughly located along the trend of Black Lake Canyon and perpendicular to the coastline. Historically, it appears that groundwater flow is typically roughly parallel to the boundary. This suggests that little to no subsurface inflow occurs across this boundary. The western boundary of the NCMA follows the coastline from Pismo Creek in the north to Black Lake Canyon. Given the generally westward groundwater gradient in the area, this boundary is the site of subsurface outflow and is an important impediment to seawater intrusion. However, the boundary is susceptible to seawater intrusion if groundwater elevations onshore decline, such as may be occurring in the central portion of NCMA along the Cienega Valley. 3.3 Groundwater Monitoring Network The NCMA Monitoring Program includes: (1) compilation of groundwater elevation data from the County, (2) water quality and groundwater elevation monitoring data from the network of sentry and monitoring wells in the NCMA, (3) water quality data from the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Division of Drinking Water (DDW), and (4) groundwater elevation data from municipal pumping wells. Analysis of these data is summarized below in accordance with the Monitoring Program for the Northern Cities Management Area (Todd, 2008) and as modified as additional well data and data sources have become available over the years. Approximately 150 wells within the NCMA were monitored by the County at some time during the past few decades. The County currently monitors 50 wells on a semiannual basis, in April and October, within the NCMA. The County monitoring program includes four “sentry well” clusters (piezometers) along the coast, a four-well cluster in Oceano, and the County Monitoring Well No. 3 (12N/35W-32C03) located on the eastern NCMA boundary between the NCMA and NMMA (Figure 6). The County monitors more than 125 additional wells in the NMMA portion of the SMGB within the County. Beginning in 2009, the NCMA agencies initiated a quarterly sentry well monitoring program to supplement the County’s semiannual schedule. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 9 - To monitor overall changes in groundwater conditions, representative wells within the NCMA were selected for preparation of hydrographs and evaluation of water level changes. Wells were selected based on the following criteria:  The wells must be part of the County’s current monitoring program or part of a public agency’s regular monitoring program.  Detailed location information must be available.  Construction details of the wells must be available.  The locations of the wells should have a wide geographic distribution.  The historical record of water level data must be long and relatively complete. Many of the wells that have been used in the program are production wells that were not designed for monitoring purposes, in other words are screened across various production zones. Moreover, many of the wells are active production wells or located near active wells and are therefore potentially subject to localized pumping effects that result in measurements that are lower than the regionally representative water level. These effects are not always apparent at the time of measurement and data cannot easily be identified as representing static groundwater levels in specific zones (e.g., unconfined or deep confined to semi-confined). Therefore, data should be considered as a whole in developing a general representation of groundwater conditions. The “sentry” wells (32S/12E-24Bxx, 32S/13E-30Fxx, 32S/13E-30Nxx, and 12N/36W-36Lxx) are a critical element of the groundwater monitoring network and are designed to provide an early warning system to identify potential seawater intrusion in the basin (Figure 6). Each sentry well consists of a cluster of multiple wells that allows for the measurement of groundwater elevation and quality from discrete depths. Also shown in Figure 6 is the OCSD observation well cluster, a dedicated monitoring well cluster located just seaward of OCSD production wells 7 and 8, and County Monitoring Well #3 (12N/35W-32C03). Figure 7 shows the depth and well names of the sentry well clusters, the OCSD observation well cluster, and County Monitoring Well #3. Traditionally, the wells were divided into three basic depth categories including (1) shallow; (2) intermediate; (3) and deep to describe the relative depths of each monitoring well within the cluster. The basic depth categories do not necessarily describe the geologic unit and relative depth of the unit that the screened portion of the well monitors. More recently, however, it is becoming apparent that it is important to recognize and identify the geologic unit that each well monitors. The water level responses and water quality changes are quite different between the shallow alluvial unit (24B01, 30F01, and 30N01), the Paso Robles Formation (24B02, 30F02, 30N02, 30N03, 36L01, Oceano Green, Oceano Blue, and 32C03), and the deeper Careaga Sandstone (24B03, 30F03, 36L02, Oceano Silver, and Oceano Yellow). The significance of this level of differentiation and the impact of the value of the Deep Well Index will be studied more extensively in the future. Since the sentry well monitoring program began in 2009, 41 monitoring events have been conducted. Monitoring events are now performed quarterly, in January, April, July, and October. These monitoring events include collection of synoptic groundwater elevation data and water quality samples for laboratory analysis. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 10 - 3.4 Groundwater Levels Groundwater elevation data are gathered from the network of wells throughout the NCMA to monitor effects of groundwater use, groundwater recharge, and to indicate risk of seawater intrusion. Over time, analysis of these groundwater elevation data has included development of groundwater surface contour maps, hydrographs, and an index of key sentry well water elevations. 3.4.1 Groundwater Level Contour Maps Contoured groundwater elevations for the spring (April 2018) and fall (October 2018) monitoring events, including data from the County monitoring program, are shown in Figures 8 and 9, respectively. Groundwater level contours for April 2018 are presented in Figure 8. Spring groundwater contours north of the Santa Maria River Fault show a westerly to southwesterly groundwater flow. The groundwater gradient and flow are generally inferred on the basis of historical records, historical trends, and water level data from the NMMA farther east because of a limited number of wells and water level data in the southernmost portion of the area that is dominated by sensitive-species dunes and State Parks land. Agricultural groundwater production resulted in a broad, but subdued, pumping trough in the central portion of the NCMA, in Cienega Valley south of Arroyo Grande Creek. As shown on Figure 8, the water elevations in the Cienega Valley are in the range of 6 to 13 feet NAVD88. These data show a slight decrease in water elevations of 1.5 to 2.2 feet from April 2017 to April 2018. Prior to 2017, the subdued pumping trough in the Cienega Valley usually manifested itself as a closed depression, with groundwater elevations generally below “sea level” (NAVD88) in the center of the depression. A second pumping depression has often formed north of Arroyo Grande Creek in the area of concentrated municipal pumping. This second depression occurs partly in response to the recent drought. However, that historical pumping depression has not formed now since 2017. April 2018 water levels in the main production zone along the coast ranged from 7.6 to 11 feet NAVD88. Groundwater level contours for October 2018 are presented in Figure 9. The groundwater conditions in October 2018 showed a decline of approximately 4 to 29 feet from April 2018. Conditions exhibited a return to the previously prevalent pumping depression in the Cienega Valley, with groundwater elevations as deep as (-)16 feet NAVD88. The groundwater elevation in the pumping depression in October 2018 was approximately 3 feet lower than was present in October 2017. October 2018 groundwater elevations in the main production zone along the coast ranged from 5.4 to 7.7 feet NAVD88. 3.4.2 Historical Water Level Trends Hydrographs of several water wells in the NCMA are presented in Figure 10. The hydrographs for wells 32D03 and 32D11 (Figure 10) are paired hydrographs for wells in the vicinity of the municipal wellfields. Depending on the duration of pumping of the municipal wells, historically water levels in these wells have been below levels in other areas of the basin for NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 11 - prolonged periods of time. The hydrographs show that, historically, groundwater elevations in these wells generally have been above mean sea level. In 2007 to 2009, when groundwater pumping was at its peak in comparison to the past 30 years and contributed to the apparent seawater intrusion event in the coastal wells in 2009, an area of lower groundwater elevations ("trough") beneath the active wellfield appeared. As illustrated in Figure 10, the water elevations of all the wells, including the paired wells 32D03 and 32D11, exhibited a steady decline from 2011 to 2016 during which time rainfall was below normal every year. In this time groundwater elevations declined to near sea level or, in the case of 33K03, to below sea level. By October 2016 the groundwater elevations in these wells were generally below the levels observed in 2009-2010. However, beginning in 2016 and throughout 2017 and 2018, all of the wells exhibited an overall increase in water levels except for the normal, seasonal decline during the summer. The water level in well 33K03, located near the NCMA/NMMA boundary, is now several feet above sea level (NAVD88). 3.4.3 Sentry Wells Regular monitoring of water elevations in clustered sentry wells located along the coast are an essential tool for tracking critical groundwater elevation changes at the coast. Groundwater elevations in these wells are monitored quarterly as part of the sentry well monitoring program. As shown by the hydrographs for the five sentry well clusters (Figure 11), the sentry wells provide a long history of groundwater elevations. Inspection of the recent data shown in Figure 11 compared to the historical record illustrates some noteworthy trends:  From 2013 until near the end of 2016, the water level trend of 30N02, one of the wells that experienced elevated TDS and chloride levels in 2009-2010 (i.e. “water quality degradation”), looked quite similar to the water level trend of the well in 2007-2010, immediately before and during the period of incipient seawater intrusion. This trend was noteworthy and alarming. However, since the end of 2016 and continuing through 2018, the water level reversed the downward trend and now has water elevations seasonally fluctuating around 7 feet NAVD88.  The decline in water levels since 2005 to 2016 in the Oceano Dunes wells (36L01 and 36L02) was also notable and potentially significant, particularly in 36L01 which is screened across the Paso Robles Formation. In 2016, both wells reached historic low water elevations. However, since late 2016, both wells have started recovering to less-alarming levels. The deepest wells in the clusters, 24B03, 30F03, and 30N02, were previously identified as key wells to monitor for potential seawater intrusion and were suggested to reflect the net effect of changing groundwater recharge and discharge conditions in the primary production aquifer. One of the thresholds to track the status and apparent health of the basin is to average the groundwater elevations from these three deep sentry wells to generate a single, representative index, called the Deep Well Index. Previous studies suggested a Deep Well Index value of 7.5 feet NAVD88 as a minimum threshold, below which the basin is at risk for eastward migration of NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 12 - seawater and a subsequent threat of encroaching seawater intrusion. Historical variation of this index is represented by the average deep sentry well elevations in Figure 12. Inspection of the Deep Well Index in 2008-09, prior to the period of water quality degradation in 30N02 and 30N03, the Deep Well Index dropped below the 7.5-foot threshold and remained below that level for almost 2 years. It appears that prolonged levels below the threshold may be causing the degradation. Since the start of the recent drought in 2012, the Deep Well Index dropped several times below the threshold, but usually for only a few months at a time. 2016 was notable because the Deep Well Index started the year above the trigger value, with an index value of 9.18 in January 2016. By April, the index value dropped to 8.53 (1.03 feet above the trigger value). The index value continued to decline and on June 8, 2016 dropped below the 7.5-foot threshold. For more than 6 months, the Deep Well Index remained below the index trigger value and reached an index value of 5.39 feet in October. In late October, the Deep Well Index began to rise and rose above the threshold value on November 28, 2016 (Figure 12). In 2017, the Deep Well Index remained above the 7.5-foot threshold value the entire year except for a very brief period between August 18 and August 29, 2017 when the agencies were forced to increase groundwater pumping due to a maintenance shutdown of the Lopez Lake water supply. In 2018, the Deep Well Index started the year above the trigger value with an index value of over 9 feet in January. It continued to rise, reached a high over 11 feet in mid-March, and then began to decline. The index value dropped below the 7.5-foot threshold in early July. For more than 4 months, the Deep Well Index remained below the index trigger value and reached an index value of approximately 6.5 feet in late October. In early November, the Deep Well Index began to rise and by late November, 2018, it rose above the threshold value where it remained through the end of the year (Figure 12). The index value finished 2018 at about 9 feet NAVD88. Key wells, including 24B03, 30F03, 30N02, 36L01, 36L02, and 32C03, are instrumented with pressure transducers equipped with conductivity probes that periodically record water level, water temperature, and conductivity (Figures 13 through 18). It should be noted that transducer malfunctions in early to mid-2015 resulted in variable conductivity data in some of the wells. All transducers were replaced and are working properly. Wells 24B03, 30F03, and 30N02 comprise the wells used to calculate the Deep Well Index. Wells 36L01 and 36L02 are adjacent to the coast. Well 32C03 is the easternmost well and adjacent to the boundary between the NCMA and NMMA. The following discusses 2018 water levels for these key wells:  Deep Well Index Wells: The Deep Well Index wells exhibited a pattern throughout 2018 that is consistent with previous years. The water levels in wells 24B03, 30N02 and 30F03 generally declined starting in April or May 2018 and continued to decline into October when they began to rise. Also consistent with patterns seen in previous years is the variability of aquifer response among the three wells. Well 24B03, the northernmost well located in the North Beach Campground, maintains a relatively stable and moderated water level throughout the year, and consistently sustains groundwater elevations higher than the Deep Well Index value. The water level in 24B03 mitigates the water levels in 30N02, which typically maintain levels consistently deeper than the Deep Well Index. Well 30F03 generally closely follows the Deep Well Index value. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 13 -  Coastal Wells: The water level in well 36L01, screened within the Paso Robles Formation, remained 4 to 10 feet above sea level (NAVD88) throughout 2018 and remained stable within the relatively narrow historical range. The water level in well 36L02, which is screened within the Careaga Sandstone, illustrates a much greater seasonal fluctuation than is observed in 36L01. Similar to 2017, the water elevation in 36L02 remained above sea level throughout 2018, in comparison with 2015 and 2016 when the water elevation in the well dropped below sea level in late September and remained below sea level into mid-October.  NCMA/NMMA Boundary: Well 32C03, which shows regular seasonal fluctuations, remained above sea level throughout all of 2017 and 2018, in contrast with the prior 4 years when the water level dropped below sea level in August and remained at a low elevation until early October. 3.5 Change in Groundwater in Storage The relative change of groundwater levels and associated change in groundwater in storage in the NCMA portion of the SMGB between April 2017 and April 2018 were estimated on the basis of a comparison of water level contour maps created for these periods. Comparison of the April water levels was chosen to comply with DWR reporting requirements and SGMA. The groundwater contour lines from each period were compared and the volumetric difference between the two was calculated. The results are presented in Figure 19, which shows contours of equal difference between water elevations of April 2017 and April 2018. Figure 19 shows that, with the exception of two small areas along the coast, the NCMA portion of the basin experienced a net decrease of groundwater in storage. From the change of water levels, a volumetric change in groundwater storage was estimated, based on aquifer properties (storage coefficient of 0.02) representative of the Paso Robles Formation in the area as documented in the SMGB Characterization Project2 (Fugro, 2015). The net decrease in groundwater levels represented a net decrease of groundwater in storage from April 2017 to April 2018 of approximately 600 acre feet (AF). 3.6 Water Quality Water is used in several ways in the NCMA and each use requires a certain minimum water quality. Because contaminants from seawater intrusion or from anthropogenic sources potentially can impact the quality of water in the basin, water quality is monitored at each of the sentry well locations in the NCMA and County Well No. 3 (32C03). 2 The water levels used to estimate the change in groundwater storage are not differentiated by aquifer. In addition, use of the fixed storage coefficient (representing the Paso Robles Formation) may result in a generalized storage change estimate for portions of the NCMA area (i.e. the alluvium-dominated Cienega Valley). To alleviate these issues it is recommended that future annual change in storage estimates utilize the Phase 1B model that is being developed as part of the Central Coast Blue Project (see Section 7.1.2). NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 14 - 3.6.1 Quarterly Groundwater Monitoring Quarterly groundwater monitoring events occurred in January, April, July, and October 2018. During each event, depths to groundwater were measured, and wells were sampled using procedures, sampling equipment, and in-field sample preservation protocol pursuant to ASTM International Standard D4448-01. The water quality data from these events and historical data from these wells are provided in Appendix A. Graphs of historical chloride and TDS concentrations over time are presented in Figures 20 and 21, respectively, to monitor for trends that may aid in the detection of impending seawater intrusion. The historical water quality data show that concentration levels of TDS and chlorides, as well as other constituents, remain relatively stable within a very narrow historical range. There have been a few notable abnormal occurrences, however (see Figures 20 and 21). The NCMA 2009 Annual Monitoring Report (Todd, 2010) suggested that the observed historical variation in water quality data could be caused by several reasons such as variable permeability of geologic materials, potential mixing with seawater, ion exchange in clay-rich units, and variability in surface recharge sources such as Arroyo Grande and Meadow Creeks (Todd, 2010). Improved management of municipal groundwater use, because of an overall reduction in pumping since 2009, has likely contributed to the past few years of relatively stable groundwater quality. 3.6.2 Analytical Results Summary Analytical results of key water quality data, including chloride, TDS, and sodium, were generally consistent with historical concentrations and observed ranges of constituent concentrations during 2018. In general, no water quality results were observed that are a cause of concern. Figure 22 is a Piper diagram, one of several means of graphically representing water quality. Of interest is that there appears to be three separate water quality types found in the monitoring wells: 1. The Pier Avenue deep well (30N02, screened in the Paso Robles Formation from 175 to 255 feet) and Oceano Dunes intermediate well (36L01, screened in the Paso Robles Formation from 227 to 237 feet, are screened in the same production zone in the Paso Robles Formation. This is despite their different nomenclature as “deep” vs. “intermediate” wells. Relative to the other wells in the area these two wells are high in sulfates and have calcium-magnesium-sulfate rich water. Interestingly, both wells are relatively low in chloride. This is significant because this zone, and well 30N02, was the site of the apparent seawater intrusion event in 2009-2010. 2. The County Monitoring Well #3 (32C03) has an apparent water quality that is different than any of the other wells in the area. It is relatively high in sodium, chloride, and potassium. Its location in the right quadrant of the diamond-shaped part of the diagram commonly characterizes a sodium-chloride-rich groundwater representative of marine or deep ancient groundwater, even though it is a relatively shallow well and screened within the Paso Robles Formation, which is a Plio-Pleistocene age alluvial deposit. Although its overall water quality signature is quite different than seawater, it is more closely representative of seawater than any of the other wells in the area. Well 32C03 is screened from 90 to 170 feet, in the Paso Robles Formation. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 15 - 3. All of the other wells in the monitoring network fall into the third category of groundwater. These wells are all generally a calcium-bicarbonate groundwater that is commonly associated with shallow groundwater. Of interest is that this grouping of water quality represents groundwater from wells that are screened in both the Paso Robles Formation and the Careaga sandstone (wells 24B03, 30F03, and 36L02 are screened in the Careaga sandstone; the others are screened in the Paso Robles Formation). None of the water quality results from monitoring wells throughout 2018 indicate an incipient episode or immediate threat of seawater intrusion. Since the decline of TDS, sodium, and chloride concentrations following the 2009-2010 seasons, it is also clear that the location and inland extent of the seawater-fresh water interface is not known, except for the apparent indication that it was detected in well 30N02, 30N03, and MW-Blue, all of which are screened in the Paso Robles Formation. No indications of seawater intrusion have been observed in wells screened in the underlying Careaga sandstone. At this time, without additional offshore data, the location of the interface or mixing zone is not known and will not be known unless and until it intercepts a monitoring well. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 16 - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 17 - 4. Water Supply and Production/Delivery 4.1 Water Supply The NCMA water supply consists of three major sources including Lopez Lake, the SWP, and groundwater. Each source of supply has a defined delivery volume that varies from year to year. 4.1.1 Lopez Lake Lopez Lake and Water Treatment Plant (Lopez Lake, which also is referred to as Lopez Reservoir) is operated by FCWCD Zone 3. FCWCD Zone 3 provides treated water directly to the NCMA agencies and releases water to Arroyo Grande Creek for habitat conservation and agricultural use. The operational safe yield of Lopez Lake is 8,730 acre feet per year (AFY), which reflects the amount of sustainable water supply during a drought of defined severity. Of this yield, 4,530 AFY have been apportioned by agreements to contractors including each of the NCMA agencies and County Service Area ("CSA") 12 in the Avila Beach area. Of the 8,730 AFY safe yield, 4,200 AFY are reserved for downstream releases to maintain flows in Arroyo Grande Creek and provide groundwater recharge. The 2018 FCWCD Zone 3 allocations are shown in Table 2. Table 2. Lopez Lake (FCWCD Zone 3 Contractors) 2018 Water Allocation (AFY) Contractor Normal Water Allocation, (AFY) Arroyo Grande 2,290 Grover Beach 800 Pismo Beach 892 Oceano CSD 303 CSA 12 (not in NCMA) 245 Total 4,530 Downstream Releases 4,200 Safe Yield of Lopez Lake 8,730 Notes: AFY = acre-feet per year, CSA = County Service Area, CSD = Community Services District, FCWCD = Flood Control & Water Conservation District, LRRP = Low Reservoir Response Plan, NCMA = Northern Cities Management Area In December 2014, FCWCD Zone 3 adopted the Low Reservoir Response Plan (LRRP). The LRRP establishes actions that FCWCD Zone 3 can take when the amount of water in storage in the reservoir drops below 20,000 AF, provided that the FCWCD Board of Supervisors declares a drought emergency. The purpose of the LRRP is to limit downstream releases and municipal diversions from Lopez Reservoir to preserve water within the reservoir, above the minimum pool, for a minimum of 3 to 4 years under drought conditions. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 18 - The reduction strategies for the LRRP are tied to the amount of water in the reservoir. As the amount of water in the reservoir drops below the triggers (20,000; 15,000; 10,000; 5,000; and 4,000 AF), the hydrologic conditions are reviewed and adaptive management used to meet the LRRP objectives. The municipal diversions are to be reduced according to the strategies shown in Table 3. Table 3. Lopez Lake Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Low Reservoir Response Plan Amount of Water in Storage (AF) Municipal Diversion Reduction Municipal Diversion (AFY) 20,000 0% 4,530 15,000 10% 4,077 10,000 20% 3,624 5,000 35% 2,941 4,000 100% 0 Notes: AF= acre-feet, AFY = acre-feet per year The mandatory actions after the LRRP is enacted include: reductions in entitlement water deliveries; reductions in downstream releases; no new allocations of Surplus Water from unreleased downstream releases; and extension of time that agencies can take delivery of existing unused water throughout the duration of the Drought Emergency, subject to evaporation losses if the water is not used in the year of original allocation. Included in the LRRP is an adaptive management provision that allows modification of the terms of the LRRP to match the initially prescribed reductions based on actual hydrologic conditions. The downstream releases are to be reduced according to the strategies described in Table 4. The release strategies represent the maximum amount of water that can be released. The FCWCD controls the timing of the reduced releases to meet the needs of the agricultural stakeholders and to address environmental requirements. Table 4. Lopez Lake Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Low Reservoir Response Plan Amount of Water in Storage (AF) Downstream Release Reduction Downstream Releases (AFY) 20,000 9.5% 3,800 15,000 9.5% 3,800 10,000 75.6% 1,026 5,000 92.9% 300 4,000 100% 0 Notes: AF= acre-feet, AFY = acre-feet per year NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 19 - The LRRP was put into effect on April 1, 2015. Throughout 2015 and all of 2016, Lopez operated pursuant to the 15,000 AF diversion reduction trigger that required a 10% reduction in municipal diversions. The 10,000 AF trigger requiring a 20% reduction was avoided because agencies enacted mandatory water conservation measures and utilized other sources of water including some minimal rainfall and SWP water. Lopez Reservoir recovered from a low of 11,000 AF in storage to a peak of more than 30,000 AF in May 2017, to approximately 25,000 AF at the start of 2018 because of the relatively heavy rainfall year of late 2016 and early 2017. Although contractually the LRRP is no longer in effect when both triggers are rescinded (Board of Supervisors declaration of water emergency and reservoir levels drop below 20,000 AF), the Zone 3 agencies resolved to keep the LRRP in effect until there is clear evidence that the drought is over. Because the reservoir volume was above 20,000 AF, no mandatory reductions in municipal deliveries were required in 2017. In 2018, the reservoir was operated under the LRRP at above the 20,000 AF trigger (which does not require a reduction in deliveries) until the LRRP was terminated on March 31st. Although the reservoir level did drop below the 20,000 AF level in November, and remained below 20,000 AF through December, the LRRP was not reactivated during 2018. The status of the reservoir and management actions related to the LRRP will be monitored throughout 2019 and adjusted accordingly based on winter 2019 rainfall and storage in Lopez Lake. Total discharge from Lopez Lake in 2018 was 9,099 AF, of which 4,873 AF were delivered to NCMA contractors, 77 AF were delivered to CSA 12, and 4,149 AF were released downstream to maintain flow in Arroyo Grande Creek (Table 5). In the past, when management of releases resulted in a portion of the 4,200 AFY remaining in the reservoir, or the contractors did not use their full entitlement for the year, the water was offered to the contractors as surplus water. Surplus water deliveries to the NCMA agencies in 2018 equaled 692 AF (Table 5). Table 5. 2018 Lopez Lake Deliveries Agency 2018 Allocation Usage (AF) 2018 Surplus Usage (AF) 2018 Total Lopez Lake Water Delivery (AF) Arroyo Grande 2,163 0 2,163 Grover Beach 804 0 804 Pismo Beach 911 515 1,426 Oceano CSD 303 177 480 Total NCMA 2017 Usage 4,181 692 4,873 CSA 12 (not in NCMA) 77 0 77 Downstream Releases 4,149 -- 4,149 Total 2017 Lopez Lake Deliveries 8,407 692 9,099 Notes: AF= acre-feet, AFY = acre-feet per year, CSD = Community Services District, NCMA = Northern Cities Management Area Source: FCWCD Zone 3 Monthly Operations Report NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 20 - 4.1.2 State Water Project Pismo Beach and OCSD have contracts with FCWCD to receive water from the SWP. The FCWCD serves as the SWP contractor and provides imported water to local retailers through the Coastal Branch pipeline. Pismo Beach and OCSD have contractual water delivery allocations, commonly referred to as “Table A” water, of 1,100 AFY and 750 AFY, respectively (Table 6). Additionally, Pismo Beach contracts for 1,240 AF of SWP 140 AF of which is owned by private parties. In addition to their Table A allocation, Pismo Beach holds 1,240 AFY of additional allocation with FCWCD and OCSD holds an additional allocation of 750 AFY. The additional allocation held by the agencies, usually referred to as a “drought buffer”, is available to augment their SWP water supply when the SWP annual allocation, i.e., percent of SWP water available, is less than 100 percent. The additional allocations also increases each agencies water held in storage. In any given year, however, Pismo Beach’s and OCSD’s total SWP deliveries cannot exceed 1,240 AF and 750 AF, respectively. Table 6. 2018 NCMA SWP Deliveries Agency Table A Allocation, AFY Drought Buffer, AFY 2018 Delivery, AFY Arroyo Grande -- -- -- Grover Beach -- -- -- Pismo Beach 1,100 1,240 242 Oceano CSD 750 750 -- Total Allocation/Usage, AFY 1,850 1,990 242 Notes: Pismo Beach contracts for 1,240 AF of Table A SWP, but 140 AF are owned by private parties Drought Buffer = Additional supplies when Table A allocation is less than 100%; total SWP deliveries (Table A and drought) cannot exceed 1,240 AFY AFY= acre-feet per year, CSD = Community Services District, NCMA = Northern Cities Management Area The SWP annual allocation for contractors for 2018 was set at 15 percent of Table A contractual allocation amounts on November 29, 2017. The 2018 SWP allocation of Table A contractual allocations was increased three times in 2018; to 20 percent on January 29, 30 percent on April 24 and 35 percent on May 21st. Because SWP contractors have the opportunity to store or bank a portion of their allocated water in any one year for delivery during the next year, the volume of delivered SWP water may exceed that year’s Table A allocation. Normally, carryover water is water that has been exported during the year from the Delta but has not been delivered. However, storage for carryover water no longer becomes available if it interferes with storage of SWP water for project needs. For 2019, the initial allocation of the SWP contractors was set at 10 percent of Table A contractual allocation amounts on November 30, 2018. The Table A contractual allocation was increased to 15 percent on January 25, 2019, 35 percent on February 20, 2019, and to 70 percent on March 20, 2019. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 21 - The SWP supply has the potential to be affected by drought and environmental issues, particularly because of the endangered Delta smelt in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. However, OCSD and Pismo Beach have not been negatively affected to date by reduced SWP supplies because FCWCD allocations to its subcontractors have typically been fulfilled, even in dry years. This is a result of FCWCD’s maintenance of excess, unused SWP entitlement. Therefore, even when SWP supplies are decreased, the FCWCD’s excess SWP entitlement provides a buffer so that contracted volumes to water purveyors, such as OCSD and Pismo Beach, still may be provided in full. During 2018, Pismo Beach took delivery of 242 AF of SWP water and OCSD did not take any SWP water delivery. 4.1.3 Groundwater The Judgment and the 2002 Settlement Agreement governs the use of groundwater in the NCMA and establishes that groundwater will continue to be allotted and independently managed by the NCMA agencies, NCMA overlying owners, and FCWCD ("Northern Parties"). Each of the NCMA agencies has the capability to extract groundwater from municipal water supply wells located in the central and northern portions of the NCMA as shown on Figure 23. Groundwater also satisfies agricultural irrigation and rural domestic use throughout the NCMA. A calculated, consensus “safe yield” value of 9,500 AFY for the NCMA portion of the SMGB was included in the 2002 Settlement Agreement through affirmation of the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement among the NCMA agencies. It provides allotments for agricultural irrigation of 5,300 AFY, subsurface outflow to the ocean of 200 AFY, and urban use of 4,000 AFY. The volume of the allotment for urban use was subdivided as follows:  Arroyo Grande: 1,202 AFY  Grover Beach: 1,198 AFY  Pismo Beach: 700 AFY  OCSD: 900 AFY The basis of the safe yield was established in 1982 by a Technical Advisory Committee, consisting of representatives from Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, Pismo Beach, OCSD, Avila Beach Community Water District, Port San Luis Harbor District, the Farm Bureau, and the County to deal with a safe yield allocation strategy and agreement not to exceed the safe yield of the “Arroyo Grande Groundwater Basin.” The basis for the committee's analysis was DWR (1979). The Technical Advisory Committee concluded that the safe yield was 9,500 AFY. These findings and the allocation of the safe yield then were incorporated into a voluntary groundwater management plan (1983 “Gentlemen’s Agreement”) and were further formalized in the 2002 Settlement Agreement and the 2005 Stipulation for the SMGB Adjudication. According to Todd (2007), the “safe yield” allotment for agricultural irrigation is significantly higher than the actual agricultural irrigation demand and the calculated amount for subsurface outflow is unreasonably low. Todd (2007) recognized that maintaining sufficient subsurface outflow to the coast and preservation of a westward groundwater gradient are essential to preventing seawater intrusion. A regional outflow of 3,000 AFY was estimated as a reasonable approximation although the minimum subsurface outflow necessary to prevent seawater intrusion is unknown. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 22 - The 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement provides that groundwater allotments of each of the urban agencies can be increased when land within the corporate boundaries is converted from agricultural use to urban use, referred to as an agricultural conversion credit. Agricultural conversion credits equal to 121 AFY and 209 AFY were developed in 2011 for Arroyo Grande and Grover Beach, respectively. These agricultural credits were unchanged during 2018. Total groundwater use in the NCMA, including agricultural irrigation and rural uses, is shown in Table 7 (descriptions of agricultural irrigation applied water and rural use estimation are provided in Sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2, respectively). Total estimated groundwater pumpage in the NCMA in 2018 from the SMGB was 3,558 AF. Table 7. NCMA Groundwater Pumpage from Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, 2018 Agency Groundwater Allotment + Ag Conversion Credit (AF) 2018 Groundwater Use from SMGB (AF) Percent Pumped of Groundwater Allotment Arroyo Grande 1,202 + 121 = 1,323 49 4% Grover Beach 1,198 + 209 = 1,407 416 30% Pismo Beach 700 53 8% Oceano CSD 900 246 27% Total Urban Groundwater Allotment / Use 4,000 + 330 = 4,330 764 18% Agricultural Irrigation Applied Water 5,300 - 330 = 4,970 2,651 53% Nonpotable Irrigation by Arroyo Grande -- 62 -- Rural Water Users -- 81 -- Estimated Subsurface Outflow to Ocean (2001 Groundwater Management Agreement) 200 -- -- Total NCMA Groundwater Allotment / Use 9,500 3,558 37% Notes: AF= acre-feet, SMGB = Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, CSD = Community Services District, NCMA = Northern Cities Management Area 4.1.4 Developed Water As defined in the Stipulation, “developed water” is “groundwater derived from human intervention” and includes infiltration from the following sources: “Lopez Lake water, return flow, and recharge resulting from storm water percolation ponds.” Return flow results from deep percolation of water used in irrigation that is in excess of the plant’s requirements. Return flows have not been estimated recently, but would be considered part of the groundwater basin inflow. In 2008, Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and Pismo Beach prepared stormwater management plans. To control stormwater runoff, and to increase groundwater recharge, each city now NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 23 - requires that new development construct onsite retention or detention ponds. As these new ponds or basins are constructed, the increase in groundwater recharge could result in recognition of substantial augmentation of basin yield and provision of recharge credits to one or more of the NCMA agencies (Todd, 2007). Thus, a re-evaluation of estimated stormwater recharge is warranted as new recharge facilities are installed and as additional information on flow rates, pond size, infiltration rates, and tributary watershed area becomes available. Pursuant to the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement, recharge credits would be based on a mutually accepted methodology to evaluate the amount of recharge that would involve quantification of factors such as Lopez Lake and SWP recharge, stormwater runoff amounts, determination of effective recharge under various conditions, and methods to document actual recharge to developed aquifers. 4.1.5 Total Water Supply Availability The baseline, or full allocation, water supply available to the NCMA agencies is summarized in Table 8. The baseline water supplies include 100 percent Lopez Lake allocation, SMGB groundwater allotments, agricultural credits, and 100 percent delivery of SWP allocations. This baseline water supply does not include Lopez Lake surplus or SWP carryover because these supplies vary from year to year and are not always available. The category “Other Supplies” includes groundwater pumped from outside the NCMA boundaries (outside the SMGB). The baseline supply for the NCMA agencies totals 10,625 AFY. Table 8. Baseline (Full Allotment) Available Urban Water Supplies (AFY) Urban Area Lopez Lake SWP Allocation (at 100%) Groundwater Allotment Ag Credit Other Supplies Total Arroyo Grande 2,290 0 1,202 121 160 3,773 Grover Beach 800 0 1,198 209 0 2,207 Pismo Beach 892 1,100 700 0 0 2,692 Oceano CSD 303 750 900 0 0 1,953 Total 4,285 1,850 4,000 330 160 10,625 Notes: AFY= acre-feet per year, CSD = Community Services District, SWP = State Water Project Table 9 summarizes the available water supply to the NCMA agencies in 2018, including Lopez Lake, Lopez Lake carryover (surplus) water, the 2018 SWP 35 percent Table A delivery schedule, and the available SWP carryover water. The total available water supply is a compilation of all components of each agency’s portfolio. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 24 - Table 9. 2018 Available Urban Water Supply, (AF) Urban Area Lopez Lake Allocation Lopez Lake Surplus 2018 SWP Allocation (at 35% Delivery) 2018 SWP Drought Buffer 2018 SWP Carryover Ground- water Allotment Ag Credit Other Supplies Total (2018) Arroyo Grande 2,290 564 0 0 0 1,202 121 160 4,337 Grover Beach 800 197 0 0 0 1,198 209 0 2,404 Pismo Beach 892 220 385 01 1,2402 700 0 0 3,0521 Oceano CSD 303 75 263 01 7502 900 0 0 2,0281 Total 4,285 1,056 648 0 1,990 4,000 330 160 11,821 Notes: 1In any given year, Pismo Beach’s total SWP deliveries cannot exceed 1,240 AF and OCSD’s deliveries cannot exceed 750 AF. In years when the Table A SWP allocation, plus drought buffer, plus carryover exceed 1,240 AF for Pismo Beach and 750 AF for OCSD, the total available SWP supply is capped at 1,240 AF or 750 AF for Pismo Beach and OCSD, respectively. 2Based on personal communication with Jill Ogren on January 15, 2019. AF = acre-feet, CSD = Community Services District, SWP = State Water Project 4.2 Water Use Water use refers to the total amount of water used to satisfy the needs of all water user groups. In the NCMA, water use predominantly serves urban production and agricultural applied water, a relatively small component of rural domestic use including small community water systems, and domestic, recreational, and agriculture-related businesses. 4.2.1 Agricultural Water Supply Requirements For this 2018 NCMA Annual Monitoring Report, the irrigation applied water estimations were updated using the 2015 Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) Demand Calculator (IDC). The IDC is a stand-alone program that simulates land surface and root zone flow processes, and, importantly, the agricultural water supply requirements for each crop type. IDC applies user specified soil, weather, and land-use data to estimate and track the soil moisture balances. More specifically, available water within the root zone is tracked for each of the crops to simulate when irrigation events take place based on crop requirements and cultural irrigation practices. Data Used in the IDC:  Land-use. The San Luis Obispo County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office (ACO) annually compiles an estimate of irrigated acres in the County. A view displaying the irrigated agricultural lands within NCMA for 2018 is shown in Figure 24. The 2018 survey indicates a total of 1,482 acres of irrigated agriculture in the NCMA consisting predominantly of rotational crops. Table 10 lists the crop types and acreages found in the NCMA that were used in the IDC program.  Climate Data. 2018 weather data from the FCWCD rain gauge in Oceano and the CIMIS Nipomo Station (202) were used for precipitation and data related to reference ET values, NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 25 - respectively. The data needed to calculate reference ET include solar radiation, humidity, air temperature, and wind speed. Both weather stations are shown in Figure 4.  ET Values by Crop Category. The DWR Consumptive Use Program (CUP) was used to estimate potential ET values based on specific annual climate data and crop type. The CUP used monthly climate data from the closest CIMIS station (202, Nipomo) and includes crop coefficients to calculate ET values for the irrigated crop categories.  Assumptions used in the analysis include: o Since the NCMA is located near the coast, agricultural practices are influenced significantly by the marine layer. As seen in Figure 4, the Nipomo CIMIS station used for climatological data in both the CUP and IDC is located farther inland than the easternmost boundary of NCMA and the recorded weather data does not fully account for the cooling and moisture effects of the marine layer. o Use of an unadjusted calculated ET results in a higher value than that actually taking place in the NCMA. Studies have identified that ET values within the marine layer can be as much as 20 to 25 percent lower than that of the same crop located just outside of the marine layer influence. Irrigation Training and Research Center <http://www.itrc.org/etdata/etmain.htm> provides typical year (1997 Hydrology) ET values using various irrigation methods for Zone 3, the coastal outside marine layer, and Zone 1, the marine layer. The computed percent reduction in ET to Zone 3 values range from 11% for rotational crops (small vegetables) to 19% for strawberries. The distance the marine layer extends inland can vary from less than ½ mile to as much as 4 to 5 miles, depending on land topography. Low-lying areas have a higher frequency of marine layer coverage, and for longer periods throughout the day. o The NCMA is considered to be a low-lying area with boundaries extending between 2 and 5 miles inland. Recognizing that not all the crops would be affected by the marine layer, but also accounting for the cooling influence over some of the area, monthly ET values calculated on the basis of the CIMIS Nipomo Station data were adjusted lower by 12 percent and are shown in Table 10.  Soil Data. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) was used to collect soil parameters in the NCMA for use in the IDC. The soil properties used include saturated hydraulic conductivity, porosity, and the runoff curve numbers. The field capacity and wilting points were developed on the basis of the described soil textures (i.e., sand, loam, sandy clay, etc.) and industry standards. The IDC relies on soil properties for estimating water storage, deep percolation, and runoff; all of which lead to a refined estimation of applied water. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 26 - Table 10. 2018 NCMA Crop Acreages and Calculated Evapotranspiration Crop Type Acreage 2018 Potential ET1 (AF per acre) Rotational Crops 1,292 1.92 Strawberry 155 0.9 Nursery Plants 11 1.8 Avocados 24 1.8 Notes: 1See “ET Values by Crop Category,” in text section above. 2Rotational crops ET is based on a two- to three-crop rotation. ET = evapotranspiration, AF = acre-feet Model Development and Computations The IDC is written in FORTRAN 2003 using an object-oriented programming approach. The program consists of three main components: (1) input data files, (2) output data files, and (3) the numerical engine that reads data from input files, computes applied water demands, routes water through the root zone, and prints out the results to the output files. The flow terms used in the root zone routing are defined in the table below and shown in the graphic on the following page. Drainage from ponded areas (Dr) was not applicable because there are no ponded crops in the NCMA; and data related to generic soil moisture (G) were not available. P Precipitation User Specified ET Evapotranspiration IDC Output G Generic source of moisture (i.e., fog, dew) Data Not Available Aw Applied water IDC Output Dr Outflow resulting from drainage of ponded areas (rice, refuges, etc.) Not Applicable RP Direct runoff IDC Output Rf Return flow User Specified (fraction of applied water) U Re-used portion of return flow User Specified (fraction of return flow) D Deep percolation IDC Output Notes: Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) Demand Calculator (IDC) NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 27 -   Source: California DWR (2016). All extracted geospatial information was applied to a computational grid within the IDC framework to simulate the root zone moisture for 2018 in NCMA agricultural areas. The IDC provides the total water supply requirement for each crop category met through rainfall and applied irrigation water in agricultural areas based on user-defined parameters for crop evaporation and transpiration requirements, climate conditions, soil properties, and agricultural management practices. Sources for data related to crop demands (i.e., potential ET), climate conditions, and soil properties are discussed above. The computations for actual crop ET (versus potential ET), applied water, and deep percolation are described below. The potential ET is the amount of water a given crop will consume through evaporation and/or transpiration under ideal conditions (i.e., fully irrigated 100 percent of the time). Fully irrigated conditions mean that the water required to meet all crop demands is available. Water is available to the crops when the soil moisture content within the root zone is between the field capacity and the wilting point. When the soil moisture is above the field capacity, some water will go to runoff and/or deep percolation; when the soil moisture is below the wilting point, it is contained in the smallest pore spaces within the root zone and considered unavailable to the crops. The difference between the field capacity and the wilting point is the total available water (TAW). In IDC, when the soil moisture is above one-half of the TAW, the crop ET will be equal to the potential ET. However, if the soil moisture is below one-half of the TAW, the plants will experience water stress and ET decreases linearly until it reaches zero at the wilting point. This method of simulating water stress is similar to the method described in Allen et al. (1998) to compute non- standard crop ET under water stress conditions. The IDC monitors the moisture content within the root zone and applies water by triggering an irrigation event when the calculated soil moisture is below a user-specified minimum allowable soil moisture requirement. For this application of the IDC, the minimum soil moisture requirement was set to trigger an irrigation event when the soil moisture fell below one-half the TAW to limit NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 28 - water stress in the crops. During an irrigation event, the soil moisture content in the root zone reaches field capacity. If precipitation occurs, soil moisture may increase above field capacity, generating deep percolation, and potentially runoff, both depending on the quantity and temporal distribution of rainfall. Deep percolation is the vertical movement of water through the soil column flowing out of the root zone resulting in the potential for groundwater recharge. The IDC applies the van Genuchten- Mualem equation (Mualem, 1976; van Genuchten, 1985) to compute deep percolation using the user-defined saturated hydraulic conductivity and pore size distribution. Results The total agricultural water supply requirements for 2018 was estimated to be 2,651 AF, and the effective precipitation (i.e., rainwater used by the crop) was 411 AF. Figure 25 illustrates the estimated crop water requirement in the NCMA as calculated by the IDC, and displays the four identified crop types and their estimated monthly applied water. The rotational crops have the highest water supply requirement because they cover the greatest area (see Figure 24) and have the greatest annual ET (Table 11). The estimated agricultural water supply requirement of 2,651 AF in 2018 compares with the estimated 2,536 AF in 2017, 2,494 AF in 2016, 3,008 AF in 2015, and 2,955 AF in 2014. In 2014, the methodology of estimating agricultural water requirements was modified from an estimated applied rate based on hydrologic conditions to the IWFM IDC methodology described here. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 29 - Table 11. 2018 IDC Model Results of Monthly Applied Water Monthly Applied Water (AF) Annual Total (AF) Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Rotational Crops (AF) - - 1 130 335 280 522 363 358 261 226 - 2,477 Strawberry (AF) - - - - - 16 25 40 33 24 - - 138 Avocados (AF) - - - - - 2 6 6 5 4 3 - 25 Flowering and Nursery (AF) 1 - - - - - 1 3 3 2 1 - 11 Total 1 - 1 130 335 296 548 411 399 26 6 - 2,651 Monthly Precipitation (inches) Annual Total (inches) Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Precipitation (inches) 2.64 0.12 4.96 0.56 - - - - - 0.48 1.52 0.88 11.16 Monthly Unit Water Demand (AF/Acre) Annual Total (AF/Acre) Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Rotational Crops (AF/Acre) - - 0.001 0.10 0.26 0.22 0.40 0.28 0.28 0.20 0.18 - 1.92 Strawberry (AF/Acre) - - - - - 0.10 0.16 0.26 0.21 0.15 - - 0.89 Avocados (AF/Acre) - - - - - 0.09 0.24 0.23 0.21 0.17 0.12 - 1.05 Flowering and Nursery (AF/Acre) 0.08 - - - - - 0.11 0.28 0.27 0.20 0.11 - 1.05 Area Weighted Average 0.001 - 0.001 0.09 0.23 0.20 0.37 0.28 0.27 0.20 0.16 - 1.79 Notes: AF = acre-feet, AF/Acre = acre-feet per acre 4.2.2 Rural Use In the NCMA, rural water use refers to groundwater pumping not designated as urban use or agricultural irrigation applied water and includes small community water systems, individual domestic water systems, recreational uses, and agriculture-related business systems. Small community water systems using groundwater in the NCMA were identified initially through a NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 30 - review of a list of water purveyors compiled in the 2007 County IRWMP. These include the Halcyon Water System, Ken Mar Gardens, and Pacific Dunes RV Resort. The Halcyon Water System serves 35 homes in the community of Halcyon, while Ken Mar Gardens provides water supply to 48 mobile homes on South Halcyon Road. The Pacific Dunes RV Resort, with 215 RV sites, provides water supply to a largely transitory population and a nearby riding stable. In addition, about 25 homes and businesses have been identified as served by private wells through inspection of aerial photographs of rural areas within NCMA. Two mobile home communities, Grande Mobile and Halcyon Estates, are served by OCSD through the distribution system of Arroyo Grande. Therefore the production summary of OCSD includes these two communities. Based on prior reports, it is assumed that the number of private wells is negligible within the service areas of the NCMA agencies. The Pismo Beach Golf Course (Le Sage Riviera Campground) uses an onsite water well for turf irrigation. The pumped water is not metered, and total water use is not known by the golf course operators. An estimate of water demand for the golf course is based on the irrigated acreage, sandy soils, near-ocean climate, and water duty factors from the U.S. Golf Association, Alliance for Water Efficiency, U.S. Golf Courses Organization of America, and several other sources. The estimated rural water demand is provided in Table 12. Table 12. Estimated Rural Water Production Groundwater User No. of Units Estimated Water Production, AFY per Unit Estimated Annual Water Production, AFY Notes Halcyon Water System 35 0.40 14 1 Ken Mar Gardens 48 -- 6 2 Pacific Dunes RV Resort 215 0.03 6 3 Pismo Beach Golf Course -- -- 45 4 Rural Users 25 0.40 10 1 Current Estimated Rural Use 81 Notes: 1 Water use/unit based on 2000 and 2005 Grover Beach water use per connection, 2005 UWMP. 2 Demand based on metered water usage. 3 Water use/unit assumes 50 percent annual occupancy and 0.06 AFY per occupied site. 4 Estimated golf course demand, based on estimated water duty factor, annual ET, and irrigated acreage. AFY = acre-feet per year UWMP = Urban Water Management Plan ET = evapotranspiration 4.2.3 Urban Production for Potable Use Urban water production for potable use is presented in Table 13 for each of the NCMA agencies from 2005 through 2018. These values reflect Lopez Lake deliveries, SWP deliveries, and groundwater production data, and represent all water used within the service areas of the four NCMA agencies (including the portions of Arroyo Grande and Pismo Beach that extend outside the NCMA), and system losses. In general, urban water production has ranged from 5,476 AF (2016) to 8,982 AF (2007). There has been an overall decline in urban production since 2007, NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 31 - although there were slight increases in 2012, 2013, 2017, and 2018. The long-term declining trend in production is likely attributed to the relatively slow economy from 2009 through 2012 and because of conservation activities implemented by the NCMA agencies in response to the historic drought. Since 2013, when urban production was 7,939 AF, urban production declined dramatically to 2016 to the lowest level in at least the past 20 years. The urban production in 2018 is up slightly from 2017 at 5,878 AF. Table 13. Urban Water Production for Potable Use (Groundwater and Surface Water, AF) Year Arroyo Grande Grover Beach Pismo Beach OCSD Total Urban  2005 3,460  2,082  2,142  931 8,615  2006 3,425  2,025  2,121  882 8,453  2007 3,690  2,087  2,261  944 8,982  2008 3,579  2,051  2,208  933 8,771  2009 3,315  1,941  2,039  885 8,180  2010 2,956  1,787  1,944  855 7,542  2011 2,922  1,787  1,912  852 7,473  2012 3,022  1,757  2,029  838 7,646  2013 3,111  1,792  2,148  888 7,939  2014 2,752  1,347  1,949  807 6,856  2015 2,239  1,265  1,736  703 5,943  2016 1,948  1,210  1,646  672 5,476  2017 2,194  1,248  1,700  718 5,860  2018 2,212  1,221  1,720  725 5,878  Notes: AF = acre-feet, CSD = Community Services District 4.2.4 2018 Groundwater Pumpage Total SMGB groundwater use in the NCMA, including urban production, applied agricultural water requirements, and rural pumping, is shown in Table 14, a replication of Table 7. Total estimated SMGB groundwater pumpage in the NCMA in 2018 was 3,558 AF which represents an increase from 2017 of 3,456 A. However, with the exception of 2016 and 2017, this represents the lowest volume of groundwater production from the NCMA portion of the basin in at least the past 20 years. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 32 - Table 14. NCMA Groundwater Pumpage from Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, 2018 (AF) Agency Groundwater Allotment + Ag Conversion Credit (AF) 2018 Groundwater Use from SMGB (AF) Percent Pumped of Groundwater Allotment Arroyo Grande 1,202 + 121 = 1,323 49 4% Grover Beach 1,198 + 209 = 1,407 416 30% Pismo Beach 700 53 8% Oceano CSD 900 246 27% Total Urban Groundwater Allotment / Use 4,000 + 330 = 4,330 764 18% Agricultural Irrigation Applied Water 5,300 - 330 = 4,970 2,651 53% Nonpotable Irrigation by Arroyo Grande -- 62 -- Rural Water Users -- 81 -- Estimated Subsurface Outflow to Ocean (2001 Groundwater Management Agreement) 200 -- -- Total NCMA Groundwater Allotment / Use 9,500 3,558 37% Notes: AF = acre-feet, CSD = Community Services District, NCMA = Northern Cities Management Area The estimated groundwater pumpage of 3,558 in 2018 represents about 37 percent of the calculated yield of 9,500 AFY for the NCMA portion of the Santa Maria Basin. A graphical depiction of water use by supply source for each NCMA agency since 2000 is presented as Figure 26. The graphs depict changes in water supply availability and use over time, including the increased use of SWP water during the early years of the period when SWP Table A deliveries were greater. The increased dependence in 2017 and 2018 on Lopez Reservoir is illustrated in this graphic. Although all four agencies pumped groundwater as part of their supply portfolio in 2018, groundwater pumped from the SMGB constituted a minor part of the overall water supply, an amount of 825 AF 3 or 14 percent of overall urban use. As shown in Figure 27, groundwater pumpage reached a peak in 2007 and then declined in 2008, 2009, and 2010. From 2010 through 2013, pumpage increased slightly every year, but even so, overall groundwater use remained significantly lower than historical annual pumpage rates. From 2013 through present, annual pumpage totals have been on a downward trend. In 2018, urban potable groundwater use declined to 764 AF; which is 18 percent of the 4,330 AF of combined urban groundwater allotment and agricultural conversion credit. 3 This total includes the non-potable irrigation production by Arroyo Grande NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 33 - 4.2.5 Changes in Water Production Historical water use for urban uses, agricultural irrigation, and rural uses is shown in Table 15. Table 15. Total Water Use (Groundwater and Surface Water, AF) Year Arroyo Grande Grover Beach Pismo Beach OCSD Total Urban Agricultural Irrigation1 Rural Water Total Use 2005 3,460 2,082 2,142 931 8,615 2,056 36 10,707 2006 3,425 2,025 2,121 882 8,453 2,056 36 10,545 2007 3,690 2,087 2,261 944 8,982 2,742 36 11,760 2008 3,579 2,051 2,208 933 8,771 2,742 36 11,549 2009 3,315 1,941 2,039 885 8,180 2,742 36 10,958 2010 2,956 1,787 1,944 855 7,542 2,056 38 9,636 2011 2,922 1,787 1,912 852 7,473 2,742 38 10,253 2012 3,022 1,757 2,029 838 7,646 2,742 41 10,429 2013 3,111 1,792 2,148 888 7,939 2,742 42 10,722 2014 2,752 1,347 1,949 807 6,855 2,955 38 9,848 2015 2,239 1,266 1,736 703 5,943 3,008 38 8,990 2016 1,948 1,210 1,646 672 5,476 2,551 81 8,108 2017 2,194 1,248 1,700 718 5,860 2,579 80 8,519 2018 2,212 1,221 1,720 725 5,878 2,713 81 8,672 Notes: 1Irrigation applied water includes agricultural irrigation plus SMGB non-potable irrigation by Arroyo Grande. AF = acre-feet, CSD = Community Services District In general, urban water production has ranged from 8,982 AF (2007; Table 15) to 5,476 AF in 2016. Water use since 2007 shows an overall decline each year with a slight increase in 2012 and 2013; this overall decline in water use may be attributed to conservation activities implemented by the NCMA agencies in response to the drought. In the agricultural irrigation category, agricultural acreage has remained fairly constant. Thus, annual applied water for agricultural irrigation varies mostly with weather conditions. Acknowledging the variability caused by weather conditions, agricultural irrigation applied water is not expected to change significantly given the relative stability of applied irrigation acreage and cropping patterns in the NCMA south of Arroyo Grande Creek. Changes in rural domestic pumping have not been significant. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 34 - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 35 - 5. Comparison of Water Supply v. Water Production The Baseline Available Urban Water Supplies for each of the NCMA agencies is 10,625 AFY, assuming 100 percent delivery of SWP allocation and assuming no Lopez Lake surplus water or SWP carryover; refer to Table 8. In 2018, because of the availability of Lopez Lake surplus water and SWP carryover water, the total available urban water supply was 11,821 AF (Table 9). As described in the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement and affirmed in the 2002 Settlement Agreement, the calculated historical “safe yield” from the NCMA portion of the groundwater basin is 9,500 AFY. Because all of the agricultural irrigation water use is supplied by groundwater, the total available agricultural irrigation supply is a portion of the estimated safe yield; this portion was allocated as 5,300 AFY for agricultural and rural use. The agricultural conversion of 330 AFY reduces this allocation to 4,970 AFY. Of the estimated safe yield of 9,500 AFY, other than what is allocated for agricultural irrigation and rural use, the remaining 4,330 AFY is allocated for urban water use (4,330 AFY, including 4,000 AFY groundwater allocation plus 330 AFY in agricultural conversion credit) and an estimated 200 AFY for subsurface outflow to the ocean. In 2018, the total estimated NCMA water production was 8,672 AF (Table 16). The 2018 water production, by source, of each city and agency is shown in Table 16. Note that the production volumes described here are gross production, if pumped groundwater, and gross deliveries, if surface water deliveries, and equals net consumptive demand plus losses and return water. Table 16. 2018 Water Production by Source (AF) Urban Area Lopez Lake State Water Project SMGB Groundwater Other Supplies1 Total Arroyo Grande 2,163 0 49 0 2,212 Grover Beach 804 0 416 0 1,221 Pismo Beach 1,426 242 53 0 1,720 Oceano CSD 480 0 246 0 725 Urban Water Use Total 4,873 242 764 0 5,878 Agricultural Irrigation Applied Water 0 0 2,651 0 2,651 Rural Water Users 0 0 81 0 81 Non-potable Irrigation by Arroyo Grande 0 0 62 0 62 Total 4,873 242 3,558 0 8,672 Notes: 1 “Other Supplies” includes groundwater pumped from outside the NCMA boundaries (which was zero in 2018) AF = acre-feet, SMGB = Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, CSD = Community Services District NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 36 - As shown in Table 16, urban water use in 2018 to the NCMA was supplied from 4,873 AF of Lopez Lake water, 242 AF of SWP water, and 764 AF of groundwater. Arroyo Grande did not pump from their Pismo Formation wells in 2018. Based on the calculated yield of the NCMA portion of the basin, the baseline, or full allocation, of total available supply for all uses is 15,595 AFY, which is the sum of 10,625 AFY for urban use plus the allocation for agricultural irrigation and rural area of 4,970 AFY. In 2018, factoring in the SWP delivery schedule and availability of SWP carryover water and Lopez Lake surplus, the total available supply for all uses was 11,821 AF (Table 9), compared to actual 2018 NCMA water use of 8,672 AF (Table 15). It must be noted, however, that this comparative review of available 2018 supply versus production must be viewed with caution because of the potential threats to the groundwater supply (see Section 6.1, below). As described earlier, the NCMA agencies pumped only 18 percent of their “available” groundwater allotment. Such minimal utilization of the groundwater resource resulted in a minor loss of groundwater in storage in the basin and a slight lowering of water level elevations. It is clear that the NCMA agencies could not have used their entire groundwater allotment in 2018 without significantly lowering water elevations below current conditions and potentially seriously exacerbating the threat of seawater intrusion. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 37 - 6. Threats to Water Supply Because the NCMA agencies depend on both local and imported water supplies, changes in either state-wide or local conditions can threaten the NCMA water supply. Water supply imported from other areas of the state may be threatened by state-wide drought, effects of climate change in the SWP source area, management and environmental protection issues in the Sacramento- San Joaquin Delta that affect the amount and reliability of SWP deliveries, and risk of seismic damage to the SWP delivery system. Local threats to the NCMA water supply similarly include extended drought and climate change that may affect the yield from Lopez Lake and reduced recharge to the NCMA. In addition, the NCMA is not hydrologically isolated from the NMMA and the rest of the SMGB, and water supply threats in the NMMA are a potential threat to the water supply sustainability of the NCMA. There is a potential impact from seawater intrusion if the groundwater system as a whole, including the entire SMGB, is not adequately monitored and managed. In particular, the management of the basin may need to account for sea level rise and the relative change in groundwater gradient along the shore line. 6.1 Threats to Local Groundwater Supply 6.1.1 Declining Water Levels Water levels continue to exhibit an overall declining trend in the NCMA. Important factors to maintaining water levels are managing inflow and outflow.  Inflow: An important inflow component to the NCMA area is subsurface inflow into the aquifers that supply water wells serving the NCMA. Historically, subsurface inflow to the NCMA from the Nipomo Mesa along the southeast boundary of the NCMA is an important component of groundwater recharge. This inflow is reduced from historical levels, as recognized in 2008-2009, to “something approaching no subsurface flow” because of lower groundwater levels in the NMMA (NMMA 2nd Annual Report CY 2009, page 43). This condition continues to worsen, as described in all subsequent NMMA Annual Reports (NMMA, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017).  Outflow: A major outflow component is groundwater pumpage. Total SMGB groundwater pumping in the NCMA (urban, agriculture, and rural domestic) was 3,558 AF in 2018, which is 37 percent of the court-accepted 9,500 AFY safe yield of the NCMA portion of the basin. Such minimal utilization of the groundwater resource resulted in a minor loss of groundwater in storage in the basin and a slight lowering of water level elevations. It is clear that the NCMA agencies could not have used their entire groundwater allotment in 2018 without significantly lowering water elevations below current conditions and potentially seriously exacerbating the threat of seawater intrusion. The current slight decrease of groundwater in storage, despite groundwater pumping at only 32 percent of the safe yield, illustrates the impacts of the recent drought. However, it also illustrates the impacts of reduced subsurface inflow recharge from the east (Nipomo Mesa). This condition NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 38 - of declining water levels in the NCMA, even though total pumping is currently 32 percent of the basin safe yield, will be exacerbated if the NCMA agencies are required to increase groundwater withdrawals because of a reduction or total loss in local surface water supplies or SWP deliveries. 6.1.2 Seawater Intrusion The NCMA is underlain by an accumulation of alluvial materials that slope gently offshore and extend for many miles under the ocean (DWR 1970, 1975). Coarser materials within the alluvial materials comprise aquifer zones that receive freshwater recharge in areas above sea level. If sufficient outflow from the aquifer occurs, the dynamic interface between seawater and fresh water will be prevented from moving onshore. Sufficient differential pressure to maintain a net outflow is indicated by onshore groundwater elevations that are above mean sea level and establish a seaward gradient to maintain that outflow. The 2008 NCMA Annual Report documented that a portion of the NCMA groundwater basin exhibited water surface elevations below sea level (NCMA 2008 Annual Monitoring Report (Todd, 2009)). Hydrographs for NCMA sentry wells (Figures 11 and 12) show coastal groundwater elevations at relatively low levels for as long as 2 years. Such sustained low levels had not occurred previously in the historical record and reflected the impact of drought on groundwater levels. The low coastal groundwater levels indicated a potential for seawater intrusion. Elevated concentrations of TDS, chloride, and sodium were observed in wells 30N03 and 30N02 beginning in May 2009, indicating potential seawater intrusion (Figures 28 and 29). MW-Blue well also showed elevated concentrations of TDS and chlorides, but a concurrent decline in sodium. Concentrations declined to historical levels in well 30N03 by July 2010 and declined in well 30N02, one of the sentry wells comprising the Deep Well Index, to historical levels by October 2009. Comparing well 30N02 to the other deep index wells, the other deep index wells showed no elevated concentrations during the same time period. However, comparing well 30N02 to wells with similar screen elevations (Figure 7), wells 36L01 (approximately 11,950 feet south of well 30N02) and the MW-Blue well, approximately 3,300 feet east-southeast of well 30N02, suggested that seawater intrusion perhaps progressed eastward as far as the MW-Blue well, but not as far south as well 36L01 (Figure 29). While the TDS and chloride concentrations were elevated from August 2009 to July 2011 in the MW-Blue well, the sodium concentrations remained within historical levels. During the same time period, TDS, chloride, and sodium concentrations remained within historical levels in well 36L01. The well cluster at 32S/13E 30N may be relatively prone to seawater intrusion because of the location near the more permeable sediments deposited by the ancestral Arroyo Creek (NCMA 2009 Annual Monitoring Report) and the lower groundwater elevations typical to the east (Figures 8 and 9). During 2018, there were no indications of seawater intrusion. 6.1.3 Measures to Avoid Seawater Intrusion In recognition of the risk of seawater intrusion, the NCMA agencies have developed and implemented a water quality monitoring program for the sentry wells and OCSD observation wells. The NCMA agencies, FCWCD, and the State of California also have worked cooperatively toward the protection of the sentry wells as long-term monitoring sites. Several measures are employed by the NCMA agencies to reduce the potential for seawater intrusion. Specifically, the NCMA agencies have voluntarily reduced coastal groundwater pumping, decreased overall water NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 39 - use via conservation, and initiated plans, studies, and institutional arrangements to secure additional surface water supplies. As a result, each of the four major municipal water users reduced groundwater use between 25 and 95 percent during the past several years. In 2018, municipal groundwater use was 764 AF, which constitutes 18 percent of the urban user’s groundwater allotment (including agricultural conversion credits) of the basin safe yield (Table 7). Central Coast Blue is a regional recycled water project that includes advanced treatment of water from Pismo Beach’s and South San Luis Obispo County’s (SSLOCSD) wastewater treatment plants and injection into the SMGB to reduce the risk of seawater intrusion and improve water supply sustainability for the region. Tasks related to the development of the project that were performed prior to and throughout 2018 include feasibility study analysis, preliminary design, pilot plant development and operation, funding appropriation, cost/benefit sharing analysis, and groundwater modeling. Reduced groundwater recharge, whether it is from drought or reduction of subsurface inflow from the north and east, reduces subsurface outflow to the ocean and increases the potential threat of seawater intrusion. 6.2 Threats to State Water Project Supply Both extended drought and long-term reduction in snowpack from climate change can affect SWP deliveries. Despite above average precipitation in 2016 and early 2017, below average precipitation in the Central Coast area through the latter months of 2017 resulted in an only modest reprieve from drought conditions. Storage capacity levels of the state’s two largest reservoirs, Lake Shasta and Lake Oroville were 70 and 35 percent capacity, respectively, as of the start of 2018, both down from the previous year. Leading into 2019, rainfall during the last 8 months of 2018 resulted in 2.88 inches of rain. The initial allocation announcement by DWR, announced on November 30, 2018, informed SWP contractors that their 2019 allocation would be 10 percent of requests for deliveries. The Table A allocation was subsequently increased on January 25, 2019 to 15 percent. As the winter rainfall season progresses, the allocations often increase by March or April. The last 100 percent allocation—difficult to achieve even in wet years largely because of Delta pumping restrictions to protect threatened and endangered fish species—was in 2006. The immediate threat of allocation reductions to Pismo Beach and OCSD, the only SWP contractors in the NCMA, has not significantly materialized during the past several years. The FCWCD’s excess SWP entitlement provides a buffer, in addition to the agency’s drought buffer, so that contracted volumes to water purveyors, such as the OCSD and Pismo Beach, still may be provided in full. However, the SWP supply has the potential to be affected by drought as well as environmental issues, particularly involving the Delta smelt in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. 6.3 Threats to Lopez Lake Water Supply Extended drought conditions in recent years have contributed to record low water levels in Lopez Lake and impacts of climate change may affect future precipitation amounts in the Lopez Creek watershed. As discussed in Section 4.1.1, the Zone 3 agencies developed and implemented the NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 40 - LRRP in response to reduced water in storage in the lake. The LRRP is intended to reduce municipal diversions and downstream releases as water levels drop in order to preserve water within the reservoir for an extended drought. The relatively heavy rainfall of late 2016 and early 2017 created hope that the drought of 2012 to 2016 had ended. A relatively wet March 2018 increased the 2017-18 rainfall totals to the area to approximately 60 percent of normal. Although this was followed by below average precipitation throughout the remainder of 2018, precipitation amounts during the first three months of 2019 have been well above average, resulting in a return to non-drought conditions. Even with reduced diversions and releases, water from Lopez Lake may be significantly reduced or unavailable to the Zone 3 agencies in the event of future drought. Without access to water from Lopez Lake, the NCMA agencies and local agriculture stakeholders may be forced to rely more heavily on their groundwater supplies and increase pumping during extended drought conditions, which could result in lowering water levels in the aquifer and an increased threat from seawater intrusion. Moreover, a reduction in downstream releases from the reservoir, as mandated by the LRRP, likely will lead to reduced recharge to the NCMA portion of the SMGB and further contribute to declining groundwater levels. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 41 - 7. Management Activities The NCMA and overlying private well users have actively managed surface water and groundwater resources in the NCMA agencies area for more than 30 years. Management objectives and responsibilities were first established in the 1983 “Gentlemen’s Agreement,” recognized in the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement, and affirmed in the 2002 Settlement Agreement. The responsibility and authority of the Northern Parties for NCMA groundwater management was formally established through the 2002 Settlement Agreement, Stipulation, and Judgment After Trial. Throughout the long history of collaborative management, which was formalized through the Agreement, Stipulation, and Judgment, the overall management goal for the NCMA agencies is to preserve the long-term integrity of water supplies in the NCMA portion of the SMGB. 7.1 Management Objectives Eight basic Water Management Objectives have been established for ongoing NCMA groundwater management: 1. Share Groundwater Resources and Manage Pumping 2. Enhance Management of NCMA Groundwater 3. Monitor Supply and Demand and Share Information 4. Manage Groundwater Levels and Prevent Seawater Intrusion 5. Protect Groundwater Quality 6. Manage Cooperatively 7. Encourage Water Conservation 8. Evaluate Alternative Sources of Supply Each of these objectives is discussed in the following sections. Under each objective, the NCMA TG has identified strategies to meet the objectives. These strategies are listed and then discussed under each of the eight objectives listed below. Other potential objectives are outlined in the final section. A major management undertaking of the NCMA TG was the development in 2014 of a Strategic Plan (WSC, 2014) to provide the NCMA with: 1. A mission statement to guide ongoing and future initiatives as well as capture the requirements outlined in the Gentlemen’s Agreement, the Settlement Agreement, and the Stipulation. The mission statement said: Preserve and enhance the sustainability of water supplies for the Northern Cities Area by:  Enhancing supply reliability  Protecting water quality  Maintaining cost-effective water supplies  Advancing the legacy of cooperative water resources management NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 42 - 2. A framework for communicating water resource goals 3. A formalized Work Plan for the next 10 years Through the strategic planning process, the NCMA TG identified several key strategic objectives to guide its efforts. These efforts include: A. Enhance Water Supply Reliability  Prepare the NCMA agencies for prolonged drought conditions.  Develop a coordinated response plan for seawater intrusion and other supply emergencies.  Analyze impacts of pumping on the groundwater basin.  Better protect against threats to groundwater sustainability. B. Improve Water Resource Management  Update the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement.  Develop more formalized structure/governance for the NCMA TG. C. Increase Effective Outreach  Engage agriculture stakeholders.  Improve coordination with FCWCD and other regional efforts.  Increase communication with various City Councils and Boards of Directors. The Strategic Plan formalized many of the water resource management projects, programs, and planning efforts that the NCMA agencies, both individually and jointly, have been engaged in that address water supply and demand issues, particularly with respect to efforts to ensure a long- term sustainable supply. The following section discusses the major management activities that the NCMA agencies have pursued during 2018 that incorporate the planning objectives outlined in the 2014 Strategic Plan. In January 2015, the NCMA agencies developed a Water Supply, Production and Delivery Plan (WSPDP) that applies the strategic objectives to the various supplies available to the area. The NCMA area receives supplies from Lopez Lake, the SWP, and the underlying groundwater basin. The purpose of the FY 2014/15 Water Supply, Production and Delivery Plan is to provide the NCMA agencies with a delivery plan that optimizes use of existing infrastructure and minimizes groundwater pumping from the SMGB. The plan includes the development of a water supply and delivery modeling tool for the NCMA agencies, evaluation of three delivery scenarios, and development of recommendations for water delivery for FY 2014/15. The WSPDP made recommendations that were implemented or subject to further study. These recommendations are summarized in subsequent sections, and include:  Continue ongoing water conservation efforts to limit demand and make additional supply available for potentially future dry years.  Immediately implement the strategies identified in Scenario 1 Baseline Delivery to minimize SMGB groundwater pumping in the near term. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 43 - These recommendations reinforce the ongoing management efforts by the NCMA and provide potential projects to improve water supply reliability and protect water quality during the ongoing drought. Ongoing work to implement the recommendations includes evaluation of additional delivery facilities to add operational flexibility to ensure optimum use of all supplies. Implementing the WSPDP has allowed the NCMA to minimize the use of groundwater thereby protecting against seawater intrusion while meeting the needs of its customers and other water users in the basin. The NCMA agencies, in conjunction with the other Zone 3 agencies and the FCWCD, continue efforts to evaluate and implement potential drought emergency options. This initiative includes identification, evaluation, and ranking of potential options available to Zone 3 to improve the reliability of its water supplies. This evaluation of options was completed by the Zone 3 Technical Advisory Committee and presented to the Zone 3 Advisory Committee and the County Board of Supervisors (BOS). As a result of these efforts, the Zone 3 agencies and the County have pledged to work collaboratively together to continue to evaluate and implement emergency water supply reliability options as required in conditions of extended drought. Potential options that the Zone 3 agencies have evaluated in the past few years include: Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Options:  Cloud Seeding. Investigate opportunities to use cloud seeding to enhance rainfall in the Lopez Watershed. This could involve a cooperative agreement with the County.  State Water Project. Maximize importation of FCWCD SWP supplies, including subcontractor and “Excess Entitlement” supplies. o Evaluate delivery of SWP water to non-SWP subcontractors under emergency provisions (e.g., Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, etc.).  Unsubscribed Nacimiento Water Project (NWP) Water. Investigate transfer/exchange opportunities to obtain unsubscribed NWP water for the Zone 3 agencies (i.e., exchange agreements with the City of San Luis Obispo and the Chorro Valley pipeline SWP subcontractors).  Water Market Purchases. Investigate opportunities to obtain additional imported water and deliver it to the Zone 3 agencies through the SWP infrastructure (e.g., exchange agreements with San Joaquin/Sacramento Valley farmers, water broker consultation, groundwater banking exchange agreements, etc.).  Morro Bay Desalination Plant Exchanges. Investigate opportunities to obtain SWP water from Morro Bay by providing incentives for Morro Bay to fully utilize its desalination plant capacity.  Land Fallowing. Evaluate potential agreements with local agriculture representatives to offer financial incentives to fallow land within the Arroyo Grande and Cienega Valleys and make that water available for municipal use.  Enhanced Conservation. Evaluate opportunities for enhanced water conservation by the Zone 3 agencies beyond the Governor’s Mandatory Water Conservation Order (e.g., water NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 44 - rationing, no outdoor watering, agriculture water restrictions, etc.) to preserve additional water.  Nacimiento/California Men’s Colony Intertie. Complete design of a pipeline that would connect the NWP pipeline to the California Men’s Colony (CMC) Water Treatment Plant. Investigate opportunities for Zone 3 agencies to purchase NWP water and use exchange agreements and existing infrastructure to deliver additional water to Zone 3 through the Coastal Branch pipeline. 7.1.1 Share Groundwater Resources and Manage Pumping Strategies:  Continued reduction of groundwater pumping, maintain below safe yield.  Coordinated delivery of Lopez Lake water to the maximum amount available, pursuant to the Lopez Lake LRRP.  Continue to import SWP supplies to OCSD and Pismo Beach.  Maintain surface water delivery infrastructure to maximize capacity.  Utilize Lopez Lake to store additional SWP water within San Luis Obispo County Discussion: A longstanding objective of water users in the NCMA has been to cooperatively share and manage groundwater resources. In 1983, the Northern Parties (including water users in the NCMA area) mutually agreed on an initial safe yield estimate and an allotment of pumping between the urban users and agricultural irrigation users of 57 percent and 43 percent, respectively. In this agreement, the NCMA agencies also established pumping allotments among themselves. Subsequently, the 2001 Groundwater Management Agreement included provisions to account for changes such as agricultural land conversions. The agreements provide that any change in the accepted safe yield based on ongoing assessments would be shared on a pro rata basis. Pursuant to the stipulation, the NCMA agencies conducted a water balance study to update the safe yield estimate (Todd, 2007). As a result, the NCMA agencies agreed to maintain the existing pumping allotment among the urban users and established a consistent methodology to address agricultural land use conversion. In addition to cooperatively sharing and managing groundwater resources, the NCMA agencies have coordinated delivery of water from Lopez Lake. At the same time, Pismo Beach and OCSD have continued to import SWP water. Both actions maximize use of available surface water supplies. In 2016, in response to the ongoing drought at that time and the threat of diminishing water supplies, Arroyo Grande approved a measure authorizing the City to purchase SWP water from the FCWCD’s excess allotment on a temporary basis and only during a declared local water emergency; that condition was not reached in 2017 and Arroyo Grande did not purchase SWP water. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 45 - The WSPDP now provides a framework for the NCMA, as a whole, to actively and effectively manage the groundwater resource, particularly in years of below normal rainfall and below “normal” SWP delivery schedules. The WSPDP outlined a strategy to provide sufficient supplies to NCMA water users in instances of reduced SWP delivery. Specifically, in 2018, municipal groundwater pumpage at 764 AF (825 AF including non-potable water pumped by Arroyo Grande) was less than any other year during the 20-year period from 1999 through 2018 (inclusive). Many aspects of the NCMA’s water management strategy that shifted direction in 2014 as a result of the severity of the 2012-16 drought continued into 2018. Adoption of the LRRP by FCWCD resulted in the implementation of the first stage of LRRP reduction triggers, which protect the Lopez Lake from running dry in any single year while providing flows for habitat protection in Arroyo Grande Creek. Although the drought emergency was lifted in 2017, the Zone 3 agencies continued operating under the LRRP through March 31st 2018. In addition, the NCMA agencies have increased conservation efforts even more than in previous years to adequately and safely manage the water resource (see additional discussion in Section 7.1.7). Seawater intrusion is the most important potential adverse impact for the NCMA agencies to consider in their efforts to effectively manage the basin. Seawater intrusion, a concern since the 1960s, would degrade the quality of water in the aquifer and potentially render portions of the basin unsuitable for groundwater production (DWR, 1970). A Deep Well Index of the three primary deep sentry wells of 7.5 feet (NAVD88) has been recognized as the index, above which it is thought that there is sufficient fresh water (groundwater) outflow to prevent seawater intrusion. From late 2009 to April 2013, the NCMA agencies’ management of groundwater levels and groundwater pumpage maintained the sentry well index above the 7.5-foot level. However, for several weeks in April and May 2013, from early July through mid-December 2013, and from mid- April 2014 through mid-December 2014, the index value dropped below the target. In 2015, the index value was above the Deep Well Index threshold from January through February; however, the index remained below the target level from March through December 2015, generally between 4 and 7 feet below the 7.5-foot target. Similarly, in 2016, the Deep Well Index started the year above the threshold value, with an index value of 9.18 in January. By mid-May the index value dropped below the 7.5-foot index level. Between mid-May and October 2016, the Deep Well Index remained below the index threshold value, reaching an index value of 5.39 feet in October. In late October, the Deep Well Index began to rise and on November 28, 2016, it rose above the threshold value (Figure 12). In 2017, the Deep Well Index remained above the 7.5-foot threshold value the entire year (except for a very brief period between August 18 and August 29, 2017, when the agencies were forced to increase groundwater pumping due to a maintenance shutdown of the Lopez Lake water supply). In 2018, the Deep Well Index started the year above the trigger value, with an index value of over 9 feet in January. It continued to rise, reaching a high over 11 feet in mid-March and then began to decline. The index value dropped below the 7.5-foot threshold in early July. For more than 4 months, the Deep Well Index remained below the index trigger value, reaching an index value of approximately 6.5 feet in late October. In early November, the Deep Well Index began to rise and by late November, 2018, it rose above the threshold value where it remained through the end of the year (Figure 12). The index value finished 2018 at about 9 feet NAVD88. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 46 - Another potential adverse impact of localized pumping includes reduction of flow in local streams, notably Arroyo Grande Creek (Todd, 2007). The NCMA agencies (as Zone 3 contractors) have participated with FCWCD in preparation of the Arroyo Grande Creek Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) that addresses reservoir releases to maintain both groundwater levels and habitat diversity in the creek. The FCWCD contracted with ECORP Consulting in 2015 to conduct the additional hydraulic studies to finalize the HCP. The work continued throughout 2018; the scheduled completion of the HCP is not certain. 7.1.2 Enhance Management of NCMA Groundwater Strategies:  Develop a groundwater model for the NCMA/NMMA or the entire SMGB.  Coordinate with the County and NMMA to develop new monitoring well(s) in key locations within the SMGB.  Develop a Salt and Nutrient Management Plan (SNMP) for the NCMA/NMMA.  Develop and implement a framework for groundwater storage/conjunctive use, including return flows.  Update the 2001 Agreement Regarding Management of the Arroyo Grande Groundwater Basin, approved in 2002. Discussion: The NCMA agencies participated in the oversight of the performance of the SMGB characterization study (Fugro, 2015) that was finalized with the distribution of the complete datasets in March 2016. The project was conducted as part of the County IRWMP 2014 update, in part to prepare for and to provide the foundational data for development of a numerical groundwater flow model and preparation of a basin-wide SNMP. To date, the SNMP has not been initiated, but significant progress was made in 2017 and 2018 toward development of a numerical groundwater flow model, associated with a recycled water project referred to as Central Coast Blue (formerly referred to as the Regional Groundwater Sustainability Project). The intent of Central Coast Blue is to enable Pismo Beach, partnering NCMA agencies and the SSLOCSD to construct an Advanced Treatment Facility (ATF) to produce Advanced Purified Water (APW) to augment its water supply through injection to recharge the groundwater basin and develop a seawater intrusion barrier to improve water supply reliability for the area. As part of Central Coast Blue planning and technical studies, a localized groundwater flow model (the Phase 1A model) was developed for the northern portion of the NCMA that evaluated the concept of injecting APW into the SMGB to increase the recharge to the basin, improve water supply reliability and help prevent future occurrences of seawater intrusion. Based on the results of the Phase 1A model and through funding by SSLOCSD Supplemental Environmental Program (SEP), work was initiated in 2017 and continued in 2018 for development of the Phase 1B groundwater flow model. The model domain of the Phase 1B model covers the entire NCMA, NMMA, and the portion of the SMVMA north of the Santa Maria River. The purpose of the model is to evaluate additional groundwater injection and extraction scenarios to further support Central Coast Blue. It will be utilized to identify the locations of the proposed injection NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 47 - wells, quantify the amount of water that can be injected, evaluate strategies for preventing seawater intrusion, and develop estimates of the overall yield that the Central Coast Blue stakeholders will be able to receive from the project. This modeling work is expected to be completed in mid-2019. As part of the FCWCD’s SMGB characterization study (Fugro, 2015), continuous monitoring transducers were installed in 2015 in coastal sentry wells 36L01 and 36L02 (which are part of the NCMA monitoring program) and in wells 11N/36W-12C01 and 11N/36W-12C02. As a result, continuous water level and field-parameter water quality data were collected from these wells throughout 2018. The monthly NCMA TG meetings provide for collaborative development of joint budget proposals for studies and plans, and shared water resources. In addition, the monthly meetings provide a forum for discussing the data collected as part of the quarterly monitoring reports. 7.1.3 Monitor Supply and Demand and Share Information Strategies:  Develop coordinated Urban Water Management Plans (UWMPs) for the NCMA agencies.  Develop a coordinated Water Shortage Contingency Plan to respond to a severe water shortage condition in the NCMA.  Share groundwater pumping data at monthly NCMA TG meetings.  Evaluate future water demands through comparison to UWMP projections: o Arroyo Grande 2015 UWMP (revised and updated, January 2017) o Pismo Beach 2015 UWMP (June 2016) o Grover Beach 2010 UWMP o OCSD is not required to prepare an UWMP because the community population does not meet the minimum requirement threshold. Discussion: Pismo Beach and Arroyo Grande prepared updated UWMPs in 2016 and 2017, respectively. OCSD is not required to prepare an UWMP because the community population does not meet the minimum requirement threshold; however, many of the aspects of a UWMP are addressed through participation in the NCMA planning process. Regular monitoring of activities that affect the groundwater basin, and sharing that information, have occurred for many years. The monitoring efforts include gathering data on hydrologic conditions, water supply and demand, and groundwater pumping, levels, and quality. The current monitoring program is managed by the NCMA agencies in accordance with the Stipulation and the Judgment, guided by the July 2008 Monitoring Program for the NCMA. The monitoring data and a summary of groundwater management activities are summarized in the Annual Reports. Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and Pismo Beach each have evaluated their future water demands as part of their respective 2010 UWMPs and 2015 UWMP updates. The NCMA shares NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 48 - information with the two other management areas (NMMA and SMVMA) through data exchange and regular meetings throughout the Annual Report preparation cycle. Management activities have become more closely coordinated among the NCMA agencies as a result of the 2012-16 drought. In particular, the NCMA agencies implemented the LRRP to limit municipal diversions and downstream releases from Lopez Reservoir to ensure that water is available for future potentially dry years. In addition, the Zone 3 agencies (which include the NCMA TG) initiated a long-term drought planning effort. The planning effort is intended to prepare water supplies for periods of extended drought conditions. 7.1.4 Manage Groundwater Levels and Prevent Seawater Intrusion Strategies:  Use stormwater ponds to capture stormwater runoff and recharge the groundwater basin.  Install transducers in key monitoring wells to provide continuous groundwater elevation data; the following wells have transducers: o 24B03 o 30F03 o 30N02 o 36L01 o 36L02 o 32C03 (County Monitoring Well No. 3)  Collect and evaluate daily municipal pumping data to determine the impact on local groundwater elevation levels. Discussion: Prevention of seawater intrusion through the management of groundwater levels is essential to protect the shared resource. The NCMA agencies increase groundwater recharge with stormwater infiltration and closely monitoring groundwater levels and water quality in sentry wells along the coast. Arroyo Grande and Grover Beach each maintain stormwater retention ponds within their jurisdiction; the FCWCD maintains the stormwater system, including retention ponds, in OCSD. These ponds collect stormwater runoff, allowing it to recharge the underlying aquifers. There are approximately 140 acres of detention ponds in Arroyo Grande and 48 acres of detention ponds in Grover Beach. The stormwater detention pond in OCSD is approximately one-half acre. Grover Beach modified its stormwater system in 2012 to direct additional flow into one of its recharge basins. The San Luis Obispo County Stormwater Resources Plan (SLO Co, 2019) was submitted to the State Water Resources Control Board for review on February 28, 2019. The purpose of this Stormwater Resources Plan is to identify and prioritize stormwater and dry weather runoff capture projects in the County through detailed analyses of watershed conditions and processes, surface and groundwater resources, and the multiple benefits that can be achieved through stormwater- NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 49 - related capital projects and other programmatic actions (SLO Co., 2019). The Stormwater Management Plan identifies four proposed projects within the NCMA, including the Pismo Preserve Roads Improvement Project, the Oceano Drainage Improvement Project, South Halcyon Green/Complete Street and a stormwater infiltration basins project. These proposed projects emphasize water supply augmentation, environmental restoration and other community benefits, including an estimated annual infiltration capacity of 26 AF and an instantaneous floodwater capture capacity of 3.37 AF (SLO Co., 2019). Although closely related to the objectives to manage pumping, monitor supply and demand, and share information, this objective also specifically recognizes the proximity of production wells to the coast and the threat of seawater intrusion. The NCMA agencies and FCWCD have long cooperated in the monitoring of groundwater levels, including quarterly measurement by the NCMA of groundwater levels in sentry wells at the coast. Upon assuming responsibility for the coastal monitoring wells, the NCMA became aware of the need to upgrade their condition. In July 2010 the wellheads (surface completions) at four sentry monitoring well clusters in the NCMA were renovated:  24B01, -B02, and-B03  30F01, -F02, and -F03  30N01, -N02, and -N03  36L01 and -L02 The renovations included raising the elevations of the top of each individual well casing by 2 to 3 feet and resurveying relative to the NAVD88 standard in late September 2010 (Wallace Group, 2010). The individual well casings are now above the ground surface and protective locking steel risers enclose each cluster. As a result of this work, the sentry wells in the NCMA now are protected from surface contamination and tampering. Quarterly measurement of groundwater levels aids in assessing the risk of seawater intrusion along the coast. To enhance the data collection and assessment efforts, the NCMA installed transducers in five of the key sentry monitoring wells to provide continuous groundwater levels at key locations. By combining this with the collection and evaluation of daily municipal pumping data, the NCMA is better able to determine the response of local groundwater levels to extractions and, therefore, better manage the basin. To gain insight into water level fluctuation and water quality variation in the area between the NCMA and NMMA, a continuous monitor was installed in well 32C03 (County Well No. 3), which was constructed and is owned by the County as part of the County-wide groundwater monitoring network. Water level monitoring was initiated in April 2012, when sensors were installed to document water level, temperature, and specific conductivity. In 2015, continuous monitoring sensors were installed in coastal monitoring wells 36L01 and 36L02 located in the Oceano Dunes. Data from the transducers in these wells now are collected on a quarterly basis along with the other sentry wells. Additional studies to enhance basin management efforts that have been discussed by the NCMA TG include: NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 50 -  Consider implementation of a monthly water level elevation data analysis of the sentry wells during periods when the Deep Well Index value is below the index target of 7.5 feet NAVD88 for an extended period of time. Given that the index generally has remained steady because of reduced groundwater pumping, the NCMA has deferred the issue of monthly analysis.  Consider implementation of a monthly analysis of electrical conductivity data from the wells with downhole transducers during periods when the Deep Well Index value is below the index target of 7.5 feet to track potential water quality degradation (an enhanced monitoring schedule of County Well No. 3 is not necessary because background water quality does not change or fluctuate significantly). If electrical conductivity data suggest water quality degradation, implement a monthly sampling and monitoring program. Given that the index generally has remained steady because of reductions in groundwater pumping, the NCMA has deferred the issue of monthly analysis.  Assess the potential impacts on sentry well water level elevations from extended periods of increased groundwater pumping by conducting analytical modeling analyses to predict water level responses given certain pumping scenarios. These analyses may prove fruitful as scenarios unfold regarding decreased SWP deliveries or short-term emergency cuts to Lopez Lake deliveries. Utilization of the Phase 1B model, in preparation in 2017-2018 in support of Central Coast Blue, may be used for the purpose in 2019 and beyond.  The 2005 Stipulation requires Nipomo Community Services District (NCSD) and the other NMMA parties to develop a Nipomo Supplemental Water Project (NSWP) to import a minimum of 2,500 AFY to mitigate overpumping that may impact groundwater inflow to the NCMA, and thus may facilitate seawater intrusion in both NCMA and NMMA. On July 2, 2015, the NCSD began taking deliveries of SWP from the City of Santa Maria. The NSWP is designed to deliver 3,000 AFY, however current deliveries are about 800 AFY. The additional stages of the NSWP and funding sources to implement the project to allow increased water delivery to meet the requirements of the Judgment are being planned; full implementation of the project is apparently planned for 2025-26. 7.1.5 Protect Groundwater Quality Strategies:  Perform quarterly water quality monitoring at all sentry wells and County Well No. 3.  Gather temperature and electrical conductivity data from monitoring wells to continuously track water quality indicators for seawater intrusion.  Prepare an SNMP pursuant to state policy using the results of the SMGB characterization study (Fugro, 2015).  Construct a recycled water system in Pismo Beach, pursuant to the results of Pismo Beach’s Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study (RWFPS), completed in 2015 (WSC, 2015) and Central Coast Blue.  Support regional recycled water project planning through performance of a RWFPS by the South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District. The RWFPS was completed in 2017. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 51 - Discussion: The objective to protect groundwater quality is closely linked with the objective for monitoring and data sharing. To meet this objective all sources of water quality degradation, including the threat of seawater intrusion, need to be recognized. Water quality threats and possible degradation affect the integrity of the groundwater basin, potentially resulting in loss of use or the need for expensive water treatment processes. Sentry wells are monitored quarterly and data from other NCMA production wells are assessed annually. The monitoring program includes evaluation of potential contaminants in addition to those that might indicate seawater intrusion. Temperature and electrical conductivity probes have been installed in five monitoring wells to provide continuous water quality tracking for early indication of seawater intrusion. A sixth sentry well cluster (36L) in the Oceano Dunes was instrumented in April 2015 as part of the SMGB characterization study (Fugro, 2015). The results of the SMGB characterization study provide the foundation for preparation of an SNMP. Investigations continued throughout 2018 for work associated with Pismo Beach’s Central Coast Blue project. These efforts continue to follow up on Pismo Beach’s RWFPS to investigate alternatives for constructing a recycled water system that will enable the NCMA agencies to beneficially use recycled water to augment their groundwater supply and provide a new, drought- proof source of water supply for the area. Engineering was performed throughout 2018, and the environmental review process continued along with continued development of the groundwater flow model. 7.1.6 Manage Cooperatively Strategies:  Improve agriculture outreach by enhancing coordination with local growers.  Coordinate groundwater monitoring data sharing and annual report preparation with the NCMA, NMMA, and the SMVMA.  Improve interagency coordination among the NCMA agencies and include the County. Discussion: Since 1983, NCMA management has been based on cooperative efforts of the affected parties, including the NCMA agencies, private agricultural groundwater users, the County, the FCWCD, and other local and state agencies. Specifically, the NCMA agencies have limited their pumping and, in cooperation with FCWCD, invested in surface water supplies so as to not exceed the safe yield of the NCMA portion of the SMGB. Other organizations participate, as appropriate. In addition to the efforts discussed in this 2018 Annual Report, cooperative management occurs through many other venues and forums, including communication by the NCMA agencies in their respective public meetings and participation in the Water Resources Advisory Council (the County-wide advisory panel on water issues). The NCMA agencies participated in preparation and adoption of the 2014 update of the County IRWMP. The IRWMP promotes integrated regional water management to ensure sustainable water uses, reliable water supplies, better water quality, environmental stewardship, efficient urban development, protection of agriculture, and a strong economy. The IRWMP integrates all of NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 52 - the programs, plans, and projects within the region into water supply, water quality, ecosystem preservation and restoration, groundwater monitoring and management, and flood management programs. Since the Judgment, the NCMA has taken the lead in cooperative management of its management area. The NCMA TG met monthly throughout 2018 and has been a willing and active participant in the SMGBMA technical subcommittee, which first met in 2009 (the SMGBMA technical subcommittee did not meet in 2018). The purpose of the SMGBMA technical subcommittee is to coordinate efforts among the management areas, such as enhanced monitoring of groundwater levels and improved sharing of data. With the current threats to water supply in all management areas, greater communication, analytical collaboration, and data sharing, especially between NCMA and NMMA, are encouraged. An outcome of actions initiated by NCMA in early 2016 resulted in several activities of increased discussion and collaboration between the NCMA and NMMA throughout 2017. The NCMA-NMMA Management Coordination Committee met several times in 2017 and 2018 to discuss items of mutual concern and develop strategies for addressing the concerns. Another area of increased mutual collaboration between the NCMA and NMMA was the formation of a technical team, consisting of representatives from the NCMA and NMMA, to collaboratively develop a single data set of water level data points to prepare a consistent set of semiannual water level contour maps for the NCMA and NMMA, so that the maps from each management area would represent a mutually agreed upon condition at the NCMA/NMMA boundary. This collaboration continued throughout 2018. A third initiative was to create a Modeling Subcommittee, composed of a select set of representatives from the NCMA and NMMA, to discuss the feasibility and possible work scope for the development of a numerical groundwater flow model of the SMGB, or at least that portion of the basin north of the Santa Maria River. When the Phase 1B groundwater flow model project was initiated in 2017, representatives from this subcommittee formed a technical review and advisory committee to provide input to the modeling consultant and monitor progress. 7.1.7 Encourage Water Conservation Strategies:  Share updated water conservation information.  Implement UWMPs. Discussion: Water conservation, or water use efficiency, is linked to the monitoring of supply and demand and the management of pumping. Water conservation reduces overall demand on all sources, including groundwater, and supports management objectives to manage groundwater levels and prevent seawater intrusion. In addition, water conservation is consistent with state policies seeking to achieve a 20 percent reduction in water use by the year 2020. Water conservation activities in the NCMA are summarized in various documents produced by the NCMA agencies, including the 2015 Urban Water Management Plans (UWMP) of Arroyo Grande and Pismo Beach and the 2010 UWMP of Grover Beach. OCSD is not required to prepare an UWMP. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 53 - In addition to ongoing water conservation efforts, the drought conditions that extended throughout 2016 led the NCMA agencies to increase their effort to reduce water use. The statewide mandatory water conservation requirements, signed into law on April 1, 2015, by the governor (Executive Order B-29-15), which enacted mandatory water conservation requirements because of the ongoing drought conditions and the historic low Sierra snowpack measurements, were continued throughout 2016 and into early 2017. On April 7, 2017, the State of California took action to lift the drought emergency and State mandated water use restrictions throughout the state. The water conservation measures instituted by each NCMA agency are summarized below. Arroyo Grande On April 7, 2017, the State of California took action to lift the drought emergency and State mandated water use restrictions throughout the state. The action also eliminated the State’s mandate for Arroyo Grande to save 28 percent of its water use. In response, the Arroyo Grande City Council approved and adopted a resolution in May 2017 rescinding the Stage 1 Water Shortage Emergency in the City, which removes temporary water use limitations that established individualized water budgets for all residential customers. During the State-mandated Stage 1 restrictions, Arroyo Grande water use reduction was on average 42% compared to 2013, thereby meeting and exceeding the State mandates. The City Council’s action was based on a determination that there is no immediate or imminent threat to the City’s ability to meet the community’s water supply needs. However, all established mandatory water use restrictions remained in effect, including limitations on outdoor irrigation and continued adherence to four-day outdoor irrigation based on the property address. Mandatory water conservation measures include:  Use of water that results in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited.  No water will be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets, or other such use except where necessary to protect the public health and safety.  Outdoor water use for washing vehicles will be attended and have hand-controlled water devices.  Outdoor irrigation is prohibited between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.  Irrigation of private and public landscaping, turf areas, and gardens is permitted at even- numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays, and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays.  No irrigation of private and public landscaping, turf areas, and gardens is permitted on Wednesdays. Irrigation is permitted at all addresses on Saturdays and Sundays.  In all cases, customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping.  Emptying and refilling swimming pools and commercial spas are prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to provide for the public health and safety. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 54 -  Use of potable water for soil compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited.  New swimming pools may be constructed, however, they will have a cover that conforms to the size and shape of the pool and acts as an effective barrier to evaporation. The cover must be in place during periods when use of the pool is not reasonably expected to occur.  Hotel, motel, or other commercial lodging establishments will offer their patrons the option to forego the daily laundering of towels, sheets, and other linens.  Restaurants or other commercial food service establishments will not serve water except upon the request of a patron. In addition to the mandatory water conservation measures outlined above, the Water Shortage Emergency resolution included a tiered billing system, whereby residential customers were assigned a baseline amount of water, based on the amount of water used during the billing period of 2013. Residential customers in Tier 1 then were required to reduce consumption by 10 percent, customers in Tier 2 were required to reduce consumption by 20 percent, and customers in Tier 3 were required to reduce consumption by 30 percent. To help manage the use of water, the City offers water conservation incentive programs designed to decrease overall water use. The conservation and incentive programs include:  Plumbing Retrofit Program. This program includes installation or adjustment of showerheads, toilets, faucet aerators, and pressure regulators for single-family and multi- family residential units constructed before 1992. This program has been in place since 2004 at an expense to the City of more than $1.55 million.  Water Wise Landscaping Program. This program provides resources for designing and installing water-wise landscaping in San Luis Obispo County, selecting climate-appropriate plants, and irrigation and drainage improvements that will help you improve your landscape and protect your watershed.  Washing Machine Rebate. This program pays water customers a one-time rebate for the installation of a certified energy efficient Tier 3 washing machine.  Mandatory Plumbing Retrofit. Upon change of ownership of any residential property, the seller must retrofit the property’s plumbing fixtures to meet defined low-water use criteria.  Water Conservation Hotline. Pismo Beach In 2014, Pismo Beach introduced the first-in-the-state waterless urinal mandate and a 0.5-gallon per minute (gpm) restroom aerator retrofit requirement. The components of this program includes:  Waterless urinal retrofits. All existing urinals in the City will be retrofitted to waterless urinals before February 14, 2016. Exemptions to this section may be granted at the discretion of the City Engineer under certain conditions. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 55 -  Faucet aerators. Residential restroom construction will be fitted with aerators that emit no more than 0.5 gpm. Exemptions may be granted at the discretion of the City Engineer in cases to protect public health and safety. Restroom faucets in all publicly accessible restrooms, including those in hotel rooms, lobbies and restrooms, restaurants, schools, commercial and retail buildings, public buildings, and similar publicly accessible restrooms were retrofitted to install aerators that emit no more than 0.5 gpm.  Sub-meters in new construction. All new multi-unit buildings, regardless of proposed use, will be required to have a separate sub-meter capable of measuring the water use of every usable unit, separate common space, and landscaping that is expected to use at least 25 gallons of water per day on average for the course of a year, regardless of the overall size of the building. Buildings that have a separate water meter for each unit are exempt. Also in 2014, Pismo Beach adopted several Water Conservation Incentive Programs to help reduce water consumption and ensure reliable future water supply. On February 16, 2016, the Pismo Beach City Council updated the Water Conservation Incentive Programs list to include:  Cash for Grass. This program reimburses residents for each square foot of lawn removed (minimum 300 square feet) and replaced with drought-tolerant landscaping, which is required to have drip or micro-spray irrigation and be on an automatic timer.  Free Catch Bucket Program. This program gives residents one free shower catch bucket for capturing unused shower water and re-purposing it for irrigation or utility purposes.  Rain Barrel Rebate Program. This program reimburses residents up to $100 ($50 per rain barrel) when up to two rain barrels are purchased and installed to use rain water, conserve potable water, and reduce stormwater runoff.  Water Wise Landscaping Program. This program provides resources for designing and installing water-wise landscaping in San Luis Obispo County, selecting climate-appropriate plants, and irrigation and drainage improvements that will help you improve your landscape and protect your watershed.  High Efficiency Toilet Rebate Program. This program provides a one-time rebate for each 3.5-gallon per flush or higher toilet replaced with a 1.28-gallon per flush or lower toilet. In January, 2017, Pismo Beach adopted an updated schedule of development impact fees to include new recycled water fees for all new development, redevelopment, and additions to existing buildings that create additional dwelling units or additional non-residential floor area, to help fund the cost of Central Coast Blue. In June, 2017, in response to the State of California action to lift the drought emergency and State mandated water use restrictions throughout the state, Pismo Beach declared a “Normal Water Supply” and adopted an Urgency Ordinance O-2017-003, revising the restrictions associated with each water supply status to conform to State mandates. The restrictions for a Normal Water Supply include: NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 56 -  Use of water which causes runoff onto adjacent properties, non-irrigated areas, private and public walkways, roadways, gutters, parking lots or structures is prohibited.  Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, paved surfaces, buildings, and similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled water devices, which shut off the water immediately when not in use.  No water will be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets, or other such uses except as found necessary by the city to protect the public health or safety.  Outdoor Irrigation. o Outdoor irrigation is prohibited between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. o Applying water to outdoor landscapes during and within 48 hours following measurable precipitation is prohibited.  Restaurants will serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer.  Using water in a fountain or other decorative water feature, except where the water is part of a recirculating system, is prohibited.  The use of outdoor irrigation during and 48 hours following measurable precipitation is prohibited. Grover Beach In June 2014, Grover Beach declared a Stage III Water Shortage that required all water customers to reduce their water usage by 10 percent. Many of the prohibitions that had previously been voluntary since declaration of the Stage II Water Shortage Declaration became mandatory with the Stage III declaration. The declaration also provided the City with the authority to impose penalties for failure to comply with the water reduction or use prohibitions. The Stage III Water Shortage declaration, with associated prohibitions, continued throughout 2018. These prohibitions include:  Washing of sidewalks, driveways, or roadways where air-blowers or sweeping provides a reasonable alternative.  Refilling of private pools except to maintain water levels.  Planting of turf and other new landscaping, unless it consists of drought-tolerant plants.  Washing vehicles, boats, etc. without a quick-acting shut-off nozzle on the hose.  Washing any exterior surfaces unless using a quick-acting shut-off nozzle on the hose.  Restaurant water service, unless requested.  Use of potable water for construction purposes, unless no other source of water or method can be used.  Operation of ornamental fountain or car wash unless water is re-circulated. Grover Beach has implemented demand management rebate programs including: NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 57 -  Cash for Grass Rebate Program  Smart Irrigation Controller and Sensor Rebate Program  Toilet Fixtures, Showerheads, and Aerators Retrofit Rebate Program  Washing Machine Rebate Program Oceano CSD Given the population of its service area, OCSD is not required to prepare an UWMP or reduce water consumption as mandated by the Governor for Urban Water Suppliers. Outdoor water use restrictions have been adopted, as required. In April 2015, OCSD adopted a rate increase that included tiered rates to promote water conservation. These tiered rates remain in effect, but were reduced in July 2017, upon adoption of the Post Drought Consumption Charges and Supplemental Water Charge Ordinance. OCSD pumped only 27 percent of its groundwater allotment in 2018 and is maintaining its annual allocation of Lopez Lake water in storage as allowed pursuant to the LRRP. Meanwhile, OCSD’s conservation efforts continue to exceed the Governor’s drought-mandated goal (since rescinded) of 25 percent. Overall consumption has declined to approximately 85 gallons per capita daily (gpcd) after the implementation of drought conservation rates, illustrating that as a disadvantaged community, it is responding effectively to conservation rates. OCSD’s demand is less than its annual allocation of SWP water, preserving local supplies if needed in subsequent years, depending on SWP deliveries. In the event that SWP deliveries are decreased to a level that is insufficient to meet OCSD demand, then mandatory conservation efforts will be implemented to match the available supply. If the supply is less than 55 gpcd needed to meet health and safety needs, then the supply shortfall will be supplemented from Lopez Lake supplies. Current SWP reliability analyses prepared by the DWR illustrate a low probability that SWP water will not be able to meet OCSD demands in any two consecutive years. Additional strategies exist in the event of temporary non-delivery of SWP and Lopez Lake water and other unforeseen circumstances. Post-drought strategies include resumption of groundwater pumping, resumption of Lopez Lake deliveries, and storage of SWP water as provided in SWP contracts. 7.1.8 Evaluate Alternative Sources of Supply Strategies:  Evaluate expanded use of recycled water, including development and implementation of Central Coast Blue.  Analyze capacity of the Lopez Lake and Coastal Branch pipelines to maximize deliveries of surface water. The following analyses have been completed: o Lopez Lake Pipeline Capacity Evaluation o Lopez Lake Pipeline Capacity Re-Evaluation o Coastal Branch Capacity Assessment NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 58 - o Lopez Bypass and State Water Delivery Evaluation  Optimize existing surface water supplies, including surface water storage through the development of a framework for interagency exchanges and transfers, including SWP and Lopez Lake supplies.  Maximize Lopez Lake pipeline capacity. Discussion: The NCMA agencies continue to evaluate alternative sources of water supply that could provide a more reliable and sustainable water supply for the NCMA. An expanded portfolio of water supply sources will support sustainable management of the groundwater resource and help to reduce the risk of water shortages. These alternative sources include:  State Water Project. OCSD and Pismo Beach are currently SWP customers. Both agencies increased their SWP allocations by securing “drought buffers” to increase the availability of supply during periods of SWP shortfalls. Grover Beach and Arroyo Grande are not SWP customers; however, Arroyo Grande approved a measure in 2016 authorizing the City to purchase SWP water from the FCWCD’s excess allotment on a temporary basis and only during a declared local water emergency. To date, Arroyo Grande has not declared such an emergency and has not purchased SWP water.  Water Recycling. As discussed in Section 7.1.5, Pismo Beach and the SSLOCSD both prepared RWFPSs to evaluate alternatives for a recycled water program that could provide a supplemental water supply source and improve the water supply reliability for the Pismo Beach and the SSLOCSD member agencies (Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and OCSD). Section 7.1.5 also describes ongoing efforts for Central Coast Blue that will enable the NCMA agencies to produce recycled water to augment their water supplies. Construction of the new facility will allow for the use of recycled water to recharge the groundwater basin and provide a new, drought-proof source of water supply for the area. As conceived, the project includes construction of a distribution system that will inject advanced purified water into the SMGB and will allow the NCMA agencies to increase recharge to the basin, improve water supply reliability, and help to prevent future occurrences of seawater intrusion. Lopez Lake Expansion. In 2008, the County sponsored a preliminary assessment of the concept of installing an inflatable rubber dam at the Lopez Dam spillway. Subsequently, the FCWCD Service Area 12 and Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and Pismo Beach funded a study to further analyze the feasibility of increasing the yield of Lopez Lake by raising the spillway height with an inflatable dam or permanent extension. The study was finalized in 2013 and identified the potential to increase the annual yield from Lopez Lake by 500 AFY with a spillway height increase by 6 feet (Stetson, 2013). The NCMA agencies are continuing to evaluate other aspects of the project, including pipeline capacity and impacts on the HCP process. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 59 -  Desalination. In 2006, Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and OCSD used Prop 50 funds to complete a feasibility study on desalination as an additional water supply option for the NCMA. This alternative supply is not considered to be a viable option at this time. Previous efforts by the FCWCD to (1) evaluate the potential to expand the existing desalination facility at the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant and (2) connect it to the Lopez Lake pipeline to provide a supplemental water supply for the Zone 3 agencies have been terminated since PG&E announced plans to close the power plant.  Nacimiento Pipeline Extension. In 2006, Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and OCSD completed a Nacimiento pipeline extension evaluation to determine the feasibility of delivery of water from the Nacimiento reservoir to the NCMA. This alternative supply is not considered to be a viable option at this time. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 60 - This page left blank intentionally. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 61 - 8. References Allen, R.G., Pereira, L.S., Raes, D., and Smith, M. 1998. Crop evapotranspiration- Guidelines for computing crop water requirements: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Irrigation and Drainage Paper 56, 300p. California Department of Water Resources (DWR). 1958. San Luis Obispo County Investigation, Bulletin No. 18, vol 1 and 2. California Department of Water Resources (DWR). 1970. Sea-Water Intrusion: Pismo-Guadalupe Area. Bulletin No. 63-3, 76 p. California Department of Water Resources (DWR). 1975. 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Submitted to the State Water Resources Control Board on February 28, 2019. Stetson Engineers. 2013. Lopez Lake Spillway Raise Project Report. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, in Judgment After Trial, entered January 25, 2008 incorporating 2002 Settlement Agreement among the Northern Cities, Northern Landowners, and Other Parties, and 2005 Settlement Stipulation for the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin adjudication. NCMA 2018 Annual Monitoring Report - 63 - Todd Engineers. 2007. Water Balance Study for the Northern Cities Area. Todd Engineers. April 2007. Todd. Engineers. 2008. Monitoring Program for the Northern Cities Management Area. Todd Engineers, July 2008. Todd Engineers. 2010. Summary of Renovations for the Northern Cities Management Area Sentry Wells, San Luis Obispo County, California. U.S. Geological Survey. 2006. Quaternary fault and fold database for the United States. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/qfaults Van Genuchten, M.T. 1985. A Closed-form solution for predicting the conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 44, 892-898. Wallace Group. 2010. Survey Report on the “Sentry” Well Elevation Establishment for Cities of Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, Pismo Beach and the Oceano Community Services District. Water Systems Consulting, Inc. (WSC). 2014. Final Draft Strategic Plan for the Northern Cities Management Area Technical Group, June 2014. Water Systems Consulting, Inc. (WSC). 2015. Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study – Final: prepared for the City of Pismo Beach, April 2015. Woodring, W.P and Bramlette, M.N. 1950. Geology and Paleontology of the Santa Maria District, California: U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 222, 142 p. Worts, G.G., Jr. 1951. Geology and ground-water resources of the Santa Maria Valley area, California: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1000, 176 p. This page left blank intentionally. FIGURES This page left blank intentionally. Santa Maria Guadalupe Nipomo Arroyo Grande Grover Beach Pismo Beach Orcutt Northern Cities Management Area Sa n L u i s O b i s p o C o u n t y Sa n t a B a r b a r a C o u n t y £ 101 Nipomo Mesa Management Area Santa Maria Valley Management Area Date: January 16, 2019 LEGEND Northern Cities Management Area Nipomo Mesa Management Area Santa Maria Valley Management Area Santa Maria Groundwater Basin (DWR 2016) County Borders Santa Maria Groundwater Basin FIGURE 1 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\001-2016 Annual Rpt\Project_GIS\Project_mxds\Annual_Report\Figure_1_Santa_Maria_Groundwater_Basin.mxd o 012345 Miles Pacific Ocean GroverBeach ArroyoGrande Oceano PismoBeach £¤101 Sant a M a r i a R i v e r F a u l tPismoCreekArroyoGrandeCreekMeadowCreek L o s B erros Creek Oc e a n o F a u l t Wilmar A v e n u e F a u l t Date: February 2, 2019 Data Sources: LEGENDNorthern Cities Management AreaNipomo Mesa Management AreaSanta Maria Groundwater Basin (DWR 2016)FaultsStreams Northern Cities Management Area FIGURE 2 San Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_2_Northern_Cities_Management Area.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean ANNUAL PRECIPITATION 1950 TO 2018 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 3P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 3 NCMA Precip 1950 - present Shaded.grf19501955196019651970197519801985199019952000 2005201020152020Calendar Year -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Cumulative Departure from Average, Inches0 10 20 30 40 Annual Precipitation, InchesD ro u g ht Dro u g ht Average Precipitation 1950-2018: 15.6 Inches Wet PeriodAlternating Wet and Dry Years Wet Period &< &< &< ·|}þ1 ·|}þ1 Pismo Beach(DRI 046943 - DiscontinuedAugust 2017) Oceano(SLO 795) Nipomo(CIMIS 202) £¤101 Date: January 16, 2019 LEGEND &<Active Weather Station &<Inactive Weather Station Nipomo Mesa Management AreaNorthern Cities Management AreaSanta Maria Valley Management Area Location of Precipitation Stations FIGURE 4 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Figure_4_NCMA_Precipitation_Station_Locations.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean MONTHLY 2018 AND AVERAGE PRECIPITATION AND EVAPOTRANSPIRATION Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California FIGURE 5 P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 5 NCMA Monthly Precip and Evap !> !> !> !> !> !> !> County MW#3Well 12N/35W32C03 North Beach CampgroundWells 32S/12E-24B01, 02, 03 Highway 1Wells 32S/13E-30F01, 02, 03 Pier Avenue32S/13E-30N01, 02, 03 Oceano CSDObservation Wells(Green, Blue, Silver, and Yellow) Oceano DunesWells 12N/36W-36L01, 02 OceanoWellNo. 8Sant a M a r i a R i v e r F a u l tPismoCreek A rroyoG r an de C re ekMeadow C reek L o s B erros Creek Oc e a n o F a u l t Wilmar A v e n u e F a u l t Date: February 2, 2019 Data Sources: LEGEND !>NCMA Monitoring WellsNorthern Cities Management AreaFaultsStreams Locations of Monitoring Wells FIGURE 6 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_6_NCMA_Monitoring_Wells.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean DEPTHS OF MONITORING WELLS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 7P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 7 NCMA Depths of Monitoring Wells -700 -600 -500 -400 -300 -200 -100 0 Elevation, feet NAVD88Well Well Screen Transducer XD1.7 XD2.7 XD3.5 XD4.4 XD4.6 XD6.5 North Beach Campground 24B 01 02 03 Highway 1 30F 01 02 03 Pier Avenue 30N 01 02 03 Oceano Dunes 36L 01 02 OCSD Green Blue Silver Yellow 31H H10 H11 H12 H13 County MW#3 32C03 XD Sant a M a r i a R i v e r F a u l t Oc e a n o F a u l t Wilmar A v e n u e F a u l tPismoCreek Arroyo Grand e C reekMeadow C reek LosBerrosCree k £¤101 6.95 -2.84 5.38 14.32.7 6.1-4.07 13.7 0.773.39 8.81 3.8 120.26 130.6613.19 0.49 10.57 9.45 6.913.924.4 7.115.46 134.24 5.76 7.66 7.56 10.87 9.5111.23 11.86 8.1713.3112.2614 11 10.17 8.1810.48 13.03 10.62 37.5 14.75 10.45 4030201050Date: January 10, 2019 Data Sources: SLO County, NCMA and NMMA Agencies LEGENDWells Used in Groundwater ContouringGroundwater Contour (feet, NAVD88)Northern Cities Management AreaStreamsFaults Groundwater Elevation Contours Spring 2018 FIGURE 8 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_8_NCMA_Water_Level_Contours_April_2018.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean Sant a M a r i a R i v e r F a u l t Oc e a n o F a u l t Wilmar A v e n u e F a u l tPismoCreek Arroyo Grand e C reekMeadow C reek LosBerrosCree k £¤101 1.1 -8.3 -1 -15.1-1.3 -4.3 -9.9 3.4 -1.6-7.8 2 -4.9 1.8 117.8 130-15.6 10 3 4 1.58.319.3 7.6-2.2 129.9 1.6 6 6.9 7.7 108.2 9.8 5.49.48.1 10 7.7 5.4 6.47.2 4.8 29.2 7.1 40302 0 10 50 -10 Date: January 10, 2019 Data Sources: SLO County, NCMA and NMMA Agencies LEGENDWells Used in Groundwater ContouringGroundwater Contour (feet, NAVD88)Minor Groundwater ContourNorthern Cities Management AreaStreamsFaults Groundwater Elevation Contours Fall 2018 FIGURE 9 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_9_NCMA_Water_Level_Contours_Oct_2018.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean SELECTED HYDROGRAPHS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 101990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 -20 0 20 40 -20 0 20 40 -20 0 20 40 -20 0 20 40 60 P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 10 NCMA Selected Hydrographs Well -32D03 Well -32D11 Water Elevation, feet NAVD8832D03 and 32D11 28K02 30K03 33K03 SENTRY WELL HYDROGRAPHS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 111965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 0 5 10 15 200 5 10 15 200 5 10 15 200 5 10 15 20 P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 11 NCMA Sentry Well Hydrographs Well -24B03 Well -24B02 Water Elevation, feet NAVD88North Beach Campground Highway 1 Pier Avenue Oceano Dunes Well -30F03 Well -30F02 Well -30N02 Well -30N03 Well -36L01 Well -36L02 Flowing Artesian Flowing Artesian Flowing Artesian HYDROGRAPH OF DEEP WELL INDEX LEVEL Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 121965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 -5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Deep Well Index Elevation, feet NAVD88Deep Well Index Level (Wells -24B03, -30F03 and -30N02) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 Chloride, mg/lWell -30N02 Well -24B03 Well -30F03 Deep Well Index Threshold: 7.5 feet Deep Well Index is the average of groundwater elevations in the deep wells of Sentry Well clusters 24B,30F, and 30N (See Figure 6 for locations of monitoring wells and Figure 7 for well depths). WATER ELEVATION, CONDUCTIVITY, AND TEMPERATURE, WELL 24B03 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 132010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 -5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Water Elevation, feet NAVD880 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Sp. Cond.uS/cmWell -24B03 North Beach Campground Deep Well Well Depth: 435 feet (Careaga Sandstone) Deep Well Index 65 67 69 71 73 Temp.ºFDeep Well Index Threshold: 7.5 feet P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 13 NCMA Well 24B03 WATER ELEVATION, CONDUCTIVITY, AND TEMPERATURE, WELL 30F03 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 142010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 -5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Water Elevation, feet NAVD880 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Sp. Cond.uS/cmWell -30F03 Highway 1 Deep Well Well Depth: 372 feet (Careaga Sandstone) Deep Well Index 65 67 69 71 73 Temp.ºFDeep Well Index Threshold: 7.5 feet P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 14 NCMA Well 30F03 WATER ELEVATION, CONDUCTIVITY, AND TEMPERATURE, WELL 30N02 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 15-5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Water Elevation, feet NAVD882010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Sp. Cond.uS/cmWell -30N02 Pier Avenue Deep Well Well Depth: 255 feet (Paso Robles Formation) Deep Well Index 63 65 67 69 71 Temp.ºFP:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 15 NCMA Well 30N02 Deep Well Index Threshold: 7.5 feet WATER ELEVATION, CONDUCTIVITY, AND TEMPERATURE, WELL 36L01 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 162010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 -5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Water Elevation, feet NAVD880 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Sp. Cond.uS/cmWell -36L01 Oceano Dunes Deep Well Well Depth: 237 feet (Paso Robles Formation) 65 67 69 71 73 Temp.ºFP:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 16 NCMA Well 36L01 WATER ELEVATION, CONDUCTIVITY, AND TEMPERATURE, WELL 36L02 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 172010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 -5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Water Elevation, feet NAVD880 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Sp. Cond.uS/cmWell -36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Well Well Depth: 545 feet (Careaga Sandstone) Well -36L02 Manual Measurements 65 67 69 71 73 Temp.ºFP:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 17 NCMA Well 36L02 Transducer data corrupted Dashed where inferred WATER ELEVATION, CONDUCTIVITY, AND TEMPERATURE, WELL 32C03 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 182010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 -5-4-3-2-101234567891011121314151617181920Water Elevation, feet NAVD880 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Sp. Cond.uS/cm65 67 69 71 73 Temp.ºFWell 12N/35W-32C03 County Monitoring Well No. 3 Well Depth: 170 feet (Paso Robles Formation) P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 18 NCMA Well 32C03 Sant a M a r i a R i v e r F a u l t Oc e a n o F a u l t Wilmar A v e n u e F a u l tPismoCreek Arroyo Grand e C re e kMeadow C reek Los Berros Creek £¤101 -5-15-15-200-1 0 - 1 0 0 Date: January 10, 2019 Data Sources: SLO County, NCMA and NMMA Agencies LEGEND Contours of Equal Difference in Water Level, feet Area of Net Rise Area of Net Decline Northern Cities Management Area Streams Faults Change in Groundwater Elevation, April 2017 to April 2018 FIGURE 19 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_19_Water Level Change_April_2017 to 2018_final.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean CHLORIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN MONITORING WELLS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 202010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 0 100 2000 100 2000 100 2000 100 200 P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 20 NCMA Chloride Grouped Well -24B03 Well -24B02 Well -30F01 -30F02 Well -30F03 Well -30N03 Well -30N02 Well -36L02 Well -36L01 Well -32C03Chloride Concentration, mg/lNorth Beach Campground Highway 1 Pier Avenue Oceano Dunes and 32C03 TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS CONCENTRATIONS IN MONITORING WELLS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 212010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 0 500 1,000 1,5000 500 1,000 1,5000 500 1,000 1,5000 500 1,000 1,500 P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 21 NCMA TDS Grouped Well -24B03 Well -24B02 Well -30F01 Well -30F02 Well -30F03 Well -30N03 Well -30N02 Well -36L02 Well -36L01 Well -32C03Total Dissolved Solids Concentration, mg/lNorth Beach Campground Highway 1 Pier Avenue Oceano Dunes and 32C03 PIPER DIAGRAM OF WATER QUALITY IN SELECT MONITORING WELLS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California FIGURE 22 \\PDX\Projects\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 22 NCMA Piper Diagram.grf *100806040200Ca 10080604020Na+K100 80 60 40 20 0 Mg020406080100Cl 100 80 60 40 20 0SO410080604020HCO3+CO38060402080604020Carbonate (CO3) + Bicarbonate (HCO3)Cal c i um (Ca) + Magnes i um (Mg)Sulfate (SO4) + Chloride (Cl)Sodi um (Na) + Pot as s i um (K) – Seawater Base Well –24B02 Well –24B03 Well –30F02 Well –30F03 Well –30N02 Well –30N03 Well –36L01 Well –36L02 Well –31H11 (Blue) Well –32C03 Note: Data include "middle" and "deep" wells from 2018 quarterly sampling events. !R !R!R!R!R !R !R!R!R!R!R!R!R !R !R!R!R !R !R £¤101 Sant a M a r i a R i v e r F a u l tPismoCreekArroyoGrandeCr e e kMeadow C reek L o s B erros Creek Oc e a n o F a u l t Wilmar A v e n u e F a u l t Date: February 2, 2019 Data Sources: LEGEND !R City of Arroyo Grande Well !R City of Grover Beach Well !R City of Pismo Beach Well !R Oceano Community Services District Well Northern Cities Management AreaFaultsStreams Locations of MunicipalProduction Wells FIGURE 23 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_23_Locations of Municipal Production Well.mxd o 0 1 Miles PacificOcean Date: January 28, 2019 Data Sources: LEGENDNorthern Cities Management AreaLandscape MainAvocadoGarden Transplant Plants Outdoor Transplant PlantsRotational CropsStrawberryUncultivated Land NCMA Agricultural Land 2018 FIGURE 24 Northern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Document Path: Y:\0672_Northern_Cities_Management_Area\Source_Figures\005_2018_Annual_Report\Annual_Report\Figure_24_NCMA Agricultural Land_2017.mxd o 0 1 Miles 2018 ESTIMATED AGRICULTURAL WATER DEMAND AND MONTHLY PRECIPITATION AT THE SLO NO. 795 GAUGE Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 25P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 24 2017 NCMA Estimated Agricultural Water Demand and Monthly Precipitation at the CIMIS Nipomo Station MUNICIPAL WATER USE BY SOURCE Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 26P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 25 NCMA Municipal Water Use by Source TOTAL WATER USE (URBAN, RURAL, AG) BY SOURCE Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 27P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 26 NCMA Total Water Use by Source HISTORICAL TDS, CHLORIDE AND SODIUM, INDEX WELLS AND 30N03 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 281965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 TDS, mg/l0 40 80 120 160 200 Chloride, mg/l0 100 200 300 Sodium, mg/lWell -24B03 (Careaga) Well -30F03 (Careaga) Index Wells Well -30N02 (Paso Robles) Well -30N03 (Paso Robles) P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 27 NCMA TDS, Cl and Sodium Index Wells and 30N03 30N02 Chloride >600 mg/l in 2009 HISTORICAL TDS, CHLORIDE AND SODIUM, WELLS 30N02, MW-BLUE AND 36L01 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, CaliforniaFIGURE 291965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 TDS, mg/l0 40 80 120 160 200 Chloride, mg/l0 100 200 300 Sodium, mg/lWell -30N02 (Paso Robles) Well -31H11 (Blue; Paso Robles Formation) Well -36L01 (Paso Robles Formation) P:\Portland\672-Northern Cities Management Area\005-2018 Annual Report\03 Annual Report\0 Admin Draft\Figures\Parts Fig 28 NCMA TDS, Cl and Sodium Wells 30N02 MW-Blue and 36L01 This page left blank intentionally. APPENDIX A NCMA Monitoring Well Water Level and Water Quality Data This page left blank intentionally. Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/9/2018 6.29 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2932S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/10/2018 7.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.5832S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/10/2018 6.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.1032S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/10/2018 6.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.5832S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/10/2017 6.12 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.4632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/11/2017 6.74 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.8432S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/11/2017 6.30 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2832S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/10/2017 5.54 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.0432S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/12/2016 6.54 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.0432S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/19/2016 6.78 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.8032S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/12/2016 6.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2332S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/12/2016 5.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.4132S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/13/2015 5.73 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8532S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/14/2015 6.06 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.5232S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/14/2015 6.22 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.3632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/13/2015 5.83 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.7532S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/14/2014 5.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8232S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/29/2014 5.99 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.5932S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium6/4/2014 6.52 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.0632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/15/2014 5.95 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.6332S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/14/2014 5.75 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8332S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/14/2013 6.07 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.5132S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/9/2013 6.09 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.4932S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/10/2013 7.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.5832S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/14/2013 5.72 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/29/2012 5.92 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.6632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/23/2012 5.79 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.7932S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/18/2012 5.58 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.0032S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/11/2012 5.72 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium11/21/2011 5.80 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.7832S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/26/2011 6.38 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2032S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/20/2011 6.40 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.1832S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/24/2011 5.78 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8032S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/21/2010 6.37 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2132S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium7/27/2010 6.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.132S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/27/2010 3.84 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 6.8632S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium1/27/2010 3.13 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 7.5732S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium10/19/2009 2.28 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 8.4232S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium8/20/2009 3.25 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 7.4532S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium5/12/2009 3.58 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 7.1232S/12E-24B01 North Beach Shallow Alluvium4/7/2009 1.61 Flush Top Flush Mount 11.70 10.09P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/9/2018 6.65 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.9332S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/10/2018 7.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.4132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/10/2018 6.02 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.5632S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/10/2018 5.57 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.0132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/10/2017 6.46 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.1232S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/11/2017 6.93 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.6532S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/11/2017 6.26 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.3232S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/10/2017 5.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.2532S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/12/2016 7.05 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.5332S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/19/2016 7.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 5.9732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/12/2016 6.37 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/12/2016 5.51 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.0732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/13/2015 6.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.9732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/14/2015 6.97 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.6132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/14/2015 7.13 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.4532S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/13/2015 6.28 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.3032S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/14/2014 6.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.9732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/29/2014 7.05 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.5332S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles6/4/2014 8.25 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 5.3332S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/15/2014 6.55 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.0332S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/14/2014 6.34 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2432S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/14/2013 7.08 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.5032S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/9/2013 7.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.4132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/10/2013 6.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2532S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/14/2013 5.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.9732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/29/2012 5.88 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/23/2012 6.12 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.4632S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/18/2012 5.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/11/2012 5.47 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.1132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles11/21/2011 5.69 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8932S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/26/2011 6.51 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.0732S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/20/2011 6.30 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.2832S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/24/2011 5.69 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 7.8932S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/21/2010 6.79 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.7932S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles7/27/2010 7.05 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.5332S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles4/27/2010 4.34 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 6.3632S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles1/27/2010 3.38 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 7.3232S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles10/19/2009 2.26 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 8.4432S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles8/20/2009 4.09 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 6.6132S/12E-24B02 North Beach Middle Paso Robles5/12/2009 4.74 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 5.96P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/9/2018 3.80 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.7832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/10/2018 4.18 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.4032S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/10/2018 2.55 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 11.0332S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/10/2018 2.51 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 11.0732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/10/2017 3.60 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.9832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/11/2017 3.75 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.8332S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/11/2017 2.90 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.6832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/10/2017 2.59 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.9932S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/12/2016 4.70 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.8832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/19/2016 5.10 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.4832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/12/2016 3.81 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.7732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/12/2016 3.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.5732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/13/2015 4.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.9632S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/14/2015 4.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.8232S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/14/2015 4.86 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.7232S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/13/2015 3.59 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.9932S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/14/2014 4.60 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.9832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/29/2014 4.78 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.8032S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga6/4/2014 7.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 6.2532S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga5/5/2014 5.36 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.2232S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/15/2014 3.94 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.6432S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/14/2014 3.81 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.7732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/14/2013 4.50 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.0832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/9/2013 4.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.132S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/10/2013 3.41 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.1732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/14/2013 2.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 11.132S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/29/2012 3.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.5732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/23/2012 2.98 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.632S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/18/2012 1.93 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 11.6532S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/12/2012 2.15 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 11.4332S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga11/21/2011 2.93 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.6532S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/26/2011 3.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.4132S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/20/2011 3.25 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.3332S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/24/2011 2.65 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 10.9332S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/21/2010 4.60 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 8.9832S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga7/27/2010 4.54 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 13.58 9.0432S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga4/27/2010 1.43 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 9.2732S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga1/27/2010 0.94 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 9.7632S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga10/19/2009 0.81 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 9.8932S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga8/19/2009 4.18 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 6.5232S/12E-24B03 North Beach Deep Careaga5/12/2009 3.18 Flush Top Flush Mount 10.70 7.52P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/9/2018 15.23 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.9332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/10/2018 14.81 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.3532S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/10/2018 14.03 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.1332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/10/2018 14.40 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.7632S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/10/2017 14.65 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.5132S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/11/2017 13.73 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.4332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/11/2017 13.25 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.9132S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/10/2017 13.99 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.1732S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/12/2016 17.08 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.0832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/19/2016 16.42 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.7432S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/12/2016 14.83 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.3332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/12/2016 15.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.1632S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/13/2015 17.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.0532S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/14/2015 16.93 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.2332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/14/2015 16.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.1532S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/13/2015 15.41 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.7532S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/14/2014 17.05 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.1132S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/29/2014 17.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.0532S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles6/4/2014 16.82 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.3432S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/15/2014 15.56 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.6032S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/14/2014 16.58 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.5832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/14/2013 17.07 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.0932S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/9/2013 16.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.9932S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/10/2013 14.58 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.5832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/14/2013 14.36 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/30/2012 14.95 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.2132S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/24/2012 14.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.1632S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/18/2012 13.42 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.7432S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/10/2012 13.80 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.3632S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles11/21/2011 13.78 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.3832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/26/2011 13.50 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.6632S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/20/2011 12.82 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.3432S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/24/2011 13.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.8332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/21/2010 16.55 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.6132S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles7/26/2010 15.68 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.4832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/27/2010 11.02 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 12.1432S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles1/28/2010 12.73 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.4332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles10/19/2009 14.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.8332S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles8/19/2009 14.34 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.8232S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles5/12/2009 12.38 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.7832S/13E-30F01 Highway 1 Shallow Alluvium / Paso Robles4/7/2009 11.67 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 24.16 12.49P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/9/2018 15.94 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.2232S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/10/2018 15.90 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.2632S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/10/2018 14.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.5432S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/10/2018 14.79 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.3732S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/10/2017 15.45 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.7132S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/11/2017 15.30 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.8632S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/11/2017 14.27 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.8932S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/10/2017 14.53 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.6332S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/12/2016 17.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.8132S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/19/2016 17.63 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.5332S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/12/2016 15.98 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.1832S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/12/2016 15.29 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.8732S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/13/2015 17.29 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.8732S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/14/2015 17.44 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.7232S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/14/2015 16.94 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.2232S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/13/2015 16.41 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.7532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/14/2014 17.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.8332S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/29/2014 17.31 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.8532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles6/4/2014 18.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.1632S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/15/2014 16.27 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.8932S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/14/2014 17.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.1532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/14/2013 17.52 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.6432S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/9/2013 17.15 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.0132S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/10/2013 15.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.432S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/14/2013 15.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.1532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/30/2012 15.27 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.8932S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/24/2012 14.82 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.3432S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/18/2012 14.38 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.7832S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/12/2012 14.31 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.8532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles11/21/2011 14.94 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.2232S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/26/2011 14.46 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.732S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/20/2011 14.23 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.9332S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/24/2011 14.36 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.8032S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/21/2010 7.39 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 15.7732S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles7/26/2010 16.21 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.9532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/27/2010 12.14 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 8.2232S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles1/28/2010 13.09 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 7.2732S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles10/19/2009 14.36 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 6.0032S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles8/19/2009 14.81 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 5.5532S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles5/12/2009 14.34 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 6.0232S/13E-30F02 Highway 1 Middle Paso Robles4/7/2009 12.28 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 8.08P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/9/2018 15.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.6832S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/10/2018 16.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.0532S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/10/2018 12.16 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 11.0032S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/10/2018 12.85 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.3132S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/10/2017 14.70 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.4632S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/11/2017 13.64 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.5232S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/11/2017 12.36 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.8032S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/10/2017 14.25 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.9132S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/12/2016 17.82 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.3432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/19/2016 17.22 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.9432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/12/2016 14.90 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.2632S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/12/2016 14.84 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.3232S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/13/2015 18.87 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 4.2932S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/14/2015 18.87 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 4.2932S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/14/2015 17.92 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.2432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/13/2015 14.13 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.0332S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/14/2014 18.98 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 4.1832S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/29/2014 18.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 4.5432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga6/4/2014 22.27 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 0.8932S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga5/5/2014 21.34 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 1.8232S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/15/2014 16.14 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.0232S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/14/2014 15.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 7.8132S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/14/2013 17.30 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.8632S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/9/2013 16.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 6.5532S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/10/2013 14.69 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.4732S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/14/2013 12.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.5432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/30/2012 14.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.5532S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/24/2012 14.50 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.6632S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/18/2012 10.43 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 12.7332S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/12/2012 12.37 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.7932S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga11/21/2011 13.24 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 9.9232S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/26/2011 14.22 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 8.9432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/20/2011 12.51 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.6532S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/24/2011 12.67 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 10.4932S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/21/2010 6.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 16.5432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga7/26/2010 17.32 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 23.16 5.8432S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga4/27/2010 11.38 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 8.9832S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga1/28/2010 10.98 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 9.3832S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga10/19/2009 14.18 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 6.1832S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga8/19/2009 20.23 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 0.1332S/13E-30F03 Highway 1 Deep Careaga5/12/2009 17.68 Flush Top Flush Mount 20.36 2.68P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/9/2018 9.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.7832S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/10/2018 9.46 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.6732S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/10/2018 9.04 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.0932S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/10/2018 8.97 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1632S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/10/2017 9.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.7832S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/11/2017 9.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1332S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/11/2017 8.70 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.4332S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/10/2017 7.89 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.2432S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/12/2016 10.21 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.9232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/19/2016 9.91 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.2232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/12/2016 8.93 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.2032S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/12/2016 8.73 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.4032S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/13/2015 10.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.0232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/14/2015 9.91 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.2232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/14/2015 9.51 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.6232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/13/2015 9.03 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1032S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/14/2014 9.95 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.1832S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/29/2014 9.88 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.2532S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium6/4/2014 9.54 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.5932S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/15/2014 9.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.9632S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/14/2014 9.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.5232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/14/2013 9.86 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.2732S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/9/2013 9.40 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.7332S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/10/2013 8.98 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1532S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/14/2013 8.60 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.5332S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/29/2012 8.96 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1732S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/23/2012 8.54 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.5932S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/18/2012 8.53 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.6032S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/9/2012 8.74 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.3932S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium11/21/2011 8.78 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.3532S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/26/2011 9.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/20/2011 8.59 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.5432S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/24/2011 8.18 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.9532S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/21/2010 9.99 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.1432S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium7/27/2010 8.97 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.1632S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/27/2010 6.14 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.3932S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium1/26/2010 4.90 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 8.6332S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium10/20/2009 6.53 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.0032S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium8/20/2009 6.71 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 6.8232S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium5/11/2009 6.03 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.5032S/13E-30N01 Pier Ave Shallow Alluvium4/7/2009 5.83 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.70P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/9/2018 8.37 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.7632S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/10/2018 9.12 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.0132S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/10/2018 7.50 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.6332S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/10/2018 7.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.5232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/10/2017 8.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.5232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/11/2017 8.84 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.2932S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/11/2017 7.55 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.5832S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/10/2017 7.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 9.0232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/12/2016 10.13 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.0032S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/19/2016 10.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.5132S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/12/2016 9.21 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.9232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/12/2016 7.98 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.1532S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/13/2015 10.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.6532S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/14/2015 10.88 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.2532S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/14/2015 11.88 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 4.2532S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/13/2015 9.40 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.7332S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/14/2014 10.52 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.6132S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/29/2014 10.22 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.9132S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles6/4/2014 11.33 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 4.8032S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/15/2014 9.31 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.8232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/14/2014 10.26 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.8732S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/14/2013 10.72 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.4132S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/9/2013 10.36 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.7732S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/10/2013 8.26 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.8732S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/14/2013 7.71 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.4232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/29/2012 8.01 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.1232S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/23/2012 9.15 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.9832S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/18/2012 6.72 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 9.4132S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/11/2012 7.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.9632S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles11/21/2011 6.45 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 9.6832S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/26/2011 7.59 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.5432S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/20/2011 6.65 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 9.4832S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/24/2011 6.68 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 9.4532S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/21/2010 10.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.3732S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles7/27/2010 9.53 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.6032S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles4/27/2010 5.26 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 8.2732S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles1/26/2010 5.88 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.6532S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles10/20/2009 6.56 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 6.9732S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles8/20/2009 7.50 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 6.0332S/13E-30N03 Pier Ave Middle Paso Robles5/12/2009 6.33 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.20P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/9/2018 10.77 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.3632S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/10/2018 10.23 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.9032S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/10/2018 5.96 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 10.1732S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/10/2018 7.43 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.7032S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/10/2017 10.40 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.7332S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/11/2017 8.38 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.7532S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/11/2017 5.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 10.7832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/10/2017 7.34 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.7932S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/12/2016 13.44 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 2.6932S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/19/2016 12.40 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 3.7332S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/12/2016 8.57 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.5632S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/12/2016 7.48 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.6532S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/13/2015 14.14 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 1.9932S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/14/2015 13.55 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 2.5832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/14/2015 10.02 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.1132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/13/2015 7.85 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.2832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/14/2014 13.69 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 2.4432S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/29/2014 13.27 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 2.8632S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles6/4/2014 15.20 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 0.9332S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles5/5/2014 13.19 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 2.9432S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/15/2014 8.57 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.5632S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/14/2014 9.30 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 6.8332S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/14/2013 12.13 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 4.0032S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/9/2013 11.05 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 5.0832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/10/2013 7.06 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 9.0732S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/14/2013 4.98 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 11.1532S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/29/2012 8.52 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.6132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/23/2012 8.31 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 7.8232S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/18/2012 3.45 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 12.6832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/11/2012 4.88 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 11.2532S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles11/21/2011 5.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 10.7832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/26/2011 7.25 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 16.13 8.8832S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/20/2011 3.53 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 10.0032S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/24/2011 3.67 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 9.8632S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/21/2010 10.42 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 3.1132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles7/27/2010 10.02 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 3.5132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles4/27/2010 6.14 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 7.3932S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles2/25/2010 1.72 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 11.8132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles2/25/2010 1.72 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 11.8132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles1/26/2010 3.72 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 9.8132S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles10/20/2009 7.38 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 6.1532S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles8/20/2009 11.94 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 1.5932S/13E-30N02 Pier Ave Deep Paso Robles5/11/2009 6.98 Flush Top Flush Mount 13.53 6.55P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/9/2018 27.35 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.2832S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/10/2018 27.94 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.6932S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/10/2018 24.15 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.4832S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/10/2018 24.15 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.4832S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/10/2017 26.53 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.1032S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/11/2017 25.11 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.5232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/11/2017 21.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.6532S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/10/2017 24.50 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.1332S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/12/2016 30.74 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.8932S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/19/2016 29.77 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 4.8632S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/12/2016 25.64 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.9932S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/12/2016 20.83 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 9.6632S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/13/2015 31.88 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.7532S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/14/2015 31.61 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.0232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/14/2015 28.81 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.8232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/13/2015 26.11 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.5232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/14/2014 31.64 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.9932S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/29/2014 32.30 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.3332S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles6/4/2014 32.82 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 1.8132S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/15/2014 27.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.6532S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/14/2014 28.55 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.0832S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/14/2013 30.31 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 4.3232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/9/2013 29.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 4.6532S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/10/2013 23.30 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.3332S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/14/2013 23.59 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.0432S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/30/2012 27.31 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.3232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/25/2012 27.15 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.4832S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/18/2012 21.65 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.9832S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/12/2012 23.29 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.3432S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles11/21/2011 22.46 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.1732S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/26/2011 25.51 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.1232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/20/2011 114.79 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -80.1632S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/24/2011 106.59 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -71.9632S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/21/2010 112.71 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 -82.2232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles7/26/2010 95.61 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 -65.1232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/26/2010 63.90 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 -33.4132S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles1/27/2010 43.71 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 -13.2232S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles10/20/2009 29.20 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 1.2932S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles8/19/2009 24.55 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 5.9432S/13E-31H10 Oceano Green Paso Robles4/7/2009 28.12 Manhole Top of Casing 30.49 2.37P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/9/2018 28.82 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.8132S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/10/2018 28.60 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.0332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/10/2018 23.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.6532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/10/2018 25.08 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.5532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/10/2017 28.03 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.632S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/11/2017 26.18 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.4532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/11/2017 21.90 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.7332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/10/2017 25.00 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.6332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/12/2016 30.74 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.8932S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/19/2016 29.62 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.0132S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/12/2016 25.13 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.5032S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/12/2016 22.00 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 8.5432S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/13/2015 32.70 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 1.9332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/14/2015 32.21 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.4232S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/14/2015 28.41 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.2232S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/13/2015 25.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.6532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/14/2014 32.70 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 1.9332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/29/2014 32.69 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 1.9432S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles6/4/2014 34.02 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 0.6132S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/15/2014 27.07 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.5632S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/14/2014 27.86 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.7732S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/14/2013 30.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.6532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/9/2013 29.36 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.2732S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/10/2013 24.45 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.1832S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/14/2013 23.14 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.4932S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/30/2012 27.68 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.9532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/25/2012 27.18 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.4532S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/18/2012 20.10 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 14.5332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/12/2012 22.26 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.3732S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles11/21/2011 22.73 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.9032S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/26/2011 25.29 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.3432S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/20/2011 22.59 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.0432S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/24/2011 24.87 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.7632S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/21/2010 30.11 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 0.4332S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles7/26/2010 24.74 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 5.8032S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/26/2010 18.52 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 12.0232S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles1/27/2010 22.06 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 8.4832S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles10/20/2009 27.50 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 3.0432S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles8/19/2009 24.65 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 5.8932S/13E-31H11 Oceano Blue Paso Robles4/7/2009 27.65 Manhole Top of Casing 30.54 2.89P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/9/2018 39.15 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -4.5232S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/10/2018 28.92 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.7132S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/10/2018 23.50 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.1332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/10/2018 23.90 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.7332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/10/2017 28.06 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.5732S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/11/2017 24.09 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.5432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/11/2017 21.14 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 13.4932S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/10/2017 24.80 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.8332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/12/2016 31.00 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.6332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/19/2016 26.95 Manhole Top of Casing 30.48 3.5332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/12/2016 25.32 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.3132S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/12/2016 21.44 Manhole Top of Casing 30.48 9.0432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/13/2015 32.30 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.3332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/14/2015 32.58 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.0532S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/14/2015 30.38 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 4.2532S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/13/2015 26.19 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.4432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/14/2014 43.01 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -8.3832S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/29/2014 33.65 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 0.9832S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga6/4/2014 36.33 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -1.7032S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/15/2014 42.20 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -7.5732S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/14/2014 27.78 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.8532S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/14/2013 30.92 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.7132S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/9/2013 30.91 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.7232S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/10/2013 26.08 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.5532S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/14/2013 23.12 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.5132S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/30/2012 27.14 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.4932S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/25/2012 27.68 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.9532S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/18/2012 20.13 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 14.532S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/11/2012 23.00 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.6332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga11/21/2011 22.85 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.7832S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/26/2011 25.23 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/20/2011 21.27 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 13.3632S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/24/2011 22.02 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.6132S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/21/2010 29.11 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.5232S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga7/26/2010 24.24 Manhole Well Casing 30.48 6.2432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/26/2010 19.04 Manhole Well Casing 30.48 11.4432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga1/27/2010 21.05 Manhole Well Casing 30.48 9.4332S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga10/20/2009 27.52 Manhole Well Casing 30.48 2.9632S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga8/19/2009 29.34 Manhole Well Casing 30.48 1.1432S/13E-31H12 Oceano Silver Careaga4/7/2009 31.32 Manhole Well Casing 30.48 -0.84P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)32S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/9/2018 37.38 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -2.7532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/10/2018 28.90 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.7332S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/10/2018 23.55 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.0832S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/10/2018 23.85 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.7832S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/10/2017 27.96 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.6732S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/11/2017 23.68 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 10.9532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/11/2017 21.18 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 13.4532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/10/2017 24.79 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.8432S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/12/2016 30.91 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.7232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/19/2016 29.58 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 5.0532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/12/2016 25.25 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 9.3832S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/12/2016 21.66 Manhole Top of Casing 30.52 8.8632S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/13/2015 32.28 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.3532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/14/2015 32.60 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 2.0332S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/14/2015 30.42 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 4.2132S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/13/2015 26.32 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.3132S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/14/2014 41.12 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -6.4932S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/29/2014 33.72 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 0.9132S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga6/4/2014 36.55 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -1.9232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/15/2014 39.06 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 -4.4332S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/14/2014 27.80 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.8332S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/14/2013 30.83 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 3.8032S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/9/2013 30.41 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 4.2232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/10/2013 26.09 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 8.5432S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/14/2013 23.25 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.3832S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/30/2012 27.23 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.4032S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/25/2012 27.69 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 6.9432S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/18/2012 20.05 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 14.5832S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/12/2012 23.08 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.5532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga11/21/2011 22.98 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 11.6532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/26/2011 26.73 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 7.9032S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/20/2011 21.30 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 13.3332S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/24/2011 22.01 Manhole Top Flush Mount 34.63 12.6232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/21/2010 28.22 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 2.3032S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga7/26/2010 25.50 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 5.0232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/26/2010 19.17 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 11.3532S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga1/27/2010 20.58 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 9.9432S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga10/20/2009 25.80 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 4.7232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga8/19/2009 31.04 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 -0.5232S/13E-31H13 Oceano Yellow Careaga4/7/2009 34.78 Manhole Well Casing 30.52 -4.26P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)12N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/9/2018 20.80 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.9712N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/10/2018 20.74 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.0312N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/10/2018 19.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.6612N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/10/2018 19.32 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.4512N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/10/2017 21.23 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.5412N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/11/2017 21.59 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.1812N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/11/2017 19.38 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.3912N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/10/2017 19.70 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.0712N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/12/2016 21.86 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 4.9112N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/19/2016 22.21 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 4.5612N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/12/2016 20.56 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.2112N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/12/2016 18.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.0112N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/13/2015 22.14 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 4.6312N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/14/2015 21.84 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 4.9312N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/14/2015 21.18 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.5912N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/13/2015 19.89 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.8812N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/14/2014 21.75 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.0212N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/29/2014 21.57 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.2012N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles6/4/2014 22.36 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 4.4112N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/15/2014 19.89 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.8812N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/14/2014 20.38 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.3912N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/14/2013 21.71 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.0612N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/9/2013 21.37 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.412N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/10/2013 20.10 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.6712N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/14/2013 18.62 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.1512N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/31/2012 20.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.6612N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/24/2012 19.42 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.3512N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/20/2012 18.26 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.5112N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/18/2012 23.83 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 2.9412N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/11/2012 17.68 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 9.0912N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles11/21/2011 18.08 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.6912N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/26/2011 19.63 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.1412N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/20/2011 18.26 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.5112N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles1/24/2011 17.61 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 9.1612N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/21/2010 20.75 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.0212N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles7/27/2010 21.18 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 5.5912N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/26/2010 15.94 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 8.0412N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles10/21/2009 17.72 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 6.2612N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles8/20/2009 19.16 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 4.8212N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles5/11/2009 17.68 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 6.3012N/36W-36L01 Oceano Dunes Middle Paso Robles4/18/2009 15.95 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 8.03P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)12N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/9/2018 25.10 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 1.6712N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/10/2018 24.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 2.6612N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/10/2018 16.02 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 10.7512N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/10/2018 19.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.6612N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/10/2017 24.70 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 2.0712N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/11/2017 23.65 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 3.1212N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/10/2017 15.00 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 11.7712N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/10/2017 16.15 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 10.6212N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/12/2016 27.86 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 -1.0912N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/19/2016 25.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 1.0112N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/12/2016 18.43 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.3412N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/12/2016 16.27 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 10.5012N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/13/2015 27.17 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 -0.4012N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/14/2015 26.11 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 0.6612N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/14/2015 22.24 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 4.5312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/13/2015 16.91 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 9.8612N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/14/2014 26.30 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 0.4712N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/29/2014 25.64 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 1.1312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga6/4/2014 25.22 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 1.5512N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/15/2014 16.94 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 9.8312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/14/2014 18.76 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.0112N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/14/2013 23.94 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 2.8312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/9/2013 23.15 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 3.6212N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/10/2013 15.35 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 11.4212N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/14/2013 11.24 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 15.5312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/31/2012 18.81 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.9612N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/24/2012 19.05 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.7212N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/18/2012 10.81 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 15.9612N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/11/2012 11.18 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 15.5912N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga11/21/2011 13.99 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 12.7812N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/26/2011 18.03 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 8.7412N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga1/24/2011 9.37 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 17.4012N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/21/2010 19.77 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 7.0012N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga7/27/2010 20.53 Stove Pipe Top of Steel 26.77 6.2412N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga4/26/2010 9.24 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 14.7412N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga10/21/2009 17.65 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 6.3312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga8/20/2009 19.15 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 4.8312N/36W-36L02 Oceano Dunes Deep Careaga5/11/2009 14.38 Flush Top Flush Mount 23.98 9.60P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Level DataWellCommonNameAquifer DateDepth to Water(feet)Surface CompletionRP DescriptionRP Elev,feet NAVD88Groundwater Elevation(feet VD88)12N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/9/2018 43.85 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 3.8512N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/10/2018 40.00 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 7.7012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/10/2018 32.80 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 14.9012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles1/10/2018 35.10 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 12.6012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/10/2017 42.05 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 5.6512N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/11/2017 38.34 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 9.3612N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/11/2017 28.44 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 19.2612N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles1/10/2017 34.85 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 12.8512N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/12/2016 47.49 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 0.2112N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/19/2016 44.51 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 3.1912N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/12/2016 36.41 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 11.2912N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles1/12/2016 36.48 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 11.2212N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/13/2015 51.21 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 -3.5112N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/14/2015 49.07 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 -1.3712N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/14/2015 44.00 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 3.7012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles1/13/2015 38.90 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 8.8012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/14/2014 50.50 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 -2.8012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/29/2014 44.02 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 3.6812N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles6/4/2014 45.46 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 2.2412N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/15/2014 41.51 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 6.1912N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles1/14/2014 41.00 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 6.7012N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/14/2013 45.26 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 2.4412N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/9/2013 43.83 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 3.8712N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/10/2013 37.89 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 9.8112N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles1/14/2013 32.26 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 15.4412N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles10/30/2012 40.05 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 7.6512N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles7/25/2012 38.62 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 9.0812N/35W-32C03 County MW-3 Paso Robles4/19/2012 23.02 Flush Top Flush Mount 47.70 24.68P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Levels\NCMA_WL_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/12E-24B0110/9/2018 2,800 1,400 600 35 180 190 410 190 ND 2 0.15 ND 0.11 1.4 2.8 410 ND ND 5,040 220.0020 50032S/12E-24B014/11/2018 3,000 1,400 560 33 170 180 430 200 0.25 2.0 0.15 ND 0.11 1.4 5.1 430 ND ND 5,150 2.20.0036 27532S/12E-24B01 10/11/2017 3,100 1,400 590 36 180 190 430 190 ND 2.3 0.17 0.130.11 1.4 0.64 430 ND ND 5,180 1.7 0.0005 218832S/12E-24B01 4/11/2017 3,400 1,400 680 41 190 210 420 190 ND 2.4 0.16 0.17 0.11 1.6 4.7 420 ND ND 5,020 1.8 0.0034 29832S/12E-24B01 10/11/2016 3,100 1,400 700 44 210 220 450 190 0.26 2.1 0.18 ND0.12 1.6 4.1 450 ND ND 5,020 1.3 0.0029 34132S/12E-24B01 4/12/2016 2,800 1,400 640 37 170 180 420 190 <0.48 2.2 0.16 <0.055 0.081 1.3 4.8 420 <8.2 <8.2 5,000 0.73 0.0034 29232S/12E-24B01 10/15/2015 3,230 230 560 34 160 170 413 42 <0.05 2.2 0.14 <0.10 0.091 1.1 0.68 413 <10 <10 4,880 0.54 0.0030 33832S/12E-24B01 4/15/2015 3,010 1,300 510 30 150 160 410 220 <0.05 2.9 0.15 <0.5 0.023 1.0 3.4 410 <10 <10 4,760 0.72 0.0026 38232S/12E-24B01 1/14/2015 2,980 1,300 520 30 150 170 400 210 <0.25 2.2 0.14 <0.5 <0.021 1.0 2.9 400 <10 <10 4,640 0.52 0.0022 44832S/12E-24B01 10/14/2014 3,160 1,100 530 32 150 170 390 180 0.32 2.2 0.16 <0.5 <0.01 1.1 <0.5 390 <10 <10 4,780 0.67 NA NA32S/12E-24B01 7/30/2014 2,950 1,300 520 29 140 170 440 190 <0.25 1.9 0.11 <0.5 0.03 1.1 2.6 440 <10 <10 4,830 0.62 0.0020 50032S/12E-24B01 4/16/2014 2,880 1,200 560 29 140 140 390 190 <0.05 2.2 0.130 <0.5 0.03 0.92 2.9 390 <10 <10 4,790 0.72 0.0024 41432S/12E-24B01 1/15/2014 2,870 1,300 540 30 140 160 380 214 <0.25 2.4 0.17 <0.5 <0.01 1.0 3.0 380 <10 <10 4,800 0.71 0.0023 43332S/12E-24B01 10/15/2013 2,860 1,200 560 31 150 160 380 200 <0.25 2.2 0.13 <0.5 <0.01 1.0 3.0 380 <10 <10 4,810 0.75 0.0025 40032S/12E-24B01 7/9/2013 2,960 1,300 560 32 150 160 395 215 <0.25 2.4 0.16 <0.5 <0.01 1.1 2.0 395 <10 <10 4,850 0.81 0.0015 65032S/12E-24B01 4/10/2013 2,920 1,300 540 30 140 150 410 220 <0.25 1.9 0.16 <0.1 <0.01 1.00 3.5 410 <10 <10 4,830 0.67 0.0027 37132S/12E-24B01 1/14/2013 2,630 1,300 540 30 140 140 410 220 <0.05 2.7 0.15 <0.1 <0.01 0.96 2.8 410 <10 <10 4,790 0.72 0.0022 46432S/12E-24B01 10/29/2012 2,950 1,200 590 34 150 160 360 200 <0.25 2.4 0.18 <0.5 <0.01 1.1 11 360 <10 <10 4,750 0.78 0.0092 10932S/12E-24B01 7/23/2012 3,010 1,400 530 30 120 130 397 210 <0.05 2.1 0.15 <0.1 0.041 0.86 3 397 <10 <10 4,720 1.4 0.0021 46732S/12E-24B01 4/18/2012 3,000 1,500 450 27 120 120 400 230 <0.1 2 0.13 0.13 <0.01 0.89 3.12 400 <10 <10 4,660 0.6 0.0021 48132S/12E-24B01 1/11/2012 2,750 1,200 520 30 140 140 400 170 <0.1 4 0.18 0.1 0.033 0.94 3.2 400 <10 <10 4,560 0.55 0.0027 37532S/12E-24B01 11/21/2011 2,740 1,200 410 25 130 120 380 200 <0.3 2.3 0.13 <0.6 0.053 0.9 2.73 380 <10 <10 4,470 0.7 0.0023 44032S/12E-24B01 7/25/2011 3,690 1,200 53033 140 150 380 200.2 <0.05 1.8 0.14<0.1 0.053 0.91 3.281 380 <5 <5 4,900 0.73 0.0027 36632S/12E-24B01 4/20/2011 2,810 1,214 500 27 140 130 400 216 <0.05 1.7 0.24 0.18 0.067 0.95 3.3 400 <2.0 <2.0 4,430 NA 0.0027 36832S/12E-24B01 1/24/2011 2,380 1,100 370 24 110 120 380 180 <0.15 1.8 0.16 <0.3 0.63 0.68 2.8 380 <2.0 <2.0 4,020 0.89 0.0025 39332S/12E-24B01 10/28/2010 2,330 960 390 25 140 140 350 160 <0.1 3.9 0.15 <0.1NA 0.75 2.6 350 <10 <10 3,860 1.3 0.0027 36932S/12E-24B01 7/27/2010 616 43 52.5 6.21115 44.7 341 160 < 0.10 2.9 0.063 < 0.10 0.11 0.274 0.18 341 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 9.34 0.0042 23932S/12E-24B01 4/27/2010 676 47 54.7 4.60 107 43.6 327 140 < 0.10 0.98 0.0714 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.0458 0.18 327 < 1.0 < 1.0 990 4.06 0.0038 26132S/12E-24B01 1/27/2010 694 55 56.2 6.80 123 43.2 340 150 0.40 1.7 0.12 < 0.10 0.33 0.875 0.19 340 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 16.6 0.0035 28932S/12E-24B01 10/19/2009 766 140 121 16.7 111 52.4 303 150 0.25 2.8 0.0959 0.11 < 0.10 0.208 0.47 303 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 7.79 0.0034 29832S/12E-24B01 8/20/2009 705 94 86.8 11.7 116 35.6 286 150 0.21 2.7 NA < 0.100.12 0.248 0.38 286 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 7.15 0.0040 24732S/12E-24B01 5/12/2009 695 100 82.1 13.2 108 45 288 150 NA NA NA 0.11 NA 0.660.29 288 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,100 23.9 0.0029 34532S/12E-24B01 3/26/1996 1,870 773 380 24.0 125 95 427 154 0.2 NA 0.27 NA NA NANA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA32S/12E-24B01 6/9/1976 1,706 667 400 16.2 94 95 474 159 0.4 NA 0.12 0.5 NA NA NANA NANANANANANA32S/12E-24B01 1/17/1966 1,700 652 406 20.0 95 83 440 175 1 NA 0.07 0.3 NA NA NANA NA NA NA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/12E-24B02 10/9/2018 640 30 48 3.8 120 37 320 160 ND 0.34 0.068 0.025 0.013 0.18 0.06 320 ND ND 952 0.62 0.0020 49232S/12E-24B02 7/12/2018 620 29 46 3.7 120 36 320 150 ND 0.30 0.072 0.042 0.013 0.17 0.11 320 ND ND 962 0.69 0.0038 26432S/12E-24B02 4/11/2018 660 31 45 3.5 110 35 320 160 0.034 0.28 0.069 0.050 0.011 0.17 0.10 320 ND ND 942 0.58 0.0032 31032S/12E-24B02 1/12/2018 570 30 53 3.8 120 38 320 160 ND 0.32 0.071 0.068 0.015 0.18 0.11 320 ND ND 930 0.56 0.0037 27332S/12E-24B02 10/11/2017 670 31 45 3.7 120 38 330 160 ND 0.41 0.077 0.045 0.014 0.18 0.1 330 ND ND 962 0.74 0.0032 31032S/12E-24B02 7/12/2017 760 31 48 4 13039 310 160 ND 0.18 0.072 0.04 0.015 0.2 0.12 310 ND ND 948 0.93 0.0039 25832S/12E-24B02 4/11/2017 630 34 46 3.7 120 35 310 170 ND 0.31 0.062 0.09. 0.017 0.17 0.12 310 ND ND 933 0.59 0.0035 28332S/12E-24B02 1/12/2017 660 34 47 3.7 120 36 320 170 ND 0.26 0.069 0.031 0.023 0.2 0.097 320 ND ND 938 0.79 0.0029 35132S/12E-24B02 10/11/2016 660 35 48 4 12039 320 170 ND 0.26 0.069 0.038 0.0230.18 0.12 320 ND ND 953 0.75 0.0034 29232S/12E-24B02 7/19/2016 660 36 50 3.9 120 38 320 160 <0.096 0.15 0.07 0.036 0.016 0.17 0.15 320 <4.1 <4.1 947 0.67 0.0042 24032S/12E-24B02 4/12/2016 640 35 48 3.8 110 37 300 160 <0.096 0.38 0.064 0.0450.011 0.17 0.13 300 <4.1 <4.1 939 0.53 0.0037 26932S/12E-24B02 1/12/2016 570 38 48 3.8 110 36 290 170 <0.022 0.27 0.044 0.11 0.015 0.16 0.15 290 <4.1 <4.1 951 0.48 0.0039 25332S/12E-24B02 10/15/2015 650 34 41 3.8 100 33 306 160 <0.05 <1 0.054 <0.10 0.014 0.18 <0.10 306 <10 <10 950 0.72 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 7/15/2015 650 35 50 3.0 120 36 295 160 <0.05 <1 0.069 <0.1 0.010.16 <0.1 295 <10 <10 950 0.69 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 4/15/2015 620 35 40 3.4 100 31 300 170 <0.05 <1 0.066 <0.1 0.010.14 <0.1 300 <10 <10 900 0.45 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 1/14/2015 640 36 41 3.3 110 32 290 170 <0.05 <1 0.062 <0.1 <0.01 0.14 <0.1 290 <10 <10 900 0.48 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 10/14/2014 630 30 41 3.9 100 32 290 140 <0.05 <1 0.065 <0.1 <0.01 0.15 <0.1 290 <10 <10 940 0.44 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 7/29/2014 620 33 42 3.5 100 33 300 150 <0.05 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.010.14 <0.1 300 <10 <10 940 0.37 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 4/16/2014 630 32 43 4.3 88 28 300 150 <0.05 <1 0.067 <0.1 <0.010.12 <0.1 300 <10 <10 940 0.32 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 1/15/2014 630 33 46 3.9 100 34 290 165 <0.05 <1 <0.05 <0.1 <0.01 0.14 <0.1 290 <10 <10 940 0.37 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 10/15/2013 630 30 44 3.8 98 32 290 170 <0.05 <1 <0.05 <0.1 <0.01 0.13 <0.1 290 <10 <10 920 0.39 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 7/9/2013 630 30 43 3.9 110 33 295 170 <0.05 <1 0.076 <0.1 <0.010.14 <0.1 295 <10 <10 940 0.6 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 4/10/2013 630 31 44 4 100 32 310 160 <0.05 <1 0.08 <0.1 <0.01 0.13 <0.1 310 <10 <10 940 0.41 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 1/14/2013 620 30 43 4 97 31 305 170 <0.05 <1 0.079 <0.1 <0.01 0.12 <0.1 305 <10 <10 950 0.72 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 10/29/2012 650 29 45 4.2 100 32 280 160 <0.05 <1 0.074 0.14 <0.01 0.13 <0.1 280 <10 <10 950 0.56 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 7/23/2012 650 35 45 4.3 87 27 297 170 <0.05 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.12 <0.1 297 <10 <10 950 0.43 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 4/18/2012 630 37 39 3.7 88 28 310 171 <0.1 <1 <0.1 0.16 <0.01 0.099 <0.2 310 <10 <10 950 0.26 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 1/11/2012 650 33 46 4.6 110 32 300 150 <0.1 1.3 <0.1 0.21 <0.020.13 0.03 300 <10 <10 950 1.7 0.0010 97132S/12E-24B02 11/21/2011 640 32 39 3.9 93 29 290 150 <0.05 <1 0.064 <0.1 <0.01 0.096 <0.1 290 <10 <10 930 0.32 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 7/25/2011 640 36 48 4.2 97 31 290 165.3 <0.05 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.096 <0.1 290 <5 <5 950 0.88 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 4/20/2011 620 39 46 7.4 90 36 320 174 <0.05 <1 0.17 0.14 0.014 <0.005 <0.1 320 <2.0 <2.0 950 NA NA NA32S/12E-24B02 1/24/2011 640 43 44 5.9 87 28 270 170 <0.05 <1.0 0.11 <0.1 0.140.085 <0.1 270 <2.0 <2.0 940 1.3 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 10/28/2010 650 43 50 4.5 110 35 270 160 <0.1 <1.0 0.12 <0.1 NA 0.085 <0.3 270 <10 <10 970 0.63 NA NA32S/12E-24B02 7/27/2010 598 42 48.9 4.29 111 40.5 318 160 < 0.10 1.3 0.0609< 0.10 0.11 0.106 0.15 318 < 1.0 < 1.0 980 2.84 0.0036 28032S/12E-24B02 4/27/2010 668 46 52.7 4.73 111 43.2 349 150 < 0.10 1.3 0.0666< 0.10 0.14 0.101 0.16 349 < 1.0 < 1.0 980 6.66 0.0035 28832S/12E-24B02 1/27/2010 622 45 58.0 5.39 115 32.2 270 160 0.18 0.84 0.117 < 0.10 0.14 0.209 0.16 270 < 1.0 < 1.0 920 3.49 0.0036 28132S/12E-24B02 10/19/2009 600 49 59.1 5.12 112 30.1 281 160 < 0.10 0.98 0.0776 0.14 < 0.10 0.163 0.19 281 < 1.0 < 1.0 870 1.14 0.0039 25832S/12E-24B02 8/20/2009 630 49 63.5 5.85 128 30.1 288 150 < 0.10 0.98 NA < 0.10 < 0.10 0.203 0.20 288 < 1.0 < 1.0 920 3.22 0.0041 24532S/12E-24B02 5/12/2009 622 82 67.5 6.33 114 34.5 282 150 NA NA NA 0.11 NA 0.252 0.24 282 < 1.0 < 1.0 990 6.76 0.0029 34232S/12E-24B02 3/26/1996 652 54 46 5 107 24 344 169 0.2 NA 0.1 NA NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA32S/12E-24B02 6/9/1976 565 34 52 4 104 27 337 153 0.6 NA 0.02 0.5 NA NA NA NA NA NANANANANA32S/12E-24B02 1/17/1966 651 62 79 5 101 32 380 147 0 NA 0.05 0.3 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/12E-24B03 10/9/2018 690 48 52 4.1 110 45 320 160 ND 0.19 0.065 ND 0.020 0.011 0.10 320 ND ND 1,030 0.19 0.0020 50032S/12E-24B03 7/12/2018 650 47 51 3.8 110 42 320 150 ND 0.14 0.062 0.023 0.020 0.10 0.16 320 ND ND 1,040 0.18 0.0034 29432S/12E-24B03 4/11/2018 670 50 53 4.0 110 44 320 160 ND 0.11 0.065 0.017 0.019 0.011 0.19 320 ND ND 1,010 0.19 0.0038 26332S/12E-24B03 1/12/2018 620 48 57 3.9 110 45 330 160 ND 0.13 0.061 0.041 0.023 0.011 0.18 330 ND ND 993 0.19 0.0038 26732S/12E-24B03 10/11/2017 660 49 54 4 120 45 330 160 ND 0.16 0.069 0.022 0.02 0.011 0.19 330 ND ND 1020 0.20 0.0039 25832S/12E-24B03 7/12/2017 790 46 54 4 120 45 320 160 ND ND 0.062 0.015 0.02 0.011 0.18 320 ND ND 1,010 0.19 0.0039 25632S/12E-24B03 4/11/2017 670 48 55 4.1 120 45 330 160 ND 0.17 0.058 ND 0.019 0.012 0.21 330 ND ND 988 0.23 0.0044 22932S/12E-24B03 1/12/2017 670 47 58 4.3 130 50 340 160 ND ND 0.068 0.012 0.024 0.014 0.18 340 ND ND 1,000 0.27 0.0038 26132S/12E-24B03 10/11/2016 680 49 53 4 110 47 340 160 ND ND 0.06 0.015 0.025 0.013 0.17 340 ND ND 1020 0.22 0.0035 28832S/12E-24B03 7/19/2016 690 47 54 4.1 110 46 340 160 <0.096 0.32 0.063 0.0170.016 0.013 0.20 340 <8.2 <8.2 1,010 0.32 0.0043 23532S/12E-24B03 4/12/2016 680 48 55 4.1 110 45 320 160 <0.096 0.21 0.056 0.0190.018 0.012 0.17 320 <8.2 <8.2 1,010 0.28 0.0035 28232S/12E-24B03 1/12/2016 610 51 53 4.0 110 46 320 170 <0.022 0.11 0.037 0.038<0.10 0.015 0.19 320 <8.2 <8.2 1,050 0.27 0.0037 26832S/12E-24B03 10/15/2015 650 44 48 4.4 100 42 325 160 <0.05 <1 <0.05 <0.10 0.016 0.010 <0.10 325 <10 <10 1,020 0.21 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 7/15/2015 680 46 60 40.0 120 47 333 160 <0.05 <1 0.064 <0.1 0.01 0.010 <0.1 333 <10 <10 1,020 0.20 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 4/15/2015 650 46 44 3.5 96 38 330 170 <0.05 <1 0.061 <0.1 0.0120.0080 <0.1 330 <10 <10 980 0.17 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 1/14/2015 670 47 48 3.6 110 43 330 170 <0.05 <1 0.052 <0.10 0.01 0.090 <0.1 330 <10 <10 970 0.17 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 10/14/2014 650 40 48 4.1 100 41 330 142 <0.05 <1 0.061 <0.1 <0.01 0.010 <0.1 330 <10 <10 1,010 0.19 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 7/30/2014 650 45 45 3.1 94 40 390 150 <0.05 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 390 <10 <10 1,020 0.19 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 4/16/2014 660 43 46 4.3 90 35 330 150 0.23 <1 0.056 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.11 330 <10 <10 1,010 0.16 0.0026 39132S/12E-24B03 1/15/2014 660 45 52 4.0 100 41 320 165 <0.05 <1 <0.05 <0.1 <0.01 0.0090 <0.1 320 <10 <10 1,010 0.17 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 10/15/2013 720 40 51 4.0 100 40 310 170 <0.05 <1 <0.05 <0.1 <0.01 0.0090 <0.1 310 <10 <10 1,010 0.2 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 7/9/2013 660 46 47 3.9 110 41 310 170 <0.05 <1 0.066 <0.1 <0.010.0100 <0.1 310 <10 <10 1,010 0.27 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 4/10/2013 670 44 46 3.8 96 38 320 160 <0.05 <1 0.071 <0.1 <0.010.0080 <0.1 320 <10 <10 1,010 0.19 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 1/14/2013 630 45 47 3.9 96 37 320 170 <0.05 <1 0.065 <0.1 <0.010.0080 <0.1 320 <10 <10 1,010 0.26 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 10/29/2012 680 45 49 4.1 100 39 305 158 <0.05 <1 0.069 0.1 <0.01 0.0090 <0.1 305 <10 <10 1,010 0.22 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 7/23/2012 670 49 47 4.1 86 35 318 170 <0.05 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.0150 <0.1 318 <10 <10 1,010 0.24 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 4/18/2012 640 50 40 3.4 84 33 320 160 <0.1 <1 <0.1 <0.2 <0.01 0.0070 <0.2 320 <10 <10 1,010 0.23 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 1/12/2012 660 46 48 3.2 92 36 300 150 <0.1 <1 <0.1 0.35 <0.02 0.0080 <0.2 300 <10 <10 1,000 0.15 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 11/21/2011 660 43 41 3.7 91 34 310 150 <0.05 1.6 0.046 <0.1 0.014 0.0090 <0.1 310 <10 <10 970 0.12 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 7/25/2011 650 46 50 6.0 98 38 310 159.6 <0.05 <1 <0.1 <0.1 0.011 0.0100 <0.1 310 <5 <5 1,010 0.21 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 4/20/2011 650 47 48 4.6 95 31 310 168 <0.05 <1 0.11 0.08 0.015 0.0080 <0.1 310 <2.0 <2.0 1,020 NA NA NA32S/12E-24B03 1/24/2011 660 46 44 5.6 87 33 320 160 <0.05 <1.0 NA <0.1 0.15 0.0096 <0.1 320 <2.0 <2.0 1,020 0.22 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 10/28/2010 660 44 48 3.8 110 39 315 50 <0.1 <1.0 0.089 <0.1 NA 0.0120 <0.3 315 <10 <10 1,020 0.55 NA NA32S/12E-24B03 7/27/2010 610 44 51.4 8.34 112 41.6 328 160 < 0.10 1.8 0.0533< 0.10 0.17 0.0602 0.16 328 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 6.7 0.0036 27532S/12E-24B03 4/27/2010 666 45 53.2 4.84 118 44 357 150 < 0.10 1.5 0.0636 < 0.10 0.1 0.0519 0.17 357 < 1.0 < 1.0 980 9.71 0.0038 26532S/12E-24B03 1/27/2010 672 48 56.4 5.40119 43.4 336 150 < 0.10 1.4 0.101 < 0.10 0.15 0.140 0.15 336 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 5.18 0.0031 32032S/12E-24B03 10/19/2009 622 40 55.1 3.93 110 42.6 342 160 < 0.10 < 0.50 0.0613 < 0.10 0.13 0.0181 0.14 342 < 1.0 < 1.0 880 0.343 0.0035 28632S/12E-24B03 8/19/2009 680 47 54.9 5.21 128 43.4 337 150 < 0.10 2.2 NA < 0.10 0.66 0.182 0.15 337 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 14.3 0.0032 31332S/12E-24B03 5/12/2009 645 44 53.2 4.53 108 41.8 332 140 NA NA NA < 0.10 NA 0.124 0.16 332 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,000 5.9 0.0036 27532S/12E-24B03 3/26/1996 646 41 52 4.3 104 42 412 164 0.2 NA 0.12 NA NA NA NA NA NANANANANANA32S/12E-24B03 6/9/1976 569 36 53 3.7 85 39 330 165 0 NA 0.06 0.4 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA32S/12E-24B03 1/17/1966 670 79 74 5 103 36 345 158 1 NA 0 0.2 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NANA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-30F01 10/10/2018 460 62 72 2.3 44 21 84 120 13 0.09 0.09 0.034 ND ND 0.16 84 ND ND 696 ND 0.0026 38832S/13E-30F01 4/12/2018 470 58 69 2.3 44 21 82 110 12 0.14 0.09 0.030 ND ND 0.23 82 ND ND 699 ND 0.0040 25232S/13E-30F01 10/11/2017 500 68 67 2.2 46 23 97 120 13 0.18 0.093 0.045 ND 0.018 0.28 97 ND ND 752 0.061 0.0041 24332S/13E-30F01 4/12/2017 510 61 65 2.1 42 20 85 120 13 0.12 0.074 0.062 ND ND 0.28 85 ND ND 682 0.045 0.0046 21832S/13E-30F01 10/11/2016 480 62 72 2.3 46 23 91 120 12 0.13 0.09 0.046 ND ND 0.32 91 ND ND 702 ND 0.0052 19432S/13E-30F01 4/13/2016 460 60 70 2.3 43 21 90 120 52 0.2 0.086 0.054 <0.01 <.0040 0.30 90 <4.1 <4.1 696 <0.030 0.0050 20032S/13E-30F01 10/14/2015 450 58 61 2.1 39 19 87 120 13 <1 0.084 <0.10 <0.01 <0.005 0.18 87 <10 <10 700 <0.05 0.0031 32232S/13E-30F01 4/15/2015 460 64 60 2.0 40 19 90 130 12 <1 0.081 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.202 90 <10 <10 700 <0.05 0.0032 31732S/13E-30F01 1/14/2015 550 95 69 2 50 24 98 140 12.50 <1 0.085 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.2 98 <10 <10 820 <0.05 0.0018 56232S/13E-30F01 10/14/2014 470 58 64 2 42 19 84 120 10.00 <1 0.081 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.2 84 <10 <10 730 <0.05 0.0030 33732S/13E-30F01 7/30/2014 540 89 71 2 46 24 94 130 13.6 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.101 94 <10 <10 860 <0.05 0.0011 88132S/13E-30F01 4/16/2014 610 122 78 3.3 47 22 100 140 12 <1 0.100 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.17 100 <10 <10 970 <0.05 0.0014 71832S/13E-30F01 1/15/2014 510 80 69 2.3 45 22 94 136 12.6 13.00 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01<0.005 0.19 94 <10 <10 810 <0.05 0.0024 42132S/13E-30F01 10/15/2013 530 78 73 2.3 47 22 86 140 12 <1 0.072 <0.1 <0.01 <.005 0.17 86 <10 <10 830 <0.05 0.0022 45932S/13E-30F01 7/10/2013 480 80 64 2.2 49 22 85 140 12.2 <1 0.089 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 85 <10 <10 770 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F01 4/11/2013 460 60 60 2.20 38 18 78 120 12 <1 0.091 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.2 78 <10 <10 710 <0.05 0.0033 30032S/13E-30F01 1/15/2013 440 65 64 2.40 40 19 95 130 12 <1 0.090 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.11 95 <10 <10 720 0.05 0.0017 59132S/13E-30F01 10/30/2012 470 60 66 2.50 43 20 75 123 12 <1 0.087 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.13 75 <10 <10 720 <0.05 0.0022 46232S/13E-30F01 7/24/2012 470 73 66 2.70 36 18 86 120 13 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.019 0.11 86 <10 <10 720 <0.05 0.0015 66432S/13E-30F01 4/19/2012 450 72 52 1.90 32 15 81 130 13 <1 <0.1 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 81 <10 <10 700 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F01 1/10/2012 460 67 61 2.00 35 17 81 120 11 <1 <0.1 0.12 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 81 <10 <10 720 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F01 11/17/2011 470 70 82 2.40 40 19 78 120 12 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.16 78 <10 <10 720 <0.1 0.0023 43832S/13E-30F01 7/25/2011 460 66 68 4.4037 19 78 117.4 12.17 <1 0.100 0.101 <0.01 0.014 0.178 78 <5 <5 720 0.11 0.0027 37032S/13E-30F01 4/20/2011 460 71 69 2.60 36 14 87 124 12 <1 0.180 0.11 <0.01 <0.005 0.17 87 <2.0 <2.0 730 NA 0.0024 41832S/13E-30F01 1/24/2011 510 75 64 4.00 34 18 83 140 11 <1.0 0.170 0.11 <0.10 <0.005 <0.1 83 <2.0 <2.0 780 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F01 10/21/2010 540 100 73 2.00 43 21 88 120 13 <1.0 0.067 <0.1 NA <0.005 <0.3 88 <10 <10 894 <.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F01 7/26/2010 464 74 82.2 2.16 47.9 25.1 88.0 120 12 < 0.50 0.098< 0.10 < 0.10 0.0817 0.37 88.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 710 0.79 0.0050 20032S/13E-30F01 4/27/2010 534 72 77.1 2.59 45.8 23.6 100 140 9.8 0.56 0.129 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.112 0.29 100 < 1.0 < 1.0 780 1.02 0.0040 24832S/13E-30F01 1/28/2010 725 140 99.9 2.70 76.4 35.8 214 170 1.6 0.84 0.120 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.112 0.56 214 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 0.640 0.0040 25032S/13E-30F01 10/19/2009 522 74 85.6 2.35 52.8 26.3 102 150 13 0.70 0.136 0.13 < 0.10 0.123 0.32 102 < 1.0 < 1.0 770 1.30 0.0043 23132S/13E-30F01 8/19/2009 648 92 98.9 3.84 63.1 31.9 113 190 10 0.56 NA < 0.100.12 1.03 0.32 113 < 1.0 < 1.0 970 4.52 0.0035 28832S/13E-30F01 5/12/2009 792 110 108 2.89 80.2 39.9 136 280 NA NA NA < 0.10 NA0.0353 0.39 136 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 0.281 0.0035 282P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-30F02 10/10/2018 580 51 50 2.9 83 35 190 130 14 0.07 0.094 0.07 ND 0.020 0.42 190 ND ND 848 0.07 0.0082 12132S/13E-30F02 7/10/2018 580 53 48 2.7 83 36 190 130 14 0.23 0.095 0.11 ND 0.026 0.59 190 ND ND 893 0.045 0.0111 9032S/13E-30F02 4/12/2018 580 48 48 2.8 82 35 190 120 13 0.12 0.097 0.072 ND 0.022 0.48 190 ND ND 854 ND 0.0100 10032S/13E-30F02 1/11/2018 580 52 51 2.7 82 36 200 130 14 0.14 0.091 0.12 ND 0.032 0.68 200 ND ND 846 ND 0.0131 7632S/13E-30F02 10/11/2017 580 51 46 2.6 80 34 200 130 14 0.16 0.094 0.083 ND 0.037 0.65 200 ND ND 877 0.037 0.0127 7832S/13E-30F02 7/12/2017 570 52 49 2.9 89 39 200 130 13 ND 0.094 0.096 ND 0.15 0.66 200 ND ND 861 ND 0.0127 7932S/13E-30F02 4/12/2017 620 52 51 2.9 88 38 200 130 13 ND 0.088 0.063 ND 0.0220.67 200 ND ND 8560.0410.0129 7832S/13E-30F021/10/2017 590 52 50 2.8 90 37 220 140 13 ND 0.09 0.08 ND 1.1 0.6 220 ND ND 884 0.150.0115 8732S/13E-30F02 10/11/2016 600 52 50 2.9 89 40 220 140 13 0.089 0.09 0.074 ND 0.025 0.6 220 ND ND 886 ND 0.0115 8732S/13E-30F02 7/20/2016 590 51 51 3.0 88 38 220 130 58 0.14 0.091 0.072 <0.010 0.170 0.57 220 <4.1 <4.1 880 0.033 0.0112 8932S/13E-30F02 4/13/2016 570 51 51 2.9 89 40 200 130 58 0.08 0.1 0.086 <0.010 0.014 0.60 200 <4.1 <4.1 876 <0.030 0.0118 8532S/13E-30F02 1/13/2016 610 53 51 2.9 89 38 210 140 13 0.14 0.091 0.15 <0.0100.035 0.47 210 <4.1 <4.1 858 <0.030 0.0089 11332S/13E-30F02 10/14/2015 570 49 45 2.8 80 35 212 130 13 <1 0.085 <0.10 <0.01 0.20 0.39 212 <10 <10 890 0.078 0.0080 12632S/13E-30F02 7/15/2015 610 50 51 2.0 88 38 204 140 13 <1 0.091 <0.1 <0.01 0.048 0.30 204 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0060 16732S/13E-30F02 4/15/2015 570 51 43 2.7 78 34 200 140 13.5 <1 0.085 <0.1 <0.01 0.087 0.42 200 <10 <10 850 <0.05 0.0082 12132S/13E-30F02 1/14/2015 590 51 42 2.4 80 34 210 140 13 <1 0.08 <0.1 <0.01 0.014 0.324 210 <10 <10 860 <0.05 0.0064 15732S/13E-30F02 10/14/2014 600 46 42 2.6 76 32 310 120 12 <1 0.08 <0.1 <0.01 0.22 0.37 310 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0080 12432S/13E-30F02 7/30/2014 580 49 46 2.6 80 35 210 130 13 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.020.27 210 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0055 18132S/13E-30F02 4/16/2014 590 49 45 3.3 68 30 200 130 12 <1 0.089 <0.1 <0.01 0.011 0.44 200 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0090 11132S/13E-30F02 1/15/2014 580 50 45 2.7 76 31 190 136 13.1 13.4 <0.1 <0.1 <0.010.054 0.4 190 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0080 12532S/13E-30F02 10/15/2013 570 50 45 2.7 75 33 190 140 12 <1 0.69 0.19 <0.01 0.099 0.38 190 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0076 13232S/13E-30F02 7/10/2013 570 50 38 2.6 78 32 190 180 <0.05 <1 0.08 0.13 <0.01 0.14 <0.1 190 <10 <10 880 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F02 4/11/2013 590 50 41 2.6 70 30 190 140 14 <1 0.09 0.1 <0.01 0.0820.43 190 <10 <10 880 <0.05 0.0086 11632S/13E-30F02 1/15/2013 550 50 44 2.9 72 31 200 140 13 <1 0.09 0.1 <0.01 0.0110.32 200 <10 <10 880 0.12 0.0064 15632S/13E-30F02 10/30/2012 610 48 45 3.0 79 34 188 135 13 <1 0.09 <0.1 <0.01 0.06 0.31 188 <10 <10 890 0.011 0.0065 15532S/13E-30F02 7/24/2012 590 56 46 3.2 69 30 194 140 14 <1 <0.1 0.11 <0.01 0.038 0.27 194 <10 <10 880 <0.05 0.0048 20732S/13E-30F02 4/19/2012 600 60 40 2.7 68 30 200 140 14 <1 <0.1 <0.2 <0.01 0.190.3 200 <10 <10 890 0.11 0.0050 20032S/13E-30F02 1/12/2012 610 52 45 3.0 73 32 200 130 12 <1 <0.1 0.25 <0.02 0.290.33 200 <10 <10 890 <0.1 0.0063 15832S/13E-30F02 11/21/2011 580 49 38 2.7 73 30 190 120 13 <1 0.07 <0.1 <0.01 0.022 0.34 190 <10 <10 870 <0.1 0.0069 14432S/13E-30F02 7/25/2011 590 52 46 5.1 73 31 190 134.3 13.19 <1 <0.1 0.127 <0.1 0.025 0.387 190 <5 <5 900 <0.1 0.0074 13532S/13E-30F02 4/20/2011 600 54 57 4.2 74 29 200 141 13 <1 0.18 0.17 <0.01 0.025 0.38 200 <2.0 <2.0 920 NA 0.0070 14232S/13E-30F02 1/24/2011 600 51 43 4.9 71 31 210 140 12 <1.0 0.15 0.12 0.27 0.041 0.3 210 <2.0 <2.0 920 <0.1 0.0059 17032S/13E-30F02 10/28/2010 610 49 38 2.3 70 30 210 130 11 <1.0 0.10 <0.1 NA 0.0094 <0.3 210 <10 <10 920 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F02 7/26/2010 560 49 45.8 2.95 85.4 36.8 223 130 11 2.5 0.0928 < 0.10 0.13 0.0646 0.59 223 < 1.0 < 1.0 890 < 0.100 0.0120 8332S/13E-30F02 4/27/2010 634 51 50.3 3.12 87.9 38.6 225 130 10 0.8 0.112 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.615 0.51 225 < 1.0 < 1.0 880 3.28 0.0100 10032S/13E-30F02 1/28/2010 604 44 52.2 4.47 92.1 38.5 230 150 11 1.4 0.127 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.913 0.48 230 < 1.0 < 1.0 920 4.55 0.0109 9232S/13E-30F02 10/19/2009 566 49 49.5 2.80 88.3 37.6 240 140 11 1.0 0.0942 0.17 < 0.10 0.924 0.51 240 < 1.0 < 1.0 850 2.15 0.0104 9632S/13E-30F02 8/19/2009 614 49 51.8 3.19 87.3 36.8 225 130 11 2.00 NA 0.10 < 0.10 2.24 0.54 225 < 1.0 < 1.0 920 19.4 0.0110 9132S/13E-30F02 5/12/2009 514 54 48.7 3.26 81.1 34.9 206 120 NA NA NA 0.11 NA 1.87 0.53 206 < 1.0 < 1.0 890 3.23 0.0098 10232S/13E-30F02 3/27/1996 678 49 52 3.8 98 42 305 166 49 NA 0.16 NA NA NA NA NA NA NANANANANA32S/13E-30F02 6/9/1976 637 48 55 2.8 98 43 343 172 17.6 NA 0.1 0.5 NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA NA32S/13E-30F02 1/20/1966 580 68 47 2 94 38 280 152 27 NA 0.08 0.2 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-30F03 10/10/2018 650 48 44 2.9 120 51 310 170 ND 0.12 0.067 0.10 0.036 0.022 0.16 310 ND ND 981 0.05 0.0033 30032S/13E-30F03 7/10/2018 630 49 42 2.6 110 49 310 170 ND ND 0.062 0.18 0.035 0.019 0.22 310 ND ND 1,030 ND 0.0045 22332S/13E-30F03 4/12/2018 640 45 43 2.6 110 46 300 160 ND 0.15 0.066 0.14 0.0360.021 0.16 300 ND ND 980 0.035 0.0036 28132S/13E-30F03 1/11/2018 650 48 45 2.8 120 51 310 170 ND 0.13 0.044 0.15 0.0410.021 0.26 310 ND ND 966 0.037 0.0054 18532S/13E-30F03 10/11/2017 660 47 42 2.6 110 50 320 170 ND 0.13 0.067 0.13 0.037 0.021 0.2 320 ND ND 996 0.056 0.0043 23532S/13E-30F03 7/12/2017 750 46 44 3 120 53 280 170 ND ND 0.064 0.14 0.035 0.023 0.2 280 ND ND 980 0.046 0.0043 23032S/13E-30F03 4/12/2017 640 48 45 2.9 120 51 310 170 ND ND 0.076 0.16 0.035 0.022 0.22 310 ND ND 9720.0650.0046 21832S/13E-30F031/10/2017 670 49 44 2.7 120 51 330 170 ND ND 0.064 0.13 0.045 0.023 0.31 330 ND ND 993 0.14 0.0063 15832S/13E-30F03 10/11/2016 680 48 41 2.6 110 49 320 170 ND 0.11 0.056 0.13 0.042 0.02 0.22 320 ND ND 992 ND 0.0046 21832S/13E-30F03 7/20/2016 660 47 44 2.9 110 51 320 170 <0.096 <0.080 0.062 0.12 0.032 0.023 0.20 320 <4.1 <4.1 992 0.04 0.0043 23532S/13E-30F03 4/13/2016 650 47 42 2.7 110 51 310 170 <0.096 0.2 0.072 0.13 0.028 0.021 0.22 310 <4.1 <4.1 981 0.03 0.0047 21432S/13E-30F03 1/14/2016 580 49 45 2.8 120 52 310 180 0.05 0.1 0.061 0.2 <0.010 0.025 0.21 310 <4.1 <4.1 947 0.054 0.0043 23332S/13E-30F03 10/14/2015 660 44 38 2.8 100 44 306 160 <0.05 <1 <0.05 0.13 0.028 0.021 0.10 306 <10 <10 990 <0.05 0.0023 44032S/13E-30F03 7/15/2015 670 45 45 1.9 120 51 305 170 <0.05 <1 0.060 0.11 0.030.019 <0.1 305 <10 <10 990 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 4/15/2015 650 46 35 2.3 99 44 300 170 <0.05 <1 0.056 0.126 0.020.015 0.1 300 <10 <10 950 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 1/14/2015 670 46 36 2.2 100 45 310 180 <0.05 <1 0.05 0.121 0.020.016 <0.1 310 <10 <10 950 0.01 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 10/14/2014 660 41 35 3.0 99 42 310 150 <0.05 <1 <0.05 <0.1 0.011 0.017 <0.1 310 <10 <10 990 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 7/30/2014 660 44 38 2.6 96 46 300 160 <0.05 <1 0.28 0.12 0.02 0.015 <0.1 300 <10 <10 990 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 4/16/2014 640 44 36 3.3 55 38 310 169 <0.05 <1 0.062 0.12 0.02 0.011 0.11 310 <10 <10 990 <0.05 0.0025 40032S/13E-30F03 1/15/2014 650 45 35 2.5 90 41 300 173 <0.05 <1 <0.05 0.13 0.01 0.015 0.12 300 <10 <10 990 <0.05 0.0027 37532S/13E-30F03 10/15/2013 670 41 40 2.7 100 44 280 179 <0.05 <1 <0.05 0.14 0.02 0.016 <0.1 280 <10 <10 990 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 7/10/2013 650 50 33 2.4 100 43 290 140 13.5 <1 0.055 <0.1 0.02 0.017 0.23 290 <10 <10 990 <0.05 0.0046 21732S/13E-30F03 4/11/2013 670 45 36 2.7 94 42 300 170 <0.05 <1 0.06 0.13 0.02 0.016 0.12 300 <10 <10 990 <0.05 0.0027 37532S/13E-30F03 1/15/2013 630 45 36 2.3 92 41 295 180 <0.05 <1 0.06 0.11 <0.01 0.015 <0.1 295 <10 <10 980 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 10/30/2012 650 43 40 3.1 100 46 280 170 <0.05 <1 0.06 <0.1 0.030.016 <0.1 280 <10 <10 990 0.02 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 7/24/2012 640 51 36 2.7 81 37 296 180 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.17 <0.01 0.016 0.2 296 <10 <10 990 <0.05 0.0039 25532S/13E-30F03 4/19/2012 640 54 32 2.3 84 36 290 180 <0.1 <1 <0.1 <0.2 0.01 0.014 <0.2 290 <10 <10 990 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 1/12/2012 660 46 39 2.1 94 42 280 160 <0.1 <1 <0.1 0.2 0.025 0.016 <0.2 280 <10 <10 990 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 11/21/2011 650 43 33 2.6 93 39 290 160 <0.05 <1 0.04 0.15 0.0280.016 <0.1 290 <10 <10 960 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 7/25/2011 650 47 46 5.1 73 31 190 170.5 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.155 0.02 0.025 <0.1 190 <5 <5 900 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 4/21/2011 650 48 40 3.8 91 34 280 179 <0.05 <1 0.1 0.2 0.029 0.015 0.11 280 <2.0 <2.0 1,000 NA 0.0023 43632S/13E-30F03 1/24/2011 650 46 36 4.7 87 38 300 170 <0.05 <1.0 0.11 0.17 0.240.016 <0.1 300 <2.0 <2.0 990 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 10/28/2010 650 46 37 2.7 100 43 280 160 <0.1 <1.0 0.10 <0.1 NA 0.032 <0.3 280 <10 <10 1,000 0.53 NA NA32S/13E-30F03 7/26/2010 608 45 43.8 2.94 107 46.8 294 160 1.3 0.84 0.0479 < 0.10 0.10 0.129 0.24 294 < 1.0 < 1.0 900 7.55 0.0053 18832S/13E-30F03 4/27/2010 668 48 40.8 2.91 101 44.7 304 160 0.21 0.84 0.0733 0.14 0.11 0.0694 0.23 304 < 1.0 < 1.0 940 2.62 0.0048 20932S/13E-30F03 1/28/2010 656 40 43.1 3.91 112 47.2 310 180 < 0.20 2.8 0.08330.13 < 0.10 0.287 0.21 310 < 1.0 < 1.0 980 4.80 0.0053 19032S/13E-30F03 10/19/2009 626 48 43.3 3.14 108 46.2 308 170 < 0.10 1.8 0.0646 0.22 < 0.10 0.255 0.17 308 < 1.0 < 1.0 910 2.09 0.0035 28232S/13E-30F03 8/19/2009 672 45 43.1 3.15 111 44.3 290 170 < 0.10 2.5 NA 0.14< 0.10 0.468 0.19 290 < 1.0 < 1.0 980 18.5 0.0042 23732S/13E-30F03 5/12/2009 678 49 44.8 3.32 109 42.9 276 180 NA NA NA 0.17 NA 0.146 0.18 276 < 1.0 < 1.0 960 1.16 0.0037 27232S/13E-30F03 3/27/1996 686 41 40 3.4 109 48 379 197 0.2 NA 0.13 NA NA NA NA NA NANANANANANA32S/13E-30F03 6/7/1976 616 43 41 2.6 96 49 333 190 0.4 NA 0.05 0.5 NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA NA32S/13E-30F03 1/19/1966 642 69 49 4 109 40 321 182 1 NA 0.05 0.3 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-30N01 10/10/2018 920 200 130 36 96 73 370 140 ND 0.62 0.21 0.36 0.0170.14 0.85 370 ND ND 1,500 3.0 0.0043 23532S/13E-30N01 4/11/2018 800 140 110 31 73 55 290 150 ND 0.73 0.2 0.36 0.017 0.1 1.1 290 ND ND 1,280 2.4 0.0079 12732S/13E-30N01 10/11/2017 870 150 120 31 78 57 320 170 ND 0.68 0.24 0.38 0.0190.12 1.5 320 ND ND 1350 3 0.0100 10032S/13E-30N01 4/11/2017 960 260 160 35 92 73 350 150 ND 0.84 0.23 0.42 0.015 0.14 1.5 350 ND ND 1,690 3.9 0.0058 17332S/13E-30N01 10/12/2016 900 180 130 32 77 61 290 180 ND 0.53 0.19 0.34 0.0210.11 1.7 290 ND ND 1420 2.7 0.0094 10632S/13E-30N01 4/12/2016 790 110 110 27 55 46 230 190 0.21 0.5 0.18 0.42 0.0130.1 1.7 230 <8.2 <8.2 1,190 1.7 0.0155 6532S/13E-30N01 10/15/2015 740 120 100 27 52 41 250 190 <0.05 <1 0.18 0.43 0.032 0.072 1.3 250 <10 <10 1,220 1.8 0.0108 9232S/13E-30N01 4/14/2015 930 190 130 28 69 54 360 170 <0.05 1.4 0.23 0.334 0.01 0.087 1.2 360 <10 <10 1,500 2.5 0.0063 15832S/13E-30N01 1/14/2015 845 170 110 29.0 71 54 320 180 <0.05 <1 0.21 0.332 0.01 0.087 1.2 320 <10 <10 1,360 2.3 0.0071 14032S/13E-30N01 10/15/2014 790 140 110 30.0 62 53 300 160 0.68 <1 0.21 0.29 <0.01 0.084 1.2 300 <10 <10 1,350 2.5 0.0086 11732S/13E-30N01 7/30/2014 800 150 110 27.0 61 52 310 160 <0.05 <1 0.81 0.33 0.01 0.081 1.1 310 <10 <10 1,360 2.4 0.0073 13632S/13E-30N01 4/16/2014 850 160 112 26.0 55 43 310 170 <0.05 <1 0.20 0.33 0.01 0.077 1.3 310 <10 <10 1,410 2.4 0.0081 12332S/13E-30N01 1/15/2014 790 154 110 26.0 56 45 260 190 <0.05 <1 0.19 0.41 <0.01 0.077 1.4 260 <10 <10 1,340 2.5 0.0091 11032S/13E-30N01 10/15/2013 950 200 140 32.0 74 60 330 180 <0.05 <1 0.21 0.33 0.01 0.095 1.3 330 <10 <10 1,570 2.8 0.0065 15432S/13E-30N01 7/10/2013 830 175 120 29.0 71 54 310 185 <0.05 <1 0.22 0.32 0.01 0.087 0.84 310 <10 <10 1,430 2.3 0.0048 20832S/13E-30N01 4/10/2013 860 180 120 29.0 67 54 320 180 <0.05 1.1 0.21 0.31 0.01 0.087 1.2 320 <10 <10 1,470 2.5 0.0067 15032S/13E-30N01 1/14/2013 800 170 120 32.0 66 53 280 200 <0.05 1.1 0.22 0.26 <0.01 0.09 1.2 280 <10 <10 1,380 2.5 0.0071 14232S/13E-30N01 10/29/2012 900 180 120 34.0 77 60 300 190 <0.05 <1 0.21 0.40 0.011 0.098 1.2 300 <10 <10 1,500 2.8 0.0067 15032S/13E-30N01 7/23/2012 840 190 120 31.0 56 45 266 200 <0.05 <1 0.22 0.43 <0.01 0.096 1.2 266 <10 <10 1,370 2.3 0.0063 15832S/13E-30N01 4/18/2012 1,050 280 140 31.0 59 47 330 210 <0.1 1.4 0.2 0.50 <0.01 0.078 1.3 330 <10 <10 1,680 2.4 0.0046 21532S/13E-30N01 1/9/2012 1,050 260 170 34.0 68 52 307 200 <0.05 2.7 0.21 0.41 <0.01 0.088 1.9 307 <10 <10 1,760 2.9 0.0073 13732S/13E-30N01 11/17/2011 1,300 360 320 40 90 69 390 220 <0.1 <1 0.23 0.38 0.017 0.11 2.5 390 <10 <10 2,210 3.4 0.0069 14432S/13E-30N01 7/25/2011 1,680 445 230 4299 81 380 255.5 <0.05 1.2 0.21 <0.1<0.01 0.12 3.016 380 <5 <5 2,480 4.2 0.0068 14832S/13E-30N01 4/20/2011 890 210 130 26 68 46 180 215 <0.05 <1 0.24 0.39 0.0130.086 4.57 180 <2.0 <2.0 1,550 NA 0.0218 4632S/13E-30N01 1/24/2011 870 180 100 28 84 46 240 210 <0.05 <1.0 <0.1 0.34 0.12 0.24 3.63 240 <2.0 <2.0 1,430 18 0.0202 5032S/13E-30N01 10/21/2010 890 190 120 26 58 45 246 200 <0.1 <1.0 <0.1 0.37 NA 0.078 2.3 246 <10 <10 1,498 <0.1 0.0121 8332S/13E-30N01 7/27/2010 917 200 130 30.0 75.0 56.2 241 220 < 0.10 < 0.50 0.165 0.29 0.23 0.101 2.8 241 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,400 2.61 0.0140 7132S/13E-30N01 4/27/2010 808 150 130 29 136 55.6 286 210 0.76 1.7 0.171 0.37 0.19 0.276 2.6 286 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,300 20.4 0.0173 5832S/13E-30N01 1/26/2010 902 210 155 33.5 156 66.4 307 230 < 0.10 1.7 0.317 0.30 0.12 0.333 3.2 307 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,500 27.3 0.0152 6632S/13E-30N01 10/20/2009 828 200 159 34.3 118 59.8 238 230 < 0.10 1.3 0.2410.38 < 0.10 0.157 3.2 238 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,300 5.33 0.0160 6332S/13E-30N01 8/20/2009 835 160 150 27.8 121 49.4 235 220 < 0.10 1.3 NA 0.370.12 0.228 2.9 235 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,400 15.9 0.0181 5532S/13E-30N01 5/11/2009 960 180 175 33.5 86.7 46.2 274 220 NA NA NA 0.36 NA 0.113 3.2 274 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,500 2.26 0.0178 56P:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-30N03 10/10/2018 540 68 59 3.4 71 32 150 130 16 ND 0.091 0.21 ND 0.0120.53 150 ND ND 847 0.030 0.0078 12832S/13E-30N03 7/12/2018 550 62 54 3.2 69 31 150 120 15 0.16 0.084 0.17 ND 0.063 0.61 150 ND ND 866 0.076 0.0098 10232S/13E-30N03 4/11/2018 590 62 58 3.3 72 33 150 120 14 0.19 0.094 0.16 ND 0.006 0.51 150 ND ND 839 ND 0.0082 12232S/13E-30N03 1/11/2018 580 64 61 3.3 74 34 150 140 14 0.20 0.088 0.19 ND 0.330.61 150 ND ND 836 0.12 0.0095 10532S/13E-30N03 10/11/2017 580 63 54 3.2 73 33 150 130 15 0.24 0.1 0.16 ND 0.86 0.64 150 ND ND 836 0.59 0.0102 9832S/13E-30N03 7/11/2017 560 64 60 3.2 77 34 150 140 14 0.1 0.089 0.14 ND 0.54 0.66 150 ND ND 871 0.18 0.0103 9732S/13E-30N03 4/11/2017 560 69 62 3.6 82 36 160 140 14 0.12 0.08 0.15 ND 0.62 0.69 160 ND ND 866 0.43 0.0100 10032S/13E-30N03 1/12/2017 580 69 62 3.6 83 38 170 150 14 0.13 0.088 0.13 ND 3.3 0.74 170 ND ND 878 1.5 0.0107 9332S/13E-30N03 10/12/2016 580 68 62 3.5 80 37 170 140 15 ND 0.088 0.16 ND 0.56 0.76 170 ND ND 879 0.17 0.0112 8932S/13E-30N03 7/19/2016 580 66 61 3.6 75 36 160 130 65 0.20 0.084 0.16 <0.0100.030 0.76 160 <4.1 <4.1 864 <0.030 0.0115 8732S/13E-30N03 4/12/2016 610 69 60 3.4 75 36 160 130 64 0.16 0.078 0.18 <0.0100.0095 0.78 160 <4.1 <4.1 895 <0.05 0.0113 8832S/13E-30N03 1/13/2016 570 72 62 3.4 77 35 160 140 15 0.15 0.083 0.22 <0.0100.0089 0.66 160 <4.1 <4.1 867 0.079 0.0092 10932S/13E-30N03 10/15/2015 570 63 54 3.3 69 32 162 130 15 <1 0.0161 0.23 <0.01 0.015 0.56 162 <10 <10 860 <0.05 0.0089 11332S/13E-30N03 7/16/2015 580 65 65 3.0 81 35 160 140 15 15.3 0.079 0.14 0.45 0.011 0.46 160 <10 <10 880 <0.05 0.0071 14132S/13E-30N03 4/14/2015 580 65 49 2.9 65 31 160 140 15.2 <1 0.078 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.47 160 <10 <10 860 <0.05 0.0072 13832S/13E-30N03 1/14/2015 610 68 53 3.0 73 34 170 150 15 <1 0.074 0.151 <0.01 0.0540 0.43 170 <10 <10 870 0.49 0.0063 15832S/13E-30N03 10/15/2014 560 59 52 3.5 67 32 160 130 14 0.54 0.066 0.14 <0.01<0.005 0.452 160 <10 <10 890 <0.05 0.0077 13132S/13E-30N03 7/30/2014 580 65 55 3.2 69 32 170 130 15 <1 <0.1 0.16 <0.01 <0.005 0.34 170 <10 <10 910 <0.05 0.0052 19132S/13E-30N03 4/16/2014 610 63 55 4.3 65 29 170 140 13.00 <1 0.08 0.15 <0.01 0.058 0.38 170 <10 <10 910 <0.05 0.0060 16632S/13E-30N03 1/15/2014 610 66 54 3.2 67 31 170 149 14.8 15 <0.1 0.16 <0.01 0.065 0.46 170 <10 <10 910 0.27 0.0070 14332S/13E-30N03 10/15/2013 580 60 57 3.3 71 32 170 150 14 <1 0.057 0.16 <0.01 0.370 0.41 170 <10 <10 910 0.1 0.0068 14632S/13E-30N03 7/10/2013 590 60 48 3.1 71 31 160 150 15.1 <1 0.074 0.18 <0.01 1.3 0.17 160 <10 <10 900 0.43 0.0028 35332S/13E-30N03 4/10/2013 600 66 53 3.3 69 31 160 150 15 <1 0.11 0.2 <0.01 0.0640.35 160 <10 <10 910 <0.05 0.0053 18932S/13E-30N03 1/14/2013 570 66 55 3.4 68 30 165 150 15 <1 0.093 0.2 <0.01 0.028 0.27 165 <10 <10 900 0.084 0.0041 24432S/13E-30N03 10/29/2012 610 60 56 3.7 74 33 155 148 14 <1 0.081 0.2 <0.01 0.027 0.3 155 <10 <10 900 0.04 0.0050 20032S/13E-30N03 7/23/2012 600 71 56 3.5 61 28 152 200 <0.05 <1 0.1 <0.1 <.002 0.120 0.3 152 <10 <10 890 0.44 0.0042 23732S/13E-30N03 4/18/2012 570 80 47 3.0 57 25 150 150 16 <1 0.1 0.3 <0.01 <0.0050.28 150 <10 <10 880 <0.1 0.0035 28632S/13E-30N03 1/11/2012 570 67 55 3.9 68 30 140 130 14 <1 0.1 0.2 <0.02 0.05100.39 140 <10 <10 870 0.17 0.0058 17232S/13E-30N03 11/21/2011 600 67 47 3.2 64 28 140 130 15 1.2 0.088 0.2 <0.01 <0.005 0.62 140 <10 <10 850 <0.1 0.0093 10832S/13E-30N03 7/25/2011 590 67 47 5.0 54 24 290 139.8 15 <1 <0.1 0.2 <0.01 0.0520 0.79 290 <5 <5 890 0.14 0.0118 8532S/13E-30N03 4/20/2011 580 76 58 4.2 62 23 140 142 16 <1 0.12 0.2 <0.1 0.05100.92 140 <2.0 <2.0 890 NA 0.0121 8332S/13E-30N03 1/24/2011 570 76 48 4.8 55 25 130 130 16 <1.0 0.12 0.2 <0.10 0.0088 1.7 130 <2.0 <2.0 900 <0.1 0.0224 4532S/13E-30N03 10/21/2010 550 69 59 3.3 65 31 133 130 15 <1.0 <0.1 0.1 NA <0.005 1.1 133 <10 <10 886 <0.1 0.0159 6332S/13E-30N03 7/27/2010 528 72 55.1 3.41 68.7 31.0 139 130 15.0 < 0.50 0.0672 0.14 0.11 < 0.00500 1.3 139 < 1.0 < 1.0 860 < 0.100 0.0181 5532S/13E-30N03 4/27/2010 672 89 60.6 3.65 70.6 32.5 134 130 14.0 < 0.50 0.0779 0.18 0.11 < 0.00500 1.2 134 < 1.0 < 1.0 870 < 0.100 0.0135 7432S/13E-30N03 1/26/2010 606 110 75.0 4.51 77.8 34.3 126 130 14 1.4 0.0654 0.15 < 0.10 0.0130 1.3 126 < 1.0 < 1.0 990 0.653 0.0118 8532S/13E-30N03 10/20/2009 806 180 93.3 25.5 92.3 41.5 162 150 9.7 2.2 0.107 0.26 < 0.10 0.245 1.4 162 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 0.344 0.0078 12932S/13E-30N03 8/20/2009 1,070 190 151 61.6 112 44.2 130 130 16 3.4 NA 0.20 < 0.10 0.151 1.6 130 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,700 1.93 0.0084 11932S/13E-30N03 5/12/2009 602 97 63.4 3.96 72.9 32.2 122 120 NA NA NA 0.22 NA 241.2 122 < 1.0 < 1.0 900 2.24 0.0124 8132S/13E-30N03 3/27/1996 624 70 62 4 78 35 150 161 106.8 NA 0.13 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA NA32S/13E-30N03 6/7/1976 705 90 54 2.9 99 43 189 168 112.5 NA 0.08 0.5 NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA NA NA32S/13E-30N03 1/21/1966 804 57 54 3 132 59 410 250 1 NA 0.08 0.5 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-30N02 10/10/2018 940 50 75 4.9 150 64 190 500 0.18 0.16 0.16 0.069 NDND 0.09 190 ND ND 1,340 0.22 0.0017 58132S/13E-30N02 7/12/2018 1,000 47 66 4.5 140 59 190 480 0.19 0.19 0.14 0.099 ND ND 0.12 190 ND ND 1,390 0.17 0.0026 39232S/13E-30N02 4/11/2018 1,100 46 76 4.9 160 65 190 480 0.17 0.15 0.16 0.097 ND 0.007 0.14 190 ND ND 1,350 0.41 0.0030 32932S/13E-30N02 1/11/2018 980 49 77 4.6 150 63 190 510 0.19 0.10 0.15 0.13 ND ND0.16 190 ND ND 1,330 0.2 0.0033 30632S/13E-30N02 10/11/2017 1000 46 70 4.8 160 65 200 510 0.19 0.19 0.17 0.11 ND0.005 0.27 200 ND ND 1340 0.28 0.0059 17032S/13E-30N02 7/11/2017 1,100 49 74 4.8 150 64 190 480 0.2 0.13 0.15 0.08 ND 0.023 0.16 190 ND ND 1,360 2.0 0.0033 30632S/13E-30N02 4/11/2017 980 50 74 4.8 160 64 190 510 0.2 0.12 0.14 0.14 ND ND 0.18 190 ND ND 1,320 0.2 0.0036 27832S/13E-30N02 1/13/2017 980 49 80 5.1 170 69 200 490 0.19 0.12 0.16 0.078 ND 0.011 0.16 200 ND ND 1,340 0.63 0.0033 30632S/13E-30N02 10/12/2016 1,000 50 77 5 160 69 200 500 0.18 ND 0.15 0.11 ND ND 0.27 200 ND ND 1370 ND 0.0054 18532S/13E-30N02 7/19/2016 1,000 48 78 5 160 68 200 500 0.97 0.17 0.15 0.11 <0.010 <0.0040 0.2 200 <8.2 <8.2 1,350 <0.030 0.0042 24032S/13E-30N02 4/12/2016 1,000 44 72 4.8 150 67 190 470 1.0 <0.080 0.14 0.096<0.010 <0.0040 0.21 190 <8.2 <8.2 1,390 <0.030 0.0048 21032S/13E-30N02 1/13/2016 990 48 74 4.9 150 64 190 520 0.27 0.12 0.14 0.22 <0.010 <0.0040 <0.046 190 <8.2 <8.2 1,300 0.041 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 10/15/2015 1,040 47 64 4.6 140 60 192 480 0.72 <1 0.13 0.18 <0.01 <0.005 <0.10 192 <10 <10 1,350 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 7/16/2015 1,030 49 82 4.4 170 70 190 480 1.4 1.52 0.15 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.11 190 <10 <10 1,360 <0.05 0.0022 44532S/13E-30N02 4/14/2015 840 47 61 4.3 130 58 190 500 0.576 <1 0.14 <0.3 <0.01<0.005 <0.3 190 <10 <10 1,330 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 1/14/2015 1,050 50 62 4.2 140 59 190 520 0.40 <1 0.13 0.115 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 190 <10 <10 1,320 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 10/15/2014 1,040 44 65 5.0 140 58 200 440 0.77 <1 0.13 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 200 <10 <10 1,370 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 7/30/2014 1,020 45 66 4.6 140 60 220 470 0.51 <1 0.10 0.13 <0.01 <0.005 <0.4 220 <10 <10 1,340 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 4/16/2014 1,040 46 66 5.0 120 50 190 520 0.47 <1 0.14 0.1 <0.01<0.005 <0.1 190 <10 <10 1,350 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 1/15/2014 1,060 45 60 4.1 120 49 190 477 0.65 1.1 0.13 0.43 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 190 <10 <10 1,370 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 10/15/2013 1,030 46 70 4.9 140 58 190 541 0.46 <1 0.12 0.18 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 190 <10 <10 1,360 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 7/10/2013 1,020 50 61 4.5 140 59 185 500 0.63 <1 0.14 0.12 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 185 <10 <10 1,370 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 4/10/2013 1,080 48 60 4.3 120 52 185 500 0.50 <1 0.15 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 185 <10 <10 1,360 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 1/14/2013 1,010 48 63 4.5 120 53 188 530 0.40 <1 0.14 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 188 <10 <10 1,350 0.07 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 10/29/2012 1,030 40 68 5.0 140 58 180 500 <0.25 <1 0.14 <0.5 <0.01 <0.005 <0.5 180 <10 <10 1,360 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 7/23/2012 1,040 54 63 4.5 110 48 188 510 0.13 <1 0.15 0.15 <0.01 0.01 <0.1 188 <10 <10 1,360 <0.05 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 4/18/2012 990 60 56 4.2 110 47 190 560 0.14 <1 0.12 0.21 <0.01 <0.005 0.28 190 <10 <10 1,360 <0.1 0.0047 21432S/13E-30N02 1/11/2012 1,040 49 64 4.9 130 54 180 460 1.30 <1 0.17 0.16 <0.02 <0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,360 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 11/21/2011 1,020 46 57 4.5 130 54 180 450 0.15 <1 0.15 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,360 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 7/25/2011 1,050 50 81 7.7 150 62 180 479.1 0.15 <1 0.16 0.144 <0.01 0.006 <0.1 180 <5 <5 1,370 0.49 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 4/20/2011 1,030 52 63 5.4 130 44 180 508 0.17 <1 0.19 0.2 <0.01<0.005 <0.1 180 <2.0 <2.0 1,380 NA NA NA32S/13E-30N02 1/24/2011 1,050 50 60 6.4 120 49 190 490 0.24 <1.0 0.17 0.17 <0.10 0.064 <0.1 190 <2.0 <2.0 1,380 0.12 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 10/21/2010 1,040 48 52 3.5 100 45 181 460 0.15 <1.0 <0.1 <0.1 NA <0.005 <0.3 181 <10 <10 1,377 <0.1 NA NA32S/13E-30N02 7/27/2010 777 57 67.6 7.31 141 58.5 190 470 0.3 3.5 0.138 < 0.10 0.11 0.102 0.28 190 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,300 3.43 0.0049 20432S/13E-30N02 4/27/2010 800 93 71.9 12.50 108 46.3 159 300 7.0 3.2 0.123 0.13 0.11 0.0776 0.7 159 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,100 3.27 0.0075 13332S/13E-30N02 2/25/2010 1,000 48 71.4 4.70 141 58.1 195 490 0.16 < 0.50 0.15 0.15 < 0.10 0.0393 0.16 195 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,300 3.30 0.0033 30032S/13E-30N02 2/25/2010 1,010 74 76.9 10.2 138 55.8 195 440 0.13 2.4 0.142 0.16 < 0.10 0.0579 0.24 195 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,400 1.69 0.0032 30832S/13E-30N02 1/26/2010 970 50 74.2 4.77 152 62.2 195 510 0.14 < 0.50 0.1290.11 < 0.10 < 0.00500 0.16 195 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,300 < 0.100 0.0032 31332S/13E-30N02 10/20/2009 2,080 690 274 151 239 101.0 220 400 < 0.10 7.0 0.201 0.16 0.87 0.398 2.0 220 < 1.0 < 1.0 2,800 5.50 0.0029 34532S/13E-30N02 8/20/2009 1,350 500 199 82.2 123 49.0 199 220 6.4 6.3 NA 0.23 0.14 0.339 2.8 199 < 1.0 < 1.0 2,100 4.91 0.0056 17932S/13E-30N02 5/11/2009 1,290 170 129 52 137 66.9 176 470 NA NA NA 0.18 NA 0.128 0.56 176 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,800 5.24 0.0033 30432S/13E-30N02 3/27/1996 1,050 50 71 5.5 145 60 243 516 0.9 NA 0.23 NA NA NA NA NANANANANANANA32S/13E-30N02 6/7/1976 1,093 48 62 4.7 150 60 248 484 0 NA 0.13 0.7 NA NA NA NA NANANANANANA32S/13E-30N02 1/21/1966 1,069 54 71 5 148 63 232 483 0 NA 0.12 0.5 NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-31H10 10/9/2018 590 33 45 5.3 88 54 330 120 ND 0.20 0.075 0.11 0.011 0.16 0.08 330 ND ND 916 6.5 0.0023 42932S/13E-31H10 7/12/2018 510 34 46 6.0 45 54 300 96 ND 0.23 0.080 0.12 0.012 0.12 0.16 300 ND ND 846 3.8 0.0047 21332S/13E-31H10 4/10/2018 690 41 51 3.5 120 55 310 200 ND 0.16 0.089 0.19 0.0160.21 0.15 310 ND ND 1,020 4.7 0.0037 27332S/13E-31H10 1/10/2018 660 35 44 3.3 110 56 350 170 ND 0.23 0.075 0.20 0.0160.2 0.17 350 ND ND 1,020 5.3 0.0049 20632S/13E-31H10 10/11/2017 640 33 41 3.1 120 57 360 160 ND 0.38 0.083 0.18 ND 0.21 0.13 450 89 ND 1070 4.3 0.0039 25432S/13E-31H10 7/11/2017 720 36 48 3.8 120 60 350 170 ND 0.17 0.09 0.15 0.011 0.17 0.13 350 ND ND 1,020 4.7 0.0036 27732S/13E-31H10 4/12/2017 600 39 47 3.4 120 62 340 190 ND ND 0.09 0.19 0.013 0.19 0.22 340 ND ND 1,020 5.2 0.0056 17732S/13E-31H10 1/13/2017 670 34 45 3.4 130 60 370 180 ND 0.16 0.076 0.17 0.0140.22 0.1 370 ND ND 1,020 7.8 0.0029 34032S/13E-31H10 10/12/2016 700 33 40 3.2 120 59 380 170 ND 0.22 0.062 0.18 0.012 0.15 0.12 380 ND ND 1040 5.3 0.0036 27532S/13E-31H10 7/20/2016 630 33 42 4.4 99 57 370 150 <0.096 0.3 0.068 0.14 <0.01 0.19 0.14 370 <8.2 <8.2 991 8.9 0.0042 23632S/13E-31H10 4/13/2016 670 37 46 3.4 120 57 350 180 <0.096 0.21 0.078 0.19 0.011 0.23 0.14 350 <8.2 <8.2 1,030 6.7 0.0038 26432S/13E-31H10 1/13/2016 380 37 49 9.9 6.8 46 170 54 <0.022 0.43 0.044 0.088 0.014 0.084 0.19 210 34 <4.1 603 2.2 0.0051 19532S/13E-31H10 10/14/2015 320 32 33 2.7 17 48 216 68 <0.05 <1 0.089 0.12 0.0160.098 <0.10 227 11 <10 600 1.4 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 7/15/2015 330 34 44 3.4 15 54 195 81 <0.05 <1 0.082 <0.1 <0.01 0.081 <0.1 213 18 <10 610 0.98 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 4/16/2015 660 35 33 2.7 99 48 360 170 <0.05 <1 0.083 0.163 <0.01 0.17 <0.1 360 <10 <10 1,000 4.6 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 1/14/2015 760 55 56 3.0 110 50 300 250 <0.05 <1 0.11 0.159 0.021 0.17 <0.1 300 <10 <10 1,070 4.2 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 10/16/2014 720 41 46 3.7 110 53 330 200 <0.05 <1 0.10 <0.1 <0.01 0.17 <0.1 330 <10 <10 1,090 6.5 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 7/30/2014 660 34 35 2.4 95 49 420 160 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.16 <0.01 0.17 <0.1 420 <10 <10 1,040 6.5 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 4/17/2014 890 55 70 5.4 100 45 250 380 <0.05 <1 0.15 0.12 0.01 0.31 0.13 250 <10 <10 1,260 4.9 0.0024 42332S/13E-31H10 1/16/2014 900 57 66 4.60 110 50 240 360 <0.05 <1 0.180 0.2 0.020.32 <0.1 240 <10 <10 1,260 6.0 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 10/16/2013 690 30 40 3.40 100 49 340 190 <0.05 <1 0.091 0.14 <0.01 0.23 <0.1 340 <10 <10 1,050 7.4 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 7/11/2013 860 60 50 4.40 110 47 240 340 <0.05 <1 0.18 0.15 0.020.28 <0.1 240 <10 <10 1,230 4.9 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 4/11/2013 900 60 69 4.60 110 47 250 350 0.82 <1 0.2 0.12 0.03 0.28 <0.2 250 <10 <10 1,250 5.7 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 1/16/2013 820 66 76 5.00 100 47 260 320 <0.1 <1 0.21 0.13 <0.010.31 <0.2 260 <10 <10 1,230 4.2 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 10/30/2012 780 65 75 4.70 100 46 255 280 <0.05 <1 0.19 0.14 0.04 0.23 <0.1 255 <10 <10 1,190 4 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 7/25/2012 830 76 80 5.30 96 45 250 310 <0.05 <1 0.22 0.15 0.04 0.24 <0.1 250 <10 <10 1,220 6.7 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 4/19/2012 790 87 69 4.50 52 37 250 270 <0.1 <1 0.19 0.21 0.05 0.17 <0.2 250 <10 <10 1,180 4 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 1/12/2012 760 76 85 4.00 79 40 270 190 <0.1 <1 0.23 0.21 0.069 0.23 <0.2 270 <10 <10 1,150 4.8 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 11/21/2011 720 39 38 3.40 96 43 320 180 <0.05 3.5 0.079 0.19 0.013 0.17 <0.1 320 <10 <10 1,050 4.8 NA NA32S/13E-31H10 7/25/2011 760 69 66 6.4080 35 310 208.8 <0.05 <1 0.16 0.17 0.041 0.23 0.199 310 <5 <5 1,170 5.3 0.0029 34832S/13E-31H10 1/24/2011 310 98 22 8.1 34 9.2 19.0 53 <0.05 <1.0 <0.1 0.2 4.420.4 0.63 19.0 <2.0 <2.0 480 10 0.0064 15632S/13E-31H10 10/28/2010 290 81 26 9.3 64 11 160.0 68 <0.1 <1.0 <0.1 0.2 NA 0.85 0.36 160.0 <10 <10 520 38 0.0044 22532S/13E-31H10 7/26/2010 438 85 34.3 1.9361.7 30.4 30.0 210 < 0.10 < 0.50 0.0435 0.58 0.22 1.46 0.32 30.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 690 36 0.0038 26632S/13E-31H10 4/26/2010 560 83 47.7 5.786.1 48.3 62 310 < 0.10 0.84 < 0.02< 0.1 0.56 2.54 0.31 62.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 880 233 0.0037 26832S/13E-31H10 1/27/2010 460 130 45.0 25.4 682 124 112 100 0.56 NA < 0.0200 0.21 0.25 32.4 0.49 112.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 760 4,360 0.0038 26532S/13E-31H10 10/20/2009 362 92 39.6 2.92 19.2 45.1 76.8 110 < 0.10 < 0.500.0697 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.242 0.39 80.0 3.2 < 1.0 590 11.4 0.0042 23632S/13E-31H10 8/19/2009 420 160 48.4 3.37 49.9 20.4 17.6 54 < 0.10 1.1 NA < 0.10 0.25 1.76 0.68 17.6 < 1.0 < 1.0 690 242 0.0043 23532S/13E-31H10 5/16/1983 665 35 40 NA 85 65 360 90 < 4 NA NA 0.2 NA 0.01 NA 360 NDND 950 0.10 NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-31H11 10/9/2018 720 37 49 3.8 130 59 340 210 ND 0.24 0.091 0.15 0.0150.23 0.08 340 ND ND 1,090 8.2 0.0021 48132S/13E-31H11 7/12/2018 720 36 43 3.6 120 54 340 190 ND 0.27 0.082 0.17 0.0140.25 0.15 340 ND ND 1,110 7.2 0.0042 24032S/13E-31H11 4/10/2018 780 73 81 3.8 110 47 300 210 ND 0.090 0.17 0.18 0.0660.24 0.40 300 ND ND 1,130 7.3 0.0055 18332S/13E-31H11 1/10/2018 750 39 51 3.7 130 57 340 220 ND 0.17 0.089 0.20 0.0210.28 0.16 340 ND ND 1,090 5.9 0.0041 24432S/13E-31H11 10/11/2017 720 38 45 3.7 120 56 350 200 ND 0.22 0.13 0.18 0.0150.22 0.14 350 ND ND 1080 5.6 0.0037 27132S/13E-31H11 7/11/2017 820 43 53 3.9 130 58 320 230 ND 0.11 0.11 0.13 0.018 0.29 0.19 320 ND ND 1,100 9.7 0.0044 22632S/13E-31H11 4/12/2017 720 45 53 3.8 120 56 320 250 ND ND 0.11 0.17 0.022 0.25 0.18 320 ND ND 1,100 6.3 0.0040 25032S/13E-31H11 1/13/2017 750 44 57 4 13058 340 240 ND 0.11 0.11 0.13 0.024 0.29 0.15 340 ND ND 1,100 7.20 0.0034 29332S/13E-31H11 10/12/2016 780 41 49 3.9 120 57 350 220 ND 0.12 0.097 0.16 0.021 0.28 0.16 350 ND ND 1100 8.10 0.0039 25632S/13E-31H11 7/20/2016 420 120 64 6.8 4.3 38 60 39 <0.096 0.097 0.12 0.059 0.084 0.084 0.59 89 29 <4.1 617 9.0 0.0049 20332S/13E-31H11 4/13/2016 410 110 64 604 3.9 40 51 56 <0.096 <0.080 0.11 0.0580.084 0.053 0.58 92 41 <4.1 628 6.7 0.0053 19032S/13E-31H11 1/13/2016 450 120 70 7.7 4.5 36 49 65 <0.022 <0.080 0.11 0.0950.11 0.072 0.76 86 37 <4.1 675 8.6 0.0063 15832S/13E-31H11 10/14/2015 350 110 69 9.2 3.7 31 42 74 <0.05 <1 0.16 <0.10 0.099 0.036 0.44 75 33 <10 670 5.7 0.0040 25032S/13E-31H11 7/15/2015 380 120 85 11.0 4.3 35 40 85 <0.05 <1 0.19 <0.1 0.1 0.05 0.409 65 25 <10 690 9.6 0.0034 29332S/13E-31H11 4/16/2015 400 120 66 7.6 4.9 36 54 100 <0.05 <1 0.17 <0.1 0.0880.039 0.481 76 22 <10 700 6.6 0.0040 24932S/13E-31H11 1/14/2015 420 125 68 7.0 6.4 37 45 126 <0.05 <1 0.15 <0.1 0.0970.038 0.39 65 20 <10 720 3.5 0.0031 32532S/13E-31H11 10/16/2014 370 120 78 13.0 4.2 29 53 77 <0.05 <1 0.17 <0.1 0.110.040 0.35 88 <10 <10 740 4.5 0.0029 34332S/13E-31H11 7/30/2014 450 120 71 4.4 9.6 43 53 130 0.13 <1 0.15 0.12 0.1 0.078 0.29 73 20 <10 800 8 0.0024 41432S/13E-31H11 4/17/2014 370 120 89 14.0 2.4 17 76 39 <0.05 <1 0.16 <0.1 0.12 0.03 0.43 121 45 <10 720 3.7 0.0036 27932S/13E-31H11 1/16/2014 350 122 89 15 2 18 68 42 <0.05 <1 0.17 0.1 0.09 0.026 0.48 125 57.5 <10 710 2.3 0.0039 25432S/13E-31H11 10/16/2013 360 100 98 20 3.1 15 66 36 <0.05 <1 0.19 <0.1 0.11 0.057 0.38 139 73 <10 710 4.1 0.0038 26332S/13E-31H11 7/11/2013 370 140 70 6.3 4 23 82 40 0.4 <1 0.2 0.11 0.11 0.043 0.44 117 35 <10 730 3.2 0.0031 31832S/13E-31H11 4/11/2013 340 90 81 14 2.9 18 78 30 <0.05 <1 0.19 0.12 0.07 0.046 0.3 155 77.5 <10 650 3.2 0.0033 30032S/13E-31H11 1/16/2013 360 107 99 7.1 3.3 24 110 36 <0.05 <1 0.25 <0.1 <0.010.048 0.4 165 55 <10 720 3.7 0.0037 26832S/13E-31H11 10/30/2012 380 97 100 6.4 4.5 24 130 38 <0.05 <1 0.28 <0.1 0.1 0.09 0.2 168 38 <10 720 6.1 0.0021 48532S/13E-31H11 7/25/2012 240 49 56 11 5.4 22 99 43 <0.05 <1 0.16 0.19 0.023 0.11 <0.1 132 33 <10 470 6.6 NA NA32S/13E-31H11 4/19/2012 380 100 87 5.5 3.5 26 150 79 <0.1 <1 0.27 0.26 0.09 0.033 0.68 180 30 <10 750 1.6 0.0068 14732S/13E-31H11 1/12/2012 480 96 110 4.9 5.6 33 154 95 <0.1 <1 0.28 <0.2 0.11 0.01 0.306 180 26 <10 850 0.2 0.0032 31432S/13E-31H11 11/21/2011 390 90 78 4.6 5.2 24 111 86 <0.05 <1 0.19 0.13 0.0920.014 0.28 128 17 <10 720 0.5 0.0031 32132S/13E-31H11 7/25/2011 260 29 23 5.3 8.7 20 84 80 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.199 0.072 0.041 <0.1 89 <5 <5 440 2.7 NA NA32S/13E-31H11 4/21/2011 580 118 70 19 49 17 8.8 274 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.29 0.109 0.091 0.4 11.3 2.5 <2.0 950 NA 0.0034 29532S/13E-31H11 1/24/2011 680 110 60 17 64 22 5.0 330 <0.05 <1.0 <0.1 0.22 0.960.16 0.31 11.2 6.2 <2.0 1,040 10.0 0.0028 35532S/13E-31H11 10/21/2010 770 100 68 12 88 31 14.0 380 <0.1 <1.0 <0.1 0.28 NA 0.054 <0.3 14.0 <10 <10 1,163 2.2 NA NA32S/13E-31H11 7/26/2010 783 130 80.1 8.58 142 42.0 2.8 450 < 0.10 < 0.50 < 0.0200 0.26 0.31 3.97 0.8 2.8 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 593 0.0059 16932S/13E-31H11 4/26/2010 1,130 160 70.2 6.48 208 50.7 8.4 530 < 0.10 0.56 < 0.02 0.23 0.54 3.10 1.0 8.4 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,600 383 0.0061 16532S/13E-31H11 1/27/2010 1,740 430 55.6 4.98 282 43.0 < 1.0 680 < 0.10 < 0.50 0.0819 0.14 0.41 9.41 2.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 2,300 170 0.0047 21532S/13E-31H11 10/20/2009 2,250 1,000 19.5 2.40 487 22.5 5.0 410 < 0.10 0.98 0.0532 0.13 < 0.10 13.1 4.5 5.0 < 1.0 < 1.0 3,100 236 0.0045 22232S/13E-31H11 8/19/2009 322 150 93.2 16.7 23.9 12.1 3.0 4.0 < 0.10 1.3 NA 0.19 0.5 0.7 0.74 23.0 20.0 < 1.0 640 153 0.0049 20332S/13E-31H11 5/16/1983 840 80 90 NA 100 50 250 160.0 < 4 NA ND 0.2 NA 0.14 NA 250.0 ND ND 1,200 0.10 NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-31H12 4/21/2011 410 97 100 7.2 3.5 21 80 134 <0.05 <1 0.23 0.18 0.0970.065 0.42 100 20 <2.0 770 NA 0.0043 23132S/13E-31H12 1/24/2011 440 92 90 9.2 3.4 27 90 140 <0.05 <1.0 0.25 0.11 0.940.041 0.35 110 20 <2.0 810 2.2 0.0038 26332S/13E-31H12 10/21/2010 460 90 110 15 6.8 32 94 140 <0.1 <1.0 0.2 0.1 NA 0.1 0.38 124 30 <10 868 3.5 0.0042 23732S/13E-31H12 7/26/2010 478 83 109 5.9452.9 30.4 122.0 94 < 0.10 <0.50 0.255 < 0.10 0.41 0.477 0.56 130.0 8.0 < 1.0 730 61.0 0.0067 14832S/13E-31H12 4/26/2010 452 83 83 7.42 29.3 34.5 72.0 190 < 0.1 0.56 0.134 < 0.10 0.65 0.702 0.4 86.0 14.0 < 1.0 810 71.0 0.0048 20832S/13E-31H12 1/27/2010 496 71 92.2 10.6 22.9 39.1 13.0 230 <0.10 < 0.50 0.323 < 0.10 0.20 0.604 0.29 51.0 38.0 < 1.0 780 54.4 0.0041 24532S/13E-31H12 10/20/2009 564 71 80.8 8.63 33.2 49.8 49.6 310 <0.10 < 0.50 0.148 < 0.10 < 0.10 0.337 0.32 64.0 14.4 < 1.0 850 20.0 0.0045 22232S/13E-31H12 8/19/2009 522 180 148 71.6 95.2 8.42 30.0 3.5 <0.10 1.7 NA 0.24 0.52 2.36 0.76 170 140 < 1.0 1,000 278 0.0042 23732S/13E-31H12 5/16/1983 630 40 40 NA 90 50 330 80 < 4 NA NA 0.1 NA 0.02 NA 330 NDND 900 0.05 NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-31H09 10/9/2018 690 42 46 2.7 110 54 360 170 0.03 0.15 0.067 0.11 0.017 0.035 0.09 360 ND ND 1,080 0.042 0.0022 44732S/13E-31H09 7/10/2018 630 46 47 2.6 120 53 360 170 ND 0.11 0.073 0.13 0.0180.032 0.17 360 ND ND 1,100 0.041 0.0037 27132S/13E-31H09 4/10/2018 700 44 45 2.5 110 51 360 170 0.074 0.11 0.068 0.13 0.016 0.035 0.17 360 ND ND 1,060 0.10 0.0039 25932S/13E-31H09 1/10/2018 680 40 46 2.6 120 53 360 160 ND 0.14 0.062 0.16 0.0190.048 0.14 360 ND ND 1,040 0.38 0.0035 28632S/13E-31H09 10/11/2017 640 40 47 2.6 120 55 370 160 0.024 0.12 0.079 0.13 0.016 0.046 0.13 370 ND ND 1020 0.34 0.0033 30832S/13E-31H09 7/11/2017 750 40 48 2.8 120 56 360 170 ND ND 0.075 0.11 0.015 0.057 0.15 360 ND ND 1,050 0.42 0.0038 26732S/13E-31H09 4/12/2017 620 42 52 3.1 130 60 360 170 0.037 ND 0.082 0.17 0.017 0.05 0.14 360 ND ND 1,040 0.30 0.0033 30032S/13E-31H091/11/2017 640 61 53 3 100 48 320 150 ND ND 0.071 0.16 0.02 0.05 0.24 320 ND ND 9760.40 0.0039 25432S/13E-31H09 10/12/2016 720 46 49 2.8 120 56 370 170 0.029 0.18 0.069 0.12 0.021 0.041 0.18 370 ND ND 1070 0.36 0.0039 25632S/13E-31H09 7/20/2016 680 45 50 2.9 120 56 370 160 0.18 0.14 0.075 0.15 0.013 0.049 0.16 370 <8.2 <8.2 1,060 0.33 0.0036 28132S/13E-31H09 4/13/2016 670 43 48 2.9 110 57 350 160 <0.096 0.2 0.062 0.14 0.012 0.056 0.18 350 <8.2 <8.2 1,040 0.46 0.0042 23932S/13E-31H09 1/12/2016 630 48 48 2.8 110 54 350 180 0.051 0.14 0.042 0.24 0.017 0.047 0.36 350 <8.2 <8.2 1,100 0.46 0.0075 13332S/13E-31H09 10/14/2015 680 43 44 3.1 100 50 360 160 <0.05 <1 0.089 0.28 0.02 0.033 <0.10 360 <10 <10 1,060 0.18 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 7/15/2015 680 43 52 2.4 120 56 360 170 <0.05 <1 0.079 0.11 0.010.033 <0.1 360 <10 <10 1,070 0.13 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 4/16/2015 680 49 41 2.4 100 47 350 170 <0.05 <1 0.068 0.114 <0.01 0.039 <0.1 350 <10 <10 1,030 0.47 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 10/16/2014 670 40 43 2.8 110 50 3500 150 <0.05 <1 0.055 0.103 <0.01 0.03 <0.1 350 <10 <10 1,060 0.064 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 7/30/2014 670 43 43 2.2 110 48 360 160 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.15 <0.010.029 <0.1 360 <10 <10 1,070 0.057 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 4/15/2014 680 42 43 3.3 87 43 340 170 <0.05 <1 0.09 0.11 <0.01 0.023 <0.1 340 <10 <10 1,070 0.05 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 1/16/2014 680 45 42 2.6 100 46 360 171 <0.05 <1 <0.05 0.13 <0.01 0.032 <0.1 360 <10 <10 1,060 0.18 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 10/16/2013 670 40 44 2.6 100 47 350 180 0.47 <1 <0.05 0.15 <0.01 0.03 <0.1 350 <10 <10 1,053 0.11 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 7/10/2013 670 44 43 2.8 110 52 350 180 <0.05 <1 0.072 0.12 <0.01 0.032 <0.1 350 <10 <10 1,070 0.11 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 4/11/2013 720 43 40 2.7 98 46 350 170 <0.05 <1 0.072 0.14 <0.010.029 <0.1 350 <10 <10 1,070 0.12 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 1/16/2013 660 43 43 2.7 100 47 360 180 <0.05 <1 0.07 0.1 <0.01 0.031 <0.1 360 <10 <10 1,060 0.130 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 10/30/2012 660 40 44 2.9 110 49 345 170 <0.05 <1 0.071 0.14 <0.01 0.03 <0.1 345 <10 <10 1,070 0.086 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 7/24/2012 700 47 44 2.8 93 45 356 180 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.17 <0.01 0.029 <0.1 356 <10 <10 1,070 0.660 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 4/25/2012 680 48 44 2.7 95 43 350 200 <0.1 <1 <0.1 0.26 <0.01 0.032 <0.2 350 <10 <10 1,070 0.200 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 1/10/2012 690 45 44 2.6 100 44 340 160 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.2 <0.01 0.024 <0.1 340 <10 <10 1,070 0.100 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 11/22/2011 690 41 39 2.7 100 46 350 160 <0.1 <1 0.046 <0.2 0.013 0.03 <0.2 350 <10 <10 1,010 0.0 NA NA32S/13E-31H09 7/25/2011 690 44 39 4.5 86 40 340 166.9 <0.05 <1 <0.1 0.145 <0.01 0.026 <0.1 340 <5 <5 1,070 <0.1 NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l32S/13E-31H13 10/9/2018 400 84 79 4.2 4.9 43 190 13 ND 0.052 0.16 0.043 0.0450.083 0.18 220 23 ND 678 2.1 0.0021 46732S/13E-31H13 7/12/2018 470 81 72 3.9 3.9 38 190 13 ND 0.096 0.14 0.041 0.0450.064 0.31 220 25 ND 699 0.86 0.0038 26132S/13E-31H13 4/10/2018 490 82 78 3.8 4.5 44 190 20 ND ND 0.14 0.039 0.041 0.083 0.30 220 30 ND 676 4.2 0.0037 27332S/13E-31H13 1/10/2018 430 75 75 3.8 4.3 38 190 7.2 ND ND 0.14 0.050 0.046 0.07 0.25 210 26 ND 626 2.5 0.0033 30032S/13E-31H13 10/11/2017 390 77 70 3.7 4.9 38 190 15 ND 0.11 0.16 0.034 0.0390.079 0.28 220 29 ND 648 1.1 0.0036 27532S/13E-31H13 7/11/2017 390 76 80 3.9 7.8 45 190 30 ND ND 0.15 0.033 0.036 0.13 0.28 210 19 ND 680 2.2 0.0037 27132S/13E-31H13 4/12/2017 430 79 87 4.4 4 44180 21 ND 0.13 0.17 0.024 0.043 0.77 0.28 220 40 ND 667 4.5 0.0035 28232S/13E-31H13 1/13/2017 480 81 95 4.7 3.9 41 190 14 ND ND 0.19 0.037 0.056 0.065 0.31 220 33 ND 652 3.3 0.0038 26132S/13E-31H13 10/12/2016 410 80 87 4.3 4.2 43 190 22 ND ND 0.18 0.04 0.055 0.072 0.29 220 33 ND 678 2.3 0.0036 27632S/13E-31H13 7/20/2016 510 91 99 5.1 2.4 34 170 19 <0.096 <0.080 0.22 0.0430.054 0.038 0.43 210 44 <4.1 694 1.2 0.0047 21232S/13E-31H13 4/13/2016 450 94 99 4.6 2.5 33 150 25 <0.096 <0.080 0.22 0.0540.045 0.035 0.44 200 51 <4.1 701 1.2 0.0047 21432S/13E-31H13 1/13/2016 460 99 97 4.8 2.6 32 150 30 <0.022 <0.080 0.19 0.084<0.010 0.038 0.53 190 43 <4.1 717 0.33 0.0054 18732S/13E-31H13 10/14/2015 370 85 91 4.8 3.1 32 159 45 <0.05 <1 0.23 <0.10 0.060 0.043 0.26 189 30 <10 710 0.30 0.0031 32732S/13E-31H13 7/15/2015 390 90 99 4.4 2.7 34 145 55 <0.05 <1 0.21 <0.1 0.06 0.034 0.24 185 40 <10 730 0.24 0.0027 37532S/13E-31H13 4/16/2015 360 89 86 4.8 2.6 31 137 58 <0.05 <1 0.20 <0.1 0.057 0.030 0.266 172 35 <10 680 0.42 0.0030 33532S/13E-31H13 1/14/2015 390 90 84 4.8 2 31 140 61 <0.05 <1 0.18 <0.1 0.059 0.035 0.24 170 30 <10 670 0.47 0.0026 38332S/13E-31H13 10/16/2014 370 80 84 5.0 3.2 32 146 59 <0.05 <1 0.19 <0.1 0.0550.044 0.18 170 24 <10 720 0.61 0.0023 44432S/13E-31H13 7/30/2014 380 86 81 4.2 3.6 35 158 61 <0.05 <1 0.16 <0.1 0.05 0.047 0.17 175 17 <10 730 0.25 0.0020 50632S/13E-31H13 4/17/2014 380 84 86 5.2 3 26 120 87 <0.05 <1 0.18 <0.1 0.08 0.032 0.3 143 23 <10 730 0.45 0.0036 28032S/13E-31H13 1/16/2014 390 89 91 5.0 4.1 34 119 103 <0.05 <1 0.20 <0.1 0.06 0.043 0.34 136 17 <10 740 0.30 0.0038 26232S/13E-31H13 10/16/2013 410 84 87 4.7 5.3 33 114 130 <0.05 <1 0.17 <0.1 0.080.053 0.3 124 10 <10 760 0.28 0.0036 28032S/13E-31H13 7/11/2013 420 80 70 4.8 4.5 35 116 120 <0.05 <1 0.19 <0.1 0.06 0.047 0.21 136 20 <10 760 0.19 0.0026 38132S/13E-31H13 4/11/2013 450 77 77 4.7 5.8 38 113 150 <0.05 <1 0.19 <0.1 0.06 0.069 0.2 128 15 <10 780 0.15 0.0026 38532S/13E-31H13 1/15/2013 420 74 78 4.7 7.0 40 110 180 <0.05 <1 0.18 <0.1 <0.010.087 <0.1 125 15 <10 810 0.55 NA NA32S/13E-31H13 10/30/2012 380 88 99 5.7 3.3 30 160 63 <0.05 <1 0.25 <0.1 0.08 0.035 0.3 168 7.5 <10 740 0.33 0.0034 29332S/13E-31H13 7/25/2012 390 108 107 5.5 2.7 29 13 66 <0.05 <1 0.28 <0.1 0.0790.0037 0.23 168 155 <10 750 0.84 0.0021 47032S/13E-31H13 4/19/2012 390 110 83 4.3 2.5 26 400 68 <0.1 <1 0.22 0.23 0.09 0.032 0.39 420 20 <10 790 0.24 0.0035 28232S/13E-31H13 1/12/2012 410 94 95 4.5 3.0 28 300 68 <0.1 <1 0.24 <0.2 0.1 0.032 0.31 320 20 <10 760 0.89 0.0033 30332S/13E-31H13 11/21/2011 410 94 83 4.6 3.4 30 152 72 <0.05 <1 0.21 <0.1 0.09 0.035 0.3 160 8 <10 730 0.65 0.0032 31332S/13E-31H13 7/25/2011 420 90 84 7.1 4.4 31 148 91.8 <0.05 <1 0.20 <0.1 0.071 0.046 0.297 150 2.5 <5 760 1.90 0.0033 30232S/13E-31H13 4/21/2011 380 88 110 6.3 4.0 27 140 101 <0.05 <1 0.41 0.14 0.070.13 0.33 140 <2.0 <2.0 750 N/A 0.0038 26732S/13E-31H13 1/24/2011 430 83 73 6 6.3 31 160 100 <0.05 <1.0 0.22 0.11 0.66 0.078 0.28 160 <2.0 <2.0 780 0.49 0.0034 29632S/13E-31H13 10/21/2010 410 87 100 3.9 6.0 33 148 100 <0.1 <1.0 0.14 <0.1 NA0.087 <0.3 148 <10 <10 796 0.66 NA NA32S/13E-31H13 7/26/2010 446 94 93.0 8.8110.2 32.0 38.4 120 < 0.10 < 0.50 0.142 < 0.10 0.32 0.196 0.48 56.0 17.6 < 1.0 700 22.4 0.0051 19632S/13E-31H13 4/26/2010 416 96 87.6 9.86 14.8 37.1 46.0 150 < 0.1 0.63 0.132 < 0.10 0.39 0.579 0.44 58.0 12.0 < 1.0 780 56.2 0.0046 21832S/13E-31H13 1/27/2010 498 89 79.6 10.215.6 38.0 31.0 180 < 0.10 0.56 0.132 < 0.10 0.19 0.283 0.38 51.0 20.0 < 1.0 810 23.6 0.0043 23432S/13E-31H13 10/20/2009 446 100 97.1 12.8 16.4 37.9 26.6 180 < 0.10 0.56 0.168 0.2 < 0.10 0.180 0.42 42.6 16.0 < 1.0 760 18.9 0.0042 23832S/13E-31H13 8/19/2009 426 160 101 18.9 93.2 29.1 64.4 36 < 0.10 0.98 NA 0.2 0.31 5.490 0.60 84.4 20.0 < 1.0 790 682 0.0038 26732S/13E-31H13 5/16/1983 770 60 70 NA 90 70 330 120 9 NA NA 0.1 NA 0.02 NA 330 ND ND 1,100 0.24 NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l12N/36W-36L01 10/10/2018 850 38 67 3.5 140 49 180 430 0.43 0.16 0.16 0.03 ND ND ND 180 ND ND 1,190 0.19 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/10/2018 960 39 64 3.4 130 47 180 430 0.50 0.11 0.17 0.12 ND ND0.063 180 ND ND 1,230 ND 0.0016 61912N/36W-36L01 4/11/2018 900 39 70 3.5 140 49 180 430 0.48 0.11 0.16 0.052 ND ND 0.10 180 ND ND 1,190 ND 0.0026 39012N/36W-36L01 1/11/2018 940 38 76 3.5 140 50 180 440 0.37 0.19 0.17 0.073 ND ND 0.097 180 ND ND 1,180 ND 0.0026 39212N/36W-36L01 10/11/2017 880 35 65 3.7 140 50 190 430 0.43 0.14 0.19 0.048 ND0.054 ND 190 ND ND 1210 0.23 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/12/2017 1,000 37 73 3.9 150 55 180 420 0.36 0.15 0.17 0.034 ND 0.0048 ND 180 ND ND 1,180 0.23 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 4/12/2017 860 37 73 4 130 49 180 420 0.45 0.14 0.17 0.017 ND 0.0087 0.06 180 ND ND 1,170 0.43 0.0017 59712N/36W-36L01 1/12/2017 870 38 76 3.8 150 55 190 430 0.46 0.12 0.21 0.036 ND ND 0.07 190 ND ND 1,180 0.11 0.0018 54312N/36W-36L01 10/12/2016 890 35 72 3.8 140 56 190 430 0.42 0.11 0.17 0.036 NDND 0.12 190 ND ND 1220 0.037 0.0034 29212N/36W-36L01 7/19/2016 920 37 69 3.6 130 50 180 430 1.9 0.25 0.15 0.043 <0.010 <0.0040 0.10 180 <8.2 <8.2 1,200 <0.030 0.0027 37012N/36W-36L01 4/12/2016 860 38 65 3.5 130 49 180 390 2.0 <0.080 0.16 0.036 <0.010 <0.0040 0.12 180 <8.2 <8.2 1,210 <0.05 0.0032 31712N/36W-36L01 1/14/2016 890 36 64 3.4 130 49 180 410 0.47 <0.080 0.15 0.062 <0.010 <0.0040 0.10 180 <8.2 <8.2 1,210 0.070 0.0028 36012N/36W-36L01 10/15/2015 920 37 63 4.2 120 47 180 400 0.68 <1 0.15 <0.20 <0.01 <0.005 <0.20 180 <10 <10 1,210 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/16/2015 930 39 74 2.8 140 50 180 410 1.2 <1 0.15 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 180 <10 <10 1,210 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 4/14/2015 890 38 55 3.1 110 44 180 440 0.759 1.0 0.16 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,160 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 1/13/2015 880 39 59 3.0 120 45 180 440 0.584 <1 0.14 <0.1 <0.01<0.005 <0.1 180 <10 <10 1,160 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 10/15/2014 910 34 58 3.7 120 43 180 380 0.950 <1 0.14 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,210 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/30/2014 890 36 61 3.2 120 47 180 390 0.603 <1 0.12 <0.2 <0.01<0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,220 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 4/16/2014 910 36 46 2.6 76 27 180 440 0.77 <1 0.15 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 180 <10 <10 1,200 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 1/16/2014 910 35 60 3.1 110 42 180 416 1.00 1.1 0.14 <0.2 <0.01<0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,190 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 10/16/2013 910 40 63 4.5 120 43 170 460 0.76 <1 0.13 <0.2 <0.01<0.005 <0.2 170 <10 <10 1,210 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/10/2013 910 39 54 3.2 120 42 175 430 0.78 <1 0.14 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 175 <10 <10 1,210 0.18 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 4/11/2013 890 38 59 3.6 110 43 180 420 0.82 <1 0.16 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,200 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 1/15/2013 870 39 61 3.4 110 41 178 440 0.57 <1 0.15 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 178 <10 <10 1,190 0.13 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 10/31/2012 910 35 66 4.0 130 46 165 400 1.60 <1 0.16 0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.5 165 <10 <10 1,200 <0.05 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/24/2012 880 43 65 3.9 110 41 168 420 <0.05 <1 0.16 <0.1 <0.010.02 <0.1 168 <10 <10 1,190 0.19 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 4/18/2012 880 47 52 3.2 95 36 180 450 0.42 <1 0.12 <0.2 <0.01 <0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,190 <0.1 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 1/11/2012 790 41 64 4.1 120 44 170 380 1.30 <1 0.19 0.18 <0.02 <0.005 <0.2 170 <10 <10 1,190 <0.1 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 11/21/2011 910 39 55 3.5 110 40 180 380 0.37 <1 0.16 <0.2 <0.01<0.005 <0.2 180 <10 <10 1,200 <0.1 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/25/2011 890 41 65 5.7 110 43 170 408.9 0.39 <1 0.15 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 170 <5 <5 1,200 0.024 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 4/21/2011 890 42 61 4.2 100 30 170 415 0.60 <1 0.19 0.07 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 170 <2.0 <2.0 1,200 NA NA NA12N/36W-36L01 1/24/2011 890 41 55 5.1 98 36 180 400 0.50 <1.0 0.20 0.15 <0.10<0.005 <0.1 180 <2.0 <2.0 1,200 <0.1 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 10/21/2010 910 38 76 3.6 130 47 169 400 0.39 <1.0 0.10 <0.1 NA <0.005 <0.3 169 <10 <10 1,213 <0.1 NA NA12N/36W-36L01 7/27/2010 707 36 64.2 3.70 127 47.4 182 420 0.40 < 0.50 0.158< 0.10 < 0.10 < 0.00500 0.11 182 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,100 < 0.100 0.0031 32712N/36W-36L01 4/26/2010 860 42 70.3 4.13 129 48.9 191 400 0.45 0.77 0.223 < 0.1 0.15 0.057 0.14 191 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,100 4.53 0.0033 30012N/36W-36L01 10/21/2009 856 38 72.0 4.64 131 48.2 192 420 0.49 0.84 0.150 0.12 < 0.10 0.0994 0.13 192 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,100 1.68 0.0034 29212N/36W-36L01 8/20/2009 890 39 78.0 4.21 138 48.1 184 390 0.49 0.56 NA < 0.10 < 0.10 0.185 0.14 184 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 2.03 0.0036 27912N/36W-36L01 5/11/2009 832 63 83.8 4.88 111 45.4 204 330 NA NA NA 0.12 NA 0.551 0.22 204 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 4.02 0.0035 28612N/36W-36L01 3/26/1996 882 35 66 4.8 124 47 233 408 2 NA 0.24 NA NA NA NA NA NA NANANANANA12N/36W-36L01 6/8/1976 936 38 72 3.5 130 48 223 423 0.6 NA 0.15 0.7 NA NA NA NA NANANANANANAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l12N/36W-36L02 10/10/2018 840 99 110 7.2 100 46 260 240 ND 2 0.33 0.06 0.13 0.19 0.40 260 ND ND 1,200 5.2 0.0040 24812N/36W-36L02 7/10/2018 800 100 99 5.6 89 41 260 240 ND 2.0 0.33 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.62 260 ND ND 1,260 0.9 0.0062 16112N/36W-36L02 4/11/2018 850 100 110 6.0 96 42 260 230 0.044 1.8 0.32 0.097 0.16 0.17 0.66 260 ND ND 1,210 2.1 0.0066 15212N/36W-36L02 1/11/2018 800 100 110 6.3 97 44 260 230 ND 2.0 0.38 0.12 0.17 0.17 0.65 260 ND ND 1,190 0.51 0.0065 15412N/36W-36L02 10/11/2017 830 100 100 5.9 97 44 280 230 ND 1.8 0.36 0.087 0.130.16 0.66 280 ND ND 1220 0.41 0.0066 15212N/36W-36L02 7/12/2017 940 97 100 6.1 98 45 250 230 ND 2.2 0.32 0.096 0.13 0.16 0.59 250 ND ND 1,200 0.75 0.0061 16412N/36W-36L02 4/12/2017 780 97 120 6.7 98 43 250 240 ND 2.2 0.35 0.082 0.14 0.16 0.51 250 ND ND 1,190 0.77 0.0053 19012N/36W-36L02 1/12/2017 810 94 120 6.6 110 48 270 240 ND 2 0.36 0.08 0.19 0.190.53 270 ND ND 1,200 1.1 0.0056 17712N/36W-36L02 10/12/2016 820 99 120 6.6 110 50 270 240 ND 2 0.35 0.084 0.14 0.17 0.58 270 ND ND 1230 0.1 0.0059 17112N/36W-36L02 7/19/2016 820 97 110 6.2 95 45 270 240 <0.096 2 0.33 0.081 0.1 0.15 0.65 270 <8.2 <0.82 1,220 0.14 0.0067 14912N/36W-36L02 4/12/2016 800 96 100 6 94 44 270 230 <0.096 1.8 0.32 0.12 0.12 0.14 0.81 270 <8.2 <0.82 1,240 0.37 0.0084 11912N/36W-36L02 1/14/2016 860 96 110 6.4 99 47 260 230 <0.018 1.6 0.34 0.10 0.078 0.17 0.65 260 <8.2 <8.2 1,240 1.9 0.0068 14812N/36W-36L02 10/15/2015 800 89 96 6.0 91 0.15 266 230 <0.05 2.2 0.32 0.22 0.098 0.15 0.37 266 <10 <10 1,220 0.32 0.0042 24112N/36W-36L02 7/16/2015 840 97 120 5.9 110 46 260 240 <0.05 2.44 0.34 0.11 0.11 0.15 0.59 260 <10 <10 1,230 0.16 0.0061 16412N/36W-36L02 4/14/2015 800 98 88 5.3 83 39 270 240 <0.05 2.9 0.33 0.104 0.089 0.13 0.380 270 <10 <10 1,180 0.40 0.0039 25812N/36W-36L02 1/13/2015 820 100 91 5.5 86 39 250 250 <0.05 2.2 0.31 0.105 0.09 0.13 0.322 250 <10 <10 1,190 0.077 0.0032 31112N/36W-36L02 10/15/2014 800 88 96 6.4 91 40 260 210 <0.05 2.1 0.32 <0.1 0.092 0.14 0.358 260 <10 <10 1,230 0.12 0.0041 24612N/36W-36L02 7/30/2014 800 98 99 5.8 88 39 280 210 <0.05 2.4 0.28 0.11 0.09 0.14 0.19 280 <10 <10 1,240 0.27 0.0019 51612N/36W-36L02 4/16/2014 820 95 89 6.3 73 31 280 210 <0.05 2.3 0.31 <0.1 0.09 0.13 0.35 280 <10 <10 1,240 0.22 0.0037 27112N/36W-36L02 1/16/2014 800 100 87 5 76 33 270 230 <0.05 2.3 0.31 0.23 0.09 0.14 0.44 270 <10 <10 1,230 0.41 0.0044 22712N/36W-36L02 10/16/2013 810 90 110 6.4 91 40 260 240 <0.05 2.2 0.32 <0.1 0.10.15 0.32 260 <10 <10 1,220 0.54 0.0036 28112N/36W-36L02 7/10/2013 790 105 94 5.8 88 38 260 240 <0.05 2.5 0.34 <0.1 0.080.13 0.11 260 <10 <10 1,240 0.31 0.0010 95512N/36W-36L02 4/11/2013 830 100 99 6.2 83 37 260 220 <0.05 2.2 0.35 <0.1 0.098 0.14 0.45 260 <10 <10 1,240 0.60 0.0045 22212N/36W-36L02 1/15/2013 770 110 110 6.7 84 38 265 220 <0.05 2.8 0.36 <0.1 0.02 0.14 0.20 265 <10 <10 1,240 0.61 0.0018 55012N/36W-36L02 10/31/2012 800 100 120 7.3 90 39 265 200 <0.1 2.4 0.4 0.34 0.120.14 0.34 265 <10 <10 1,250 0.30 0.0034 29412N/36W-36L02 7/24/2012 800 134 125 7.4 83 35 277 200 <0.05 2.3 0.42 0.13 0.12 0.14 0.31 277 <10 <10 1,250 0.52 0.0023 43212N/36W-36L02 4/18/2012 770 130 95 6.2 75 33 270 210 0.42 4 0.35 0.36 0.12 0.13 <0.2 270 <10 <10 1,250 0.77 NA NA12N/36W-36L02 1/11/2012 900 122 110 7.2 95 37 290 170 <0.1 4.8 0.48 0.28 <0.02 0.17 0.45 290 <10 <10 1,250 1.80 0.0037 27112N/36W-36L02 11/21/2011 780 130 95 6.1 77 33 270 160 <0.1 <1 0.4 <0.2 <0.01 0.13 0.45 270 <10 <10 1,240 0.40 0.0035 28912N/36W-36L02 7/25/2011 790 129 110 9.1 74 33 280 177 <0.05 2.3 0.36 0.12 0.14 0.13 0.51 280 <5 <5 1,280 2.30 0.0040 25212N/36W-36L02 4/21/2011 770 120 90 5.3 86 26 280 206 <0.05 2.3 0.24 0.26 0.140.004 0.57 280 <2.0 <2.0 1,270 NA 0.0048 21112N/36W-36L02 1/24/2011 800 120 95 7.6 75 30 300 190 <0.05 2.3 0.39 0.16 1.310.13 0.53 300 <2.0 <2.0 1,270 1.40 0.0044 22612N/36W-36L02 10/21/2010 770 120 130 7.6 89 44 275 160 <0.1 3.4 0.48 <0.1 NA 0.15 0.54 275 <10 <10 1,293 0.12 0.0045 22212N/36W-36L02 7/27/2010 737 110 121 7.81 91.1 38.9 268 190 < 0.10 < 0.50 0.427 0.10 0.77 0.180 0.80 268 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 0.845 0.0073 13812N/36W-36L02 4/26/2010 720 100 116 6.88 85.4 32.4 215 210 1.5 0.77 0.382 0.2 0.28 0.167 0.7 215 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,100 3.870 0.0070 14312N/36W-36L02 10/21/2009 638 99 113 6.1581.6 23.0 172 200 < 0.10 3.2 0.2680.33 57 0.128 0.61 172 < 1.0 < 1.0 940 0.255 0.0062 16212N/36W-36L02 8/20/2009 785 100 131 6.66 89.8 36.6 290 190 < 0.10 3.8 NA 0.15 0.27 0.307 0.75 290 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,200 0.830 0.0075 13312N/36W-36L02 5/11/2009 775 120 132 7.24 84 39.7 294 180 NA NA NA 0.18 NA 0.426 0.78 294 < 1.0 < 1.0 1,300 0.958 0.0065 15412N/36W-36L02 3/26/1996 772 127 130 8.7 86 36 390 148 0.2 NA 0.5 NA NA NA NA NA NANANANANANA12N/36W-36L02 6/8/1976 820 126 118 6.6 94 44 393 184 0 NA NA 0.5 NA NA NA NA NA NANA NA NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019 Appendix A: NCMA Sentry Wells Water Quality DataWell Date TDS Chloride Sodium Potassium Calcium MagnesiumBicarbonate as CaCO3SulfateNitrate(as N)Total Kjeldahl NitrogenBoron Fluoride Iodide Manganese BromideTotal Alkalinity as CaCO3Carbonate as CaCO3Hydroxide as CaCO3Specific ConductivityIronBromide / Chloride RatioChloride / Bromide Ratiomg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l mg/l umhos/cm mg/l12N/35W-32C03 10/9/2018 280 62 64 2.8 14 6.2 50 28 8.4 0.07 0.093 0.031 ND ND 0.13 50 ND ND 446 0.087 0.0021 47712N/35W-32C03 7/10/2018 300 64 60 2.5 13 5.8 54 27 8.5 ND 0.089 0.11 ND ND 0.1854 ND ND 458 0.047 0.0028 35612N/35W-32C03 4/10/2018 320 66 62 2.6 13 6.1 51 30 8.4 ND 0.087 0.047 ND ND 0.23 51 ND ND 450 0.26 0.0035 28712N/35W-32C03 1/10/2018 320 62 67 2.7 14 6.4 50 27 8.2 0.11 0.09 0.073 ND ND 0.20 50 ND ND 438 0.21 0.0032 31012N/35W-32C03 10/11/2017 320 64 63 2.8 14 6.5 53 28 8.4 0.11 0.11 0.04 ND 0.010.17 53 ND ND 445 0.6 0.0027 37612N/35W-32C03 7/11/2017 370 63 71 2.9 16 7 55 28 7.9 ND 0.094 0.035 ND 0.0062 0.21 55 ND ND 450 0.3 0.0033 30012N/35W-32C03 4/11/2017 300 65 66 2.8 14 6.6 52 28 8 ND 0.082 0.038 ND ND 0.19 52 ND ND 442 0.077 0.0029 34212N/35W-32C03 1/13/2017 300 67 72 3 16 7.1 53 29 8.2 ND 0.093 0.033 ND ND 0.21 53 ND ND 449 0.072 0.0031 31912N/35W-32C03 10/13/2016 310 64 68 2.9 14 6.5 53 25 8.1 0.12 0.088 0.08 ND ND 0.18 53 ND ND 433 ND 0.0028 35612N/35W-32C03 7/20/2016 300 66 65 2.8 13 6.4 57 26 35 <0.08 0.087 0.03 <0.010<0.0040 0.16 57 <4.1 <4.1 450 0.039 0.0024 41312N/35W-32C03 4/13/2016 290 65 66 2.8 14 6.5 51 26 36 0.086 0.083 0.039 <0.010 <0.0040 0.22 51 <4.1 <4.1 438 0.08 0.0034 29512N/35W-32C03 1/14/2016 290 69 68 2.9 14 6.3 50 27 8.6 <0.08 0.094 0.083 <0.010 <0.0040 0.16 50 <4.1 <4.1 430 0.079 0.0023 43112N/35W-32C03 10/14/2015 280 61 57 2.6 12 5.8 51 28 8.4 <1 0.090 <0.10 <0.01 <0.005 <0.10 51 <10 <10 430 0.33 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 7/14/2015 280 64 67 2.7 14 6.2 50 30 8.0 <1 0.10 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 50 <10 <10 440 0.22 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 4/15/2015 280 62 52 2.4 12 5.4 51 30 7.8 <1 0.081 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.11 51 <10 <10 420 0.11 0.0018 56412N/35W-32C03 1/14/2015 290 63 56 2.3 13 5.8 51 30 8.2 <1 0.077 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.1 51 <10 <10 420 0.38 0.0016 63012N/35W-32C03 10/16/2014 270 55 54 2.7 13 5.7 51 26 7.3 0.3 0.069 <0.1 <0.01 0.005 <0.1 51 <10 <10 430 0.35 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 7/30/2014 280 60 58 1.9 14 6.5 60 29 7.3 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 <0.1 60 17 <10 450 0.16 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 4/15/2014 270 57 55 2.2 12 5 54 29 7.1 <1 0.096 <0.1 <0.01 <0.005 0.11 54 <10 <10 430 0.21 0.0019 51812N/35W-32C03 1/16/2014 300 62 57 2.8 14 6.3 54 35 8.1 8.2 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.008 0.12 54 <10 <10 450 0.47 0.0019 51712N/35W-32C03 10/16/2013 310 58 62 2.9 15 6.4 54 38 7.5 <1 0.06 <0.1 <0.01 0.009 0.1 54 <10 <10 450 0.21 0.0017 58012N/35W-32C03 7/11/2013 290 60 45 2.4 14 5.9 61 30 7.4 <1 0.071 <0.1 <0.01 0.006 <0.1 61 <10 <10 440 0.17 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 4/12/2013 330 58 55 2.9 16 6.6 60 35 7.5 <1 0.091 <0.1 <0.01 0.019 0.1 60 <10 <10 460 0.49 0.0017 58012N/35W-32C03 1/15/2013 290 62 57 2.8 15 6.3 55 38 8.3 <1 0.089 <0.1 <0.01 0.01 <0.1 55 <10 <10 470 0.23 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 10/30/2012 330 57 60 3.3 19 7.5 60 36 7.8 <1 0.09 <0.1 <0.01 0.033 <0.1 60 <10 <10 470 1.9 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 7/25/2012 330 67 61 3.3 17 6.4 59 35 8.2 <1 <0.1 <0.1 <0.01 0.068 <0.1 59 <10 <10 460 0.49 NA NA12N/35W-32C03 4/19/2012 370 74 52 2.9 30 12 120 58 5 <1 0.17 0.2 <0.01 0.056 <0.2 120 <10 <10 580 1.3 NA NAP:\Portland\672‐Northern Cities Management Area\005‐2018 Annual Report\Water Quality\NCMA_WQ_SentryWells.xlsx1/15/2019