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Citywide Transportation Model and Circulation Study - 2016City of Pismo Beach Citywide Transportation Model and Circulation Study FINAL REPORT 1300 First Street, Suite B Gilroy, CA 95020 T: 408.848.5912 | F: 408.848.2202 www.hatchmott.com Table of Contents 1. Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................1 A. Background .................................................................................................................................................... 1 B. Specific Transportation Issues Facing Pismo Beach ....................................................................................... 6 2. Existing Conditions .................................................................................................................................7 A. Roadway Network .......................................................................................................................................... 7 B. Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation ................................................................................................................. 7 C. Pedestrian Facilities ....................................................................................................................................... 9 D. Bicycle Facilities ........................................................................................................................................... 13 E. Support Facilities .......................................................................................................................................... 17 F. Trip Generators and Attractors .................................................................................................................... 18 G. Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Activity ....................................................................................................... 18 H. Transit .......................................................................................................................................................... 25 I. Parking ......................................................................................................................................................... 27 J. Traffic Operations and Recommendations – Existing Conditions ................................................................ 31 K. Community Participation ............................................................................................................................. 53 3. General Plan Buildout Conditions .......................................................................................................... 57 A. Weekday PM – Volume Derivation .............................................................................................................. 57 B. Summer Sunday and Memorial Day Sunday – Volume Derivation ............................................................. 63 C. Traffic Operations and Recommendations - General Plan Buildout ............................................................ 64 D. Improvements Recommended in Previous Studies ..................................................................................... 75 E. Network Alternatives ................................................................................................................................... 79 F. Regional Highway Improvements .............................................................................................................. 113 4. Recommendations .............................................................................................................................. 115 A. Pedestrian and Bicycle ............................................................................................................................... 115 B. Transit ........................................................................................................................................................ 122 C. Rail .............................................................................................................................................................. 122 D. Parking ....................................................................................................................................................... 122 E. Traffic Operations ...................................................................................................................................... 123 F. Transportation Demand Management ...................................................................................................... 124 5. Public Comments on Recommendations .............................................................................................. 129 6. References ......................................................................................................................................... 130 7. Report Preparation ............................................................................................................................. 132 List of Exhibits 1. Regional Setting of Greater Pismo Beach Area .................................................................................. 2 2. Historical Growth on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at Pismo Creek .............................................................. 4 3. Historical Growth on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at US 101 ....................................................................... 4 4. Historical Growth on US 101 at Pismo Creek ..................................................................................... 5 5. Historical Growth on US 101 North of Price Street ........................................................................... 5 6. Existing Pedestrian Facilities in Pismo Beach ..................................................................................... 11 7. Existing Bicycle Facilities in Pismo Beach ........................................................................................... 15 8. Pedestrian Volumes – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour ................................................................... 19 9. Pedestrian Volumes – Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour ................................................. 20 10. Pedestrian Volumes – Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour ........................................ 21 11. Bicycle Volumes – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour ......................................................................... 22 12. Bicycle Volumes – Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour ....................................................... 23 13. Bicycle Volumes – Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour .............................................. 24 14. Existing Transit Routes in Pismo Beach ............................................................................................. 26 15. Downtown Pismo Beach Parking Space Inventory ............................................................................ 28 16A. Location of Current Public Parking Facilities within Downtown Pismo Beach .................................. 29 16B. Location of Time-Limit On-Street Parking Areas in Downtown Pismo Beach ................................... 29 17A. Greater Pismo Beach Study Area (North) .......................................................................................... 35 17B. Greater Pismo Beach Study Area (South)........................................................................................... 36 18A. Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes ........................................................................................ 37 18B. Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes (Continued) .................................................................... 38 18C. Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes (Continued) .................................................................... 39 18D. Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes (Continued) .................................................................... 40= 19. Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour Volumes ...................................................................... 41 20. Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour Volumes ............................................................. 42 21. Intersection Levels of Service – Existing Conditions .......................................................................... 43-47 22A. Intersection Operations – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour ............................................................. 49 22B. Intersection Operations – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour (Continued) ......................................... 50 23. Intersection Operations – Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour ........................................... 51 24. Intersection Operations – Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour .................................. 52 25. Public Comments from September 2014 Workshop ......................................................................... 54 26. Street Network Issues Discussed at September 2014 Workshop ...................................................... 55 List of Exhibits (Continued) 27. Suggested Future Parking Areas Discussed at September 2014 Workshop ...................................... 56 28. Other Issues Discussed at September 2014 Workshop ..................................................................... 56 29A. Segment Volumes in Greater Pismo Beach Area – Roadways ........................................................... 59-60 29B. Segment Volumes in Greater Pismo Beach Area – Freeways ............................................................ 61 29C. Segment Volumes in Greater Pismo Beach Area – Ramps ................................................................ 62 30. Intersection Levels of Service – General Plan Buildout (Year 2035) .................................................. 66-70 31A. Intersection Operations – General Plan Buildout Weekday PM Peak Hour ...................................... 71 31B. Intersection Operations – General Plan Buildout PM Peak Hour (Continued) .................................. 72 32. Intersection Operations – General Plan Buildout Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour .................... 73 33. Intersection Operations – General Plan Buildout Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour ........... 74 34. Dolliver St. (SR 1) / Price St. Roundabout .......................................................................................... 77 35. Dolliver St. (SR 1) / Price St. Roundabout with Future US 101 SB Onramp ....................................... 78 36. Price Street / James Way Extension Alternatives .............................................................................. 81 37. Projected Traffic Diversions with Price Street Extension (Year 2035) ............................................... 82 38. Intersection LOS – GPBO Weekday PM Peak Hour – With Price Street Extension ........................... 83 39. Five Cities Drive / US 101 SB Ramps – Outlets Main Entrance Improvements with Price Street Extension ....................................................................................... 85 40. Projected Traffic Diversions with James Way Extension (Year 2035) ................................................ 86 41. Frady Lane Improvements ................................................................................................................. 89 42. Projected Traffic Diversions with Frady Lane Realignment and Mattie Road Extension (Year 2035) ...................................................................... 90 43A. Mattie Road Extension Conceptual Plan / Profile .............................................................................. 93 43B. Mattie Road Extension Conceptual Cross Sections – STA 5+00 to STA 20+00 .................................. 94 43C. Mattie Road Extension Conceptual Cross Sections – STA 25+00 to STA 40+00 ................................ 95 44. Mattie Road Area Intersection Levels of Service – General Plan Buildout Weekday PM Peak Hour – With Mattie Road Extension ................................................................... 97 45A. Stimson Ave. / Ocean View Ave. One Way Couplet With Two Eastbound Price St. Through Lanes .................................................................................. 99 45B... Stimson Ave. / Ocean View Ave. One Way Couplet With Two-Way Cycle Track ................................................................................................................ 100 List of Exhibits (Continued) 46. Recommended Pier Area Improvements........................................................................................ … 103 47. Example of a Pedestrian Scramble .................................................................................................... 105 48. Left Turn Pocket Alternatives on Dolliver St. (SR1) ............................................................................ 107 49. Example of Bike Boulevard Pavement Striping .................................................................................. 109 50. Regional Improvement Concept List in Five Cities Area .................................................................... 114 51. Summary of Recommendations........................................................................................................ 116-117 52. Transportation Demand Management Options ............................................................................... 124 53A. Price St. from San Luis Ave. to Pomeroy Ave. - Possible Double Loaded Median Back-In Angled Parking .................................................................. 125 53B. Pomeroy Ave. from Cypress St. to Price St. – Possible Back-In Angled Parking ................................ 126 53C. Hinds Ave. from Cypress St. to Price St. – Possible Back-In Angled Parking ...................................... 127 List of Appendices A. Intersection Traffic Counts B. Level of Service Calculations – Existing Conditions C. Summary of Stakeholder Interviews D. Summary of Public Workshops D1. September 2014 D2. January 2015 E. Citywide Model Volume Plots E1. Existing (Year 2014) E2. General Plan Buildout (Year 2035) with Existing Street Network E3. Model Documentation F. Net Change in Land Use – 2014 vs. 2035 G. General Plan Buildout Volume Adjustment Factors – 2014 vs. 2035 H. Future Sunday Land Use – 2014 vs. 2035 I. Future Statewide Growth Projections J. Level of Service Calculations – General Plan Buildout (Year 2035) Conditions K. Year 2035 Network Alternative Model Volume Plots L. Two-Way Bicycle Lanes – Best Practices M. Pismo Creek Recreational Path – Proposed Alignment N. Transportation Demand Management Report 1. Introduction Pismo Beach is a coastal city in southern San Luis Obispo County, within the “Five Cities” region south of the City of San Luis Obispo. Its population has remained at about 8,000 people since the 1980’s. This is due to the limited expansion that is possible given its geographic location between the Pacific Ocean and the steep coastal mountains. Also during this time, the city has realized an increase in vacation home ownership and a reduction in resident occupied homes. Pismo Creek flows through Price Canyon, which forms a natural barrier between the downtown and the southern part of the city. A rail line – owned by Union Pacific Railroad – also follows Price Canyon and serves as an additional barrier. US 101 provides the only roadway connection across these barriers, although other routes exist outside of Pismo Beach (such as State Route 1 and West Grand Avenue, to the south). Exhibit 1 (Page 2) depicts the location of Pismo Beach in the southern portion of San Luis Obispo County. The city experiences an inundation of traffic during the summer months, especially in its downtown, as well as on weekends, special events and holidays. This is due to the attractive unique small businesses and a classic California coastal city culture, as well as its beachfront and pier, located adjacent to its downtown. Pismo State Beach, in Grover Beach, is the only beach in California that allows vehicles to drive on its sand dunes, attracting thousands of visitors each year. Special events occur frequently in Downtown Pismo Beach throughout the year, including the annual downtown Jazz Festival, The Classic at Pismo Beach Car Show in June, Fourth of July celebrations, and the Clam Festival in October, which attract tens of thousands of visitors per event from across the country. In May 2014 and 2015, the Amgen Tour of California bicycle race started or ended in Downtown Pismo Beach, attracting thousands of visitors and temporarily closing some of the city street network. A. Background Pismo Beach is facing a number of major policy and program decisions that will guide the quality of life, economic vitality, and overall future character of the community, with its transportation system being one key factor. It has updated elements of its General Plan and an update to the Circulation Element is anticipated. The General Plan was last updated in 1992. Much has changed since 1992, including major retail and hotel development along Five Cities Drive, residential and retail development on James Way and residential development along Mattie Road. In addition to land use changes within Pismo Beach, substantial development has occurred throughout the Five Cities Area as well as southern San Luis Obispo and northern Santa Barbara Counties. Other important changes have taken place in our society’s overall approach to providing transportation services for our communities. There is now more emphasis on providing a safer, healthier, friendlier environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. Transit is being enhanced to provide an alternative to automobiles. The interrelationship between land use and transportation in terms of energy consumption and environmental impacts is now officially recognized at the State level, most notably with the passage of Senate Bill 375. In response, the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) recently adopted a Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) as a part of the Regional Transportation Plan. This further encourages the development of transportation modes other than single occupant vehicles as well as compatible land use patterns. Map Source: Google Maps, 2014 Exhibit 1 – Regional Setting of Greater Pismo Beach Area Despite these changes, the population of Pismo Beach itself has remained relatively constant over the past several decades. The 2000 United States Census reported a population of approximately 8,600 people, while the 2010 United States Census reported a population of about 7,700 people. Much of the traffic growth on regional routes through Pismo Beach has been due to through traffic, not only from other Five Cities communities like Grover Beach, Oceano and Arroyo Grande, but also regional travel between Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties and statewide travel between Northern and Southern California. US 101 is the only alternate route to Interstate 5 and Highway 99 for traffic between northern and southern California. This is illustrated by Exhibits 2 through 5 (Pages 4-5), which depict the traffic growth on Dolliver Street (State Route 1, or SR 1) and US 101 between 1980 and 2013, according to Caltrans counts. While traffic has been relatively stable on Dolliver Street (SR 1) over the past 20-plus years, growth on US 101 has been substantial. Traffic volumes on US 101 in the Pismo Beach area are noticeably higher than normal when incidents occur on Interstate 5 such as major accidents or road closures from construction or weather (San Joaquin Valley fog or snow on the Grapevine). SLOCOG has a regional transportation model that forecasts traffic growth in all of San Luis Obispo County. SLOCOG also recently completed the U.S. 101 Corridor Mobility Study, which evaluates the need for U.S. 101 corridor improvements in San Luis Obispo County, including in Pismo Beach. The City has determined that specific circulation issues and alternatives should be evaluated, building on the SLOCOG model and the U.S. 101 Corridor Mobility Study. Therefore, the City has commissioned the preparation of this Citywide Multimodal Transportation Model, which encompasses the City’s current City limits and its Sphere of Influence (SOI). It also includes a Citywide Circulation Study that incorporates community input through a public outreach program and exploration of complete streets transportation improvements to meet the needs of the community. The City has been actively and continuously engaging the community in recent years to address multimodal transportation issues. Public comment, concerns and recommendations have been well documented and helped guide the preparation of the Shell Beach Road Streetscape Plan (Phase I) and Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, and most recently the Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan. This Citywide Multimodal Transportation Model and Circulation Study incorporates these local plans, programs, and projects, as well as regional transportation policies to address circulation and mobility in Pismo Beach. The Plan focuses on automobile, transit, bicycle, and pedestrian mobility in an effort to reduce congestion, vehicle miles traveled and associated emissions, meet diverse socioeconomic and mobility needs, and to advance public health, quality-of-life, and economic prosperity. Exhibit 2 – Historical Growth on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at Pismo Creek Exhibit 3 – Historical Growth on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at US 101 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015Average Annual Daily TrafficYear Dolliver (SR 1) at US 101 AADT 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015Average Annual Daily TrafficYear Dolliver (SR 1) at US 101 AADT Exhibit 4 – Historical Growth on US 101 at Pismo Creek Exhibit 5 – Historical Growth on US 101 North of Price Street Data Source (Exhibits 2 through 5): Caltrans traffic counts, 1980 through 2013. B. Specific Transportation Issues Facing Pismo Beach The City of Pismo Beach has a range of specific transportation goals that are addressed in this study. Several of them are listed below. • Identify major transportation improvement projects. The 1992 General Plan identified a number of major street improvements that will be needed as the City approaches the buildout of the land uses anticipated at the time of that update. These include widening US 101 and Price Canyon Road, US 101 frontage roads to connect the downtown area with Five Cities Drive and/or James Way, various interchange improvements and other street extensions. A variety of studies have been prepared over the years to identify improvements along US 101. These are referred to throughout this document with regard to their relation with current and future travel demand. • Provide a safe, efficient system for pedestrians and bicyclists. Pismo Beach has also been on the leading edge of multi-modal transportation planning, evidenced by the recently adopted Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan, March 2014, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, June 15, 2010 and the City of Pismo Beach Bikeshare Feasibility Study, August 25, 2014 (http://pismobikeshare.com). Summaries are provided of these studies in Section 2.B - Existing Conditions – Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation (page 8). • Promote transit usage by providing better connectivity with existing and proposed transit facilities as well as transit oriented development. The South County Transit Plan, San Luis Obispo County Highway 101 Bus Rapid Transit Applications Study, June 2013, and SLOCOG 2013 Park & Ride Lot Study, August 2013are referenced herein. • Analyze traffic impacts of land use alternatives. The November 2014 election included the City of Pismo Beach Planning Area R Development Standards General Plan Amendment - Measure H, which was approved by Pismo Beach voters in November 2014. Measure H amended the General Plan to limit development on 1,100 acres in Price Canyon area if annexed into the City. The initiative designates the land with "watershed and resource management" zoning, a new category that will be in effect for at least the next 30 years. Land with this zoning restricts parcels to a minimum of 40 acres in size, which yields a maximum of two residential units for this development area. The measure precludes development projects such the Spanish Springs project, which was proposed to consist of hundreds of homes, a hotel, conference center and a nine-hole golf course. With the reduction in development potential in and near Price Canyon, future development in Pismo Beach will be comprised primarily of infill and redevelopment projects within the existing city limits. • Develop strategies and improvements to enhance access to the Downtown and Pier area. Several substantial development projects are in various stages of implementation in the downtown and pier area. One of the challenges will be to reduce the congestion that already occurs in the peak season while providing more convenient access and parking. The Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan provided a valuable start on this effort. 2. Existing Conditions A. Roadway Network As indicated on Exhibit 1 (Page 2), Pismo Beach is located in the southern coastal area of San Luis Obispo County. It is a part of the “Five Cities” region, comprised of Pismo Beach, Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, Shell Beach and Oceano. It is located approximately 10 miles south of the City of San Luis Obispo. US 101 is the backbone for travel to and from the Five Cities region. It also serves as an important route for regional and state-wide travel. It is a four-lane freeway through most of Pismo Beach, with auxiliary (weaving lanes) and truck climbing lanes in specific locations. Interchanges along US 101 in Pismo Beach include Spyglass Drive, Mattie Road (northbound on ramp and off ramp only), Price Street north of downtown (southbound off ramp only), State Route (SR) 1 (southbound off ramp only), Wadsworth Avenue (northbound off ramp only), Hinds Avenue – Price Canyon Road (southbound off ramp only), Price Street south of downtown (northbound off ramp and southbound on ramp only), Five Cities Drive (southbound off ramp and on ramp only), Fourth Street and Oak Park Boulevard. Other routes that provide access into and out of the region include SR 1, Price Canyon Road, Noyes Road, and State Route 227. Within Pismo Beach, there are many arterial and collector roadways that provide local and regional circulation routes. These include Price Street, Shell Beach Road, Mattie Road, Dolliver Street (SR 1), Wadsworth Avenue, Pomeroy Avenue, Hinds Avenue, Fourth Street, James Way, Five Cities Drive and Oak Park Boulevard. The directional designation of the majority of streets in this study is based upon their orientation, i.e., “north- south” streets are roadways that generally travel in a general north-south alignment. However, exceptions include many streets in downtown, where Price, Dolliver (SR 1), and Cypress Streets are designated north-south streets and their cross streets (e.g. Pomeroy Avenue, Hinds Avenue) are designated as east-west streets. B. Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation The climate and topography of Pismo Beach provide an attractive environment for bicycling, walking, and recreational trail use within the City. The primarily level terrain in the downtown area, extending along the Pacific Ocean, combined with its abundant sunshine, low levels of precipitation, and increasingly dense land use pattern, help make bicycling and walking viable transportation and recreational options year-round. The City has made bicycle and pedestrian mobility a priority with adoption of the following plans related to multimodal circulation access and enhancement: Pismo Beach General Plan and Local Coastal Plan (Adopted 1992/Updated 2014) The currently adopted City of Pismo Beach General Plan/Local Coastal Program (City of Pismo Beach, 1992) was originally developed in 1992 and certified in 1993 by the California Coastal Commission. It was most recently updated in April, 2014; however, no changes were made to the Circulation Element at that time. The General Plan guides growth, development, and infrastructure in Pismo Beach and contains elements that address: land use, housing, growth management, transportation and circulation, conservation, design, public facilities and services, parks and recreation, noise and safety. The City’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan is intended to serve as the bicycle, pedestrian, and trails component of the General Plan. Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan (2010) According to the California Streets and Highways Code, Sections 891.2 and 891.4, local agencies must complete a Bicycle Transportation Plan to qualify for Bicycle Transportation Account (BTA) grant funds issued by the California Department of Transportation Division of Local Assistance. Conforming plans must contain required Bicycle Transportation Plan elements and be no more than five years old. The City of Pismo Beach developed the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2010 and updated it in 2015. This plan establishes goals, policies, implementation actions, and priorities for the development of bicycling and walking facilities in Pismo Beach, as envisioned by the General Plan. Key elements of the plan include maps of existing and proposed bicycle facilities and their proximity to major activity centers. The implementation plan identifies project priorities, locations, improvement descriptions, facility types, and cost estimates. The plan will guide development of the proposed improvements. Recommendations from this Plan are summarized in Section 4.A – Recommendations - Pedestrian and Bicycle. Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan (2013) The “Complete Street” Plan provides design concepts, goals and a framework for enhancing Pismo Beach’s street network. The plan area extends approximately five miles through the City from its northern boundary to the City of Grover Beach, and includes Shell Beach Road, Price Street and Dolliver Street (Pacific Coast Highway). The plan directs improvements along this major north-south corridor with the goal of increasing the frequency of bicycle and pedestrian use by enhancing the corridor’s safety, comfort, connectivity and attractiveness. Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan (2014) The City of Pismo Beach prepared the Downtown Strategic Plan as a visioning and guidance tool, developed to help shape future development in the City’s downtown. It incorporates adopted transportation infrastructure and mobility strategies from the General Plan, Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, and the Complete Street Plan. The Downtown Strategic Plan includes suggestions ideas such as a roundabout at the Price Street/Dolliver Street intersection and new bike facilities on Dolliver Street. It also builds on the Complete Street Plan by providing additional pedestrian, bicycle, transit, vehicular, and parking opportunities. City of Pismo Beach Bikeshare Feasibility Study (2014) The Downtown Strategic Plan noted that a bicycle sharing program – where the public can freely use a city- provided bicycle – may be worth pursuing within the downtown area. A feasibility study was subsequently prepared that determined that a bicycle sharing program is feasible, and identified locations in the downtown area that the shared bicycles can be stored. The website http://pismobikeshare.com was also created to educate citizens and tourists about the concept of bike sharing. The City anticipates that a bike sharing program may be operational by 2019. US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan (2014) The San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) sponsored the preparation of the US 101 Mobility Master Plan in partnership with the City of Pismo Beach and other municipalities and agencies in San Luis Obispo County. The purpose was to develop a unified transportation and mobility vision for the US 101 corridor throughout the entire County. The plan contains data and transportation improvement recommendations along US 101 through the City of Pismo Beach; including evaluating opportunities to enhance bicycle and pedestrian connectivity and safety, alleviate traffic in Pismo Beach and improve transit and roadway connectivity. Recommendations from this study that are related to Pismo Beach are included in Section 3.F – Regional Highway Improvements. Statewide Initiatives and Legislation Bicycle and pedestrian planning in the City must strive to be consistent with statewide programs governing the implementation of bicycle and pedestrian transportation facilities. These include:  Assembly Bill 32 (2006) and Senate Bill 375 (2008) Senate Bill 375 (SB 375) (Steinberg, 2008) is the implementation legislation for Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32) (Nunez and Pavley, 2006). AB 32 requires the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) by 28 percent by the year 2020 and by 50 percent by the year 2050. Reducing automobile trips is one method of reducing GHG emissions. This may be achieved by promoting modes other than the automobile, such as walking, bicycling, or riding transit. Land use strategies that create less auto-dependent development is also encouraged.  Assembly Bill 1358 (2007) Assembly Bill 1358 (Leno and Levine, 2007) is the Complete Streets Act. It calls for the inclusion of all modes of transportation (pedestrian, bicycles, transit, and automobile) into the design of roadways.  Assembly Bill 1581 (2012) Assembly Bill 1581 (Wieckowski and Wolk, 2012) requires that new actuated traffic signals or modified existing traffic signals include technology that is able to detect bicycles and motorcycles. It also calls for the timing of actuated traffic signals to account for bicycles.  Caltrans Deputy Directive 64 (Revision 1) DD-64-R1 (2008) Deputy Directive 64-R1 (DD-64-R1) (Caltrans, 2008) was issued to ensure that travelers of all ages and modes may move “safely and efficiently along and across a network of ‘complete streets’.” The directive establishes responsibilities for Caltrans staff to safely accommodate bicyclists, pedestrians, and transit users. C. Pedestrian Facilities Walkability is an important component of every city. Common pedestrian facilities include sidewalks, marked crosswalks, and curb ramps. There are several different types of crosswalk enhancements that aim to improve safety for pedestrians. Exhibit 6 (Page 11) provides the locations of pedestrian facilities within the Pismo Beach Area. SIDEWALKS AND CURB RAMPS Sidewalks typically are at least 4 feet of width in most non-commercial areas throughout the City. Sidewalks are typically 9 to 10 feet wide in the downtown and 6 feet wide in newer subdivisions. Streets in Downtown Pismo Beach generally have sidewalks on both sides of the street, with the exception of parts of Park Avenue (east of Dolliver Street), Addie Street (west of Dolliver Street), and Cypress Street (north of Main Street). There are numerous streets within the City of Pismo Beach where sidewalks are not provided or are intermittently available. These occur primarily in Shell Beach, Pismo Heights, along portions of Mattie Road and within private mobile home parks, parks and gated communities. Curb ramps provide wheelchair and stroller access to sidewalks at corners of intersections. Truncated domes alert visually impaired pedestrians as they approach a street crossing. New standards for the construction of ADA compliant curb ramps have prompted recent renovation of several street corners by the City. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 6 – Existing Pedestrian Facilities in Pismo Beach Source: Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, adopted June 15, 2010. Minor modifications have been made by Hatch Mott MacDonald. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) CROSSWALKS Crosswalks are defined as either “that portion of a roadway included within the prolongation or connection of the boundary lines of sidewalks at intersections” or “any portion of a roadway distinctly indicated for pedestrian crossing by lines or other markings” (California Vehicle Code (CVC) Section 275). Therefore, legal unmarked crossings are those at intersections defined by the prolongation of sidewalk areas. Marked crosswalks feature striping and other enhancements to delineate a street crossing for pedestrians. There are two types of crosswalks: controlled and uncontrolled. At uncontrolled crosswalks, drivers are legally required to yield to pedestrians, but do not have to stop when a pedestrian is not present. Controlled crosswalks are located at intersections with stop signs or traffic signals. D. Bicycle Facilities EXISTING BIKEWAYS AND TRAILS Bicycle facilities can be classified into two types: 1) Bikeways or facilities provided for bicycle travel; and 2) Support facilities for use by bicyclists while travelling or once they have reached their destination. Both types of facilities are described below. The locations of bikeways in Pismo Beach are indicated on Exhibit 7 (Page 15). BIKEWAYS The Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities (American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials [AASHTO], 2011) and Chapter 1000 of the Highway Design Manual (Caltrans, 2015) identify four primary types of bikeways: Class I Bike Paths, Class II Bike Lanes, Class III Bike Routes, and Class IV Bikeways.  Bike Path or Shared Use Path (Class I Bikeway) Off-street bike paths are facilities for use exclusively by bicycles, pedestrians, equestrians, and other non- motorized users, with minimal cross-flow by motor vehicles. They are almost always located in an exclusive right-of-way.  Bike Lane (Class II Bikeway) Bike lanes are areas within paved streets that are identified with striping, stencils, and signs for preferential (semi-exclusive) bicycle use.  Bike Route or Shared Roadways (Class III Bikeway) Shared roadways are on-street routes intended to provide continuity to the bikeway system. Bike routes are designated by signs or pavement marking and are shared by motorists. Many bike routes provide shoulders that can be used by bicyclists or pedestrians.  Cycle Tracks or Separated Bikeway (Class IV Bikeway) Cycle tracks or separated bikeways, also referred to as “Class IV bikeways,” promote active transportation. They provide a separate travel way that is designated exclusively for bicycle travel adjacent to a roadway and are protected from vehicular traffic. Types of separation include, but are not limited to, grade separation, flexible posts, inflexible physical barriers, or on-street parking.  Innovative Bikeways (Including Bicycle Boulevards) The NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide (National Association of City Transportation Officials [NACTO], 2014) includes design guidance for a standardized set of treatments for bicycling streets in the United States. Several of these treatments can be implemented using guidance in the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CAMUTCD) (Caltrans, 2014). The NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide also includes design guidance for a variety of bike lanes, cycle tracks, signal enhancements, intersection enhancements, signing and marking enhancements, and bicycle boulevards. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Source: Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, adopted June 15, 2010 Exhibit 7 – Existing Bikeways in Pismo Beach This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Roadways with bicycle lanes (Class II) in Pismo Beach include Dolliver Street (SR 1/Pacific Coast Highway) through the downtown, Mattie Street and James Way. Bicycle path (Class I) examples include the bike path over Pismo Creek, adjacent to and immediately south of US 101 that connects Price Street and Five Cities Drive as well as along a portion of Mattie Road. E. Support Facilities Support facilities include pedestrian and bicycle bridges and overpasses, short and long-term bicycle parking and gear storage, showers and changing stations, and other amenities not exclusive to, but supportive of walking and bicycling (including wayfinding signage, benches, water fountains and restrooms). The primary examples in Pismo Beach include:  A pedestrian pathway underneath US 101 at Pismo Avenue, connecting the downtown and Bello Street neighborhood. This is currently the only exclusively non-motorized connection across the US 101 freeway in Pismo Beach.  A pedestrian bridge exists across Pismo Creek along Dolliver Street, which connects the downtown area to Pismo State Beach and the mobile home parks south of downtown.  The Cypress Street bridge over Pismo Creek accommodates vehicle and bicycle travel with a separated pedestrian walkway.  Pedestrian access along Price Street and Shell Beach Road, connecting Downtown Pismo Beach to the Shell Beach neighborhood, is maintained through a network of sidewalks and pedestrian pathways.  A promenade, or boardwalk, currently extends along the beachfront from Main Street south to Addie Street. The Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan proposes to extend this promenade to the north, in order to provide a convenient facility to walk between the downtown and the neighborhoods and hotels north of the downtown.  There are multiple companies in Pismo Beach and the surrounding area that offer pedicab rides, rent bicycles (capacity for one and two people) and surreys (capacity for two to four people) to members of the public.  The City of Pismo Beach has prepared a feasibility study to consider initiating a bicycle sharing program. The program would provide bicycles for rent at key locations around the City. REGIONAL CONNECTIONS There is currently no continuous dedicated bicycle or pedestrian facility between San Luis Obispo and the Five Cities region. The Bob Jones Trail currently is a discontinuous multi-use paved pathway along San Luis Obispo Creek in the city of San Luis Obispo and the unincorporated community of Avila Beach. In San Luis Obispo, the trail connects Prado Road near Higuera Street with Los Osos Valley Road at US 101. In Avila Beach, the trail starts at a trailhead and parking lot along Ontario Road north of Avila Beach Drive and extends westward to the intersection of San Juan Street and Avila Beach Road. A connection of these two distinct trails is currently being studied. Within the Five Cities region, the City of Grover Beach published a trail feasibility study in 2010 – Beach Cities Multi-Purpose Trail — to create a new multi-use trail between the unincorporated community of Oceano and eastern Pismo Beach via Pismo State Beach, downtown Pismo Beach, and the Pismo Lakes Ecological Reserve (in southeastern Pismo Beach). This route would be usable by both pedestrians and bicyclists. It is currently not funded and is in need of garnering support throughout the Five Cities Area. F. Trip Generators and Attractors Pismo Beach includes a diversity of land uses that range from high density and pedestrian-focused retail commercial in the downtown area, commercial development along Five Cities Drive and Oak Park Boulevard, medium and low density residential throughout the foothill and ocean side communities, and recreation land uses to the south. Destination areas include multiple City parks, Shell Beach neighborhood commercial and beach access areas, downtown shopping, the beach, and three large shopping areas on the southeast side of the City. The Shell Beach area and downtown are prime bicycling and walking areas given the limited parking during busy periods. Shopping centers located along Five Cities Drive and Oak Park Boulevard in the southeasterly portion of the City have large parking lots, by providing improved bicycling facilities (such as bike racks and bike lockers), they could encourage customers and shopping center employees to travel there by bicycle. G. Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Activity Exhibits 8 through 10 (Pages 19-21) depict the existing pedestrian volumes in Downtown Pismo Beach during the Weekday PM, Summer Sunday Midday, and Memorial Day Sunday Midday (i.e., the Sunday before Memorial Day) peak hours. The corresponding tabular traffic count worksheets are included in Appendix A. The most recent counts indicate that pedestrian activity in the downtown is greatest during the Summer Sunday and Memorial Day Sunday peak hours, with hundreds of pedestrians per hour travelling along and across Dolliver Street (State Route 1 – SR 1) and Pomeroy Avenue to and from the beach, pier, and various small businesses. These large concentrations of pedestrians are a main contributor to the circulation challenges in the downtown. Pedestrian volumes are relatively low outside of the downtown. Pedestrians do not contribute to any vehicle congestion issues in other portions of the city and are generally accommodated by existing sidewalks. The exceptions are locations where sidewalks are not provided. These have been identified in the previously cited Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. Exhibits 11 through 13 (Pages 22-24) depict the existing bicycle volumes in Downtown Pismo Beach under Weekday PM, Sunday Summer Midday, and Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hour conditions. Traffic count worksheets for these volumes are tabulated in Appendix A. Bicycle volumes are relatively low in the downtown. The largest volume was about 20-30 bicycles an hour in each direction on Dolliver Street (SR 1) during the Memorial Day Sunday peak hour. Bicycle use outside of Downtown Pismo Beach is negligible and does not contribute to vehicle congestion. Exhibit 8 – Pedestrian Volumes - Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Exhibit 9 – Pedestrian Volumes - Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour Exhibit 10 – Pedestrian Volumes - Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour Exhibit 11 – Bicycle Volumes - Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Exhibit 12 – Bicycle Volumes - Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour Exhibit 13 – Bicycle Volumes - Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour H. Transit EXISTING TRANSIT SERVICE The San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority (RTA) operates four transit routes through Pismo Beach. Exhibit 14 (Page 26) depicts the transit routes in the Pismo Beach Area. Route 10 is a regional route between San Luis Obispo and Santa Maria, operating hourly on weekdays between roughly 5:45 AM and 8:30 PM in the northbound direction and 6:30 AM and 9:45 PM in the southbound direction. Route 10 also operates every three hours on Saturdays (roughly 7:15 AM – 7:30 PM northbound and 8:30 AM – 8:45 PM southbound) and three trips in each direction on Sundays (between roughly 8:15 AM and 6:45 PM). The only stop along this route in Pismo Beach is at the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets. Approximately 35 passengers were observed exiting from the southbound Route 10 bus on Thursday, March 6, 2014 at 6:00 PM, which represented the evening peak commute period. Route 10 has approximately 1,100 passengers per weekday and approximately 300 passengers per weekend day according to RTA. The remaining routes are contracted through and branded as “South County Transit,” and provide local service within Pismo Beach and to the surrounding communities. Routes 21 and 24 are interlocking routes that travel in opposing directions on overlapping portions of their routes, with Route 21 traveling clockwise and Route 24 traveling counterclockwise. Route 21 serves the communities of Shell Beach, downtown Pismo Beach, the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets, downtown Grover Beach, and eastern Arroyo Grande. Route 24 follows a similar route, except that it also serves downtown Arroyo Grande and does not serve Shell Beach. Both routes operate hourly between approximately 6:30 AM and 6:30 PM. Three or fewer passengers boarded or disembarked the Route 21 and Route 24 buses at 6pm, which is the evening peak commute period. Route 21 has approximately 240 passengers per day and Route 24 has approximately 200 passengers per day according to RTA. Finally, RTA also operates the Avila to Pismo Trolley, a local bus built to look like a trolley car. The trolley only operates between late March and mid-October, with extended service between June and September. During normal operations, the trolley operates hourly between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM on Saturdays and Sundays. During the summer months, the trolley operates from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM on Thursdays through Sundays. It travels between Avila Beach and Pismo Beach, stopping at the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets and many local stops within greater Avila Beach, Shell Beach, and downtown Pismo Beach. The route forms a loop between Avila Beach and Pismo Beach. All of the local bus stops in Shell Beach are bypassed on the way from Pismo Beach Premium Outlets to the outskirts of Avila Beach. The trolley carries approximately 160 passengers per day according to RTA. FUTURE TRANSIT SERVICE SLOCOG has been studying potential upgrades to transit service in the South County for the past few years. In 2011, SLOCOG commissioned the South County Transit Plan, which evaluated current transit service and identified opportunities to expand service and increase revenues. In 2013, SLOCOG studied the establishment of bus rapid transit along the US 101 corridor (San Luis Obispo County Highway 101 Bus Rapid Transit Application Study), including service to the park and ride lot and bus stops at the Pismo Beach Premium Outlets. As a corollary to the bus rapid transit study, SLOCOG also released its 2013 Park & Ride Lot Study in August 2013, which suggested adding a new park and ride facility on Mattie Road near Spyglass Drive and adjacent to US 101. SLOCOG and the City are now evaluating the implementation of this facility. Exhibit 14 – Existing Transit Routes Within Pismo Beach Source: San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority, 2015 EXISTING TRAIN SERVICE A railroad track owned by Union Pacific Railroad extends through Pismo Beach by way of Price Canyon between the greater San Luis Obispo area and Grover Beach. The only roadway crossing of the railroad within Pismo Beach is a grade-separated crossing at US 101. The nearest crossing of the railroad in the vicinity of Pismo Beach is to the south at Grand Avenue in the City of Grover Beach. This is an at-grade crossing near State Route 1. The nearest rail station is adjacent to the Grand Avenue crossing in Grover Beach and is commonly referred to as “The Train Station”. It is serviced four times each day (two northbound and two southbound trains) by the Pacific Surfliner service operated by Amtrak on its route between San Luis Obispo and San Diego. The station also is served three times per day by buses connecting to other train stations along the Pacific Surfliner route and by twice daily, round-trip bus service to the Central Valley and Southern California. I. Parking Pismo Beach, due to its beach front location, is typical of numerous coastal communities in California. It is inundated with guests and visitors that not only increase traffic during the summer months, but also significantly increase parking demand. This, in turn, increases traffic volumes and congestion as drivers circulate the downtown area in search of parking. Improving parking operations will assist the City in improving the experience of visitors to the downtown area. This seasonal swell of traffic and parkers results in high parking occupancies during the seasonal peak periods and very low parking demands during the off-season. The exception is the pier parking lot, which is heavily used throughout the year. These swings in overall downtown parking demand present challenges for how much parking to provide, how to manage the parking and how it is maintained and supported financially. This parking assessment is designed to provide a high level overview of the parking challenges, and recommendations to adjust parking to enhance the traffic, circulation and public parking operations. This parking study is not intended to serve as a detailed, microscopic level parking strategic plan or parking management plan. EXISTING PARKING SUPPLY WITHIN DOWNTOWN PISMO BEACH Exhibit 15 (Page 28) tabulates a parking space inventory of Downtown Pismo Beach. Most parking in Downtown Pismo Beach is on‐street parking – virtually all streets in the downtown allow on-street parking. Approximately 873 parking spaces are on-street parking spaces with seasonal enforcement of time limits. The exceptions are Pomeroy and Hinds Avenues from Dolliver Street [SR 1] to the pier area and Cypress Street from Pomeroy to Hinds Avenues, which all have pay parking year round. A total of 588 spaces are provided in parking lots in the downtown. A small number of parking spaces are located in lots with time limited parking only (e.g. Addie Street at Mary Harrington Park of Dolliver Street (SR 1) and a small lot behind the Pismo Beach Chamber of Commerce building at the corner of Dolliver Street (SR 1) and Hinds Avenue). The total number of public parking spaces in downtown, including the Addie Street lot and the Price Street lot is approximately 1,461 spaces. The downtown hotel parking lots provide 816 spaces and the private parking lots include approximately 495 spaces. Thus, a total 2,772 parking spaces are provided. There are multiple parking lots in the downtown, some of which are heavily utilized. Exhibit 16A (Page 29) depicts their locations within the downtown. Except as noted above, on-street parking spaces operate as free parking with no charge for parking but are managed with time-limited parking during the timed parking season. Their locations are illustrated on Exhibit 16B (Page 29). A small number of on-street pay parking spaces are provided on Cypress Street, Hinds Avenue and Pomeroy Avenue near the pier. Exhibit 15 – Downtown Pismo Beach Parking Space Inventory Two of the largest lots are located near the pier. The largest public lot (210 spaces) is accessible off of Pomeroy (inbound only) and Hinds Avenue (outbound only) and is located at the foot of the pier. This parking lot is the parking location most desired by patrons who want to go to the beach, pier and associated commercial area. As it is located the closest to the beach and pier, many patrons unsuccessfully attempt to park at this location first, and then circulate throughout the downtown looking for other places to park. This causes vehicles to recirculate on downtown streets, which compounds traffic congestion. Until recently, the second largest parking lot in the downtown was a private dirt parking lot on Cypress Street between Pomeroy and Hinds Avenues, directly adjacent to the pier area. There was no charge for parking in this private lot. This property is being developed as a hotel; thus, this parking lot is no longer available. The public parking lot at the beach end of Addie Street and Park Avenue is free to the public with no time limits. It serves beach activity at the south end of downtown. This lot, which also has approximately 100 spaces, is not utilized as much as the pier parking lot during most of the year, but during peak seasons it is heavily used. Lifeguard towers are also stored here during the off‐season. The parking lots on Main Street (bordered by Main Street, Dolliver Street (SR 1) and Pismo Avenue) are pay to park lots. Ownership is split between the City of Pismo Beach and a private owner. These lots have approximately 130 spaces. The public lot on Pomeroy Avenue between Price and Dolliver (SR 1) Streets has approximately 40 spaces and is the public parking lot with the lowest utilization. While it is located less than three blocks from the beach and pier, it is routinely bypassed by patrons hoping to get a parking space closer to those attractions. This could be due to the lot being accessed by Pomeroy, with one-way traffic in the opposite direction of traffic that would attempt to enter it from Dolliver. A few smaller private lots are available for public use scattered throughout the downtown area, each having between 20 and 40 spaces. Private lots are not managed or patrolled by the City’s Parking Division. Parking Type Number of Spaces Public Parking Pay Parking – Downtown (lots) 380 Time-Limit Parking Downtown (street) 114 Price Street (street) 94 Year-Round Free Spaces (street) 873 Downtown Hotel Spaces 816 Downtown Commercial Spaces 495 Total Spaces 2,772 Source: City of Pismo Beach, 2014. Exhibit 16A – Location of Public Parking Facilities in Downtown Pismo Beach Source: Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan, 2014. Minor modifications by Hatch Mott MacDonald. Exhibit 16B – Location of Time-Limit On-Street Parking Areas in Downtown Pismo Beach Source: City of Pismo Beach web site (http://www.pismobeach.org). Accessed December 14, 2015. PARKING DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS -- DOWNTOWN PISMO BEACH Information about the City’s parking program was collected from a variety of sources including the following:  Interviews with City staff, downtown stakeholders, and members of the Parking Advisory Committee.  Collection of data and parking policy and management information from City Staff.  Review of historical data collected during the last decade including previous parking studies, and other studies with parking information.  Discussion with the Parking Advisory Committee during a regularly scheduled meeting.  Weekday and Weekend day and evening parking counts of public parking areas in downtown during the peak seasonal time period in late July, 2014. This data collection and review provided a good understanding of how parking is utilized and managed. During the summer weekday and weekend counts, parking lots for the most part fill to capacity and remain fully occupied as do on-street spaces. As soon as one vehicle leaves a space, another vehicle is waiting to take its place. All downtown lots and pay parking spaces exceed 85% capacity from approximately 10:00 AM through 4:00 PM for both weekday and weekend count periods. The lot located on Pomeroy Avenue, between Dolliver (SR 1) and Price Streets, is the last to become fully occupied. This is believed to be caused by the lack of parking wayfinding signs and the one-way flow to access that parking lot at the time of the observations in July, 2014. Parking utilization in Downtown Pismo Beach is similar to that in other coastal communities, in that: 1. There is a seasonal use of parking spaces, i.e., high parking occupancy occurs during the late spring, summer, and early fall. Demand is lower during the other times of year. Parking occupancies were noted to exceed the 85% level for on-street spaces, the pier lot and parking lots located off of Main Street from 11:00 AM until 4:00 PM during the weekday and 10:00 AM through 4:00 PM count during the weekend. 2. There is an adequate supply of parking during the off-season and “shoulder” seasons (i.e., the very start and very end of the peak season). This was based on a review of the data provided by City staff and the Parking Committee for parking occupancy counts during shoulder and off-season time. 3. There is a shortage of parking spaces within select areas of the downtown. The prime downtown destination for visitors during the peak periods is the pier and surrounding core area. This results in parking demand exceeding supply in this area. Consequently, traffic congestion is intensified as vehicles circulate around the downtown area in search of available parking. 4. In several locations, the on-street parallel parking further adds to traffic congestion due to vehicle maneuvers to enter and leave the parking spaces impeding traffic flows. This is especially true for on- street spaces along Pomeroy and Hinds Avenues (from Price Street to the pier parking lot) and along Price Street (both the curb spaces and the center aisle spaces). 5. The parking lot on Pomeroy Avenue, between Price Street and Dolliver Street (SR 1), rarely reaches 100% occupancy, even though it is within a short walking distance from the pier area. This is primarily due to the one-way access of Pomeroy to the lot. Users of this lot have to be traveling from Price Street to Dolliver Street (SR 1) to access the lot and current wayfinding signage does not indicate how to access this lot from Dolliver Street. Wayfinding signs were recently added by the City that substantially improve the ability of visitors to navigate to parking facilities throughout the downtown area. This will result in better utilization of the current parking supply, but overall demand will continue to exceed the supply during peak times. 6. The City of Pismo Beach recently completed the “Downtown Parking Enhancements and Opportunities Study,” Walker Parking Consultants, April 14, 2016, which can be found at (http://www.pismobeach.org/DocumentCenter/View/47660). It made similar observations to those described above. The study also made an additional observation that enhanced parking management (primarily parking fees that vary according to demand) would largely increase efficiency and reduce the parking supply deficiency during peak seasons. J. Traffic Operations and Recommendations – Existing Conditions Exhibit 17 (Pages 35 and 36) shows the study area, which encompasses all of Pismo Beach plus areas in surrounding communities that provide immediate access to Pismo Beach, such as portions of Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and unincorporated Avila Beach. Areas outside of the downtown region experience relatively little variation during the year, traffic volumes within the downtown area substantially increase during the peak season (i.e., roughly June through September). Therefore, in addition to the standard Weekday PM peak hour for the peak season, the downtown area was also analyzed for Summer Sunday and Memorial Day Sunday peak hours in order to obtain data to evaluate peak traffic conditions. Exhibits 18A-D, 19, and 20 (Pages 37-42) depict the existing traffic volumes in the city. These volumes were collected in May and June, 2014. The three collection periods include Weekday PM Peak Hour, Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour, and Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour (i.e., the Sunday before Memorial Day). In total, there are 50 study intersections included in the Weekday PM peak hour and 23 study intersections counted during the Summer Sunday Midday and Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hours. Raw traffic count data is tabulated in Appendix A. Intersection operations were characterized using the concept of Level of Service (LOS). Average control delays experienced at an intersection correspond to a letter-grade scale of “A” through “F”, with LOS A representing little to no delay and LOS F representing very long delay. For signalized and all-way stop intersections, a single level of service grade – representing overall intersection conditions – is presented. For one-way and two-way stop- controlled intersections, both overall and worst side street approach levels of service are presented. INTERSECTIONS WITH ACCEPTABLE OPERATIONS Exhibit 21 (Pages 43-47) summarizes the existing levels of service at the study intersections. Exhibits 22A-B, 23, and 24 (Pages 49-52) graphically depict the levels of service at those same intersections. The level of service calculations are included in Appendix B. The study intersections were evaluated based on the City standard of LOS C (1992 City of Pismo Beach General Plan Circulation Element Principle P-1.c), the San Luis Obispo County standard of LOS C (2009 San Luis Bay Coastal Area Plan) and the Caltrans standard of the transition between LOS C and LOS D (Guide for the Preparation of Traffic Impact Studies, December 2002; henceforth referred to as LOS C/D). A total of 47 of 50 intersections studied during the Weekday PM peak hour, 13 of the 21 intersections during the Summer Sunday Midday peak hour, and 12 of the 21 intersections studied under the Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hour operate acceptably and require no operational improvements based on congestion. INTERSECTIONS WITH DEFICIENT OPERATIONS Exhibit 21 (Pages 43-47) also indicates the study intersections that currently operate deficiently, as well as the recommended improvements to correct each deficiency and the resulting operations with implementation of the identified improvements. The deficient intersections, their current operations and their respective improvements are also described below, listed by intersection number. More information about the recommended improvements and why they are recommended is provided in Section 3.D – Improvements Recommended in Previous Studies (Page 75) and Section 3.E - Network Alternatives (Page 79). The following four (4) intersections operate deficiently under the Weekday PM peak hour: 26. Price Street/Hinds Avenue (Overall LOS B, but long queues on Southbound Hinds) – Review signal timing and consider widening the Hinds bridge over US 101. Vertical clearance about US 101 may be an issue. 34. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View – Stimson Couplet) 42. Fourth Street / Five Cities Drive (Signal LOS D - Add Right Turn Overlap Phase on Eastbound Five Cities Drive) 48. US 101 Southbound Ramps / El Camino Real (All-Way Stop LOS D - Install Signal) The following eight (8) intersections operate deficiently under the Summer Sunday Midday peak hour: 14. US 101 Southbound Off-ramp - Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Price Street (All-way stop LOS E - Install Roundabout) 20. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Main Street (Side Street LOS F - Eliminate One On-Street Parking Space to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Westbound Main. Consider left turn pockets as an alternative.) 21. Cypress Street / Pomeroy Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Install Signal with Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.a – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Cypress Street/Pomeroy, see discussion below) 22. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue (Signal LOS E - Eliminate Three On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Southbound Dolliver. Consider northbound left turn pocket as an alternative. Also consider Modifying Signal to include Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.b – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy, see discussion below) 25. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Hinds Avenue (Signal LOS D - Eliminate Two On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Northbound Dolliver Consider left turn pockets as an alternative..) 32. Price Street / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 34. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 35. US 101 Ramps - Price Street / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) The following nine (9) intersections operate deficiently under the Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hour: 14. US 101 Southbound Off-ramp - Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Price Street (All-way stop LOS E - Install Roundabout) 20. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Main Street (Side Street LOS F - Eliminate One On-Street Parking Space to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Westbound Main. Consider left turn pockets as an alternative.) 21. Cypress Street / Pomeroy Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Install Signal with Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.a – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Cypress Street/Pomeroy, see discussion below) 22. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue (Signal LOS F - Eliminate Three On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Southbound Dolliver. Consider northbound left turn pocket as an alternative. Also consider Modifying Signal to include Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.b – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy, see discussion below) 25. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Hinds Avenue (Signal LOS F - Eliminate Two On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Northbound Dolliver. Consider left turn pockets as an alternative.) 31. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 32. Price Street / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 34. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 35. US 101 Northbound Ramps - Price Street / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) Intersection 22, Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue - Left turns from northbound Dolliver (SR 1) onto Pomeroy (i.e., towards the pier area) are prohibited during peak tourist periods. This prohibition is indicated by the activation of a NO LEFT TURN (R3-2) “activated blankout” (i.e., back lit) electronic sign posted on a signal mast arm at the intersection. Intersections 16, 20, 22, 25, 31 and 34 - Dolliver Street (SR 1) Between Wadsworth Avenue and Ocean View Avenue - The addition of short exclusive left turn pockets on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at key intersections in Downtown Pismo Beach, such as at Pomeroy Avenue and Hinds Avenue, should be considered. These are discussed in more detail in Section 3.E.5) c – General Plan Buildout – Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Dolliver Street Left Turn Pockets. Intersections 21 and 22, Cypress Street / Pomeroy Avenue and Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue - Within Downtown Pismo Beach, some of the traffic congestion on Sundays during the peak season is created by the very large volumes of pedestrian crossings. This is especially true near the pier area, which is one of the primary destinations of many visitors to the area. At the Cypress / Pomeroy intersection, these crossings – both mid-block and at intersections – combine with the congestion caused by the parking maneuvers to create vehicle queues that can extend back to the Dolliver (SR 1) / Pomeroy intersection one block away. This congestion can then radiate out to affect operations at other intersections in the downtown area. Pedestrian activity is still relatively high on Sundays during the peak season at the Dolliver (SR 1) / Pomeroy intersection, although it is not as high as at the Cypress / Pomeroy intersection one block to the south. Here, the large number of right turning vehicles from southbound Dolliver Street (SR 1) onto westbound Pomeroy (i.e., bound for the pier area) can limit the number of pedestrians that can cross Pomeroy Avenue. This is especially true when congestion at the Cypress / Pomeroy intersection affects upstream operations at Dolliver (SR 1) / Pomeroy, just one block away. A detailed discussion of the causes of this congestion and the recommended remedial measures is included in Section 3.E.5.a and b - General Plan Buildout Conditions – Network Alternatives - Pier Area Improvements (Page 79). This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 17A – Greater Pismo Beach Study Area This page was intentionally left blank N Map data  Google 2016 Exhibit 17B– Greater Pismo Beach Study Area N Map data  Google 2016 Exhibit 18A – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes Exhibit 18B – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes (continued) Exhibit 18C – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes (continued) Exhibit 18D – Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Volumes (continued) Exhibit 19 – Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour Volumes Exhibit 20 – Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour Volumes Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 1 Shell Beach Avila Beach NB 1-L/R Two-Way Stop C/D 4.2 A Road -Drive SB 1-L/T, 1-R Side Street 21.3 C US 101 EB 1-T/R SB Ramps WB 1-L/T (County) 2 Monte Avila Beach SB 1-R Two-Way Stop C/D 3.0 A Road Drive - EB 1-L Side Street 9.4 A US 101 NB WB 1-T/R Ramps (County) 3 Spyglass US 101 NB NB 1-L, 1-T One-Way Stop C/D 8.1 A Drive Ramps SB 1-T/R Side Street 14.5 B EB 1-L, 1-T/R 4 Spyglass US 101 SB NB 1-T/R One-Way Stop C/D 5.4 A Drive Ramps SB 1-L, 1-T Side Street 12.1 B WB 1-L/T, 1-R 5 Spyglass Shell Beach NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C 13.4 B Drive Road SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R EB 1-L, 1-T/R WB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R 6 Terrace Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.7 A Avenue Road EB 1-T/R WB 1-L, 1-T 7 Vista Del Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.2 A Mar Road EB 1-T/R Avenue WB 1-L/T 8 Esparto Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.3 A Avenue Road EB 1-T/R WB 1-L/T 9 Windward Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.4 A Avenue Road EB 1-T/R WB 1-L/T 10 Mattie US 101 NB NB 1-L/T One-Way Stop C/D 7.0 A Road Ramps SB 1-T/R Side Street 12.0 B EB 1-L, 1-T/R Existing Conditions With Improvements Summer Memorial DayWeekdayWeekdaySummerMemorial Day Existing Conditons Proposed Improvement(s) Exhibit 21 – Intersection Levels of Service Existing Conditions Notes: 1. L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2. NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3. Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4. Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5. Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6. Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7. * = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 11 US 101 SB Price EB 1-L/T None C 0.0 A On-ramp Street WB 1-T/R Side Street 0.0 A 12 Mattie Price SB 1-L, 1-R Signal C 6.6 A Road Street EB 1-L/T WB 1-T/R 13 US 101 SB Price SB 1-L, 1-R One-Way Stop C/D 2.3 A Off-ramp Street EB 1-T Side Street 11.6 B WB 1-T 14 US 101 SB Price NB 1-L, 1-R All-Way Stop C/D 14.0 B 43.0 E 48.6 E 7.4 A 12.4 B 16.3 C Roundabout Off-ramp -Street SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R Dolliver EB 1-T/R Street (SR 1)WB 1-L/T 15 US 101 NB Bay NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 0.3 A On-ramp -Street EB 1-L/T/R Side Street 9.5 A Bello WB 1-L/T/R Street 16 Dolliver Wadsworth NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 2.4 A 3.5 A 4.0 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 15.1 C 32.0 D 27.0 D (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 17 Price Wadsworth NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C 9.4 A 12.0 B 14.1 B Street Avenue SB 1-L, 1-T/R EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 18 US 101 NB Wadsworth NB 1-L, 1-R One-Way Stop C/D 5.2 A 3.0 A 3.0 A Off-ramp Avenue EB 1-T Side Street 9.9 A 11.3 B 11.4 B WB 1-T 19 Bello Wadsworth NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C 8.4 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 20 Dolliver Main NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 1.6 A 18.2 C 42.4 E 1.5 A 8.8 A 18.4 C Street Street SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 15.2 C 146.7 F 248.8 F 14.8 B 60.4 F 111.5 F (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R Proposed Improvement(s) Eliminate 1 On-Street Parking Space to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Westbound Main Weekday Summer Memorial Day Existing Conditons Existing Conditions With Improvements Summer Memorial DayWeekday Exhibit 21 – Intersection Levels of Service Existing Conditions (Continued) Notes: 1. L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2. NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3. Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4. Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5. Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6. Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7. * = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 21 Cypress Pomeroy WB 1-L/T/R One-Way Stop C 16.1 C *F *F 5.5 A 4.8 A 5.1 A Signal with Pedestrian Scramble Street Avenue Side Street 16.3 C *F *F 22 Dolliver Pomeroy NB 1-L/T Signal C/D 17.4 B 65.0 E 210.1 F 9.3 A 24.6 C 39.4 D Street Avenue SB 1-T/R (SR 1)WB 1-L, 1-T/R 23 Price Pomeroy NB 1-L, 1-T/R All-Way Stop C 9.3 A 12.2 B 12.7 B Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 24 Cypress Hinds NB 1-R All-Way Stop C 7.6 A 8.1 A 8.3 A Street Avenue SB 1-L.T EB 1-T/R 25 Dolliver Hinds NB 1-T/R Signal C/D 5.7 A 35.8 D 144.2 F 6.5 A 19.7 B 26.6 C Street Avenue SB 1-L/T (SR 1)EB 1-L/T, 1-T/R 26 Price Hinds NB 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 14.1 B 13.2 B 14.8 B 14.1 B 13.2 B 14.8 B 1. Review signal timing to minimize SB Hinds queue Street Avenue SB 1-L/T, 1-T 2. Consider widening Hinds bridge EB 1-L, 1-T/R over US 101 to mitigate SB Hinds WB 1-L, 1-L/R queue 27 US 101 SB Hinds SB 1-L, 1-R One-Way Stop C/D 1.2 A 1.2 A 1.7 A Off-ramp Avenue EB 1-T Side Street 30.4 D 10.9 B 12.0 B WB 2-T 28 Bello Price NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 1.6 A 4.1 A 5.1 A Street Canyon SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 30.4 D 18.1 C 19.0 C Road EB 1-L, 1-T/R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 29 Lemoore Price NB 1-L, 1-T One-Way Stop C 0.2 A Avenue Canyon SB 1-T/R Side Street 16.0 C Road EB 1-L/R 30 Cypress Stimson NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 6.2 A 12.9 B 15.2 C 6.5 A 14.0 B 18.2 C Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 10.3 B 22.6 C 28.6 D 10.4 B 24.2 C 33.1 D EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R Proposed Improvement(s) Eliminate On-Street Parking to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Southbound Dolliver Eliminate On-Street Parking to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Northbound Dolliver Weekday Summer Memorial Day Existing Conditons Existing Conditions With Improvements Summer Memorial DayWeekday Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet Exhibit 21 – Intersection Levels of Service Existing Conditions (Continued) Notes: 1. L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2. NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3. Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4. Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5. Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6. Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7. * = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 31 Dolliver Stimson NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 4.9 A 5.0 A 8.1 A 8.4 A 7.4 A 8.6 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 32.3 D 40.0 E 54.9 F (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 32 Price Stimson NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 1.0 A 3.9 A 4.7 A 1.1 A 1.0 A 1.2 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T, 1-T/R Side Street 23.4 C 58.5 F 80.5 F 9.7 A 21.9 C 10.7 B EB 1-L/T, 1-R WB 1-L/T/R 33 Cypress Ocean View NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 4.2 A 6.5 A 7.2 A 3.6 A 5.4 A 6.3 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 9.9 A 12.7 B 15.0 B 10.1 B 13.3 B 14.9 B EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 34 Dolliver Ocean View NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 10.3 B 28.3 D 45.8 E 1.1 A 1.3 A 2.1 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 52.9 F 221.8 F 264.1 F 17.6 C 21.1 C 21.1 C (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 35 US 101 Ocean View NB 1-L, 1-T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 2.6 A 13.1 B 11.4 B 1.8 A 8.1 A 6.5 A Ramps -Avenue SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R Side Street 30.9 D 76.6 F 91.2 F 18.6 C 37.0 E 37.3 E Price EB 1-L/T, 1-R Street WB 1-L/T/R 36 Dolliver Cypress NB 1-L, 1-T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 1.1 A 1.8 A 2.2 A Street Street -SB 1-L, 1-T/R Side Street 13.0 B 18.0 C 15.8 C (SR 1)Holiday EB 1-L/T/R RV Park Ent.WB 1-L/T/R 37 Dolliver Pismo Beach NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 7.2 A 11.0 B 9.9 A Street Senior MHP -SB 1-L, 1-T/R (SR 1)Pismo Coast EB 1-L/T/R Village WB 1-L/T/R 38 US 101 NB James EB 1-T/R None C/D 0.0 A On-ramp Way WB 1-L, 1-T Side Street 0.0 A 39 Fourth James NB 1-L/T, 1-R All-Way Stop C 10.0 A Street -Way SB 1-L/T/R Paseo Ladera EB 1-L/T, 1-R Lane WB 1-L, 1-T/R 40 Fourth US 101 NB NB 2-L, 2-T Signal C/D 12.1 B Street Ramps SB 1-T, 1-T/R EB 1-L, 1-T/R Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet and Signal Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet and Price Street Restriping Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet and Price Street Restriping Existing Conditions With Improvements Summer Memorial DayWeekdayWeekdaySummerMemorial Day Existing Conditons Proposed Improvement(s) Notes: 1.L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2.NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3.Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4.Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5.Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6.Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7.* = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) Exhibit 21 – Intersection Levels of Service Existing Conditions (Continued) Notes: 1.L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2.NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3.Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4.Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5.Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6.Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7.* = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 41 US 101 SB Five Cities NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 27.1 C Ramps -Drive SB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-T/R Outlets EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Main Entrance WB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R 42 Fourth Five Cities NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 36.3 D 26.8 C Street Drive SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 43 US 101 SB Five Cities NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C/D 13.8 B Ramps -Drive -SB 1-L/T, 1-R Hotel El Camino EB 1-L/T/R Driveway Real WB 1-L/T/R 44 Ridge James SB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.0 A Road Way EB 1-L, 1-T WB 1-T/R 45 Oak Park James NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 25.7 C Boulevard Way SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 46 Oak Park US 101 NB NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 11.1 B Boulevard On-Ramp -SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R West Branch WB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-R Street 47 Camino West NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 28.3 C Mercado-Branch SB 1-L, 1-T/R US 101 NB Street EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Ramps WB 1-L, 1-T (Arroyo Grande) 48 US 101 SB El Camino SB 1-L, 1-L/R All-Way Stop C/D 33.8 D 10.1 B Signal Ramps Real EB 1-L/T WB 1-T/R (Grover Beach) 49 Oak Park El Camino NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 22.3 C Boulevard Real SB 1-L, 2-T, 1-R EB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 50 US 101 SB Avila Beach EB 1-T/R None C/D 0.0 A On-ramp Drive WB 1-L/T Side Street 0.0 A (County) Proposed Improvement(s) Weekday Summer Memorial Day Existing Conditons Existing Conditions With Improvements Summer Memorial DayWeekday Add Right Turn Overlap Phase on Eastbound Five Cities Drive Exhibit 21 – Intersection Levels of Service Existing Conditions (Continued) This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 22A – Intersection Operations Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour Exhibit 22B – Intersection Operations Existing Weekday PM Peak Hour (Continued) Exhibit 23 – Intersection Operations Existing Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour Exhibit 24 – Intersection Operations Existing Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour K. Community Participation Public participation played an essential role in this Study. Public input was solicited especially regarding existing conditions for bicyclists and pedestrians, desired bicycling and walking infrastructure, and types of support facilities or programs needed to improve bicycling in Pismo Beach. Public input was also used to generally develop and prioritize recommended network improvements. Stakeholders within the community were interviewed, including city staff, the Parking Advisory Committee, the Pismo Beach City Council, the Pismo Beach Chamber of Commerce, and city residents. Other adjacent cities were also contacted, such as the Cities of Arroyo Grande and Grover Beach, as well as other agencies whose jurisdictions are either adjacent to or within portions of Pismo Beach, such as County of San Luis Obispo, Caltrans, and the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG). A brief summary of the common themes identified by the stakeholders follows below. A full summary of the stakeholder comments is included in Appendix C. Common themes identified by the stakeholders included the following: 1. Parking capacity and circulation demand varies with the peak season, with very high demand during the summer months and little demand during other times of the year. 2. General desire for a new parking structure within the downtown core. However, it was understood that public spending for a parking structure that may only be used for three months out of the year makes this fiscally challenging. 3. The Pomeroy-Hinds one-way couplet had greatly reduced collision rates at the Price Street / Hinds Avenue intersection. Other one-way couplets within the downtown area may be useful. 4. Price Street between Price Canyon Road and the US 101 Ramps at the south side of Downtown is used as a primary thoroughfare for commuters to and from San Luis Obispo. Extending Price Street to Five Cities Drive and adding other frontage roads to US 101 would allow for these and other local trips to avoid using the freeway when traveling between southeastern and downtown Pismo Beach. 5. Strategically placed satellite parking lots (i.e., park and ride lots) are being considered to serve bus routes along US 101. Some of the satellite parking lots are within the City of Pismo Beach. The City also hosted two public workshops to encourage public feedback on existing circulation issues for all modes of transportation in Pismo Beach. The purpose of the first workshop was to provide an opportunity for members of the public to identify key transportation and circulation issues (including bicycle and pedestrian related issues) throughout the City of Pismo Beach. The second workshop was held to summarize the findings of the analysis, including identifying existing and future circulation problems and corresponding solutions, and physical or operational improvements needed citywide. The workshops were held on:  Wednesday, September 17, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM – at City Hall (Council Chambers), 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach.  Wednesday, January 7, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM – at City Hall (Council Chambers), 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach. Summaries of each public workshop are provided in Appendix D. The following points of discussion during the first workshop are summarized in Exhibit 25 (Page 54). (A summary of the second workshop can be found in Chapter 5 of this document.) Exhibit 25 – Public Comments from September 2014 Workshop Item No. Comment 1. Elevated Pedestrian Boardwalk – Important to construct between Pier and Shell Beach along hotel beach frontage. Would provide safe, attractive alternative to driving. Would alleviate parking demand within the downtown and enhance local connectivity. 2. Attractive, Clean Streets – Important to provide. Should feature wide sidewalks, visible bicycle facilities, working streetlights, and readable directional signs. 3. Emphasis Away from Vehicle Level of Service in Downtown – Should instead focus on efficient use of existing and proposed parking facilities, maintaining high -level of pedestrian usability, increase bicycle use, and increase public safety. However, should use criteria to determine investment in future capital projects. 4. High Visitor Demand to Pismo Beach Area: a. 2.4 million visitors to Pismo Beach each year b. 1+ million visitors to Pismo State Park (specifically the Dunes) each year c. $600,000 in sales tax generated in Pismo Beach each year from tourist activity d. Hotel Occupancy – an annual average of about 70%, much higher during the peak season and much lower during the off-season 5. Paid Parking: a. 200,000 cars utilize paid parking facilities annually b. Average length of stay in paid parking – 2 hours c. Visitors within campgrounds, hotels and RV parks park for free 6. Bus Tour Groups – not common: a. Few areas for buses to stage within downtown b. Hotels within downtown charge more than outside of downtown 7. Hotels, RV Parks and Vacation Rentals have high occupancy: a. 75% to 80% of Transient Occupancy Tax is generated by hotels, followed by vacation rentals and RV parks b. RV park occupancy never drops below 85% during summer months and approaches 100% during holidays and peak summer periods c. Person Occupancies: i. Hotel – 2.1 person/room (estimated) ii. RV Parks – above 2.1 persons/RV 8. Tourist Activity Growth: a. Most visitors to Pismo Beach are driving from within a 5-hour radius, including from the Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Central Valley metropolitan areas. Growth in population within those areas will lead to tourist growth within Pismo Beach b. Transient Occupancy Tax is not good measure of past tourist growth, as increase is more tied to increased room rates rather than increased demand c. Building permits and retail sales are up dramatically within the year. Sales tax may be used to project future retail growth in Pismo Beach 9. Other Traffic Issues: a. Many visitors drive, walk, and bicycle into the downtown from hotels and RV parks located outside of downtown b. Number of surreys and bicycles within downtown are increasing c. Parking demand has remained relatively flat – annual paid parking occupancy changed from 35% to 39% over six years d. More demand for hotel and RV area parking than downtown parking In addition, a workshop exercise was conducted to discuss specific street network and congestion issues within the greater Pismo Beach region. Exhibit 26 (Page 55) summarizes those network issues. Exhibit 26 – Street Network Issues Discussed at September 2014 Workshop Item No. Network Issue 1. Trail parking at Cave Landing and Shell Beach Road (near Avila Beach) creates potential traffic hazard, as well as parking availability issues on El Portal Drive and Indio Drive (adjacent residential roadways) for trail users. 2. Southbound US 101 merge from three lanes to two lanes, between Avila Beach Drive and Spyglass Drive and creates traffic congestion on US 101. 3. Increasing congestion at the Spyglass Drive / Shell Beach Road intersection during peak hours. 4. Mattie Road sidewalks and bicycle lanes are not connected to the rest of the city: a. Lack of sidewalk or bicycle lanes on Spyglass Drive between Mattie Road and Shell Beach Road. b. No striped bike lane along northbound Mattie Road. c. Lack of sidewalk along Mattie Road between 2400 Mattie Road and just south of Bayview Lane (i.e., Spyglass Drive). d. Lack of sidewalk and bicycle lanes between 1050 Mattie Road and Price Street. e. Bicycle lanes on Price Street near Mattie Road ends abruptly. 5. Left turn from Price Street onto Wadsworth Avenue is problematic. 6. Turning movement conflicts at Price Street / Dolliver Street (SR 1) – Southbound US 101 Off-Ramp cause traffic to back up onto southbound US 101. 7. Lack of crosswalks across Dolliver Street (SR 1) creates pedestrian/vehicle conflicts and a safety hazard, especially during peak hours and peak season. 8. Lack of surface street connections between north and south Pismo Beach. Extend Price Street to Five Cities Drive to relieve congestion at Five Cities Drive/US 101 interchange and provide direct pedestrian and transit connection to downtown. 9. Major Perceived Traffic Congestion Locations (outside of downtown): a. Price Street / Hinds Avenue (Price Canyon Road) b. Oak Park Boulevard / US 101 Interchange c. Fourth Street / James Way d. Five Cities Drive / US 101 Interchange 10. Major Perceived Traffic Congestion Locations (within downtown): a. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue b. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue c. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue d. Price Street / Ocean View Avenue e. Price Street / Stimson Avenue f. Price Street / Hinds Avenue (Price Canyon Road) g. Price Street /Pomeroy Avenue 11. Consider One-Way Turning Movements and Road Reconfiguration at: a. Ocean View Avenue b. Stimson Avenue c. Hinds Avenue d. Pomeroy Avenue 12. Provide a pedestrian bridge across the Union Pacific Railroad tracks from James Way/Five Cities Drive to Pismo Beach Sports Complex on Frady Lane. 13. Replace the US 101 bridge over Frady Lane and Pismo Creek to improve vehicular and emergency travel time for traffic underneath bridge. 14. Consider converting part of Cypress Street into a bicycle boulevard, including lane configurations with one-way and two-way vehicle travel. Possible future downtown and recreational parking areas were also suggested. These sites could provide access to the downtown, the future boardwalk promenade extension and the Pismo Preserve trailhead. Exhibit 27 summarizes these suggestions. Other issues discussed are summarized in Exhibit 28. Exhibit 27 – Suggested Future Parking Areas Discussed at September 2014 Workshop Item No. Suggested Future Parking Area 1. New public parking lot off Terrace Avenue at Shell Beach Elementary School. 2. Pismo Preserve trailhead at 850 Mattie Road (in addition to paving an existing dirt parking area along Price Street near Mattie Road) 3. Kon Tiki Inn hotel, Steamers restaurant and Bank of America building near the intersection of Price and Dolliver (SR 1) Streets, including below-grade parking structures. 4. Pismo Beach Self Storage site on Five Cities Drive. Exhibit 28 – Other Issues Discussed at September 2014 Workshop Item No. Other Item 1. Southbound US 101 off-ramp to Hinds Avenue – preserve, because it provides direct freeway access to downtown. 2. Perhaps add signing to direct RV traffic from northbound US 101 to use Price Street, Pomeroy Avenue, and Dolliver Street (SR 1) and avoid Ocean View Avenue. Direct RV traffic bound for southbound US 101 to use Dolliver Street (SR 1), Hinds Avenue, and Price Street to avoid Ocean View Avenue. 3. Color the existing bike lanes along Dolliver Street (SR 1). 4. Vehicles utilize the one-lane bridge on Cypress Street over Pismo Creek to exit the downtown during high traffic periods. 5. Pedestrians and bicyclists also use the Cypress Street bridge. 6. Optimize downtown parking by adding spaces where possible and removing red curb and consolidating driveways. 7. Heavy pedestrian traffic along Pomeroy Avenue near pier. 8. Congestion on Hinds Avenue (Price Canyon Road) between Price Street and Bello Street 3. General Plan Buildout Conditions A. Weekday PM – Volume Derivation SLOCOG manages a transportation demand model that forecasts future traffic growth throughout San Luis Obispo County, including Pismo Beach in the Year 2035. This model, updated in 2014, was modified to add additional land use and street network detail in Pismo Beach to create a citywide model for Pismo Beach. The Existing Conditions model (i.e., Year 2010) land use information was updated in Pismo Beach to reflect 2014 conditions (i.e., the Year 2014 model). The resulting existing and 2035 volumes from the Pismo Beach model are included in Appendix E, in addition to the documentation of the SLOCOG model modifications. Appendix F tabulates the net change in land use in the Pismo Beach area between the Existing Year model (Year 2014) and the Future Year model (Year 2035). In total, an additional 476 new homes (286 single family and 190 multi-family) and 690 new jobs are anticipated by both SLOCOG and the Pismo Beach Planning Department in Pismo Beach by the Year 2035. The net change in land use in Appendix F has been estimated for each of the 17 Neighborhood Planning Areas defined in the 1992 General Plan. For reference, Appendix F also includes the 1992 General Plan Neighborhood Planning Area Map. The Neighborhood Planning Areas where the highest growth in housing is expected include Area N - Oak Park Heights (144 dwelling units-d.u.), Area K - Commercial Core (103 d.u.), Area P - Pismo Heights and Freeway Foothills (101 d.u.) and Area B - South Palisades (48 d.u.). These represent 406 dwelling units, or 85% of the citywide growth. The remaining residential growth is scattered throughout the city. Most of the employment is anticipated in the hospitality and retail industries, primarily in Areas K (future downtown hotels) and N (retail). The average percentage growth in volume forecasted on city streets from 2014 to 2035 was determined for six distinct regions of the city. This was then applied to forecast the resulting traffic volumes at each intersection in the study area. The future percentage growth will vary by region, ranging from a low of 12% to a high of 28% over existing conditions, averaging about 19% at study intersections citywide. Appendix G provides a table summarizing the growth factor for each intersection. Exhibits 29A-C (Pages 59-62) depict the existing and future Weekday PM peak hour segment traffic volumes in the Pismo Beach region along city streets, the US 101 freeway, and freeway on- and off-ramps. Overall, the Pismo Beach region is projected to experience an overall 15% growth in traffic volumes along all city streets, freeways, and ramps between 2014 and 2035. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Percent Percent N or E S or W Total N or E S or W Total Existing N or E S or W Total Growth Avila Beach Drive Shell Beach Road - US 101 SB Offramp to US 101 SB Onramp E-W 516 205 721 363 147 510 71%393 149 542 6% Bello Street Price Canyon Road to Bay Street N-S 178 68 246 330 85 415 169%321 88 410 -1% Cypress Street Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Ocean View Avenue N-S 23 72 95 11 148 159 167%20 194 215 35% Cypress Street Ocean View Avenue to Stimson Avenue N-S 32 66 98 11 155 166 169%21 203 225 35% Cypress Street Stimson Avenue to Hinds Avenue N-S 60 77 137 2 137 138 101%2 166 169 22% Cypress Street Hinds Avenue to Pomeroy Avenue N-S N/A 77 77 N/A 185 185 240%N/A 232 232 26% Cypress Street Pomeroy Avenue to Main Street N-S 20 N/A 20 47 N/A 47 234%50 N/A 50 6% Dolliver Street (SR 1)South of Pismo Beach Senior MHP - Pismo Coast Village N-S 370 500 870 174 502 676 78%219 664 883 31% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Pismo Beach Senior MHP - Pismo Coast Village to Cypress Street - Holiday RV Park Ent.N-S 600 526 1126 215 588 803 71%261 754 1015 26% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Cypress Street - Holiday RV Park Ent. to Ocean View Avenue N-S 410 502 912 230 470 700 77%267 591 858 23% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Ocean View Avenue to Stimson Avenue N-S 363 398 761 124 245 369 48%148 323 471 28% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Stimson Avenue to Hinds Avenue N-S 354 390 744 134 213 347 47%167 284 451 30% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Hinds Avenue to Pomeroy Avenue N-S 345 382 727 168 210 378 52%212 284 496 31% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Pomeroy Avenue to Main Street N-S 279 414 693 104 151 254 37%130 220 350 37% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Main Street to Wadsworth Avenue N-S 253 395 648 117 176 293 45%140 247 386 32% Dolliver Street (SR 1)Wadsworth Avenue to Price Street N-S 190 337 527 80 140 220 42%96 203 299 36% Dolliver Street (SR 1)North of Price Street N-S N/A 247 247 N/A 88 88 36%N/A 105 105 19% Esparto Avenue South of Shell Beach Road N-S 15 27 42 0 0 0 0%0 0 0 0% Five Cities Drive West of US 101 SB Ramps - Outlets Main Entrance E-W 175 324 499 49 218 267 53%57 248 305 14% Five Cities Drive US 101 SB Ramps - Outlets Main Entrance to Fourth Street E-W 950 395 1345 540 307 847 63%695 355 1050 24% Five Cities Drive East of Fourth Street E-W 473 237 710 161 166 327 46%271 232 503 54% Fourth Street South of Five Cities Drive N-S 601 863 1464 371 528 899 61%423 574 996 11% Fourth Street Five Cities Drive to US 101 NB Ramps N-S 646 589 1235 481 379 860 70%556 401 957 11% Fourth Street US 101 NB Ramps to James Way N-S 338 257 595 356 235 591 99%408 255 663 12% Hinds Avenue West of Cypress Street E-W 136 N/A 136 173 N/A 173 127%177 N/A 177 2% Hinds Avenue Cypress Street to Dolliver Street (SR 1)E-W 187 N/A 187 223 N/A 223 119%245 N/A 245 10% Hinds Avenue Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Price Street E-W 178 N/A 178 187 N/A 187 105%200 N/A 200 7% Hinds Avenue Price Street to US 101 SB Offramp E-W 294 823 1117 262 682 944 85%301 721 1022 8% Hinds Avenue US 101 SB Offramp to Bello Street E-W 314 752 1066 279 363 643 60%319 428 746 16% James Way West of US 101 NB Onramp E-W 229 62 291 237 63 300 103%262 65 327 9% James Way US 101 NB Onramp to Fourth Street - Paseo Ladera Lane E-W 174 175 349 139 143 282 81%156 168 324 15% James Way Fourth Street - Paseo Ladera Lane to Ridge Road E-W 277 195 472 246 131 377 80%278 137 415 10% James Way Ridge Road to Oak Park Boulevard E-W 501 310 811 316 211 527 65%179 106 285 -46% James Way East of Oak Park Boulevard E-W 296 241 537 177 134 310 58%195 141 336 8% Main Street West of Dolliver Street (SR 1)E-W 51 34 85 47 0 47 55%50 0 50 6% Main Street Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Price Street E-W 33 19 52 509 21 530 1019%485 21 506 -5% Mattie Road Price Street to US 101 NB Ramps N-S 134 263 397 39 162 201 51%44 199 243 21% Mattie Road North of US 101 NB Ramps N-S 67 53 120 41 52 93 78%57 68 125 34% Mattie Road South of Spyglass Drive N-S 65 62 127 63 108 171 135%86 140 226 32% Oak Park Boulevard South of El Camino Real N-S 709 1098 1807 699 910 1609 89%842 1039 1881 17% Oak Park Boulevard El Camino Real to US 101 NB Onramp - West Branch Street N-S 1096 1099 2195 953 679 1632 74%1110 835 1945 19% Oak Park Boulevard US 101 NB Onramp - West Branch Street to James Way N-S 729 1043 1772 590 691 1281 72%692 866 1558 22% Oak Park Boulevard North of James Way N-S 294 439 733 217 204 421 57%280 319 599 42% Street Name Limits Direction Actual Count (2014)Existing Model (2014)Buildout Model (2035) Exhibit 29A – Weekday PM Peak Hour Segment Volumes on Greater Pismo Beach Area – Roadways Percent Percent N or E S or W Total N or E S or W Total Existing N or E S or W Total Growth Ocean View Avenue West of Cypress Street E-W 18 35 53 0 0 0 0%0 0 0 0% Ocean View Avenue Cypress Street to Dolliver Street (SR 1)E-W 20 46 66 145 134 279 422%149 146 295 6% Ocean View Avenue Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Price Street - US 101 Ramps E-W 100 183 283 330 387 716 253%257 381 638 -11% Pomeroy Avenue West of Cypress Street E-W N/A 99 99 N/A 129 129 131%N/A 136 136 5% Pomeroy Avenue Cypress Street to Dolliver Street (SR 1)E-W N/A 197 197 N/A 286 286 145%N/A 330 330 15% Pomeroy Avenue Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Price Street E-W N/A 121 121 N/A 563 563 466%N/A 571 571 1% Price Canyon Road East of Bello Street E-W 218 741 959 173 290 463 48%211 357 568 23% Price Street South of Ocean View Avenue N-S 493 1068 1561 667 1059 1726 111%752 1135 1887 9% Price Street Ocean View Avenue to Stimson Avenue N-S 401 1062 1463 633 1007 1639 112%704 1155 1858 13% Price Street Stimson Avenue to Hinds Avenue N-S 386 1078 1464 616 1103 1720 117%674 1196 1870 9% Price Street Hinds Avenue to Pomeroy Avenue N-S 272 256 528 592 472 1065 202%601 503 1104 4% Price Street Pomeroy Avenue to Main Street N-S 165 285 450 29 472 501 111%30 503 533 6% Price Street Main Street to Wadsworth Avenue N-S 131 231 362 254 210 464 128%234 244 478 3% Price Street North of Wadsworth Avenue N-S 145 257 402 162 276 438 109%200 319 520 19% Price Street South of US 101 SB Offramp - Dolliver Street (SR 1)N-S 113 222 335 134 249 383 114%151 282 433 13% Price Street North of US 101 SB Offramp - Dolliver Street (SR 1)N-S 266 295 561 203 291 494 88%231 356 586 19% Price Street South of US 101 SB Offramp N-S 210 304 514 98 93 191 37%113 153 266 39% Price Street US 101 SB Offramp to Mattie Road N-S 251 244 495 124 63 188 38%116 124 241 28% Price Street Mattie Road to US 101 SB Onramp N-S 295 171 466 199 14 213 46%214 46 260 22% Price Street US 101 SB Onramp to Windward Avenue N-S 233 290 523 148 167 315 60%179 206 385 22% Shell Beach Road West of Avila Beach Drive E-W 132 N/A 132 95 N/A 95 72%111 N/A 111 17% Shell Beach Road East of Avila Beach Drive E-W 150 87 237 125 68 193 81%182 101 283 47% Shell Beach Road West of Spyglass Drive E-W 216 215 431 210 143 353 82%166 237 403 14% Shell Beach Road Spyglass Drive to Terrace Avenue E-W 401 205 606 291 150 441 73%294 156 450 2% Shell Beach Road Terrace Avenue to Vista Del Mar Avenue E-W 324 156 480 238 123 361 75%274 144 419 16% Shell Beach Road Vista Del Mar Avenue to Esparto Avenue E-W 292 222 514 141 73 214 42%171 88 259 21% Shell Beach Road Esparto Avenue to Windward Avenue E-W 296 238 534 159 133 291 55%196 161 357 23% Spyglass Drive South of Shell Beach Road N-S 86 100 186 65 73 139 75%74 82 156 13% Spyglass Drive Shell Beach Road to US 101 SB Ramps N-S 281 490 771 338 420 758 98%433 541 974 29% Spyglass Drive US 101 SB Ramps to US 101 NB Ramps N-S 188 185 373 249 134 383 103%293 157 450 17% Stimson Avenue West of Cypress Street E-W 44 57 101 74 61 135 134%133 105 238 77% Stimson Avenue Cypress Street to Dolliver Street (SR 1)E-W 57 89 146 51 47 98 67%89 79 167 71% Stimson Avenue Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Price Street E-W 52 92 144 35 73 108 75%63 109 172 59% Terrace Avenue South of Shell Beach Road N-S 29 26 55 40 30 71 129%44 35 79 11% Vista Del Mar Avenue South of Shell Beach Road N-S 19 43 62 50 98 148 238%56 103 159 8% Wadsworth Avenue Cypress Street to Dolliver Street (SR 1)E-W 41 30 71 0 0 0 0%0 0 0 0% Wadsworth Avenue Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Price Street E-W 77 61 138 38 37 75 55%51 52 103 37% Wadsworth Avenue Price Street to US 101 NB Offramp E-W 168 136 304 360 179 540 178%363 225 588 9% Wadsworth Avenue US 101 NB Offramp to Bello Street E-W 234 26 260 457 43 500 192%470 44 513 3% Wadsworth Avenue Bello Street to Lemoore Avenue E-W 116 63 179 179 75 255 142%200 87 288 13% West Branch Street Oak Park Boulevard to Camino Mercado - US 101 NB Ramps E-W 616 791 1407 374 385 759 54%404 361 765 1% Windward Avenue South of Shell Beach Road N-S 23 20 43 0 0 0 0%0 0 0 0% Total:20514 24533 45047 17543 19638 37181 83%19697 23031 42728 15% Street Name Limits Direction Actual Count (2014)Existing Model (2014)Buildout Model (2035) Exhibit 29A – Weekday PM Peak Hour Segment Volumes in Greater Pismo Beach Area – Roadways (Continued) Percent Percent North South Total North South Total Existing North South Total Growth South of Oak Park Boulevard 57500 2013 3738 5750 2306 3351 5657 98%2612 3612 6223 10% Oak Park Boulevard to Fourth Street 62900 2202 4089 6290 2639 3862 6501 103%3022 4086 7107 9% Fourth Street to Price Street (South)69400 2429 4511 6940 2804 4264 7068 102%3236 4624 7860 11% Price Street (South) to Price Street (North)63100 2209 4102 6310 2137 3542 5679 90%2484 3800 6284 11% Price Street (North) to Mattie Road 62200 2177 4043 6220 2267 3630 5897 95%2562 3905 6467 10% Mattie Road to Spyglass Drive 66450 2326 4319 6645 2156 3664 5820 88%2418 3937 6355 9% Spyglass Drive to Avila Beach Drive 67800 2373 4407 6780 2226 3657 5883 87%2500 3986 6486 10% North of Avila Beach Drive 64600 2261 4199 6460 2138 3447 5586 86%2425 3778 6202 11% Total:17988 33407 51395 18673 29418 48091 94%21260 31726 52986 10% * PM Peak Hour volumes estimated by assuming 10% of daily traffic is in PM Peak Hour and 65% of that is in SB direction US 101 Existing Model (2014)Buildout Model (2035)PM Peak Hour*Caltrans Count (AADT) Exhibit 29B – Daily and Weekend PM Peak Hour Segment Volumes in Greater Pismo Beach Area – Freeways ADT PM Pk Hr* NB Offramp West Branch Street / Camino Mercado 2900 290 332 163 49%166 2% NB Onramp West Branch Street / Camino Mercado 2500 250 227 111 49%118 6% NB Onramp Oak Park Boulevard 6300 630 486 386 79%459 19% SB Onramp El Camino Real 2300 230 270 32 12%43 34% SB Offramp El Camino Real 1800 180 740 543 73%517 -5% SB Onramp Fourth Street (South)2100 210 245 90 37%112 25% NB Offramp Fourth Street 4500 450 459 267 58%283 6% SB Offramp Fourth Street (South)6700 670 200 233 116%272 17% NB Onramp Fourth Street 6300 630 435 250 57%284 14% NB Onramp James Way 1600 160 193 182 94%213 17% SB Onramp Five Cities Drive / Premium Outlets 1100 110 135 227 168%155 -32% SB Offramp Five Cities Drive / Premium Outlets 7300 730 791 486 61%533 10% NB Offramp Price Street (South)5900 590 493 667 135%752 13% SB Onramp Price Street (South)8400 840 1068 1059 99%1135 7% SB Offramp Hinds Avenue 757 76 91 336 370%311 -8% NB Offramp Wadsworth Avenue 1548 155 176 234 133%288 23% NB Onramp Bello Street 1686 169 175 364 208%366 0% SB Offramp Dolliver Street (SR 1)2070 207 247 88 36%105 19% NB Offramp Mattie Road 2567 257 258 138 53%171 24% SB Offramp Price Street 810 81 109 34 31%32 -5% NB Onramp Mattie Road 1282 128 115 27 23%27 1% SB Onramp Price Street (North)1973 197 171 204 119%195 -4% SB Onramp Spyglass Drive 1812 181 143 173 121%160 -8% NB Offramp Spyglass Drive 1717 172 169 112 66%123 10% NB Onramp Spyglass Drive 1877 188 175 182 104%204 12% SB Offramp Spyglass Drive 1988 199 355 370 104%404 9% SB Onramp Avila Beach Drive 2560 256 391 305 78%319 5% NB Offramp Avila Beach Drive 2562 256 210 146 70%149 2% SB Offramp Avila Beach Drive 975 98 132 95 72%111 17% NB Onramp Avila Beach Drive 987 99 125 59 47%74 25% Total:8687 9116 7563 83%8081 7% * PM Peak Hour volumes estimated by assuming 10% of daily traffic is in PM Peak Hour Actual Count Percent Existing Buildout Model Percent Growth Caltrans CountUS 101 Ramp Type Location Existing Model Exhibit 29C – Daily and Weekend PM Peak Hour Segment Volumes in Greater Pismo Beach Area – Ramps B. Summer Sunday and Memorial Day Sunday – Volume Derivation The SLOCOG model forecasts traffic volume for typical weekdays. It does not forecast traffic volumes during Sundays. Two different methods were used to forecast traffic growth during the Summer Sunday and Memorial Day Sunday analysis periods: 1) Downtown Projects – The trip generation was estimated on a Sunday for each of the anticipated development projects in the downtown area. Their trips were assigned to the downtown street system on an intersection-by-intersection basis; and 2) Tourist Growth – projected tourist activity traffic growth in the downtown area. Appendix H includes a trip generation table documenting Sunday peak hour traffic generated by future downtown developments. This was developed using the Institute of Transportation Engineers’ publication Trip Generation Manual, 9th Edition, 2012. These trips were then distributed throughout the downtown region, using the trip distribution also depicted in Appendix H. It was assumed that none of these trips would remain within the downtown; instead, it was assumed that all of these trips would be coming from or going to destinations outside of the downtown. All visitor serving uses such as hotels and rental homes are assumed to be 100% occupied, which represents a worst case condition, but is typical of the busy summer weekends. Future tourist growth in Downtown Pismo Beach is projected based on two sources. The first is the State of California projections for statewide population growth by county by the Year 2035. Appendix I contains those projections, along with calculations of the net percentage population growth in the five metropolitan regions of California from which most tourists to Pismo Beach are anticipated – San Francisco Bay Area, Monterey Bay Area, Central Coast, Southern California (Coastal), and the Southern Central Valley. These growth projections indicate an average population growth of about 1% per year between 2014 and 2035, or 21% total. Assuming that tourist activity in the Pismo Beach region would increase at the same rate as the statewide population growth, tourist activity would also increase by 21% between 2014 and 2035. The conversion of the increase in tourist activity to an increase in vehicular activity was achieved in part by estimating the net increase in traffic volumes at key intersections in in the downtown during the summer season above the off-peak season. This represents the net increase in traffic in Pismo Beach during the summer season created by existing tourist activity. The percentage increase varied by intersection, but was approximately 30% for the Summer Sunday Midday peak hour and 25% for the Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hour. When applied to the 21% growth in tourist activity anticipated by the Year 2035, they equated to a 6% increase in overall vehicle traffic by the Year 2035 for the Summer Sunday Midday peak hour, and a 5% increase in overall vehicle traffic by the Year 2035 for the Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hour. These percentages were added to the forecasted traffic growth from increased development at intersections on the major roadways within the downtown that lead to the pier and beach areas. The total increase in traffic at intersections in the downtown area during the Summer Sunday Midday and Memorial Day Sunday peak hours will range from 9% to 25% above Existing volumes over the next 20 years. For comparative purposes, Dolliver Street (SR 1) volumes have not increased over the past 35 years. C. Traffic Operations and Recommendations - General Plan Buildout INTERSECTIONS WITH ACCEPTABLE OPERATIONS Exhibit 30 (Pages 66-70) summarizes the levels of service at the study intersections under General Plan Buildout Conditions (i.e., Year 2035), while Exhibits 31A-B, 32, and 33 (Pages 71-74) graphically depict the levels of service at those same intersections. The level of service calculations can be found in Appendix J. Most of the study intersections continue to operate better than the City and County standard of Level of Service (LOS) “C” and the Caltrans standard of the transition between LOS C and LOS D (i.e., LOS C/D). This includes 44 of 50 intersections studied during the Weekday PM peak hour, 11 of the 21 intersections during the Summer Sunday Midday peak hour, and 11 of the 21 intersections studied under the Memorial Day Sunday Midday peak hour. INTERSECTIONS WITH DEFICIENT OPERATIONS Exhibit 30 (Pages 66-70) also indicates the study intersections under General Plan Buildout Conditions that would operate at a deficient level of service, as well as the recommended improvements to correct each deficiency and the resulting operations with implementation of the identified roadway improvements. The deficient intersections, their projected operations and their respective improvements are also repeated below, organized by intersection number. More information about the recommended improvements and why they are recommended is provided in the following two sections, Section 3.D – Improvements Recommended in Previous Studies (Page 75) and Section 3.E - Network Alternatives (Page 79).The following six (6) intersections will operate deficiently under the Weekday PM peak hour: 26. Price Street/Hinds Avenue (Overall LOS B, but long queues on Southbound Hinds) – Review signal timing and consider widening the Hinds bridge over US 101. Vertical clearance about US 101 may be an issue. 31. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 34 Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 35. US 101 Ramps - Price Street / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 42. Fourth Street / Five Cities Drive (Signal LOS E - Add Right Turn Overlap Phase on Eastbound Five Cities Drive and Optimize Signal Timing) 47. Camino Mercado - US 101 Northbound Ramps / West Branch Street (Signal LOS D - Optimize Signal Timing) 48. US 101 Southbound Ramps / El Camino Real (All-Way Stop LOS E - Install Signal) The following ten (10) intersections will operate deficiently under the Summer Sunday Midday peak hour: 14. US 101 Southbound Off-ramp - Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Price Street (All-way stop LOS E - Install Roundabout) 16. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Wadsworth Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Eliminate Two On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Eastbound Wadsworth. Consider left turn pockets as an alternative.) 20. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Main Street (Side Street LOS F - Eliminate One On-Street Parking Space to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Westbound Main. Consider left turn pockets as an alternative. ) 21. Cypress Street / Pomeroy Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Install Signal with Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.a – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Cypress Street/Pomeroy) 22. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue (Signal LOS E - Eliminate Three On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Southbound Dolliver. Consider a northbound left turn pocket as an alternative. Also consider Modifying Signal to include Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.b – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy) 25. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Hinds Avenue (Signal LOS F - Eliminate Two On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Northbound Dolliver. Consider a southbound left turn pocket as an alternative.) 31. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 32. Price Street / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 34. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 35. US 101 Ramps - Price Street / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) The following ten (10) intersections will operate deficiently under the Memorial Day Midday peak hour: 14. US 101 Southbound Off-ramp - Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Price Street (All-way stop LOS F - Install Roundabout) 20. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Main Street (Side Street LOS F - Eliminate One On-Street Parking Space to Accommodate a Right Turn Lane on Westbound Main. Consider left turn pockets as an alternative.) 21. Cypress Street / Pomeroy Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Install Signal with Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.a – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Cypress Street/Pomeroy) 22. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Pomeroy Avenue (Signal LOS E - Eliminate On-Street Parking to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Southbound Dolliver. Consider a northbound left turn pocket as an alternative. Also consider Modifying Signal to include Pedestrian Scramble – described in Section 3.5.b – General Plan Buildout Conditions - Network Alternatives – Pier Area Improvements – Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy) 25. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Hinds Avenue (Signal LOS F - Eliminate On-Street Parking to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Northbound Dolliver. Consider a southbound left turn pocket as an alternative.) 30. Cypress Street / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 31. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 32. Price Street / Stimson Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 34. Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) 35. US 101 Ramps - Price Street / Ocean View Avenue (Side Street LOS F - Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet) Exhibit 30 (Pages 66-70) also lists the improved levels of service at the deficient intersections resulting from the implementation of the corresponding recommended improvements. In many cases, the improvements are identical to those suggested under Existing conditions (i.e., in Exhibit 21 (Pages 43-47)). Additional considerations for intersection improvements under General Plan Buildout conditions are identical to those described under Existing Conditions on Page 36. Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 1 Shell Beach Avila Beach NB 1-L/R Two-Way Stop C/D 5.6 A 12.2 B Roundabout Road -Drive SB 1-L/T, 1-R Side Street 30.7 D US 101 EB 1-T/R SB Ramps WB 1-L/T (County) 2 Monte Avila Beach SB 1-R Two-Way Stop C/D 3.1 A Road Drive - EB 1-L Side Street 9.6 A US 101 NB WB 1-T/R Ramps (County) 3 Spyglass US 101 NB NB 1-L, 1-T One-Way Stop C/D 9.0 A Drive Ramps SB 1-T/R Side Street 16.7 C EB 1-L, 1-T/R 4 Spyglass US 101 SB NB 1-T/R One-Way Stop C/D 5.9 A Drive Ramps SB 1-L, 1-T Side Street 13.3 B WB 1-L/T, 1-R 5 Spyglass Shell Beach NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C 16.4 C Drive Road SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R EB 1-L, 1-T/R WB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R 6 Terrace Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 10.5 B Avenue Road EB 1-T/R WB 1-L, 1-T 7 Vista Del Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.9 A Mar Road EB 1-T/R Avenue WB 1-L/T 8 Esparto Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.9 A Avenue Road EB 1-T/R WB 1-L/T 9 Windward Shell Beach NB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 10.1 B Avenue Road EB 1-T/R WB 1-L/T 10 Mattie US 101 NB NB 1-L/T One-Way Stop C/D 7.7 A Road Ramps SB 1-T/R Side Street 13.2 B EB 1-L, 1-T/R (Year 2035)With Improvements Weekday Summer Memorial Day Weekday Summer Memorial Day General Plan Buildout General Plan Buildout Proposed Improvement(s) Exhibit 30 – Intersection Levels of Service General Plan Buildout (Year 2035) Notes: 1. L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2. NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3. Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4. Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5. Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6. Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7. * = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) 8. N/A = Not Applicable. Proposed improvement combines intersections #1 and #50 into a single intersection. Notes: 1.L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2.NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3.Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4.Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5.Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6.Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7.* = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) 8.N/A = Not Applicable. Proposed improvement combines intersections #1 and #50 into a si ngle intersection. Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 11 US 101 SB Price EB 1-L/T None C 0.0 A On-ramp Street WB 1-T/R Side Street 0.0 A 12 Mattie Price SB 1-L, 1-R Signal C 6.9 A Road Street EB 1-L/T WB 1-T/R 13 US 101 SB Price SB 1-L, 1-R One-Way Stop C/D 2.4 A Off-ramp Street EB 1-T Side Street 12.4 B WB 1-T 14 US 101 SB Price NB 1-L, 1-R All-Way Stop C/D 16.8 C 49.8 E 58.7 F 8.9 A 17.3 C 24.4 C Roundabout Off-ramp -Street SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R Dolliver EB 1-T/R Street (SR 1)WB 1-L/T 15 US 101 NB Bay NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 0.3 A On-ramp -Street EB 1-L/T/R Side Street 9.7 A Bello WB 1-L/T/R Street 16 Dolliver Wadsworth NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 2.8 A 5.3 A 5.0 A 2.7 A 4.7 A 43.0 E Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 18.1 C 56.4 F 38.5 E 17.2 C 50.1 F 31.5 D (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 17 Price Wadsworth NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C 10.2 B 13.5 B 16.4 C Street Avenue SB 1-L, 1-T/R EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 18 US 101 NB Wadsworth NB 1-L, 1-R One-Way Stop C/D 5.4 A 3.2 A 3.2 A Off-ramp Avenue EB 1-T Side Street 10.3 B 12.0 B 12.2 B WB 1-T 19 Bello Wadsworth NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C 8.9 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 20 Dolliver Main NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 1.8 A 40.0 E 85.7 F 1.7 A 17.9 C 37.7 E Street Street SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 17.9 C *F *F 17.2 C 145.9 F 284.4 F (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R Proposed Improvement(s) Eliminate 1 On-Street Parking Space to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Westbound Main Eliminate 2 On-Street Parking Spaces to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Eastbound Wadsworth General Plan Buildout General Plan Buildout With Improvements Weekday Summer Memorial Day Weekday Summer Memorial Day (Year 2035) Exhibit 30 – Intersection Levels of Service General Plan Buildout (Year 2035 -Continued) Notes: 1.L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2.NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3.Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4.Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5.Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6.Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7.* = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) 8.N/A = Not Applicable. Proposed improvement combines intersections #1 and #50 into a single intersection. Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 21 Cypress Pomeroy WB 1-L/T/R One-Way Stop C 17.7 C *F *F 4.6 A 4.5 A 4.5 A Signal with Pedestrian Scramble Street Avenue Side Street 17.9 C *F *F 22 Dolliver Pomeroy NB 1-L/T Signal C/D 17.1 B 106.4 F 287.9 F 16.4 B 40.9 D 76.6 E Street Avenue SB 1-T/R (SR 1)WB 1-L, 1-T/R 25 Dolliver Hinds NB 1-T/R Signal C/D 5.9 A 81.3 F 177.9 F 5.8 A 47.0 D 38.4 D Street Avenue SB 1-L/T (SR 1)EB 1-L/T, 1-T/R 26 Price Hinds NB 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 18.1 B 16.8 B 18.8 B 18.1 B 16.8 B 18.8 B 1. Review signal timing to minimize SB Hinds queue Street Avenue SB 1-L/T, 1-T 2. Consider widening Hinds bridge EB 1-L, 1-T/R over US 101 to mitigate SB Hinds WB 1-L, 1-L/R queue 27 US 101 SB Hinds SB 1-L, 1-R One-Way Stop C/D 1.4 A 1.5 A 2.0 A Off-ramp Avenue EB 1-T Side Street 17.6 C 11.3 B 11.9 B WB 2-T 28 Bello Price NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 2.1 A 4.4 A 5.3 A Street Canyon SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 46.9 E 23.4 C 24.2 C Road EB 1-L, 1-T/R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 29 Lemoore Price NB 1-L, 1-T One-Way Stop C 0.3 A Avenue Canyon SB 1-T/R Side Street 19.0 C Road EB 1-L/R 30 Cypress Stimson NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 6.4 A 21.7 C 31.1 D 7.8 A 9.2 A 9.9 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 10.6 B 34.6 D 55.1 F EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R Eliminate On-Street Parking to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Northbound Dolliver Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet and All-Way Stop Control Proposed Improvement(s) Eliminate On-Street Parking to Accommodate Right Turn Lane on Southbound Dolliver General Plan Buildout General Plan Buildout With Improvements Weekday Summer Memorial Day Weekday Summer Memorial Day (Year 2035) Exhibit 30 – Intersection Levels of Service General Plan Buildout (Year 2035 -Continued) Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 31 Dolliver Stimson NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 8.2 A 16.9 C 27.6 D 9.2 A 9.7 A 10.5 B Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 60.4 F 129.5 F 194.4 F (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 32 Price Stimson NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 1.5 A 7.9 A 9.2 A 1.3 A 1.1 A 1.3 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T, 1-T/R Side Street 37.4 E 117.3 F 155.6 F 10.1 B 25.8 D 11.0 B EB 1-L/T, 1-R WB 1-L/T/R 33 Cypress Ocean View NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C 4.3 A 7.3 A 7.2 A 3.6 A 5.3 A 6.3 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 10.1 B 12.6 B 16.0 C 10.4 B 14.0 B 15.9 C EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 34 Dolliver Ocean View NB 1-L/T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 32.7 D 50.6 F 82.9 F 1.4 A 1.8 A 2.7 A Street Avenue SB 1-L/T/R Side Street 175.6 F *F *F 22.9 C 29.6 D 28.2 D (SR 1)EB 1-L/T/R WB 1-L/T/R 35 US 101 Ocean View NB 1-L, 1-T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 4.2 A 22.4 C 19.7 C 2.5 A 14.1 B 10.9 B Ramps -Avenue SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R Side Street 55.5 F 147.5 F 174.3 F 25.7 D 67.6 F 64.1 F Price EB 1-L/T, 1-R Street WB 1-L/T/R 36 Dolliver Cypress NB 1-L, 1-T/R Two-Way Stop C/D 1.3 A 2.1 A 2.5 A Street Street -SB 1-L, 1-T/R Side Street 14.7 B 21.5 C 17.9 C (SR 1)Holiday EB 1-L/T/R RV Park Ent.WB 1-L/T/R 37 Dolliver Pismo Beach NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 8.3 A 12.9 B 11.1 B Street Senior MHP -SB 1-L, 1-T/R (SR 1)Pismo Coast EB 1-L/T/R Village WB 1-L/T/R 38 US 101 NB James EB 1-T/R None C/D 0.0 A On-ramp Way WB 1-L, 1-T Side Street 0.0 A 39 Fourth James NB 1-L/T, 1-R All-Way Stop C 10.6 B Street -Way SB 1-L/T/R Paseo Ladera EB 1-L/T, 1-R Lane WB 1-L, 1-T/R 40 Fourth US 101 NB NB 2-L, 2-T Signal C/D 15.1 B Street Ramps SB 1-T, 1-T/R EB 1-L, 1-T/R (Year 2035)With Improvements Weekday Summer Memorial Day Weekday Summer Memorial Day General Plan Buildout General Plan Buildout Proposed Improvement(s) Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet and Signal Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet and Price Street Restriping Implement Ocean View - Stimson Couplet Notes: 1.L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2.NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3.Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4.Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5.Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6.Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7.* = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) 8.N/A = Not Applicable. Proposed improvement combines intersections #1 and #50 into a si ngle intersection. Exhibit 30 – Intersection Levels of Service General Plan Buildout (Year 2035 -Continued) Notes: 1.L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2.NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3.Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4.Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5.Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. 6.Worst approach level of service standard is generally LOS E. Level of service "F" is the level of service at which improvements would be required. 7.* = Delay is over 300 seconds (5 minutes) 8.N/A = Not Applicable. Proposed improvement combines intersections #1 and #50 into a single intersection. Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid PM Peak Hr Sunday Mid Sunday Mid Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 41 US 101 SB Five Cities NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 29.2 C Ramps -Drive SB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-T/R Outlets EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Main Entrance WB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R 42 Fourth Five Cities NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 61.3 E 34.5 C Street Drive SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 43 US 101 SB Five Cities NB 1-L/T/R All-Way Stop C/D 21.7 C Ramps -Drive -SB 1-L/T, 1-R Hotel El Camino EB 1-L/T/R Driveway Real WB 1-L/T/R 44 Ridge James SB 1-L/R All-Way Stop C 9.3 A Road Way EB 1-L, 1-T WB 1-T/R 45 Oak Park James NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 34.9 C Boulevard Way SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R WB 1-L, 1-T/R 46 Oak Park US 101 NB NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 14.8 B 27.6 C Revise NS Oak Park Blvd. Boulevard On-ramp -SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Protected/Pemissive Left Turn West Branch WB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-R Phasing to Protected Only Street 47 Camino West NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 41.0 D 34.9 C Optimize Signal Timing Mercado-Branch SB 1-L, 1-T/R US 101 NB Street EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Ramps WB 1-L, 1-T (Arroyo Grande) 48 US 101 SB El Camino SB 1-L, 1-L/R All-Way Stop C/D 43.6 E 12.9 B Signal Ramps Real EB 1-L/T WB 1-T/R (Grover Beach) 49 Oak Park El Camino NB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Signal C 29.7 C 33.9 C Revise NS Oak Park Blvd. Boulevard Real SB 1-L, 2-T, 1-R Protected/Pemissive Left Turn EB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-R Phasing to Protected Only WB 1-L, 1-T/R (Arroyo Grande) 50 US 101 SB Avila Beach EB 1-T/R None C/D 0.0 A Consolidate with Intersection #1 On-ramp Drive WB 1-L/T Side Street 0.0 A (County) N/A Add Right Turn Overlap Phase on Eastbound Five Cities Drive and Optimize Signal Timing Proposed Improvement(s) General Plan Buildout General Plan Buildout With Improvements Weekday Summer Memorial Day Weekday Summer Memorial Day (Year 2035) Exhibit 30 – Intersection Levels of Service General Plan Buildout (Year 2035 -Continued) Exhibit 31A – Intersection Operations General Plan Buildout Weekday PM Peak Hour Exhibit 31B – Intersection Operations General Plan Buildout Weekday PM Peak Hour (Continued) Exhibit 32 – Intersection Operations General Plan Buildout Summer Sunday Midday Peak Hour Exhibit 33 – Intersection Operations General Plan Buildout Memorial Day Sunday Midday Peak Hour D. Improvements Recommended in Previous Studies A roundabout was recommended at the intersection of the US 101 Southbound Off-ramp – Dolliver Street (SR 1) and Price Street intersection (Intersection No. 14) in the Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan. It is depicted on Exhibit 34 (Page 77). As indicated in the level of service summary table on Exhibit 30 (Pages 66-70), a one-lane roundabout can successfully accommodate Year 2035 traffic demand at Level of Service C. Caltrans has proposed adding a new southbound on-ramp to US 101 at this intersection. Exhibit 35 (Page 78) illustrates how it would connect into the roundabout. It is anticipated that this ramp could be added to the proposed roundabout without requiring major modifications to the physical layout of the roundabout. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 34 – Dolliver St. (SR1) / Price St. Roundabout Source: “Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan”, Gates + Associates, March 2013, p77 Exhibit 35 – Dolliver St. (SR1) / Price St. Roundabout with Future US 101 SB Onramp Sources: 1. Roundabout Layout- “Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan”, Gates + Associates, March 2013, p77 2. Future Southbound On-Ramp – “Price Street Extension Initial Study with Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment”, Caltrans, September 2004 E. Network Alternatives In addition to the existing street network, which was considered the base condition, various major network alternatives (i.e., changes to the Pismo Beach street network such as new streets, conversions to one way streets or street realignments) were also evaluated for Year 2035 conditions. This study evaluates their effectiveness in improving operations at the study intersections or achieving other network enhancements. They are in addition to the intersection improvements described in Section 3.C – Traffic Operations and Recommendations – General Plan Buildout. They are listed below and separately described in the following pages. 1) Price Street Extension; 2) Frady Lane Improvements 3) Mattie Road Extension. The citywide model was used to forecast traffic with these network alternatives. The forecast volumes are included in Appendix E. A number of downtown-specific network alternatives were also evaluated. They include: 4) Stimson / Ocean View Couplet and Downtown Price Street Modifications; 5) Pier Area Improvements a. Cypress Street/Pomeroy Avenue Pedestrian Scramble Traffic Signal and b. Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy Signal Modification to Pedestrian Scramble c. Dolliver Street Left Turn Pockets d. Restrict Motorized Vehicles on the Cypress Street Bridge e. Cypress Street Bike Boulevard; f. Addie / Park Avenue Couplet; and g. Restrict Motorized Vehicles on Pomeroy Avenue South of Cypress 6) Other downtown network modifications were also considered. They include: a. Reverse One-Way on Pomeroy and Hinds; b. Dolliver / Price Couplet; and c. Dolliver / Bello Couplet. 1) Price Street Extension The Price Street Extension would extend Price Street eastward across Pismo Creek to connect to Five Cities Drive. In 2004, Caltrans prepared an environmental evaluation of the potential design options for this improvement (Price Street Extension Initial Study with Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration/ Environmental Assessment), based on the James Way/Price Street Frontage Road Project Study Report, March 1998. The recommended option had the following four components: 1. Extend Price Street over Pismo Creek and over the Union Pacific Railroad to connect with Five Cities Drive. This would be a two-lane road with 6-foot shoulders on each side (suitable for use by bicycle traffic) and a 5-foot sidewalk along the ocean-side of the street. 2. Closure of the existing southbound US 101 on-ramp from southbound Price Street. 3. Closure of the existing southbound US 101 off-ramp at Hinds Avenue. 4. Addition of a new southbound US 101 on-ramp at the Price / Southbound US 101 Off-Ramp – Dolliver intersection. A schematic layout of this improvement is included as Exhibit 36 (Page 81). This exhibit also illustrates four other alternative alignments analyzed in the 1998 Project Study Report (PSR) for either the Price Street Extension or James Way Extension. The following is a list of the five alternatives. 1. Alternative 1 – James Way Extension to Bello Street 2. Alternative 2 – James Way Extension to Hinds Avenue 3. Alternative 3 – James Way Extension to Price Street 4. Alternative 4 – Northbound James Way to Price Street; Southbound Price Street to Five Cities Drive 5. Alternative 5 – Price Street Extension to Five Cities Drive (Caltrans Preferred Alternative and the recommended alignment described above and analyzed below). Year 2035 citywide model volume projections for Alternative 5 is included in Appendix K. The projected traffic diversions are displayed in Exhibit 37 (Page 82). Total traffic volumes on the Price Street extension are anticipated to be almost 1,100 vehicles in the southbound direction and about 190 vehicles in the northbound direction. Most of this traffic is taken off of US 101 between the Price Street and Fourth Street interchanges. About 140 of the 190 vehicles in the northbound direction would be diverted from that section of freeway. About 1,150 vehicles would be diverted from US 101 in the southbound direction. Exhibit 36 – Price Street / James Way Extension Alternatives Source of Alternatives: “James Way/Price Street Frontage Road Project Study Report”, March 1998 and “Price Street Extension Initial Study with Proposed Mitigation Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment”, September 2004. Exhibit 37 – Projected Traffic Diversions with Price Street Extension (Year 2035 – PM Peak Hour) Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr PM Peak Hr Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec) 41 US 101 SB Five Cities NB 1-L, 1-T/R Signal C/D 256.0 F 38.6 D Add 2nd WB L, 2nd EB L, Ramps -Drive SB 1-L, 1-L/T, 1-T/R Change E/W Left Turn Phasing to Outlets EB 1-L, 1-T, 1-T/R Protected Phasing, Main Entrance WB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R Lag WB L Phase behnd EB T Phase, Accept LOS D as Standard Proposed Improvement(s) Weekday General Plan (Year 2035)With Imprvmnts. General Plan Weekday Exhibit 38 – US 101 SB Ramps – Outlets Main Entrance Intersection Level of Service – General Plan Buildout Weekday PM Peak Hour – With Price Street Extension The Price Street Extension would improve southbound freeway operations with the substantial diversion of traffic from US 101. However, it will have an impact that was not addressed in either the 1998 or 2004 Caltrans reports – the diversion of commute traffic on Price Canyon Road that currently uses Hinds Avenue and Price Street to access southbound US 101. With the removal of the southbound US 101 on-ramp at Price Street, this traffic would proceed westward to the Five Cities Drive southbound US 101 on-ramp. In the weekday PM peak hour, almost 1,100 vehicles in the southbound direction and about 190 vehicles in the northbound direction will be added to Five Cities Drive west of the US 101 Ramps / Pismo Beach Premium Outlets intersection. The SLOCOG model projects that an additional 550 vehicles during the weekday PM peak hour will enter US 101 at the Five Cities Drive southbound on-ramp. As noted on Exhibit 38 (above), this increase in hourly traffic would overwhelm the existing westbound Five Cities Drive left turn lane onto southbound US 101, resulting in an F level of service. This left turn movement would need two lanes to accommodate this level of traffic, which in turn would require widening of the southbound US 101 on-ramp. A conceptual design of these improvements is shown in Exhibit 39 (Page 85). Even with this improvement, it may not be possible to achieve acceptable operations at this intersection, with a mitigated level of service “D” during the weekday evening peak hour. The Caltrans report also did not finalize the design of the merge between the Price Street extension and the existing northbound US 101 off-ramp to Price Street, nor did it finalize the necessary lane configuration along Price Street between Hinds and Ocean View Avenues. The merge between the northbound Price Street extension and the northbound US 101 off-ramp will need to continue along Price Street between Stimson and Ocean View Avenues, to for proper merge length between through lanes. A left turn lane at Ocean View Avenue is thus not recommended, as it would encourage off-ramp traffic to immediately weave directly across Price Street and into the left turn lane that would start only a few feet away from the merge point. This maneuver would not be expected by traffic on the Price Street extension and could result in undesirable safety consequences. The Stimson / Ocean View couplet would also be indispensable to mitigate the short weaving operational problems (see below for more on the Stimson / Ocean View couplet). Notes: 1. L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2. NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3. Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4. Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5. Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. The Price Street Extension includes the addition of a southbound US 101 on-ramp at the Price Street / Southbound US 101 Off-Ramp – Dolliver Street (SR 1) intersection. This ramp is expected to only attract a few of the commuters using Price Canyon Road, because accessing an on-ramp at that location would require Price Canyon Road traffic to travel too far out of their way. It would also have a limited attraction from within the downtown area. It is forecasted to attract a total about 110 vehicles during the PM peak hour. The addition of the US 101 southbound on-ramp at Dolliver Street - Price Street intersection would require the closure of the southbound US 101 off-ramp to Hinds Avenue. This ramp only carries about 90 vehicles in the PM peak hour. However, its closure would also have unintended consequences. It is the primary route for trucks servicing the oil fields along Price Canyon Road north of Pismo Beach. With its closure, those trucks would be forced to travel through the downtown, presumably on Price Street. It is recommended that if the Hinds Avenue off-ramp is closed in the future, that the City of Pismo Beach prohibit through trucks on Price Street, forcing trucks to use Dolliver Street (SR 1) and Hinds Avenue to access Price Canyon Road, which is also through downtown Pismo Beach. Two other design options for the Price Street extension would be an extension of James Way, the frontage road on the inland side of US 101. The James Way extension options evaluated in the 2004 Caltrans report were: i. James Way Extension to Hinds Avenue – This improvement would extend James Way westward along the freeway to Hinds Avenue. It is designated Alternative 2 in the 1998 PSR and on Exhibit 33 (page 74). Five Cities Drive would be rerouted underneath the James Way extension and looped back to James Way near Highland Drive. This option was originally proposed prior to the development of the Pismo Beach Medical Center at the current western end of James Way. The Five Cities Drive loop would now require a larger loop that around the perimeter of that development. Also, the western end of the James Way extension and the northern end of the Five Cities Drive Loop would both be located very close to the Highland Drive intersection. Adequate left turn lane storage may not be able to be provided along this section of James Way. The effect of the James Way extension on traffic patterns would primarily be regional in nature. Year 2035 citywide model volume projections for this alternative can be found in Appendix K, and the projected traffic diversions are displayed in Exhibit 40 (Page 86). The James Way extension would carry about 70 vehicles in the northbound direction and 350 vehicles in the southbound direction. This diversion would be from both commuters along Price Canyon Road and traffic from within the downtown area, some of which would be diverted from the US 101 southbound on- and northbound off-ramp at Price Street. Diversions would also occur from the southbound Five Cities Drive off-ramp. ii. James Way Extension to Price Street – This improvement would extend James Way to Price Street on the alignment of the northbound US 101 off-ramp to Price Street. The existing northbound US 101 off-ramp to Price Street would be removed. It is designated Alternative 4 in the PSR and Exhibit 33 (page 74). The primary negative aspect of this improvement would be that it would remove the primary access into the downtown from northbound US 101. During the weekday PM peak hour, approximately 500 vehicles would be forced to divert to either the Wadsworth Avenue or Fourth Street off-ramps to access downtown Pismo Beach. Exhibit 39 – Five Cities Drive / US101 SB Ramps – Outlets Main Entrance Improvements with Price Street Extension Exhibit 40 – Projected Traffic Diversions with James Way Extension (Year 2013 - PM Peak Hour) 2) Frady Lane Improvements The Frady Lane Improvement would realign Frady Lane near the Pismo Beach Sports Complex. Exhibit 41 (Page 89) depicts a conceptual design of this improvement. Currently, it meanders between the existing baseball fields, bisecting the Sports Complex. The proposed alignment would be much straighter and be located between the baseball fields and the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. The proposed improvement would provide better pedestrian connectivity between the baseball fields and provide additional onsite parking spaces. A vehicular bridge over Pismo Creek between Frady Lane and Bello Street is currently being designed that will connect the Sports Complex and Frady lane to Price Canyon Road and the northern area of Pismo Beach. This would provide a secondary access into the Pismo Beach Sports Complex. This improvement would replace the existing bridge that has been closed to vehicular traffic since 1983. It would also improve emergency response times to the sports complex and mobile home parks south of US 101 for police and fire services. It also would improve public works corporation yard access to northern parts of the City and PG&E access to the southern part of the City. Finally, it would serve as an alternate route during incidents involving closure of parallel routes including crossings of Pismo Creek. Exhibit 42 (Page 90) depicts the projected traffic diversions in the Year 2035 due to the Frady Lane Realignment, including the proposed vehicle bridge, as projected by the citywide model. The projections show that there would be minimal diversion of through traffic onto the Frady Lane corridor. Rather, most of the diversion that would occur will be sports complex traffic from Frady Lane to the new Bello Street access, with a total of 15 trips in and 10 trips out during the PM peak hour. This level of traffic diversion is not anticipated to result in any noticeable effect on the operations of the study network. Midday traffic redistribution will also occur from the City corporation yard and PG&E, although not substantial enough to affect traffic operations elsewhere in the City. Finally, as illustrated on Exhibit 41 (Page 89), a relatively straightforward method can be implemented to provide a pedestrian and bicycle connection between the downtown, the Pismo Beach Sports Complex, and the eastern portion of Pismo Beach. This improvement would include two connections to the existing pedestrian/bicycle path adjacent to US 101 between Price Street and Five Cities Drive. One connection would be a pedestrian/bicycle ramp connecting the path to Frady Lane, with a new sidewalk along Frady Lane between this ramp and the Pismo Beach Sports Complex. The second would be a stairwell connecting the path to Five Cities Drive. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 41 – Frady Lane Improvements Exhibit 42 – Projected Traffic Diversions with Frady Lane Realignment and Mattie Road Extension (Year 2035 – PM Peak Hour) 3) Mattie Road Extension The Mattie Road Extension would connect Mattie Road eastward to Bello Street along the northern frontage of US 101. The potential alignment would route it through the southern end of the adjacent Pismo Preserve. The Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo has indicated it will permit this connection. A conceptual plan and profile as well as typical cross sections of this extension as a two lane road are included on Exhibits 43A-C (Pages 93-95). The existing topography in this area will make establishing this connection rather expensive due to the need for extensive grading and retaining walls along the route. Therefore, to minimize the expense of constructing this roadway, the improvement may require the complete removal of the existing northbound US 101 on-ramp at Bello Street and the existing northbound US 101 off-ramp at Shell Beach Road / Mattie Road. This will impact the ability to access northbound US 101 from the downtown and Mattie Road from northbound US 101, unless replacement ramps are included. The projected traffic diversions associated with the Mattie Road extension are also depicted in Exhibit 42 (Page 90). About 100 PM peak hour vehicles are projected on Mattie Road. In the southbound direction on the Mattie Road extension, only 15 PM peak hour vehicles are projected, all attracted from the Price Street corridor. The closure of the northbound US 101 northbound on-ramp at Bello Street and off-ramp at Mattie Road would shift traffic onto Price and Dolliver (SR 1) Streets and away from Bello Street and the Mattie Road extension. South of the existing Mattie Road interchange, Price Street would experience an additional 390 vehicles in the northbound direction during the PM peak hour, more than doubling the current traffic at this location due to the ramp closure. Exhibit 44 (Page 97) tabulates the levels of service at key study intersections with the Mattie Road extension. Despite the potential diversion of traffic onto Price Street, no additional improvements would be required at the study intersections beyond those already required under either Existing or General Plan Buildout conditions. This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 43A – Mattie Road Extension Conceptual Plan/Profile Exhibit 43B – Mattie Road Extension Conceptual Cross Sections STA 5+00 to STA 20+0 Exhibit 43C– Mattie Road Extension Conceptual Cross Sections STA 25+00 to STA 40+00 This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 44 – Mattie Road Area Intersection Levels of Service – General Plan Buildout Weekday PM Peak Hour – With Mattie Road Extension 4) Stimson / Ocean View Couplet and Downtown Price Street Modifications The Stimson Avenue/Ocean View Avenue Couplet would convert Stimson and Ocean View Avenues into one-way streets between Dolliver (SR 1) and Price Streets. Ocean View Avenue would be one-way eastbound and Stimson Avenue would be one-way westbound. Currently, both streets are two-way streets. The project would also add a two-way bicycle facility along Ocean View Avenue between Dolliver (SR 1) and Price Streets. Exhibits 45A and 45B (Pages 99 and 100, respectively) depict this improvement. Exhibit 45A (Page 99) includes associated channelization modifications along Price Street through lanes through the Ocean View Avenue intersection. Exhibit 45B (Page 100) provides a single southbound through lane from Hinds Avenue, requiring the elimination of westbound left turns from the outside lane (currently and optional left/right lane) on the Price Canyon Road approach. Exhibit 45A (Page 99) shows the extension of two eastbound lanes on Price Street from Stimson Avenue, where they currently transition into a single lane, to Ocean View Avenue. This will provide additional capacity at the Price Street/Stimson Avenue intersection. It will also improve lane utilization on southbound Price Canyon Road at Price Street, which currently experiences long queues during the evening peak period. It will also include a northbound Price Street left turn lane at Stimson Avenue. However, two parking spaces would be lost on the Price Street frontage of the Pismo Food Store as well as three spaces on the east side of Price Street, north of Stimson. A bike lane also would be provided from Hinds Avenue to Ocean View Avenue. Exhibit 45B (Page 100) shows the provision of a single through lane on southbound Price Street. This has the advantage of preserving on-street parking with ample room for a protected bike lane (cycle track) and northbound Price Street left turn lane at Stimson Avenue. The disadvantage is that it will reduce the capacity of the Price Street/Price Canyon Road-Hinds Avenue intersections, especially for westbound Price Canyon Road. Queues already are long for the westbound to southbound left turn movement with two lanes available for left turns. Existing Existing N-S E-W Lane Intersection LOS PM Peak Hr PM Peak Hr PM Peak Hr PM Peak Hr Street Street Configuration Control Standard Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS (sec)(sec)(sec)(sec) 12 Mattie Price SB 1-L, 1-R Signal C 6.9 A 9.3 A Road Street EB 1-L/T WB 1-T/R 14 US 101 SB Price NB 1-L, 1-R All-Way Stop C/D 16.8 C 8.9 A 48.8 E 13.0 B Roundabout Off-ramp -Street SB 1-L, 1-T, 1-R Dolliver EB 1-T/R Street (SR 1)WB 1-L/T WeekdayWeekday With Imprvmnts. General Plan Buildout (Year 2035) Without Mattie Rd. Extension No Imprvmnts.No Imprvmnts. Proposed Improvement(s) Weekday General Plan Buildout (Year 2035) With Mattie Rd. Extension With Imprvmnts. Weekday Notes: 1. L, T, R = Left, Through, Right. 2. NB, SB, EB, WB = Northbound, Southbound, Eastbound, Westbound. 3. Analysis performed using 2010 Highway Capacity Manual methodologies. 4. Overall level of service standard for Caltrans is the transition between LOS C and D. 5. Overall level of service standard for the City of Pismo Beach and County of San Luis Obispo is LOS C. The City will need to determine which alternative is the most beneficial. Additional detailed design alternatives also need to be explored, which would require a more detailed alternatives analysis. The following are features common to both alternatives. 1. The left turn lane on Price Street at Ocean View Avenue is currently only about 40 feet long. This is not enough storage to accommodate current demand (including recreational vehicles), and the geometrics of the upstream northbound off-ramp preclude the lengthening of the left turn lane. By changing Stimson and Ocean View Avenues into a one-way couplet, left turns can be provided at Stimson Avenue (instead of Ocean View Avenue), which can better accommodate a longer left turn lane. This improvement also works well with the proposed Price Street extension (as noted previously). Exhibits 21 and 30 (Pages 43-47 and 66-70) depict operations under Existing and General Plan Buildout with the Stimson / Ocean View couplet in place. 2. The Stimson / Ocean View couplet also eliminates one other potential roadway hazard. At the Dolliver (SR 1) / Ocean View intersection, many RVs make the turn from northbound Dolliver Street (SR 1) onto eastbound Ocean View Avenue. These RVs require a large right turning radius, which can cause these vehicles to encroach into oncoming traffic on westbound Ocean View when making the northbound-to-eastbound right turn. With implementation of the Stimson / Ocean View couplet, there will no longer be an opposing traffic stream on westbound Ocean View east of Dolliver Street (SR 1), thus eliminating this issue. 3. Signalization of the Dolliver (SR 1) / Stimson intersection would be preferred to achieve acceptable operations at this location. While this improvement also may be required without implementation of the Stimson / Ocean View couplet, the couplet would eliminate the need to also signalize the adjacent Dolliver (SR 1) / Ocean View intersection. Appendix L provides recommended design considerations (i.e., “best practices”) for the proposed two- way bicycle facilities on Ocean View Avenue and Price Street. A short term alternative that can be easily implemented is to provide wayfinding signs directing large vehicles to continue northbound on Dolliver Street to Hinds Avenue. Hinds Avenue is a two lane, one- way street that can accommodate large right turning vehicles without encroaching into on-coming traffic. Exhibit 45A – Stimson Ave. / Ocean View Ave. One way Couplet with Two Eastbound Price St. T hrough Lanes Exhibit 45B – Stimson Ave. / Ocean View Ave. One way Couplet with Two-Way Cycle Track 5) Pier Area Improvements The downtown area, especially in the vicinity of the Pismo Beach Pier, is the location of the most severe congestion in the City of Pismo Beach, occurring on nearly all summer weekends and holidays. Downtown is also the location of the highest pedestrian traffic, which is a major contributor to vehicle congestion, due to the requirement of vehicles to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks. Bicycle traffic is also highest in the downtown area and between the pier area and the RV and camping facilities to the east along Dolliver (SR 1), with about 60 bicyclists (30 bicyclists in each direction) during both the Summer Sunday and Memorial Day Sunday afternoon peak hours. This is more than four times as much as occurs during the Weekday PM peak hour (about 13 bicyclists in each direction). A similar trend also occurs along Dolliver Street (SR 1) within the downtown, with about 40 bicyclists (20 in each direction) on Sundays, versus 10-20 bicyclists during the Weekday PM peak hour. Recommended improvements in the Pier Area that improve traffic operations, pedestrian and bicycle facilities or provide signal operations that reduce pedestrian impacts on traffic operations are listed below. They are located in Exhibit 46 (Page 103), followed by individual discussions on the subsequent pages. a. Cypress Street/Pomeroy Avenue Pedestrian Scramble Traffic Signal and d. Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy Signal Modification to Pedestrian Scramble e. Dolliver Street Left Turn Pockets f. Restrict Motorized Vehicles on the Cypress Street Bridge g. Cypress Street Bike Boulevard; h. Addie / Park Avenue Couplet; and i. Restrict Motorized Vehicles on Pomeroy Avenue South of Cypress This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) Exhibit 46 – Recommended Pier Area Improvements This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) a. Cypress Street/Pomeroy Avenue Pedestrian Scramble Traffic Signal and b. Dolliver Street (State Route 1)/Pomeroy Signal Modification to Pedestrian Scramble A total of 257 pedestrians crossed the four legs of the Dolliver (SR 1)/Pomeroy intersection during the weekday evening peak hour, compared with 1,023 crossings on a Summer Sunday afternoon and 1,305 on Memorial Day Sunday afternoon (see Exhibits 8 through 10 (Pages 19-21)). The Pomeroy/Cypress intersection experienced 665 pedestrian crossings on the weekday evening, 2,765 on a summer afternoon and 2,033 on the Memorial Day Sunday afternoon. All of these are extremely high volumes that severely affect intersection operations. Installation of a pedestrian-based signal, also called a “pedestrian scramble”, may be a viable option at both locations. An example of a pedestrian scramble is depicted in Exhibit 47 (right). This signal would provide a pedestrian-only phase at the intersection. During the pedestrian phase, pedestrians would be allowed to cross all of the intersection approaches at once, without vehicular conflicts. Pedestrians would also be allowed to cross diagonally across the intersection, again without any vehicular conflicts. At the Cypress / Pomeroy intersection, the pedestrian scramble will improve existing congestion levels by organizing the current randomness of pedestrian crossings. This signal would operate as a two-phase signal, alternating between traffic flow and pedestrian crossings. Organizing the pedestrian crossings into a set timeframe (versus the current random timing of the pedestrian crossings) would reduce vehicle queuing on Pomeroy Avenue and reduce the potential for pedestrian collisions. The pedestrian scramble signal could also be turned off during the off season, reverting the intersection back to the stop control that is present today. The addition of a pedestrian scramble should be investigated at the Dolliver Street (SR 1)/ Pomeroy Avenue signal. As noted in Section 2.J - Traffic Operations and Recommendations – Existing Conditions, pedestrians are occasionally restricted from crossing Dolliver by vehicular congestion on Sundays during the peak season, which will be more difficult as vehicular and pedestrian traffic increase in the future. The addition of a pedestrian scramble could be a method to improve the capacity of pedestrian crossings at this intersection. This intersection is owned by Caltrans, which has investigated the use of pedestrian scramble phases on state highways in the past. However, it has not pursued or implemented them on any state highways to date. Exhibit 47 – Example of a Pedestrian Scramble c. Dolliver Street Left Turn Pockets The addition of short exclusive left turn pockets (40 foot long by 10 feet wide) on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at key intersections between Wadsworth Avenue and Ocean View Avenue, such as at Pomeroy Avenue and Hinds Avenue, should be considered. Most left-turning vehicles on Dolliver Street (SR 1) would be able to leave the through lane while waiting for gaps in opposing traffic, thus allowing through traffic to flow freely in an adjacent lane. This would help mitigate the current situation, where left-turning vehicles wait in through lanes and block through traffic on Dolliver Street (SR 1). Blocked vehicles can often attempt to bypass these left-turning vehicles via the bicycle lane, potentially endangering passing bicyclists. However, due to the narrow width of Dolliver Street (SR 1) – 50 feet of pavement –some on- street parking will be lost – up to three spaces on each side of Dolliver where a left turn pocket is provided. Alternatively, the existing bike lane would need to be terminated in the proximity of the left turn lane. However, the beneficial improvement in traffic congestion justifies this improvement. Two alternative left turn pockets are conceptually illustrated on Exhibit 48 on the following page. Alternative A illustrates a left turn pocket centered on Dolliver Street. Alternative B illustrated a left turn pocket offset to the northbound side of Dolliver Street. Alternative B probably would result in the loss of fewer on-street parking spaces. Dolliver Street is a state highway and any modifications will require Caltrans approval. Also, consideration needs to be given to maintaining continuous northbound and southbound Class II bike lanes as recommended in the Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan. d. Restrict Motorized Vehicles on the Cypress Street Bridge The Downtown Strategic plan recommended considering the prohibition of vehicle traffic along the Cypress Street bridge over Pismo Creek. The bridge would instead be exclusively used by pedestrians and bicyclists, with the exception of small electric vehicles, emergency vehicles and special event traffic. This closure could be done on a trial basis to better assess the benefits and consequences of this modification. Exhibit 48 – Left Turn Pocket Alternatives on Dolliver St. (SR1) This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) e. Cypress Street Bike Boulevard This improvement was suggested in the Downtown Strategic Plan. It would convert Cypress Street into a bicycle boulevard (i.e., a street where bicycles have the right-of-way over vehicles). The conversion would be similar to that of Morro Street in San Luis Obispo, with pavement striping indicating that Cypress Street is a bicycle boulevard, although unlike Morro Street, no forced vehicle traffic diversions would be implemented on Cypress Street. Exhibit 49 (right) depicts a sample roadway pavement striping (similar to striping on Morro Street in San Luis Obispo) that could be added to Cypress Street to indicate that the roadway is a bike boulevard. Cypress Street carries about 200 to 250 vehicles in the peak hour at relatively low speeds. A bike boulevard should be easily implemented. Consideration could also be given to reducing the speed limit to 20 miles per hour, which would reduce the speed differential between motorized vehicles and bicycles. f. Addie Street / Park Avenue Couplet Convert Addie Street and Park Avenue into one-way streets between Dolliver Street and the public parking lot along the beachfront. Addie would be one-way westbound (toward the beach) and Park one-way eastbound (toward Dolliver). Both Addie Street and Park Avenue are very narrow for roadways that allow two-way traffic (30 feet wide or less). With parking on both sides of the street, only about 14 feet remains for two-way travel. Most local streets have at least 20 feet for vehicle travel. By converting both roadways into a one-way couplet, only one lane of traffic will be needed on each street and parking can be preserved on both sides of each street. Converting Addie Street and Park Avenue to one-way streets will require traffic generated from land uses along these streets to travel through the city parking area at the beach end of Addie Street. This parking lot layout should be reconfigured to both improve vehicle throughput and also improve the efficiency of the parking layout. Exhibit 49 – Example of Bike Boulevard Pavement Striping Neither street experiences a large volume of traffic. The Addie Street / Park Avenue one-way couplet conversion will have little effect on traffic operations in the area during normal traffic conditions, although it may have an effect during special events held in the vicinity of the Addie Street parking lot. g. Restrict Motorized Vehicles on Pomeroy Avenue South of Cypress Convert Pomeroy Avenue to pedestrian traffic only between Cypress Street and the pier area. As previously shown on Exhibits 9 and 10 (Pages 20-21), the extreme pedestrian activity crossing both Pomeroy Avenue and Cypress Street on Sundays during the peak season affects the operation of both streets at their intersection. For this reason, Pomeroy Avenue could be converted into a pedestrian walkway between Cypress Street and the pier. This would force all traffic currently using Pomeroy to turn left onto Cypress, eliminating one of the largest pedestrian/vehicle conflicts in the city. In addition, converting Pomeroy Avenue into a pedestrian walkway would be consistent with the long-term vision of the pier plaza as described in the Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan. The entrance to the pier would be converted to a pedestrian-only plaza with minimal or no adjacent parking. One of the major disadvantages of this improvement would be the loss of on-street parking on Pomeroy between Cypress and the pier parking area, although these spaces could be replaced elsewhere in the downtown area. If the pier parking area were to remain in place (or moved underneath the plaza in front of the pier, as shown in the Strategic Plan concepts of the pier area), the entrance to the pier parking area would need to be relocated to Hinds Avenue. This, in turn, would require the conversion of Hinds Avenue to two-way travel between the pier parking lot and Cypress Street. Inbound traffic would be diverted onto Cypress Street and Hinds Avenue. Both Hinds Avenue and Cypress Street could accommodate the additional traffic. Consideration should be given to maintaining emergency and evacuation access via the Pomeroy pedestrian facility. If the City of Pismo Beach desires to underground the pier parking area, it could still place the entrance off of Pomeroy Avenue west of Cypress Street, via an access ramp into the parking lot. Pedestrian access to the pier area could be preserved via a widened sidewalk at ground level alongside the existing businesses along the north frontage of Pomeroy Avenue near the pier. There are many different access and configuration decisions that would need to be made prior to a restriction of motorized vehicles on Pomeroy Avenue south of Cypress Street. It is therefore recommended that this improvement not be implemented until a plan for the pier parking area is completed. 6) Downtown One-Way Couplet Alternatives Several downtown one-way couplet alternatives were evaluated as a part of this study. They include reversing the existing Pomeroy-Hinds couplet, creating a Dolliver (SR 1)/Price couplet, and creating a Dolliver (SR 1)/Bello couplet. Each is discussed below. a. Reverse One-Way on Pomeroy and Hinds Currently, Pomeroy Avenue is one-way westbound (i.e., towards the beach) and Hinds Avenue is one-way eastbound (i.e., away from the beach) between the pier and Price Street. This alternative would reverse the one-way directions of Pomeroy and Hinds Avenues, so that Pomeroy is one-way eastbound and Hinds Avenue is one-way westbound. The current one-way couplet was created in the 1990s to address the collision history at the Price Street / Hinds Avenue intersection, specifically collisions created by traffic turning from Price Street onto Hinds Avenue. Reversing the one-way directions on Pomeroy and Hinds would re-introduce these movements at the Price / Hinds intersection, and thus may lead to an increase in collisions. For this reason, it is recommended that this improvement not be implemented. b. Dolliver (SR 1)/ Price Couplet This alternative would convert Dolliver (SR 1) and Price Streets into one-way streets between the Price/Dolliver intersection and their mutual intersections with Hinds Avenue. Dolliver Street (SR 1) would be one-way southbound and Price one-way northbound. Based upon the volumes on both corridors, Dolliver Street (SR 1) would likely need to have two through lanes. Price Street would operate acceptably with one lane. This alternative would change the character of the Price Street corridor between Pomeroy and San Luis Avenues, as the roadway would function as a major through street rather than its current function of primarily providing access to adjoining businesses. The existing median on-street parking on Price Street in this area would likely need to be eliminated due to the potential conflicts between pedestrians and the increased through traffic. The resulting parking supply may not be adequate to serve the demand from Price Street businesses. It is also likely that Caltrans may require that Price Street also be designated as SR 1, in order to provide a state facility in the opposing direction to Dolliver Street. Caltrans encroachment permits would then be required for any work within the Price Street right of way, which could constrain the City’s ability to manage traffic operations in the downtown. The through traffic function of a state highway designation for Price Street would likely also conflict with the pedestrian-orientation of Price Street that the City has created in the area, such as the stop sign locations and the 15 miles per hour speed limit, and would likely need to be removed. The designation as a state highway would not be necessary if Caltrans were to relinquish the portion of SR 1 within the downtown, in which case the jurisdiction of the streets would revert to the City of Pismo Beach. However, the typical relinquishment process with Caltrans can take many years to accomplish. For these reasons, this couplet alternative is not recommended for implementation. c. Dolliver/Bello Couplet One variant to the Dolliver/Price Couplet is the Dolliver / Bello Couplet. This improvement would be similar to the Dolliver / Price couplet, except that Price Street would be replaced by Bello Street as the westbound one-way street. This variant would not have the same configuration effects upon Price Street as the Dolliver / Price couplet, but would introduce considerable through traffic on Bello Street, which is mostly residential and would still be subject to the probable need to designate Bello Street at SR 1. For these reasons, the Dolliver / Bello couplet is not recommended for implementation. F. Regional Highway Improvements SLOCOG is proposing a number of improvements to the US 101 corridor, which connects the Five Cities region to the rest of San Luis Obispo County and beyond. The segment of US 101 within Pismo Beach experiences the largest traffic volume along US 101 in the South County region with approximately 68,000 vehicles per day. The widening of US 101 to six lanes has been proposed through the Five Cities region for many decades (including in the 1992 Pismo Beach General Plan). However, the high expense and limited funding sources for this widening have led SLOCOG to attempt to maximize the capacity of the existing corridor with multi-modal, relatively low cost strategies. This effort began in the early 2000s with the addition of auxiliary lanes (i.e., ramp-to-ramp lanes) between Price Street and Oak Park Boulevard. SLOCOG and RTA (San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority) are currently planning Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service along the US 101 corridor. The latest plans proposed by SLOCOG are described in the US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan. They include improvements to the ramps and segments along southbound US 101 between Avila Beach Drive and Hinds Avenue and are listed in Exhibit 50 (Page 114). They include the addition of auxiliary lanes, ramp meters, extensions of the acceleration and deceleration distances on various ramps, extending the climbing lane on southbound US 101 to the Spyglass Drive off-ramp, and other ramp improvements. Many of these improvements are currently being evaluated in more detail by Caltrans staff. In December 2014, SLOCOG released its draft 2014 Regional Transportation Plan, which identifies its transportation goals for San Luis Obispo County, its preferred regional transportation improvements within the County and how it will fund them. This continues the theme of maximizing the capacity of the existing corridor, as well as increasing the number of transportation mode choices that are available to San Luis Obispo County residents. Proposed improvements in the Pismo Beach region include regional Transportation System Management strategies (such as the establishment of three new park and ride lots within Pismo Beach), the addition of regional transit service at the US 101 / Spyglass Drive interchange, the Price Street/James Way extension, reconstruction of the Hinds Avenue bridge over US 101, and the previously mentioned improvements along US 101 in Pismo Beach. Many of these proposed improvements do not have available funding at this time. ID Description Project Location US 101 Freeway Improvements 1.1.a Add General Purpose Lanes NB/SB 101 - Traffic Way to Avila Beach Drive 1.1.b Add HOV Lanes NB/SB 101 - Traffic Way to Avila Beach Drive 1.1.c Add Auxiliary Lanes *Various 1.1.d Add Ramp Meters NB/SB 101 - On-Ramps Traffic Way to Avila Beach Drive 1.1.e N/A (see Project 1.5.a) 1.1.f N/A (see Project 1.5.b) 1.1.g Increase Regional Transit Service Traffic Way to Avila Beach Drive 1.1.h Travel Demand Management Traffic Way to Avila Beach Drive * US 101 Freeway Auxiliary Lane Improvements 1.1.c01 1300' Deceleration Lane NB 101 - Grand Avenue Off-Ramp 1.1.c02 Ramp to Ramp Auxiliary Lane NB 101 - Brisco Road to Camino Mercado 1.1.c03 Acceleration Lane to N. Oak Park Blvd Overcrossing NB 101 - Camino Mercado On-Ramp 1.1.c04 Close James Hook On-Ramp. Extend Auxiliary Lane to 4th Street NB 101 - 4th Street to James Way On-Ramp 1.1.c05 600' Deceleration Lane NB 101 - Wadsworth Avenue Off-Ramp to Hinds Avenue Overcrossing 1.1.c06 2000' Acceleration Lane NB 101 - Mattie Road On-Ramp 1.1.c07 1300' Deceleration Lane NB 101 - Spyglass Drive On-Ramp 1.1.c08 Ramp to Ramp Auxiliary Lane NB 101 - Spyglass Drive to Avila Beach Drive 1.1.c09 2000' Acceleration Lane NB 101 - Avila Beach Drive On-Ramp 1.1.c10 1300' Deceleration Lane SB 101 - Avila Beach Drive Off-Ramp 1.1.c11 Extend Truck Climb Lane SB 101 - Spyglass Drive Off-Ramp 1.1.c12 Add 3rd Lane (Project 1.1.c11 + 1.1.a or 1.1.b)SB 101 - Spyglass Drive Off-Ramp 1.1.c13 Extend Auxiliary Lane to Avila Beach On-Ramp SB 101 - Avila Beach Drive On-Ramp to Project 1.1.c12 1.1.c14 2000' Acceleration Lane SB 101 - Spyglass Drive On-Ramp 1.1.c15 Ramp to Ramp Auxiliary Lane SB 101 - Price Street (Dinosaur Cave Park) to Price Street (Mattie Road) 1.1.c16 1300' Deceleration Lane SB 101 - SB 1 Off-Ramp 1.1.c17 1300' Deceleration Lane SB 101 - Hinds Avenue Off-Ramp 1.1.c18 2000' Acceleration Lane SB 101 - El Camino Real (12th Street) On-Ramp 1.1.c19 1300' Deceleration Lane SB 101 - Halcyon Road Off-Ramp Fair Oaks Avenue Intersection Improvements 1.2.a Add Traffic Signal (Offset Intersection)Fair Oaks Avenue at Orchard Avenue and SB 101 Off- Ramp 1.2.b Add Roundabout (Offset Intersection)Fair Oaks Avenue at Orchard Avenue and SB 101 Off- Ramp 1.2.c Convert Orchard Avenue to Right In/Out Fair Oaks Avenue at Orchard Avenue 1.2.d Close Orchard Avenue Access to Fair Oaks Avenue Fair Oaks Avenue at Orchard Avenue 1.2.e Realign SB 101 Ramp Terminal to Orchard Avenue (Signal)Fair Oaks Avenue at Orchard Avenue and SB 101 Off- Ramp 1.2.e Realign SB 101 Ramp Terminal to Orchard Avenue (Roundabout)Fair Oaks Avenue at Orchard Avenue and SB 101 Off- Ramp Carpool / Vanpool / Transit Access 1.3.c Small Park & Ride Lot (Spyglass Drive)Spyglass Drive at Mattie Road or Shell Beach Road Price Street Gap Closure 1.5.a Extend Price Street to Five Cities Drive Price Street between Ocean View Avenue & Five Cities Drive 1.5.b US 101 Collector Distributor Lanes US 101 - NB/SB between Price Street and 4th Street Pismo Creek / Anza Trail Improvements 1.6.a New Bicycle / Pedestrian Bridge at UP Railroad James Way to Pismo Beach Sports Complex 1.6.b Class I Trail along Pismo Creek Pismo Creek between UP Railroad and Price Street 1.6.c Class I Trail along the UP Railroad UP Railroad between Pismo Creek and James Way Projects shown in italics were not carried thorugh full analysis due to other factors that rendered them infeasible or if they have already been programmed for funding through other efforts. Abridged from: US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan , Kittleson & Associates, December 2014. Exhibit 50 – Regional Improvement Concept List in Five Cities Area 4. Recommendations Study recommendations are summarized in Exhibit 51 (Page 116) and repeated below. The recommendations are organized into the following categories: A. Pedestrian and Bicycle B. Transit C. Rail D. Parking E. Traffic Operations F. Transportation Demand Management A. Pedestrian and Bicycle CROSSWALK ENHANCEMENTS The Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, Complete Street Plan, and Downtown Strategic Plan, encourage pedestrian activity throughout the City in order to minimize automobile congestion and increase walking, bicycling, and other healthy living practices. In particular, high traffic areas within and adjacent to downtown, local schools, sports facilities, and parking/transit facilities should be areas of focus where enhancement of existing crosswalks or the incorporation of new crosswalks would encourage increased pedestrian activity and/or would improve pedestrian safety. Additional recommendations for crosswalk enhancements in the Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan and Downtown Strategic Plan include: Complete Street Plan  At the Terrace Avenue intersection with Shell Beach Road and the Shell Beach Road/Price Street/Cliff Avenue intersection, crosswalks should be highlighted through the incorporation of decorative paving treatments with separate markings for bicycles and pedestrians.  Within the downtown area, enhancements of existing crosswalks should include decorative pavers and/or markings to enhance the walkability and beautification of the street scene.  Where appropriate, raised sidewalks, decorative pavers, and ADA crosswalk upgrades should be incorporated to improve and enhance the existing or proposed pedestrian infrastructure and safety throughout the City. Downtown Strategic Plan  The City should enhance crosswalks at Main Street, Pomeroy Avenue, Hinds Avenue, and Stimson Avenue with special paving and/or markings. Item No.Recommendations A. Pedestrian and Bicycle 1.Identify locations within Pismo Beach where crosswalks should be added or enhanced 2.Pursue implementation of recreational trails, as funding becomes available 3.Convert Cypress Street, between Hinds Avenue and Addie Street, into a bicycle boulevard 4.Convert the existing Cypress Street bridge over Pismo Creek into primarily bicycle and pedestrian use, but open to one-way vehicle traffic during special events. 5.Provide additional support facilites for pedestrian and bicycle use throughout the city 6.Consider establishing a bicycle sharing program 7.Extend the existing promenade north of Main Street 8.Increase eduction, encouragement, and enforcement of bicycle facilities 9.Implement other recommendations within the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan 10.Implement other recommendations within Pismo Beach Complete Streets Plan 11.Implement other recommendations within the Downtown Strategic Plan B. Transit 1.Work with San Luis Obispo Council of Goverments (SLOCOG) and San Luis Obispo Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) to improve transit availability and accessibility within Pismo Beach C. Rail 1.Work with RTA, SLOCOG, and the City of Grover Beach to add a shuttle service between the Grover Beach train station and Downtown Pismo Beach D. Parking 1.Develop a Parking Strategy Plan for Downtown Pismo Beach 2."Right Size" (i.e. utilize during off-season) the parking inventory within Downtown Pismo Beach 3.Add both static and dynamic parking wayfinding systems 4.Study further feasibility of potential parking structure site, including: a. Parking structure site analysis b. Analyze cost benefit anaysis for each site c. Prepare financial feasibility for each site d. Prioritize development of site ranking; select site and move forward with development plan 5.Need for downtown parking standards review 6.Site-Specific parking improvements: a. Parking inventory control system (i.e. dynamic system) at pier parking area b. Back-in parking in on-street spaces on Pomeroy Avenue between Price Street and pier parking area c. Back-in parking in on-street spaces on Hinds Avenue between pier parking area and Price Street d. Convert existing parking into back-in parking on Price Street, Pomeroy Avenue, and Hinds Avenue (see Appendix N ) e. Re-evaluate parking lot layout for Addie Street lot to increase parking inventory and improve flow Exhibit 51 – Summary of Recommendations (Table continued on next page) Item No.Recommendations E. Traffic Operations 1.Implement intersection improvements identified within Exhibits 21 and 30 2.Implement Stimson/Ocean View one-way couplet, including signal at Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue and striping improvements along Price Street 3.Adopt policy that establishes a lower or no level of service standard within the Downtown area 4.If implement Price Street extension, also implement associated striping improvements along Price Street, Stimson/Ocean View one-way couplet, and improvements at the US 101 Southbound Ramps - Outlets Main Entrance / Five Cities Drive intersection 5.If the Southbound US 101 Off-Ramp to Hinds Avenue is closed, prohibit through trucks on Price Street [Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Hinds Avenue] 6.Implement the Addie Street / Park Avenue one-way couplet 7.Only convert Pomeroy Avenue to pedestrian-only traffic if way(s) to replace lost parking spaces are identified. 8.Add left turn lanes on Dolliver Street once have identified way(s) to replace any lost parking spaces 9.Work with San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) in its efforts to implement the improvements identified within the US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan and the 2014 Regional Transportation Plan F. Transportation Demand Management 1.Consider establishing a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) plan for the Downtown area Exhibit 51 – Summary of Recommendations (Continued) PROPOSED TRAILS The City of Pismo Beach should pursue recreational trails as funding becomes available. One example is the Pismo Creek Recreational Path, whose alignment is included in Appendix M. Both the City of Pismo Beach and San Luis Obispo County have identified the establishment of this trail as a long-term goal. PROPOSED BIKEWAYS Bikeway improvements and enhancements recommended in the Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, Complete Street Plan, and Downtown Strategic Plan include the following, listed individually for each of the three documents. Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan  Planning and development activities that construct, reconstruct, or reconfigure existing roadways shall, to the extent feasible as determined by the City, provide pedestrian and bicycle facilities as shown on Exhibits 7 and 8 (Pages 15 and 19).  Future Planning projects and right-of-way dedications will take the existing layout and circulation of bicycle facilities into consideration and make appropriate adjustments for facilities identified in the plan.  Whenever new development is adjacent to an existing commercial center, school or other community facilities, development should include non-motorized pathways to the center/school/facility.  The Bike Plan shall be consulted when assembling and updating the Capital Improvement Program. Complete Street Plan  Class II bicycle lanes should be extended along both sides of Shell Beach Road from the northern City limits to Spyglass Drive.  A separate multi-use trail along the west side of Shell Beach Road from the northern City limits to Spyglass Drive should be incorporated to encourage non-motorized transportation and recreational activities within and outside the City limits.  At the Shell Beach Road and Spyglass Drive intersection, Class II bicycle lane striping should be incorporated east of the intersection with appropriate signage directing cyclists to the Class II bicycle lane on Mattie Road.  The multi-use trail should continue along the east side of Shell Beach Road from Spyglass Drive to Cliff Avenue.  Existing Class III travel lanes along Shell Beach Road between Spyglass Drive and Vista Del Mar Avenue should be marked with shared lane markings or other appropriate Class III indicators.  The City should coordinate with Caltrans to determine the appropriate pavement markings to improve cyclist visibility along Price Street from Cliff Avenue to the Price Street/Dolliver Street/US 101 intersection.  The City should work with Caltrans to evaluate the configuration and determine the most appropriate alternative for the incorporation of either a Class I multi-use trail or Class II bicycle lanes from Cliff Avenue to the Price Street/Dolliver Street/US 101 intersection.  The City should consider incorporating a Class I multi-use trail behind the Best Western Hotel that connects with Price Street to the north and south.  A two-way, separate bicycle lane should be incorporated along the west side of Dolliver Street from Price Street to Main Street.  Due to high automobile traffic volumes along Dolliver Street south of Main Street, Class III bicycle lanes should be incorporated along Main Street, Pomeroy Avenue, Hinds Avenue, and Addie Avenue to connect with the Class III bicycle routes along Cypress Street and the Promenade.  The City should consider incorporating a multi-use pathway that would allow casual cyclists to traverse from the Cypress Street Bridge to the intersection of Dolliver Street and Village Drive.  Where appropriate, bicycle activity enhancements should be considered and incorporated to encourage bicycle use and safety throughout the City. Downtown Strategic Plan  The City should designate Cypress Street a bicycle boulevard from Main Street to Dolliver Street (State Route 1), orienting and prioritizing bicycle use along the boulevard but still remaining open to use by automobiles. This closure could be done on a trial basis to better assess the benefits and consequences of this modification. SUPPORT FACILITIES Support facilities recommended in the Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, Complete Street Plan, and Downtown Strategic Plan, listed individually for each of the three documents. Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan  Future updates to the Municipal Code Section 17.108.020 should consider a ratio of one bike rack for every 10 car spaces for commercial uses and one bike rack for every two car spaces for multi-family residential uses.  All new City parking lots should provide bicycle parking of not less than 10% of the number of planned parking spaces.  Long and short-term bicycle parking shall be provided at all park and ride lots and transit centers within the City and the City shall work with SLOCOG and RTA to identify funds for the provision of bicycle parking.  City staff shall identify locations where additional long and short-term bike parking may be necessary and: o May develop a “racks-with-plaques” program to provide for additional bike parking at those locations. o Recommend long-term parking facilities including lockers and showers for new developments. The City should consider placing short-term bicycle parking adjacent to shops, areas lacking automobile parking spaces, and/or in areas of observed needs where appropriate as it has already done in the downtown. Complete Street Plan  Consider opportunities to incorporate bicycle parking and seating amenities near view corridors along Shell Beach Road south of El Portal Drive, at Palisades Park, and at coastal access trail connections.  The City should consider including locations for parking and/or pedestrian bicycle amenities on the east side of Price Street, especially where the available space widens at ramp locations.  Within the downtown pedestrian core, consider incorporating pedestrian amenities such as benches to enhance walkability.  Integrate long-term bicycle parking locations to serve people who leave their bicycles at the same location for the day or overnight near transit locations, schools, and places of work.  Integrate short-term bicycle parking to serve people who leave their bicycles for short periods of time while shopping, recreating, eating, and/or running errands. Downtown Strategic Plan  Bicycle racks should be placed in prominent locations or gathering spaces that are easily accessible and, where appropriate, be in the form of public art that is reflective of the character of the downtown. BIKE SHARING As noted earlier, the City of Pismo Beach has completed but not adopted a feasibility study to consider establishing a bicycle sharing program within the City. This program would provide bicycle rental stations at key locations around the City. The traffic study encourages the development of this program and is envisioned to provide a range of benefits to the public and local business throughout the City by expanding healthy/active living choices, reducing automobile usage, improving circulation within the City particularly in the summer months, and increasing exposure to local businesses among others. Recommendations for a bike sharing program within the Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan include: The City should continue the process to incorporate a bike share program within the downtown area to encourage bicycle use, reduce automobile usage, and free additional parking spots. LOCATION–SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendations for location-specific enhancements focus on expansion of the existing promenade that currently runs from Addie Street north to Main Street. The promenade expansion would extend north from Main Street to connect neighborhoods and hotels to the downtown. It is envisioned that this would reduce automobile related trips downtown, increase pedestrian mobility, and improve access to the beach. Recommendations for expanding the existing promenade in the Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan and the Downtown Strategic Plan include (see next page): Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan  Consistent with the 2005 San Luis Obispo County Regional Transportation Plan (Vision 2025), the City should encourage the development of boardwalks, recreation and multi-use trails, which travel through or connect scenic areas or other destinations to promote walking and equestrian travel where appropriate. Downtown Strategic Plan  A new promenade extension should be incorporated north of Main Street to connect the neighborhoods and hotels to the downtown.  Stairs providing access to and from the beach located at hotels and streets between Dolliver Street and Mattie Road should connect to the extended promenade. EDUCATION, ENCOURAGEMENT AND ENFORCEMENT Recommendations for increasing education, encouragement, and enforcement described in the Pismo Beach Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan include:  The City shall work with SLO Regional Rideshare to provide Transportation Choices Programs to City employees.  The City should consider adding the following text to the Municipal Code 12.16.160 Content of Special Event form: o As a condition of the issuance of a Special Event permit, the applicant may be required to provide bicycle parking. Bicycle parking provision may include “Bike Valet” services provided by SLOCBC or by event volunteers.  The City may work with the bike coalition to advertise Bicycle Confidence Workshops in Pismo Beach.  The City should encourage Lucia Mar School District to provide bike and pedestrian safety programs at schools within City limits. The City may participate in bike rodeos or assemblies and organized walk/bike to school day events. The City may participate in Bicycle Confidence Workshops or another equivalent program, to individuals ticketed for bicycling illegally.  The City may participate in education programs for motorists on rights/rules of pedestrian and bicyclists.  The City should promote proper cycling to tourists by providing safe cycling information on the Conference and Visitors Bureau website and at the Chamber of Commerce Building downtown.  The City will continue its advertisement of the many walking and beach access options within the City by print, on-line advertisement and public access television.  The City may assist and provide support for organizations and individuals who wish to use pedestrian facilities for social activity and improvement.  The City encourages school participation with the SLOCOG Safe Routes to School program.  The City encourages Rideshare Employee Incentive Programs. Helps employers promote bicycling, walking, carpooling, and riding the bus to work. This would reduce the employers’ parking demand. This program may provide financial incentives or only promotional materials.  The City may engage Cal Poly, the San Luis Distance Club, SLO Soles Volkssport and/or other walking/running clubs, SLO County Bicycle Coalition, biking clubs or Regional Rideshare assistance to implement elements of this bicycle/pedestrian plan by doing the following: o Organizing an outreach campaign for International Walk to School Day each October or other similar walking programs. o Coordination of walking programs for varying segments of the population, including, but not limited to children and seniors. o Seeking and writing grants for bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. o Monitoring success of the implementation procedures identified in this document. o Developing a safety campaign to reduce car/bike conflicts. o Liaising between local schools and Rideshare to provide bike education o Creating or working with the SLOCBC to provide bike valet at events o Starting a “racks with plaques” and other promotion programs.  The City may participate with others to address countywide bicycle and pedestrian access issues.  The City may provide advertising opportunities through its quarterly recreation guide for walking clubs along City pedestrian trails.  The City may work collaboratively with others to support events and programs promoting pedestrian/biking/beach access opportunities. B. Transit SLOCOG and the San Luis Obispo RTA are both working to improve transit availability and accessibility within San Luis Obispo County. This includes the establishment of a future Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) route in the southern portion of San Luis Obispo County , the goal of which is also to reduce congestion along US 101. It is recommended that the City of Pismo Beach support these efforts. C. Rail There is currently no shuttle service between the Grover Beach train station and Downtown Pismo Beach. It is recommended that the City of Pismo Beach work with RTA, SLOCOG and the City of Grover Beach to establish such a service. This would enhance the alternative to travel by train rather than driving to Pismo Beach for visitors from locations along the California coast. D. Parking The following are recommendations for the parking program: 1. There is a need for development of a Parking Strategic Plan for Downtown Pismo Beach. The last formal parking study was completed in 2006 which primarily addressed the parking management of existing spaces. A Parking Strategic plan will follow the City’s Vision, Mission and Objectives statement. It will define the strategic goals for the parking system and develop the guiding principles which will serve the community to make policy and operational decisions for a 20 -30 year time period. It also will provide the implementation strategy to guide the City through the long time period of development of the program. It is important to note that a parking strategic plan is a long-term guidance document. It will take both time and money to implement all of the plan’s recommendations. 2. It is important to “right size” the downtown parking inventory to meet the needs of all seasons. This includes balancing the parking demands by creating year-round destination events which will assist with development and use of the parking inventories. It also creates the opportunity for public parking development in partnership with private developers to provide shared parking resources. 3. There is a need for a parking wayfinding system to assist the public with finding available parking, which allows them to park once and walk through-out the downtown, and reduces the repeated circulating of traffic and queuing of vehicles waiting for parking spaces to become available. The wayfinding system can include both dynamic and static signage and dynamic signage may be activated or de-activated based on seasonal demands. A static wayfinding signage program was implemented in 2015. 4. The Parking Strategic Plan also needs to analyze the potential sites for future parking structures once the “right size” parking system is determined. A parking structure feasibility plan a step-by-step process for development of parking facilities, prioritizes the sites and plan and provides a guiding plan to take advantage of partnering opportunities with private sector developers as they arise during a 20-30 year time frame. The plan includes site analysis for each site, cost benefit analysis, financial feasibility, as well as development of a ranking system for moving forward. Without such a plan, most cities function in a reactionary mode and miss opportunities for timing and forecasting parking needs and often miss opportunities for public- private partnerships in the development of shared facilities. 5. The City should undertake a review of its parking standards and requirements and adjust standards to allow public-private projects and shared parking opportunities. Such plans result in reduced parking requirements for a compact downtown such as that in Downtown Pismo Beach. 6. There are a number of site-specific parking improvements which will not only improve the parking inventory and functional use of parking inventories, they will also improve traffic flow and circulation of the downtown. These options include: a. Implement a parking inventory control system (i.e., dynamic parking guidance system) at the pier parking area which will assist with parking utilization and reduce traffic in a very congested location of downtown. b. Provide two rows of interlocking diagonal parking in the median on Price Street between Wadsworth Avenue and Hinds Avenue. These could be back-in spaces as illustrated on Exhibit 53A (Page 125)). Either conventional or back-in spaces will eliminate curb side parking spaces and relocate all parking to the center of the street. Thus, the conflicts of backing out of parking spaces into both moving traffic and curb-side parked vehicles are eliminated. (Note: This improvement could also allow the City to lengthen the left turn lanes on Price Street at Wadsworth Avenue. Although the example in Exhibit 51A matches the length of the existing 50 foot left turn lane, it could be lengthened through the elimination of one or more spaces.) c. Consider development of on-street back-in parking spaces on Pomeroy Avenue between Price Street and Cypress Street. A sample of this type of parking is provided in Exhibit 53B (Page 126). d. Consider development of on-street back-in parking spaces on Hinds Avenue between Price Street and Cypress Street. A sample of this type of parking is provided in Exhibit 53C (Page 127). e. Re-evaluate the parking lot layout for the Addie Street lot to increase the number of parking spaces and improve flow. This coupled with street improvements recommended for Addie and Park Street will increase the parking inventories within the lot. Although back-in parking would be a relatively new concept to Pismo Beach, it is a concept that has been used successfully in other areas of the state and country for decades. Examples include the cities of Oceanside, California (on Mission Avenue in its main downtown core) and San Francisco (near AT&T Park). One of the major safety benefits of back-in angled parking is that exiting vehicles who have back-in parked into angled spaces have improved visibility of through traffic and bicyclists, compared to standard angled parking. The “Downtown Parking Enhancements and Opportunities Study” previously cited on page 30 represents the Parking Strategic Plan described in Item 1 above. It makes the following additional recommendations. 1. Implement variable parking rates based on demand. This will encourage more efficient parking utilization. 2. Implement enhanced parking meters, fee collection and enforcement systems. 3. Postpone development of parking structures until parking management strategies have been fully implemented and evaluated. A parking structure is the most expensive means of addressing the peak season parking deficiency. Current and future revenue streams are not adequate to finance this option. 4. The Pier Plaza with underground parking appears to be able to be implemented without negatively impacting local businesses. The concept should be tested with a pilot project to simulate the reduced parking supply before implementing a permanent project. E. Traffic Operations The following transportation-related improvements are recommended for implementation: 1. Implement the intersection improvements identified in Exhibits 21 and 30 (Pages 43-47 and 66-70). 2. Implement the Stimson / Ocean View one-way couplet, including a new signal at the Dolliver Street (SR 1) / Stimson Avenue intersection and striping improvements along Price Street at Stimson and Ocean View Avenues as depicted on Exhibit 45 (Pages 99-100). 3. The Pismo Beach City Council should adopt a policy that establishes either a lower level of service standard or no level of service standard in Downtown Pismo Beach. The 1992 General Plan Circulation Element Principle P-1 stated that “A lower standard (than Level of Service C) may be used for the downtown area,” but did not define the level of service, the specific locations it would apply to and how this policy would relate to the applicable Caltrans level of service policy of C/D. This should be clarified. 4. If the Price Street extension to Five Cities Drive is implemented, the improvements described in Improvement 2 above as well as the recommended improvements at the US 101 Southbound Ramps – Outlets Main Entrance / Five Cities Drive intersection (Exhibit 39 (Page 85)) will be required. 5. If the southbound US 101 Off-Ramp to Hinds Avenue is closed, adjust approved through truck routes to prohibit through trucks on Price Street [Dolliver Street (SR 1) to Hinds Avenue]. 6. Implement the Addie Street / Park Avenue one-way couplet. 7. Consider converting Pomeroy Avenue (Cypress Street to pier) to pedestrian-only traffic only when a method has been determined to replace the lost parking spaces. 8. Add left turn pockets on Dolliver Street (SR 1) at selected intersections in consultation with Caltrans. 9. Work with SLOCOG to maximize throughput along the US 101 corridor in the Five Cities region. F. Transportation Demand Management The City of Pismo Beach should also consider a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) plan. This plan would identify measures and policies that can manage or reduce traffic demand within the city, especially during the summer peak season. A preliminary plan is included in Appendix N and summarized on Exhibit 52 (Below). Some of the bicycle-related recommendations are also identified in other documents, such as the Complete Streets Plan. Exhibit 52 – Transportation Demand Management Options Item No. Potential Transportation Demand Management Measure 1. Create TDM steering group 2. Create Pismo Beach TDM program 3. Review options for a formal park and ride and assess feasibility 4. Implement a formal park and ride 5. Increase localized bus stops on existing routes 6. Add public showers / enhance beach facilities for use by cyclists 7. Install cycling / walking lockers 8. Continue the Pismo Beach Rideshare program – www.pismobikeshare.com 9. Ensure cycle parking provided at key bus stops and other key locations 10. Ensure that walking and cycling routes are fully linked and fill in any gaps 11. Develop a dedicated area on city web site with transportation information 12. Develop a Pismo Beach TDM logo 13. Develop a TDM marketing campaign to encourage use of non-motorized transportation 14. Develop walking and cycling maps to promote active travel 15. Hold specific events that can be a focus for TDM promotion 16. Free “Dr. Bike sessions” to help residents and visitors maintain their bicycles 17. “Beat the Streets” challenge 18. “Drive Less” challenge 19. Free cycle training to local residents / employees Exhibit 53A – Price Street from San Luis Ave. to Pomeroy Ave. Possible Double Loaded Median Back -In Angled Parking Exhibit 53B – Pomeroy Ave. from Cypress St. to Price St. Possible Back-In Angled Parking Exhibit 53C – Hinds Ave. from Cypress St. to Price St. Possible Back-In Angled Parking This page was intentionally left blank (For Duplex Printing) 5. Public Comments on Recommendations Many of the recommendations identified in Chapter 4 were presented at a public workshop on January 7, 2015 at Pismo Beach City Hall. Below are the primary topics of discussion during that workshop. A summary of the discussion at the second public workshop, including all public comments, is provided in Appendix D. Primary Topics of Discussion: 1. Scope of Work 2. Future Forecasting Methods 3. Recommendations: a. Network Alternatives b. Intersection Alternatives c. Why are improvements necessary? d. Alternatives to identified recommendations e. Public-initiated recommendations f. Cooperation from other jurisdictions (e.g. Caltrans District 5) 4. Parking: a. Parking Structure b. Back-in Parking c. Advantages and Disadvantages of Parklets d. Park and Ride Lots 5. Dissemination of Documents via City Web Page 6. References 1. 2010 US Census, http://www.census.gov/2010census, accessed August 26, 2014. 2. AECOM Technical Services, San Luis Obispo County 2040 Population, Housing & Employment Forecast, August 11, 2011. 3. Avila Beach Pier, http://avilabeachpier.com, accessed January 21, 2015. 4. California Department of Transportation, Price Street Extension Initial Study with Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment, September 2004. 5. California Department of Transportation, Traffic Data Branch, www.dot.ca.gov/hq/traffops/safevesr/trafdata, accessed September 25, 2014. 6. California Department of Transportation, Guide for the Preparation of Traffic Impact Studies, December 2002. 7. California Department of Transportation, Transportation Concept Report for State Route 1 in District 5, April 2006. 8. City of Grover Beach website, http://grover.org, accessed January 19 and 21, 2015. 9. City of Pismo Beach, Pismo Beach Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan, June 15, 2010. 10. City of Pismo Beach, City of Pismo Beach General Plan & Local Coastal Plan, adopted November 24, 1992. 11. City of San Luis Obispo website, http://www.slocity.org, accessed January 21, 2015. 12. County of San Luis Obispo, The Land Use and Circulation Elements of the San Luis Obispo County General Plan – San Luis Bay Coastal Area Plan, Adopted March 1998, Revised August 2009. 13. DKS Associates, A Traffic Improvement Strategy for the Oak Park Heights and Five Cities Planning Areas, April 25, 1988. 14. DKS Associates, A Traffic Improvement Strategy for the U.S. 101 Study Corridor Oak Park to Grand Avenue, August 30, 1988. 15. Federal Highway Administration, FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation, http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/PED_BIKE/univcourse/pdf/swless19.pdf, accessed January 22, 2015. 16. Fehr & Peers, San Luis Obispo County Highway 101 Bus Rapid Transit Applications Study, June 2013. 17. Gates + Associates, Pismo Beach Complete Street Plan, March 2013. 18. Joseph Boud & Associates and Firma, Pismo Creek Recreational Path Project Study Report, adopted May 16, 2006. 19. Kittelson & Associates, US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan, December 2014. 20. Korve Engineering, Inc. Route 101 Major Investment Study, September 8, 1997. 21. LSC Transportation Consultants, Inc., South County Transit Plan, January 2011. 22. Merriam-Fraser Associates, Environment Impact Report for the Development of Pismo Beach Pier Commercial Project, July 1986. 23. National Association of City Transportation Officials, Two-Way Cycle Track, http://nacto.org/wp- content/gallery/twoway_cycletrack_3d/two-way-cycle-track-plan.jpg, accessed January 22, 2015. 24. Omni-Means, Grover Beach Lodge Transportation Impact Analysis Report, October 2010. 25. Omni-Means, James Way/Price Street Frontage Road Extension Project Study Report, March 1998. 26. Omni-Means, San Luis Obispo County in Pismo Beach on and adjacent to Route 101 between KP 25.7 and 26.8 Ramp Work and Frontage Rd Improvements, March 12, 1998. 27. The Regional and Urban Design Committee of the American Institute of Architects, Pismo Beach R/UDAT, no date. 28. RRM Design Group, Beach Cities Multi-Purpose Trail Feasibility Study, March 2010. 29. RRM Design Group, Pismo Beach Downtown Strategic Plan, 2014. 30. San Luis Obispo Council of Governments, 2013 Park & Ride Lot Study, August 2013. 31. San Luis Obispo Council of Governments, 2014 Regional Transportation Plan, December 2014. 32. San Luis Obispo Council of Governments, San Luis Obispo County Highway 101 Bus Rapid Transit Applications Study, June 2013. 33. San Luis Obispo Council of Governments, SLOCOG 2010RTP-PSCS: Chapter 4: Highways, Streets and Roads, 2010. 34. San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority web page, www.slorta.org, accessed December 14, 2015. 35. The (San Luis Obispo) Tribune, “New Stretch of Bob Jones Trail Nearly Finished”, published March 18, 2014, http://www.sanluisobispo.com, accessed January 21, 2015. 36. Walker Parking Consultants, Downtown Parking Enhancements and Opportunities Study, April 2016. 37. Wilbur Smith Associates, Downtown Parking Study, October 10, 2006. 7. Report Preparation Hatch Mott MacDonald (Transportation) Chris Metzger, PE, LEED AP Keith Higgins, PE, TE Allen Nie, PhD, PE Jeff Waller, TE Travis Low, EIT Ankit Sharma RRM Design Group (Land Use Public Outreach) Debbie Rudd, AICP, LEED AP Paul Kronser JR Parking Consultants (Parking) Janis Rhodes