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Urban Water Management Plan - 2015 Final 2015 Urban Water Management Plan for the City of Pismo Beach Prepared by 6/29/2016               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Table of Contents 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................... i List of Tables ................................................................................................................................................ iv List of Figures ................................................................................................................................................ v List of Terms and Acronyms ......................................................................................................................... vi 1 Introduction and overview................................................................................................................. 1-1 2 Plan Preparation ................................................................................................................................ 2-1 2.1 Coordination .............................................................................................................................. 2-2 2.2 Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation ........................................................................ 2-3 2.3 Data Sources .............................................................................................................................. 2-3 3 System Description ............................................................................................................................ 3-1 3.1 Service Area Description and Boundaries .................................................................................. 3-1 3.2 Service Area Climate .................................................................................................................. 3-3 3.3 Service Area Population and Demographics .............................................................................. 3-3 4 System Demands ................................................................................................................................ 4-1 4.1 Baselines and Targets ................................................................................................................ 4-1 Baseline Water Use ............................................................................................................ 4-1 Target Water Use ............................................................................................................... 4-3 Minimum Water Use Reduction Requirement .................................................................. 4-5 Summary of Baseline and Target Water Use ..................................................................... 4-5 4.2 Water Demands ......................................................................................................................... 4-6 Low-Income Demands ....................................................................................................... 4-9 Sales to Other Water Agencies .......................................................................................... 4-9 Additional Water Uses and Losses ................................................................................... 4-10 Total Water Use ............................................................................................................... 4-10 4.3 Wholesale Water Demand ....................................................................................................... 4-11 4.4 Water Use Reduction Plan ....................................................................................................... 4-11 5 System Supplies ................................................................................................................................. 5-1 5.1 Water Supply Sources ................................................................................................................ 5-1 Water Supply Facilities ....................................................................................................... 5-1 Distribution System and Storage ....................................................................................... 5-2 City of Pismo Beach Table of Contents 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final ii Current and Projected Water Sources ............................................................................... 5-2 5.2 Groundwater .............................................................................................................................. 5-6 Groundwater Basin Description ......................................................................................... 5-6 Groundwater Management Plan ....................................................................................... 5-7 Groundwater Levels and Historical Trends ...................................................................... 5-10 Groundwater Overdraft ................................................................................................... 5-11 Existing and Projected Groundwater Pumping ................................................................ 5-11 5.3 Transfer Opportunities ............................................................................................................. 5-12 5.4 Desalinated Water Opportunities ............................................................................................ 5-13 5.5 Recycled Water Opportunities ................................................................................................. 5-13 Wastewater Treatment Facilities ..................................................................................... 5-13 Wastewater Flow Projections .......................................................................................... 5-14 Water Recycling Facilities ................................................................................................ 5-14 Regional Recycled Water Opportunities .......................................................................... 5-17 5.6 Future Water Projects .............................................................................................................. 5-18 6 Water Supply Reliability ..................................................................................................................... 6-1 6.1 Supply Reliability by Source ....................................................................................................... 6-1 State Water Project ............................................................................................................ 6-1 Lopez Reservoir .................................................................................................................. 6-1 Groundwater ...................................................................................................................... 6-2 6.2 Supply Reliability - Historic and Future Conditions .................................................................... 6-3 Basis of Water Year Types .................................................................................................. 6-3 Future Supply Reliability .................................................................................................... 6-4 Projected Normal Year Supply/Demand ............................................................................ 6-5 Projected Single Dry Year Supply/Demand ........................................................................ 6-6 Projected Multiple Dry Year Supply/Demand .................................................................... 6-6 Projected Minimum Three Year Supply ............................................................................. 6-7 Resource Maximization and Import Minimization ............................................................ 6-8 Factors Affecting Supply Reliability .................................................................................... 6-8 7 Water Shortage Contingency Planning .............................................................................................. 7-1 7.1 Stages of Action and Reduction Objectives ............................................................................... 7-2 7.2 Administration of Water Supply Shortage Program .................................................................. 7-4 City of Pismo Beach Table of Contents 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final iii 7.3 Actions during a Catastrophic Interruption ............................................................................... 7-5 7.4 Mandatory Prohibitions on Water Wasting ............................................................................... 7-5 7.5 Consumption Reduction Methods in Most Restrictive Stage .................................................... 7-6 7.6 Excessive Use Penalties .............................................................................................................. 7-7 7.7 Revenue and Expenditure Impacts/Measures to Overcome Impacts ....................................... 7-7 7.8 Water Conservation Ordinance ................................................................................................. 7-7 7.9 Reduction Measuring Mechanism ............................................................................................. 7-8 7.10 Guidelines For Building REstriction during an Extended Drought ............................................. 7-9 8 Demand Management Measures ...................................................................................................... 8-1 8.1 Demand management measures (DMMs) Implemented or Planned to be Implemented ....... 8-1 DMM – Water Waste Prevention ...................................................................................... 8-1 DMM – Metering ............................................................................................................... 8-2 DMM – Conservation Pricing ............................................................................................. 8-2 DMM – Public Information Programs ................................................................................ 8-3 DMM – Water Loss Control................................................................................................ 8-3 DMM – Conservation Coordinator and Staffing Support .................................................. 8-3 8.2 Other Demand Management MEasures .................................................................................... 8-4 Turf Reduction Program ..................................................................................................... 8-4 Rebate Programs ................................................................................................................ 8-4 Irrigation Equipment Rebate Program ............................................................................... 8-4 Other Programs .................................................................................................................. 8-4 9 References ......................................................................................................................................... 9-1 Appendix A. DWR Checklist........................................................................................................................... A Appendix B. Notification and Outreach Materials ........................................................................................ B Appendix C. Letter of Adoption .................................................................................................................... C Appendix D. Community Development Department Memorandum ........................................................... D Appendix E. AWWA Water Loss Audit .......................................................................................................... E Appendix F. Selected Figures from the NCMA 2015 Annual Monitoring Report ......................................... F Appendix G. SMGB Judgment and Gentlemen’s AGreement ...................................................................... G Appendix H. Water Conservation Ordinance ................................................................................................H City of Pismo Beach List of Tables 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final iv LIST OF TABLES Table 2-1. DWR Schedule ........................................................................................................................... 2-1 Table 2-2. Summary of Changes in the UWMP Act Since 2010 ................................................................. 2-1 Table 2-3. Agency Coordination ................................................................................................................. 2-2 Table 3-1. Precipitation and Evapotranspiration in the City of Pismo Beach, January - June ................... 3-3 Table 3-2. Precipitation and Evapotranspiration in the City of Pismo Beach, July - December & Annual 3-3 Table 3-3. SLOCOG Annual Growth Rate Projections ................................................................................ 3-4 Table 3-4. Population Historical, Current, & Projected ............................................................................. 3-4 Table 4-1. Base Daily Per Capita Water Use - 10 year range ..................................................................... 4-2 Table 4-2. Base Daily Per Capita Water Use - 5 year range ................................................................... 4-2 Table 4-3. Daily Per Capita Water Use Target ............................................................................................ 4-5 Table 4-4. 2010 Water Deliveries ............................................................................................................... 4-7 Table 4-5. 2015 Water Deliveries ............................................................................................................... 4-7 Table 4-6. 2020 Water Deliveries ............................................................................................................... 4-8 Table 4-7. 2025 & 2030 Water Deliveries .................................................................................................. 4-8 Table 4-8. 2035 Deliveries .......................................................................................................................... 4-9 Table 4-9. Low-Income Water Deliveries ................................................................................................... 4-9 Table 4-10. Sales to Other Water Agencies ............................................................................................. 4-10 Table 4-11. Non-Revenue Water ............................................................................................................. 4-10 Table 4-12. Total Water Use, afy ............................................................................................................. 4-10 Table 4-13. Wholesale Supply Request Provided to Wholesale Suppliers .............................................. 4-11 Table 5-1. Existing Groundwater Wells City of Pismo Beach ..................................................................... 5-1 Table 5-2. Distribution Zone Summary ...................................................................................................... 5-2 Table 5-3. Current and Projected Water Supplies ..................................................................................... 5-3 Table 5-4. Current and Projected Wholesale Water Supplies ................................................................... 5-3 Table 5-5. Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Supply Options ............................................................ 5-9 Table 5-5. Historic Groundwater Pumping .............................................................................................. 5-12 Table 5-6. Projected Groundwater Pumping ........................................................................................... 5-12 Table 5-7. Transfer and Exchange Opportunities .................................................................................... 5-13 Table 5-8. Wastewater Flow Projections ................................................................................................. 5-14 Table 5-9. 2010 UWMP Recycled Water Use Projected for 2015 and Actual 2015 Recycled Water Use5-15 Table 5-10. RWFPS Alternatives Quantitative Analysis Summary ........................................................... 5-16 Table 5-11. Projected Recycled Water Use, afy ....................................................................................... 5-17 Table 6-1. Initial Prescribed Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP ............................ 6-2 Table 6-2. Initial Prescribed Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP .......................... 6-2 Table 6-2. Basis of Water Year Types ......................................................................................................... 6-4 Table 6-3. Historical Water Supply Conditions .......................................................................................... 6-4 Table 6-4. Historical Water Supply Usage .................................................................................................. 6-5 Table 6-5. Historical Water Supply Allocations – Current Sources ............................................................ 6-5 Table 6-6. Supply and Demand – Normal Year .......................................................................................... 6-6 Table 6-7. Supply and Demand Comparisons – Single Dry Year ................................................................ 6-6 City of Pismo Beach List of Figures 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final v Table 6-8. Supply and Demand Comparison - Multiple Dry Year Events .................................................. 6-7 Table 6-9. Three-Year Minimum Supply .................................................................................................... 6-7 Table 6-10 Factors Affecting Water Supply Reliability ............................................................................... 6-8 Table 7-1. Water Shortage Contingency - Rationing Stages ...................................................................... 7-2 Table 7-2. Water Shortage Contingency - Mandatory Prohibitions .......................................................... 7-6 Table 7-3. Reduction Method Description ................................................................................................. 7-7 Table 7-4. Water Shortage Contingency - Penalties and Charges ............................................................. 7-8 Table 8-1. Demand Management Measures ............................................................................................. 8-1 Table 8-2. Conservation Pricing Rate Structure ......................................................................................... 8-2 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 3-1. Service Area Map ..................................................................................................................... 3-2 Figure 3-2. Census Population Age ............................................................................................................ 3-4 Figure 4-1. Historic Gross Water Use and Per Capita Water Use .............................................................. 4-3 Figure 4-2. Historical, Baseline, Targets, and Projected gpcds .................................................................. 4-6 Figure 5-1. SSLOCSD and City Ocean Outfall ............................................................................................ 5-18 City of Pismo Beach List of Terms and Acronyms 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final vi LIST OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS Acronym/Term Definition AF acre feet AFY acre feet per year ATF Advanced Treatment Facility AWWA American Water Works Association BMP Best Management Practice CCWA Central Coast Water Authority CEQA California Environmental Quality Act CII Commercial, Industrial, and Institutional CIMIS California Irrigation Management Information System CUWCC California Urban Water Conservation Council CWC California Water Code DDW California Division of Drinking Water DMM Demand Management Measure DWR California Department of Water Resources EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ETo evapotranspiration rate FAT Full Advanced Treatment GHG Green House Gas GIS Geographical Information System gpcd gallons per capita per day gpm gallons per minute HCF Hundred Cubic Feet HCP Habitat Conservation Plan IRWMP Integrated Regional Water Management Plan ITP Independent Technical Panel LRRP Low Reservoir Response Plan mgd million gallons per day MSL mean sea level NCMA Northern Cities Management Area NRW non-revenue water OCSD Oceano Community Services District RGSP Regional Groundwater Sustainability Project RHNA Regional Housing Needs Assessment RWFPS Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study SB7 Guidebook Methodologies for Calculating Baseline and Compliance Urban Per Capita Water Use SB7 Senate Bill x 7-7 SLOCOG San Luis Obispo Council of Governments SMGB Santa Maria Valley Groundwater Basin SSLOCSD South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District City of Pismo Beach List of Terms and Acronyms 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final vii Acronym/Term Definition SWP California State Water Project SWRCB State Water Resources Control Board UWMP Urban Water Management Plan UWMP Act Urban Water Management Planning Act UWMP Guidebook Guidebook to Assist Water Suppliers in the Preparation of a 2010 Urban Water Management Plan WDR Waste Discharge Requirements WSPDP Water Supply, Production and Delivery Plan WWTP wastewater treatment plant               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach 1. Introduction and overview 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 1-1 1 INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW The California Water Code requires urban water suppliers within the state to prepare and adopt Urban Water Management Plans (UWMPs) for submission to the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). The UWMPs are required to be filed every five years and must satisfy the requirements of the Urban Water Management Planning Act (UWMP Act) of 1983, including amendments that have been made to the Act and other applicable regulations. The UWMP Act requires urban water suppliers servicing 3,000 or more connections, or supplying more than 3,000 acre-feet (af) of water annually, to prepare an UWMP. The purpose of the UWMP is for water suppliers to evaluate their long-term resource planning and establish management measures to ensure adequate water supplies are available to meet existing and future demands. The UWMP provides a framework to help water suppliers maintain efficient use of urban water supplies, continue to promote conservation programs and policies, ensure that sufficient water supplies are available for future beneficial use, and provide a mechanism for response during water drought conditions. The UWMP is a valuable planning tool used for multiple purposes including:  Serves as a valuable resource to the community and other interested parties regarding water supply and demand, conservation and other water related information  Meets a statutory requirement of the California Water Code  Provides a key source of information for Water Supply Assessments (WSAs) and Written Verifications of Water Supply  Supports regional long-range planning documents including City and County General Plans  Provides a standardized methodology for water utilities to assess their water resource needs and availability  Serves as a critical component of developing Integrated Regional Water Management Plans (IRWMPs)  Provides a resource for regional involvement in the California Water Plan This plan, which was prepared in compliance with the California Water Code, and as set forth in the 2015 guidelines and format established by the DWR, constitutes the City of Pismo Beach (City) 2015 UWMP.               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach 2. Plan Preparation 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 2-1 2 PLAN PREPARATION This plan was prepared based on guidance from DWR’s Guidebook to Assist Water Suppliers in the Preparation of a 2015 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP Guidebook) (1), DWR Urban Water Management Plans Public Workshops and Webinars, Methodologies for Calculating Baseline and Compliance Urban Per Capita Water Use (SB7 Guidebook) (2), and the 2015 DWR Review Sheet Checklist (Appendix A). 2015 UWMPs must be submitted to DWR by water purveyors by July 1, 2016. Usually, UWMPs are due on December 31 of years ending in ‘0’ and ‘5’, but a six-month extension has been granted for submittal of 2015 UWMPs. The draft 2015 UWMP Guidebook became available in November 2015 and was finalized in February 2016. DWR’s 2015 UWMP schedule is summarized in Table 2-1. Table 2-1. DWR Schedule Date Event/Task November, 2015 Draft Guidebook released December, 2015 Workshops January, 2016 Final Draft Guidebook released March, 2016 Final Guidebook, materials and tools released July, 2016 UWMPs due to DWR A DWR Review Sheet checklist is provided in Appendix A as a reference for the various sections within this UWMP that address the requirements of the UWMP Act. Table 2-2 summarizes changes to the UWMP Act since 2010 that have been addressed in this UWMP. Table 2-2. Summary of Changes in the UWMP Act Since 2010 Change CWC Section Legislative Bill Summary Demand Management Measures 10631 (f)(1) and (2) AB 2067, 2014 Requires water suppliers to provide narratives describing their water demand management measures, as provided. Requires retail water suppliers to address the nature and extent of each water demand management measure implemented over the past 5 years and describe the water demand management measures that the supplier plans to implement to achieve its water use targets. Submittal Date 10621 (d) AB 2067, 2014 Requires each urban water supplier to submit its 2015 plan to the Department of Water Resources by July 1, 2016. Electronic Submittal 10644 (a) (2) SB 1420, 2014 Requires the plan, or amendments to the plan, to include any standardized forms, tables, or displays specified by the department. Standardized Forms 10644 (a) (2) SB 1420, 2014 Requires the plan, or amendments to the plan, to include any standardized forms, tables, or displays specified by the department. City of Pismo Beach 2. Plan Preparation 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 2-2 Change CWC Section Legislative Bill Summary Water Loss 10631 (e) (1) (J) and (e) (3) (A) and (B) SB 1420, 2014 Requires a plan to quantify and report on distribution system water loss. Estimating Future Water Savings 10631 (e) (4) SB 1420, 2014 Provides for water use projections to display and account for the water savings estimated to result from adopted codes, standards, ordinances, or transportation and land use plans, when that information is available and applicable to an urban water supplier. Voluntary Reporting of Energy Intensity 10631.2 (a) and (b) SB 1036, 2014 Provides for an urban water supplier to include certain energy related information, including, but not limited to, an estimate of the amount of energy used to extract or divert water supplies. 2.1 COORDINATION To prepare this UWMP, the City coordinated with multiple neighboring and stakeholder agencies. The coordinated efforts were conducted to: 1) inform the agencies of the City’s efforts and activities; 2) gather high quality data for use in developing this UWMP; and 3) coordinate planning activities with other related regional plans and initiatives. The coordination activities conducted by the City are summarized in Table 2-3. Table 2-3. Agency Coordination Agency / Organization Participated in developing the plan Commented on the draft Attended public meetings Was contacted for assistance Was sent a copy of the draft plan Was sent a notice of intention to adopt City of Arroyo Grande X City of Grover Beach X Oceano CSD X County of San Luis Obispo X DWR CCWA X City of Pismo Beach 2. Plan Preparation 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 2-3 2.2 PLAN ADOPTION, SUBMITTAL, AND IMPLEMENTATION To fulfill the requirements of Water Code Section 10621(c) and 10642 of the UWMP Act, the City sent letters of notification of preparation of the 2015 UWMP to all neighboring cities and San Luis Obispo County 60 days prior to the public hearing and made the draft 2015 UWMP available for public review prior to holding a public hearing on June 7, 2016. Copies of the 60-day notification letters are attached as Appendix B. The public review hearing was noticed on May 24, 2016 and the hearing notice is attached in Appendix B. In addition, the City maintained a copy of the draft UWMP in its office prior to the public hearing and for the 30 days following. The Final 2015 UWMP was formally adopted by the City Council on June 21, 2016. A copy of the Adoption Resolution is included in Appendix C. The Final 2015 UWMP was sent to the California State Library, DWR (electronically using the WUEdata reporting tool), and other appropriate agencies within 30 days of adoption. The implementation of this plan shall be carried out as described unless significant changes occur between the adoption of this plan and the 2020 plan. If such significant changes do occur, the City will amend and readopt the plan as required by the California Water Code. 2.3 DATA SOURCES This UWMP was prepared by compiling data from a variety of sources, including federal, state, and local government agencies, which are cited in Section 9. Documents concerning water management in the City and surrounding areas were used and are shown below:  Urban Water Management Plan, City of Pismo Beach, 2010 (3)  General Plan/Local Coastal Plan, City of Pismo Beach, 1992 (and 1998 and 2010 amendments) (4)  Northern Cities Management Area 2015 Annual Monitoring Report, Fugro Consultants, Inc., April, 2016 (5)  Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study for the City of Pismo Beach, Water Systems Consulting, Inc., April 2016 (6)  Draft Urban Water Management Plan Update Zone 3, Wallace Group, June 2016 (7)               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach 3. System Description 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 3-1 3 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION 3.1 SERVICE AREA DESCRIPTION AND BOUNDARIES The City of Pismo Beach (City) is located in San Luis Obispo County (County) in the central coastal region of California (Figure 3-1). The City is considered a part of the area known as “Five Cities” in Southern San Luis Obispo County, which includes the incorporated cities of Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and Pismo Beach, as well as the unincorporated Oceano Community Services District (OCSD). Interstate Highway 101 runs from north to south through the City, which serves as the major connecting corridor to San Luis Obispo (approximately 13 miles north), Santa Maria (approximately 20 miles south), and Santa Barbara (approximately 80 miles south). The City is bordered by the Pacific Ocean on the west and Price Canyon on the east. Elevations within the City limits range from zero feet above mean sea level (MSL) to approximately 600 feet above MSL. A portion of the City lies within the Coastal Zone as designated by the California Coastal Act of 1976 (Coastal Act). Since the City’s western border stretches along the Pacific Ocean shoreline for approximately seven miles, the City is required to have a Local Coastal Plan that is certified by the State Coastal Commission; the City’s General Plan serves as its Local Coastal Plan. The City has historically been a popular tourist destination, and tourism continues to be the dominant economic sector in the City. Though the City’s permanent population (discussed in Section 3.3) is relatively small, visitors during summer months, special events, and holidays can increase the temporary population by up to two or sometimes three hundred percent (4). City of Pismo Beach 3. System Description 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 3-2 Figure 3-1. Service Area Map City of Pismo Beach 3. System Description 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 3-3 3.2 SERVICE AREA CLIMATE The climate in the City can be classified as coastal with average rainfall rates of about 17 inches per year. Most of the annual precipitation falls from November through April. Table 3-1 and Table 3-2 summarize monthly average reference evapotranspiration (ETo) rates, rainfall, and temperature. Table 3-1. Precipitation and Evapotranspiration in the City of Pismo Beach, January - June January February March April May June Standard Average ETo, inches(1) 2.7 2.4 3.6 4.6 5.11 4.89 Average Rainfall, inches(2) 3.48 3.42 2.80 1.38 0.34 0.07 Average Temperature, °F(2) 53 54 55 57 58 60 Notes: 1. Data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), Station 202 in Nipomo, (period of record is from January 2007 through June 2015) http://wwwcimis.water.ca.gov/cimis/data.jsp 2. Data from Western Regional Climate Center, Station: Station: 046943 Pismo Beach (period of record 1949 to 2015).http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/CLIMATEDATA.html Table 3-2. Precipitation and Evapotranspiration in the City of Pismo Beach, July - December & Annual July August Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Annual Standard Average ETo, inches(1) 4.82 4.45 3.79 3.38 2.4 1.93 43.62 Average Rainfall, inches(2) 0.03 0.02 0.25 0.74 1.92 2.50 16.96 Average Temperature, °F (2) 61 62 62 61 58 54 58 Notes: 1. Data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), Station 202 in Nipomo, (period of record is from January 2007 through June 2015) http://wwwcimis.water.ca.gov/cimis/data.jsp 2. Data from Western Regional Climate Center, Station: Station: 046943 Pismo Beach (period of record 1949 to 2015).http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/CLIMATEDATA.html The average annual temperature is 58 degrees Fahrenheit (°F). The City has mild weather year-round, with typically warm daytime temperatures and cool nighttime temperatures. The City does not have extreme seasonal variations, though the area is subject to normal weather fluctuations often experienced in marine environments. 3.3 SERVICE AREA POPULATION AND DEMOGRAPHICS According the State of California Department of Finance, the City’s 2015 population was 7,711 in its incorporated areas. While the City saw moderate annual growth of 1 percent between 1995 and 2000, the City’s population declined by 1 percent annually between 2000 and 2010 and leveled off to a 0.1 percent annual increase from 2010 to 2015. The reasons for the City’s population decline is likely due to a number of factors, including the high cost of living, an aging population, an increased number of second or vacation homes, and limited development. Figure 3-2 shows historical change in the age of the City’s population between 1990 and 2010, with the bulk of the population shifting to greater than 45 years of age. This may indicate fewer new residents moving to the area coupled with the retention of an aging population. City of Pismo Beach 3. System Description 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 3-4 Figure 3-2. Census Population Age Future population growth in the City will depend on two factors: re-growth within the current City limits and growth as a result of new developments. The City’s General Plan specifies a limit on annual growth of 3 percent. Based on historic population trends, it is unlikely that the City will experience growth that meets the 3 percent annual limit. As shown in Table 3-3, the City anticipates an average annual growth rate of approximate 0.55 percent based on historic growth trends, and San Luis Obispo Council of Governments’ (SLOCOG) San Luis Obispo County 2040 Population, Housing & Employment Forecast (8). Based on a growth rate of 0.55 percent, the buildout within the current City limits (estimated at 9,4140F0F0F0F 1) is assumed to occur beyond 2050 as shown in Table 3-4. Therefore, this UWMP will assume an annual growth within the current City limits of 0.55 percent until buildout is reached for planning purposes. Table 3-3. SLOCOG Annual Growth Rate Projections 2015-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030 2031-2035 Growth Rates(1) 0.55% 0.55% 0.55% 0.55% Notes: 1. Growth rates were calculated from SLOCOG population projection data, low range (8) Table 3-4. Population Historical, Current, & Projected 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Pismo Beach Population 8,103 7,655 7,711 7,925 8,146 8,372 8,605 1 Buildout within the current city limits is expected to be 9,414, based on a 2001 Community Development Department Memorandum, included in Appendix D. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% <17 18-24 35-44 45-54 55-64 >65Percent of Total PopulationAge Range 1990 2000 2010 City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-1 4 SYSTEM DEMANDS 4.1 BASELINES AND TARGETS Senate Bill x 7-7 (SB7) is also known as the Water Conservation Bill of 2009 and was incorporated into the UWMP Act in 2009. SB7 requires all water suppliers to increase water use efficiency with the overall goal to decrease per capita water consumption within the state by 20 percent by the year 2020. SB7 required DWR to develop certain criteria, methods, and standard reporting forms through a public process that could be used by water suppliers to establish their baseline water use and determine their water conservation targets. SB7 and the SB7 Guidebook specify methodologies for determining the baseline water demand, the 2015 interim urban water use target, and the 2020 urban water use target for the City as described in the following sections. 4.1.1 Baseline Water Use The first step in developing the baseline water use for the City is to determine the applicable range of years over which the baseline average should be calculated. The UWMP Act stipulates an agency may use either a 10 or 15-year average to determine their baseline. If 10 percent of total urban retail water deliveries in 2008 were from recycled water, then the agency can use a 15-year average baseline if it chooses. The City does not currently have the infrastructure or treatment ability in place to produce recycled water, and therefore has not utilized recycled water in the past. For this reason, a 10-year average was used for baseline determination. The UWMP Act requires the use of a continuous 10-year range with the upper end of the range ending between December 31, 2004 and December 31, 2010 to determine the baseline. As shown in Table 4-1, the City’s selected 10-year base period begins in year 2000 and ends in year 2009. In addition to the 10-year baseline, a 5-year baseline is also calculated, which is used to establish the minimum criteria for the City’s use reduction targets. The UWMP Act requires the use of a continuous 5-year range with the end of the range ending between December 31, 2007 and December 31, 2010 to determine the baseline. As shown in Table 4-2, the City’s selected 5-year base period begins in year 2004 and ends in year 2008. The City’s historical gross water use, per capita water use and residential per capita water use for the period of 1995 through 2015 are shown in Figure 4-1. Residential per capita use is shown solely for comparison purposes as it is a metric used for emergency drought reporting to the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-2 Table 4-1. Base Daily Per Capita Water Use - 10 year range Calendar Year Distribution System Population Daily System Gross Water Use (mgd) Annual Daily Per Capita Water Use (gpcd) 10 year running average (gpcd) 1995 8,110 1.6 198 1996 8,198 1.7 207 1997 8,286 1.8 222 1998 8,375 1.6 185 1999 8,463 1.6 185 2000 8,551 1.9 225 2001 8,461 1.9 219 2002 8,372 2.0 234 2003 8,282 1.9 235 191 2004 8,193 2.0 244 215 2005 8,103 1.9 236 219 2006 8,013 1.9 236 222 2007 7,924 2.0 255 225 2008 7,834 2.0 252 232 2009 7,745 1.8 235 237 2010 7,655 1.3 171 232 Base Daily Per Capita Water Use 237 Table 4-2. Base Daily Per Capita Water Use - 5 year range Calendar Year Distribution System Population Daily System Gross Water Use (mgd) Annual Daily Per Capita Water Use (gpcd) 5 year running average (gpcd) 2003 8,282 1.9 235 2004 8,193 2.0 244 2005 8,103 1.9 236 2006 8,013 1.9 236 2007 7,924 2.0 255 241 2008 7,834 2.0 252 245 2009 7,745 1.8 235 243 2010 7,655 1.3 171 230 Base Daily Per Capita Water Use 245 City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-3 Figure 4-1. Historic Gross Water Use and Per Capita Water Use 4.1.2 Target Water Use DWR provided four different methods to establish water conservation targets. Either of the methods can be utilized by the City. These four methods, their applicability to the City, and their results are summarized in the following sections. 4.1.2.1 Method 1 - Baseline Reduction Method The Method 1 2020 water conservation target is defined as a 20 percent reduction of average per-capita from the 10-year continuous baseline period. Based on the baseline daily per capita use of 237 gallons per capita per day (gpcd) determined previously, the target use for Method 1 is 190 gpcd. The 2015 interim water use target is simply the midpoint, or average, of the baseline and the 2020 water conservation target, or 213 gpcd for Method 1 in the City’s case. 4.1.2.2 Method 2 - Efficiency Standard Method The 2020 water conservation target of this method is determined by calculating efficiency standards for indoor use separately from outdoor use for residential sectors, and an overall reduction of 10 percent for commercial, industrial, and institutional (CII) sectors. The aggregated total of the efficiency standards in each area is then used to create a conservation target. Very few agencies within the State have the data necessary to determine a target water use using Method 2. It is not feasible for the City to use this methodology since the City lacks the detailed landscaped area estimates to calculate the landscaped area water use. 4.1.2.3 Method 3 - Hydrologic Region Method This method uses the ten regional urban water use targets for the state. Based on the water supplier’s location within these regions, a static water use conservation target for 2020 is assigned. 198 207 222 185 185 225 219 234 235 244 236 236 255 252 235 171 171 170 181 226 201 127 126 107 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006200720082009201020112012201320142015Average Per Capita Water Use (gpcd)Gross Water Use (AFY)Daily System Gross Water Use (AFY)Annual Daily Per Capita Water Use (gpcd) Residential Per Capita Water Use (gpcd) City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-4 Urban water use targets (2020 conservation goals) for the hydrologic regions in California are included in the DWR Guidebook to Assist Urban Water Suppliers to Prepare a 2010 UWMP (Guidebook). To determine the target using Method 3, 95 percent of the region-specific conservation goal is calculated. Based on a 2020 target of 123 gpcd for the Central Coast region, the City’s Method 3 target is 117 gpcd for 2020. The City’s 2015 interim water use target for Method 3 is then calculated to be 120 gpcd. 4.1.2.4 Method 4 - BMP Based Method Method 4 identifies water savings obtained through identified practices and subtracts them from the baseline daily per capita water use value identified for the water supplier. The water savings identified that can be used to reduce the baseline daily per capita water use value include:  Indoor residential use savings;  Commercial, industrial, and institutional savings;  Landscape and water loss savings; and  Metered savings. The Method 4 per capita water use target was calculated using the City’s 10-year baseline period (2000 to 2009). A discussion of each of the savings components and the subsequent calculated savings specifically for the City is included below.  Indoor Residential Savings. Since indoor and outdoor water use is delivered through a single meter, an assumption of 70 gpcd has been provided by DWR for standard residential indoor water use. To determine indoor residential savings potential, the draft provisional method outlines two methodologies. First, a best management practices (BMP) calculator has been developed to sum the savings for four conservation elements including single and multi- family residential housing toilets, residential washers, and showerheads. The City will use what has been termed the “default option” to determine these savings. Based on the provisional method, the default savings value is 15 gpcd.  Commercial, Industrial, and Institutional Savings. Baseline CII water use can be established for the City based on data provided in the City’s DWR Public Water Systems Statistics Sheet for years 2000 to 2009. Based on this data, the baseline per capita CII water use is 158 gpcd. The draft provisional method estimates a default value for CII savings of 10 percent. The CII water savings are therefore 15.8 gpcd.  Landscape and Water Loss Savings. The landscape and water loss water use is determined by subtracting the default indoor water use of 70 gpcd and CII water use of 158 gpcd from the calculated year’s 2000 to 2009 baseline per capita use. Based on a 2000 to 2009 baseline per capita water use of 237 gpcd, the landscape and water loss use is 9.5 gpcd. The draft provisional method estimates a default value for landscape and water loss savings of 21.6 percent of the estimated 9.5 gpcd. The landscape and water loss savings are therefore 2 gpcd.  Metered Savings. Metered savings are considered in addition to the savings attributed to the three sectors previously discussed. Because the City was fully metered in the midpoint year of 2005 (based on the methodology established by DWR) and no unmetered deliveries occurred, the unmetered per capita use was zero gpcd. Therefore, no savings from metering was calculated. City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-5 The City’s 2020 target water use is calculated as the baseline water use minus the total savings (residential indoor, CII, landscape, water loss, and meter savings). In the City’s case, the total water savings accounts for 32.8 gpcd, which equates to a 2020 target water use of 204.2 gpcd in 2020, and a corresponding interim water use target for Method 4 of 220.6 gpcd in 2015. 4.1.3 Minimum Water Use Reduction Requirement The final step in determining the applicability of the water use target for the City is to confirm the water use targets meet the minimum reduction requirements as defined by DWR. To confirm the chosen 2020 per capita target, the 5-year average baseline previously determined Table 4-2 is used. The chosen target (calculated using one of the four methods described above) must be less than 95 percent of the 5- year baseline. In order to meet this minimum criteria, the City’s 2020 target per capita water use must be less than or equal to 232 gpcd. 4.1.4 Summary of Baseline and Target Water Use Based on the 2020 water use targets calculated using the four methodologies described previously, the urban water use target for the City is 204 gpcd. Using the 10-year baseline of 237 gpcd, the 2015 interim water use target is 221 gpcd. This target was determined using Method 4. According to the DWR guidelines, this target is valid since it is less than the minimum 5-year baseline target confirmation criteria of 232 gpcd. The baseline water use, target per capita use determined based on the four methods, and the selected target and interim target are summarized in Table 4-3. Table 4-3. Daily Per Capita Water Use Target Calculation Method Water Use Target (gpcd) Method 1: 80% of Baseline Per Capita Water Use 190 Method 2: Performance Standards Not calculated Method 3: 95% of Regional Target 117 Method 4: DWR Approach 204 Selected Urban Water Use Target 204 City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-6 Since 1996, the City’s per capita water use has varied. As shown in Figure 4-1, the City’s per capita water use in 2010-2013 and 2015 was below the 2020 target. The declining trend in per capita water use from 2007 through 2015 is attributed to a combination of transitory factors such as the weak economy, hydrologic conditions, climatic conditions, State mandated Emergency regulations, and structural changes in customer demand patterns associated with effective conservation programs. For the purposes of projecting water use, the per capita water use between 2016 and 2020 was linearly interpolated to meet the 2020 target, then adjusted for future commercial and hotel water demands that are not associated with growth in residential population. It was assumed that per capita water use would stay the same from 2020-2035. The selected 2020 target was applied to the population projections previously shown in Table 3-4, then the commercial and hotel demands were added to project demands from 2020 through 2035. Figure 4-2 displays the baseline and targets as well as historical and projected per capita water use. The City’s 2015 gpcd was below the 2015 interim water use target. Figure 4-2. Historical, Baseline, Targets, and Projected gpcds 4.2 WATER DEMANDS The following tables (Table 4-4, Table 4-5, Table 4-6, Table 4-7, Table 4-8) show the past, current, and projected water deliveries for the City based on historical and projected population (Table 3-4) and per capita water use (Figure 4-1). 237 221 204 212 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 19961998200020022004200620082010201220142016201820202022202420262028203020322034Water Use (gpcd)Baseline 2015 Interim Target 2020 Target Historical GPCD Projected GPCD Projected GPCD reflects additional water demand from future commercial and hotel customers that do not correspond with an increase in residential population. City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-7 Table 4-4. 2010 Water Deliveries Water use sectors 2010 Metered Not Metered Total # of Connections Volume (afy) # of Connections Volume (afy) Volume (afy) Single family 3,699 856 0 0 856 Multi-family 323 131 0 0 131 Commercial 326 420 0 0 420 Industrial 0 0 0 0 0 Institutional/ governmental 0 0 0 0 0 Landscape 126 164 0 0 164 Agriculture 0 0 0 0 0 Other 230 61 0 0 61 Total 4,704 1,632 0 0 1,632 Table 4-5. 2015 Water Deliveries Water use sectors 2015 Metered Not Metered Total # of Connections Volume (afy) # of Connections Volume (afy) Volume (afy) Single family 3,817 762 0 0 762 Multi-family 323 154 0 0 154 Commercial 423 536 0 0 536 Industrial 0 0 0 0 0 Institutional/ governmental 0 0 0 0 0 Landscape 145 131 0 0 131 Agriculture 0 0 0 0 0 Other 267 49 0 0 49 Total 4,975 1,632 0 0 1,632 City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-8 Table 4-6. 2020 Water Deliveries Water use sectors 2020 Metered Not Metered Total # of Connections Volume (afy) # of Connections Volume (afy) Volume (afy) Single family 3,923 888 0 0 888 Multi-family 332 136 0 0 136 Commercial 435 436 0 0 436 Industrial 0 0 0 0 0 Institutional/ governmental 0 0 0 0 0 Landscape 149 170 0 0 170 Agriculture 0 0 0 0 0 Other 274 63 0 0 63 Total 5,113 1,694 0 0 1,694 Table 4-7. 2025 & 2030 Water Deliveries Water use sectors 2025 2030 Metered Metered # of Connections Volume (afy) # of Connections Volume (afy) Single family 4,032 912 4,144 936 Multi-family 341 140 351 143 Commercial 447 447 459 459 Industrial 0 0 0 0 Institutional/ governmental 0 0 0 0 Landscape 153 175 157 179 Agriculture 0 0 0 0 Other 282 65 290 67 Total 5,255 1,739 5,402 1,785 City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-9 Table 4-8. 2035 Deliveries Water use sectors 2035 Metered # of Connections Volume (afy) Single family 4,260 961 Multi-family 360 147 Commercial 472 472 Industrial 0 0 Institutional/ governmental 0 0 Landscape 162 184 Agriculture 0 0 Other 298 69 Total 5,552 1,833 4.2.1 Low-Income Demands Changes to the California Water Code section 10631.1 since 2005 require demand projections to include projected water use for single-family and multi-family residential housing needed for lower income households. Low-income households are defined as households making less than 80% of the statewide median household income. The Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) determines the housing needs in each jurisdiction over the planning period. SLCOG’s current RHNA planning period is from January 1, 2014, through June 30, 2019. For this planning period, sixty-two (62) new low-income units are projected to be needed in the City by 2019. Assuming the average water usage factor per connection in 2015, the projected demand for the low-income residential units is shown in Table 4-9. The low-income deliveries projections are included in the City’s total projected water deliveries shown in Table 4-4 through Table 4-8. Table 4-9. Low-Income Water Deliveries Low-income Water Demands 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Cumulative Total Residential (afy) 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.40 12.38 4.2.2 Sales to Other Water Agencies Although the City has an emergency connection with the City of Arroyo Grande to deliver water in emergencies, the City does not have any contracts to sell water to other agencies as a wholesaler. Additionally, the City does not plan to sell water to other agencies in the future. Table 4-10 shows the historical, current, and projected amounts of water provided to other agencies. City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-10 Table 4-10. Sales to Other Water Agencies Water distributed 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 N/A (afy) 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total (afy) 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.2.3 Additional Water Uses and Losses Table 4-11 shows the past, current and projected amount of non-revenue water (NRW) for the City. NRW is defined as the water losses plus authorized unbilled (metered and unmetered) water consumption. The City used the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Free Water Audit Software in 2015 to perform a water audit of the City for the one year period beginning July 2014 and ending June 2015 (Appendix E). The AWWA Water Audit results showed that NRW in the City was 218.72 afy for theJuly 2014 through June 2015 period. NRW is projected to be approximately 10.3% of production going forward (2016-2035) based on the average NRW percentage for 2010-2015. Table 4-11 shows the historical and projected NRW for the City. Table 4-11. Non-Revenue Water Water use 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Non-revenue water (NRW) (afy) 312 104 195 200 205 211 Total (afy) 312 104 195 200 205 211 4.2.4 Total Water Use Table 4-12 shows the past, current, and projected total water use for the City. Total water use includes water delivered to customers, water sold to other agencies, and non-revenue water. Table 4-12. Total Water Use, afy Water Use 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Total water deliveries (afy) 1,632 1,632 1,694 1,739 1,785 1,833 Sales to other water agencies (afy) 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non-revenue water (NRW) (afy) 312 104 195 200 205 211 Total (afy) 1,944 1,736 1,888 1,939 1,990 2,044 City of Pismo Beach 4. System Demands 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 4-11 4.3 WHOLESALE WATER DEMAND The City receives wholesale water from two sources: (1) the Lopez Project, for which the City has a Water Supply Agreement with the San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (District), and (2) the State Water Project (SWP), for which the City has a subcontract agreement with the District, who is a SWP Contractor. The available supply from these sources is discussed in Section 5 of this UWMP. Due to the City’s projected growth and increasing reliance on surface water in lieu of groundwater, the City expects to request its full allocations to meet projected demands of its water users. Therefore, the projected wholesale water demands in Table 4-13 are equivalent to the projected available supplies described in Section 5. The City submitted its demand projections to the District. Table 4-13. Wholesale Supply Request Provided to Wholesale Suppliers Wholesaler Contracted Volume (afy) Water Use (afy) 2010(1) 2015(1) 2020(2) 2025(2) 2030(2) 2035(2) Lopez Project 892 896 219 892 892 892 892 State Water Project 1,100 952 1,232 1,240 1,240 1,240 1,240 Total 1,992 1,848 1,451 2,132 2,132 2,132 2,132 Notes: 1. Wholesale demands from 2010 and 2015 represent actual deliveries made to the City from respective sources. Sources of this information include the 2015 NCMA Annual Report and City records. 2. The City expects to request its full allocations to meet projected demands of its water users. Therefore, the projected wholesale water demands are equivalent to the projected available supplies described in Section 5. 4.4 WATER USE REDUCTION PLAN This City is committed to taking appropriate steps to reduce its water consumption to meet its 2020 target of 204 gpcd. In fact, conservation measures enacted by the City have already caused per capita consumption to drop below the 2020 target in 2010-2013 and 2015. As the City continues to implement water conservation measures and encourage water conservation practices within its customer base, the City will likely be able to continue meeting its 2020 per capita water use target of 204 gpcd. Water conservation programs are described in more detail in Section 8.               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-1 5 SYSTEM SUPPLIES 5.1 WATER SUPPLY SOURCES This section describes the existing and projected water supply sources for the City. The City currently receives water from three sources: Lopez Lake, the State Water Project (SWP), and groundwater. A description of the City’s planning efforts for recycled water are included in Section 5.5 of this UWMP. 5.1.1 Water Supply Facilities The City’s groundwater is obtained from two wells that pump water from the Santa Maria Valley Groundwater Basin (SMGB). Table 5-1 describes the existing well supply capacity of the two groundwater wells currently in use by the City. Table 5-1. Existing Groundwater Wells City of Pismo Beach Well Number Location Year Installed Casing Depth (feet) Production Capacity (gpm) 5 8th Street and Grand Avenue 1973 500 600 23 900 Block of Huber Street 1990 395 950 Total (gpm) 1,550 Notes: 1. Table adapted from Table 5-1 in the City of Pismo Beach's Water Master Plan (2004). The City’s total groundwater pumping capacity is 1,550 gallons per minute (gpm; 2,502 acre-feet per year [afy]). Therefore, the firm groundwater pumping capacity, which is defined as the pumping capacity with the largest well out of service, is 600 gpm. The City’s other supply sources (surface water from Lopez Lake and the SWP) utilize facilities that are not managed by the City, but by the District. Specifically, the District manages the Lopez Reservoir and delivery of Lopez Entitlements to the City and the other Flood Control and Water Conservation District Zone 3 (Zone 3) members. Zone 3 was formed to fund operations of the Lopez Project, which includes Lopez Lake and Dam, Lopez Terminal Reservoir, Lopez Water Treatment Plant and Distribution System. The District also manages the SWP contract through which the City receives its State Water allocation. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-2 5.1.2 Distribution System and Storage The City’s current water distribution system consists of eight distribution zones, ten storage reservoirs, four Lopez Pipeline turnouts, and over 50 miles of distribution mains. The City’s distribution zones accommodate customers located across over seven miles of coastline, with elevations ranging from sea level to over 600 feet above mean sea level (MSL) (9). Table 5-2 provides a summary of the distribution zones, including the zone’s water supply source and reservoir, if applicable. The City’s water supply distribution system is rather complex, and is described in more detail in the City’s Water Master Plan (2004). Table 5-2. Distribution Zone Summary Distribution Zone Supply Reservoir From Booster Station Name Size (gallons) Bello Bello Turnout --- Charles Street 420,000 Well #5 Bello Street 470,000 Well #23 Pismo Oaks Turnout Pismo Oaks Bello Distribution Pismo Oaks Pismo Oaks 800,000 Pacific Estates Bello Distribution Pacific Estates Pacific Estates 1 350,000 Pacific Estates 2 850,000 Heights 2 Bello Distribution Bello Street Heights 2 440,000 Shell Beach 1 Bello Distribution Bay Street Shell Beach 1 1,000,000 Vista Del Mar Turnout Shell Beach 2 Shell Beach 1 Distribution Shell Beach Shell Beach 2 1,000,000 Sunset Palisades Turnout (N/C) Notes: 1. Table adapted from Table 3-1 in the City's Water Master Plan (2004). 5.1.3 Current and Projected Water Sources The City’s current and projected water supply sources are summarized in Table 5-3. The City projected water supply sources include local groundwater (Section 5.2), the Lopez Project (Section 5.1.3.2), SWP (Section 5.1.3.3), and recycled water (Section 5.5). While the City does not currently have the treatment abilities or conveyance system to create or distribute recycled water, the City is pursuing implementation of an advanced treatment facility and implementation of a recycled water program, as described in Section 5.5. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-3 Table 5-3. Current and Projected Water Supplies Water Supply Sources Projected Water Supply (afy) Water purchased from: Wholesale Supplied Volume 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Lopez Reservoir Yes 892 892 892 892 892 State Water Project (Secured)(1) Yes 1,240 1,240 1,240 1,240 1,240 Supplier-produced groundwater(2) No 700 700 700 700 700 Supplier-produced surface water No Transfers In No Exchanges In No Recycled Water(3) No 0 645 662 680 698 Desalinated Water No Total 2,832 3,477 3,494 3,512 3,530 Notes: 1. The City’s allocation includes a 40 af allotment for Pismo 98, LLC and 100 af for the Central Coast Development Company. A portion of this 140 af allotment is available for City use only if there is excess water available from the District. 2. Groundwater supplies include 700 afy allocated as part of the Adjudication of the SMGB. 3. These values are 100% of the anticipated yield from a recycled water upgrade to the Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant. The City's goal is to develop a regional recycled water project that could share the recycled water with regional partners and potentially utilize additional flows from the South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District’s (SSLOCSD) wastewater treatment plant. If a regional project is implemented, the volume of recycled water available could increase or decrease depending upon interagency agreements and water availability from the SSLOCSD facility among other factors. Table 5-4. Current and Projected Wholesale Water Supplies Wholesale Sources Contracted Volume(1) (afy) Projected Water Supply (afy) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Lopez Project 892 892 892 892 892 892 State Water Project 1,240 1,240 1,240 1,240 1,240 1,240 Total 2,132 2,132 2,132 2,132 2,132 2,132 Notes: 1. Contracted volume as of 2015. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-4 In the event of an emergency or need for stand-by water, the City has an emergency connection with the City of Arroyo Grande and has the opportunity to purchase water allocations from the District and other SWP subcontractors through its SWP contract. As a SWP contractor, the District may sell a portion of its excess SWP allocation to the City. Other entities in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties are also contractors of the Coastal Branch of the SWP. Therefore, the possibility exists for the City to purchase water from other State Water contractors in the area as well. 5.1.3.1 Groundwater The City currently extracts groundwater from the Arroyo Grande Plain of the Tri-Cities Mesa Subbasin (Subbasin) of the Santa Maria Valley Groundwater Basin (SMGB). The SMGB is an adjudicated basin as described in futher detail in Section 5.2. The City of Pismo Beach has an allocation of 700 afy of groundwater from the SMGB Subbasin based on the adjudicated Judgment of the SMGB. 5.1.3.2 Lopez Project The Lopez Project is managed by the District. The reservoir’s total capacity is 51,990 af with a storage capacity of 49,200 af. Storage at the end of 2015 was 13,847 af, or 28%, of total storage capacity. Out of the 4,530 afy of entitlements, the Lopez Project currently provides a contractual supply of up to 892 afy to the City. However, the enactment of Stage 2 of the Low Reservoir Response Plan (LRRP) resulted in a 10% decrease in municipal and downstream releases in 2015. More information about the LRRP is provided in Section 6.1.2. 5.1.3.3 State Water Project The SWP, operated by the DWR, provides treated surface water to the region through the Coastal Branch of the aqueduct at the Lopez turnout. The District is a primary contractor of the SWP, and serves as the entity through which the City receives its SWP allocation. The Central Coast Water Authority (CCWA) treats and distributes the water directly to contracted retailers, such as the City. The City’s current contractual water delivery allocation, commonly referred to as “Table A” water, is 1,240 af. However, 100 AF is subcontracted to the Central Coast Development Company and 40 AF is subcontracted to Pismo 98, LLC giving the City a usable Table A allocation of 1,100 afy (5). In addition to its Table A allocation, the City holds 1,240 AFY of additional allocation with the District, usually referred to as a “drought buffer”. Drought buffer water is water that has no pipeline capacity for delivery. Rather, it is used to increase deliveries during times of drought when Table A allocations are less than 100%. Throughout every year DWR sets allocations as a percentage of contracted volumes for SWP Contractors based on consideration of hydrologic and climatic data and modeling. Historically, percentage allocations have ranged from 5%- 100%. For example, if Table A allocations were 40 percent of contracted amounts, without a drought buffer the City would receive 440 AF of water considering the City’s subcontracts, and with a drought buffer of 1,240 af the City would receive an additional 496 AF for a total of 936 af. In any given year, however, under its current contracts the City’s total SWP deliveries cannot exceed 1,240 AF and the amount that can be stored in San Luis Reservoir follows the methodology described in the following Section. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-5 5.1.3.4 Stored SWP Water During years when the City has access to SWP water in excess of 1,240 AF a portion of that water can be stored in San Luis Reservoir for subsequent delivery in future years. However, there are limitations on the amount of water that can be stored. Additionally, water stored in San Luis Reservoir can be lost due to spills or interference with SWP operations. The calculations that DWR uses to determine how much water the City can place in storage are outlined below. Where: A = Available Water T = Table A Water B = Drought Buffer D = Delivery Percentage A = (T+B)D S = Storage Amount For deliveries from 0% to 50% the maximum storage allowed is 25% of the available water as shown in Equation 1. Equation 1 0 ≤ D ≤ 50%, S ≤ 0.25 x A For deliveries from 51% to 74% the maximum storage allowed is 25% plus 1% for every percentage point over 50% that is delivered as shown in Equation 2. Equation 2 For 50% < D < 75%, S ≤ [(D-50%) + 0.25] x A For deliveries 75% and over the maximum storage allowed is 50% of the available water as shown in Equation 3. Equation 3 For D ≥ 75%, S = 0.50 x A Sample Calculations: D = 20% Maximum Storage, S = 0.25A Equation 1 S = 0.25[(T+B)x0.20] S = 0.25[(1,240+1,240)x0.20] S = 0.25(496) S = 124 AF D = 62% Maximum Storage, S = [(D-50%) + 0.25] x A Equation 2 S = [(D-50%) + 0.25] x [(T+B)D] S = [(62%-50%) + 0.25] x [(1,240+1,240)0.62] S = (0.12 + 0.25) x [(2,480)0.62] S =.37 x 1,537.6 S = 568.9 AF City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-6 D = 85% Maximum Storage, S = 0.50A Equation 3 S = 0.50(T+B)D S = 0.50(1,240+1,240).85 S = 0.50(2,108) S = 1,054 It should be noted that the calculations above use 1,240 AF. Even though others have a subcontract with the City for a total of 140 AF, the maximum the City can store is based upon the contract with the District. For example, when the SWP is delivering 100% of Table A allocations, the City can take delivery of 1,240 AF, 140 AF of which belongs to others, and can store 1,240 AF (50% of the total water available under the contract). If the SWP deliveries are 65%, the City would have available 806 AF (91 AF of which is owned by others) plus 806 AF of drought buffer for a total of 1,521 AF. This would allow the City to take delivery of 1,240 AF (the amount allowed by the City’s portion of the SWP pipeline capacity) and store 281 AF, or the City could deliver a lesser amount and store up to 644.8 AF (see equations above). Additionally, since the District has a higher Table A amount than its contracted treatment and conveyance capacity in the Coastal Branch, they can use this “excess allocation” of 15,273 AFY of Table A Water to make additional SWP water available to the existing subcontractors. However, future availability of the District’s excess allocation for subcontractors is unknown and thus shouldn’t be relied upon for long term water supply planning purposes. 5.2 GROUNDWATER This section describes the SMGB and applicable subbasins that underlie the City, which are directly affected by the City’s groundwater use. 5.2.1 Groundwater Basin Description For planning purposes, DWR has subdivided the State of California into ten separate hydrologic regions, corresponding to the State’s major drainage basins. The SMGB (Number 3-12 as described in DWR Bulletin 118) underlies the Santa Maria Valley in the coastal portion of northern Santa Barbara and southern San Luis Obispo Counties. The SMGB also underlies Nipomo and Tri-Cities Mesas, Arroyo Grande Plain, and Arroyo Grande and Pismo Creek Valleys, of which the City draws from the Tri-Cities Mesa portion of the SMGB. The SMGB is bounded by the San Luis and Santa Lucia Ranges on the north, the San Rafael Mountains on the east, and Solomon Hills and San Antonio Creek Valley Groundwater Basin on the south, and the Pacific Ocean on the west. The SMGB is approximately 288 square miles (184,000 acres). This basin was adjudicated in 2008. Groundwater is found in alluvium, sand dunes, and the Orcutt, Paso Robles, Pismo, and Careaga formations. Groundwater is unconfined throughout most of the SMGB except in the coastal portion where it is confined. Specific yield of sediments in the SMGB ranges from 3 to 21 percent, with a mean specific yield of approximately 12 percent for parts of the SMGB in San Luis Obispo County. DWR estimated the safe yield of the Tri-Cities Mesa – Arroyo Grande Plain Hydrologic subarea to be between 4,000 afy and 5,600 afy (3). City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-7 Natural recharge in the basin comes from seepage losses from major streams, percolation of rainfall, and subsurface flow. Percolation of flow in Arroyo Grande Creek, controlled by releases from Lopez Dam, provides recharge for the Tri-Cities Mesa, Arroyo Grande Plain, and Arroyo Grande Valley portions of the SMGB. Incidental recharge results from deep percolation of urban and agricultural return water, treated wastewater return, and septic tank effluent. Some subsurface flow comes from consolidated rocks surrounding the SMGB and from the neighboring San Antonia Creek Valley Groundwater Basin. A 2007 Water Balance Study of the Northern Cities Management Area (NCMA) (described below) estimated a total average annual recharge of 8,535 afy, and an average annual groundwater production of 5,569 afy between 1986 and 2004. According to DWR Bulletin 118, the total storage capacity of the portion of the SMGB in San Luis Obispo County is estimated to be approximately 4,000,000 af, with about 784,000 af of the total capacity residing above MSL. A 1968 storage capacity evaluation estimated that the total storage capacity of the SMGB to be approximately 14,900,000 af. Groundwater in storage for the San Luis Obispo County portion of the SMGB was estimated to be 3,870,000 af by DWR in 1969. According to a DWR 2002 estimate, groundwater in storage in the NCMA portion of the SMGB is estimated to have been 3,411,100 af in 1985 and 3,399,700 af in 1995. Groundwater storage above MSL was estimated to have been 231,100 af in 1985 and 219,700 af in 1995 (10). A map of the SMGB is included in Appendix F. 5.2.2 Groundwater Management Plan A formal groundwater management plan has not been prepared for the City, Tri-Cities area, or the NCMA. In the future, the City may consider coordination with other agencies within the SMGB to develop a more comprehensive groundwater management plan. The City’s underlying groundwater basin is adjudicated, so allowable withdrawals from the SMGB are limited by law. A copy of the Adjudication Judgment and Gentlemen’s Agreement, which is what the management of the NCMA in the Adjudication Judgment was based on, are provided in Appendix G. As a requirement of the adjudicated judgment, the City participates in the Northern Cities Monitoring Program, which is comprised of local entities that have a vested interest in responsibly managing the surface and groundwater resources of the region. The goal of the Northern Cities Monitoring Program is to help preserve the long-term integrity of water supplies in the NCMA. The program includes joint efforts from the City of Arroyo Grande, City of Grover Beach, City of Pismo Beach, Oceano Community Services District (collectively, the Northern Cities), County of San Luis Obispo, the District and local landowners. The Northern Cities and partnered agencies have established six objectives for ongoing NCMA groundwater management, including:  Share groundwater resources and manage pumping,  Monitor supply and demand, and share information,  Manage groundwater levels and prevent seawater intrusion,  Protect groundwater quality,  Manage cooperatively,  Encourage water conservation. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-8 NCMA agencies are required by the adjudicated judgment to prepare and submit annual reports for the monitoring program, which include collection and analysis of data pertaining to the water supply and demand of the region, including land and water uses in the SMGB, supply sources, and groundwater conditions. 5.2.2.1 FY 2014/15 Water Supply, Production and Delivery Plan In January 2015, the NCMA members adopted a Water Supply, Production and Delivery Plan (WSPDP) that applies the strategic objectives to the various supplies available to the area. The WSPDP made a number of recommendations that were implemented or subject to further study. The recommendations include:  Continue ongoing water conservation efforts to limit demand and make additional supply available for potentially future dry years.  Immediately implement the strategies identified in the WSPDP to minimize SMGB groundwater pumping in the near term.  Develop an implementation plan to install the necessary appurtenances to allow the Arroyo Grande/Grover Beach Intertie to be utilized to deliver additional Lopez water to Grover Beach. Based on the results of the Arroyo Grande/Grover Beach Intertie Evaluation, construction of the 8” intertie appears to be the most cost effective.  Perform additional analysis of a potential Grover Beach Pump Station to evaluate temporary and permanent pump station alternative. These recommendations reinforce the ongoing management efforts by the NCMA and provide potential projects to improve water supply reliability and protect water quality in the face of the ongoing drought. Ongoing work to implement the recommendations includes evaluation of additional delivery facilities to add operational flexibility to assure optimum use of all supplies. Implementing the WSPDP allowed the NCMA to minimize the use of groundwater thereby protecting against seawater intrusion while meeting the needs of their customers and other water users in the SMGB. 5.2.2.2 Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Supply Options Evaluation In late 2015 and early 2016, the Zone 3 member agencies and the District collaborated to identify, evaluate and develop recommendations for emergency water supply options that could be implemented in the event that current drought continued for an extended period. These agencies are continuing to monitor drought conditions and plan for the implementation of these emergency measures, should they become necessary. The emergency supply options evaluated by Zone 3 member agencies and the District are outlined in Table 5-5. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-9 Table 5-5. Zone 3 Extended Drought Emergency Supply Options Cloud Seeding Investigate opportunities to utilize cloud seeding to enhance rainfall within the Lopez Watershed. This could involve cooperative agreement with Santa Barbara County. SWP Maximization Maximize importation of District State Water Project (SWP) supplies, including subcontractor and “Excess Entitlement” supplies. Unsubscribed Nacimiento Investigate transfer/exchange opportunities to obtain unsubscribed Nacimiento water for the Zone 3 agencies (i.e. exchange agreements with the City of San Luis Obispo and the Chorro Valley pipeline SWP subcontractors). Water Market Purchases Investigate opportunities to obtain additional imported water and deliver it to the Zone 3 agencies through the SWP infrastructure (e.g. Exchange agreements with San Joaquin/Sacramento Valley farmers, Water broker consultation, Groundwater Banking Exchange Agreements, etc.). Morro Bay Desal Investigate opportunities to obtain SWP water from Morro Bay by providing incentives for Morro Bay to fully utilize its desalination plant capacity. Land Fallowing Evaluate potential agreements with local agriculture representatives to offer financial incentives to fallow land within the Arroyo Grande and Cienega Valleys and make that water available for municipal use. Lopez Reservoir Minimum Pool Investigate feasibility of extracting water from Lopez Reservoir below the 4,000 AF minimum pool level. This may require utilization of emergency pumps to deliver the water to the Lopez Water Treatment Plant. Enchanced Conservation Evaluate opportunities for enhanced water conservation by the Zone 3 agencies beyond the Governor’s Mandatory Water Conservation Order (e.g. water rationing, no outdoor watering, agriculture water restrictions, etc.) to preserve additional water. Diablo Desal Utilize excess capacity from the Diablo Power Plant’s Desalination Facility to supply water to the Zone 3 agencies through a connection to the Lopez Pipeline. Nacimiento/CMC Intertie Complete design of pipeline that would connect the Nacimiento Pipeline to the California Men’s Colony (CMC) Water Treatment Plant. Investigate opportunities for Zone 3 agencies to purchase Nacimiento Water and utilize exchange agreements and existing infrastructure to deliver additional water to Zone 3 through the Coastal Branch pipeline. Emergency IPR Investigate opportunities to develop an Indirect Potable Reuse (IPR) Groundwater Recharge System, under emergency permits, to provide a supplemental supply for the Zone 3 Agencies. Emergency Desal Investigate opportunities to develop a desalination facility, under emergency permits, to provide a supplemental supply for the Zone 3 Agencies. Price Canyon Produced Water Investigation into opportunities to recover and utilize produced water from ongoing oil operations in Price Canyon. Upper Lopez Wells Investigate potential water storage in aquifers upstream of Lopez Reservoir and evaluate opportunities to obtain this water supply. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-10 5.2.3 Groundwater Levels and Historical Trends The Northern Cities conduct groundwater monitoring in the NCMA, which represents the northernmost portion of the SMGB. The NCMA groundwater monitoring program utilizes collected data from three primary sources: (1) groundwater elevation data collected by the County of San Luis Obispo, (2) water quality and elevation data from a network of sentry wells in the NCMA, and (3) water quality data from the Division of Drinking Water (DDW). Selected figures from the NCMA 2015 Annual Monitoring Report are included in Appendix F for reference, including a boundary map of the NCMA, historic annual precipitation, groundwater elevation contours, and selected hydrographs of NCMA monitoring wells. Regular monitoring of water elevations in clustered sentry wells located along the coast a re monitored quarterly as part of the sentry well monitoring program, which comprises an essential tool for tracking critical groundwater elevation changes. As shown by the hydrographs in Appendix F-Figure 11, the sentry wells provide a long history of groundwater elevations. Measured water elevations in these wells reflect the net effect of changing groundwater recharge and discharge conditions in the primary production aquifer. Averaging the groundwater elevations from the three deep sentry wells provides a single, representative index, called the deep well index, for tracking the status and apparent health of the basin. Previous groundwater studies and NCMA Monitoring Annual Reports have suggested a deep well index value of 7.5 feet above mean sea level (MSL) as a minimum threshold, below which the basin is at risk for sea water intrusion. Historical variation of this index is represented by the average deep sentry well elevations shown in Appendix F-Figure 12. Appendix F-Figure 12 shows the impact of three years of drought (2007- 2009) followed by recovery of the index values in subsequent years as rainfall increased and groundwater production declined. Between April 2015 and October 2015, the deep well index remained significantly below the index trigger value. In October 2015, the deep well index began to rise and since mid-December has been above the trigger value (Appendix F-Figure 12). In 2008, the lowest measured groundwater elevation was approximately ten feet below MSL. As described in the Northern Cities 2008 Annual Report, groundwater below MSL indicates a potential for seawater intrusion into fresh groundwater supplies. The area with lowest groundwater elevations encompasses municipal well fields, and represents a relatively broad and shallow pumping trough exacerbated by drought conditions. Hydrographs produced through the sentry well monitoring program indicate that groundwater elevations have historically varied above and below about 20 feet above MSL. Historical hydrographs show that groundwater elevations recover to levels similar to 2006 (a wet water year) and significantly decline during dry years like 2013. These groundwater level decreases and recovery cycles illustrate the relationship between times of the drought and increased pumping, and times of recovery with increased rainfall and decreased pumping. The last three years of very low rainfall (2013-2015) has resulted in water levels throughout the area declining 10 to 20 feet. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-11 5.2.4 Groundwater Overdraft Overdraft is the condition of a groundwater basin in which the amount of water withdrawn by pumping exceeds the amount of water that recharges the basin. By definition, overdraft is not a measure of annual fluctuations in groundwater storage volume. Rather, overdraft is a measure of the long-term trend associated with annual fluctuations. Overdraft is characterized by groundwater levels that decline over a period of years and never fully recover, even in wet years (10). DWR has identified the Central Coast Hydrologic Region to be in a state of overdraft. However, DWR also states that overdraft in this region is expected to decline as supply sources shift from groundwater to imported SWP surface water (11). As described in Section 5.2.3, a primary concern for the City and for the SMGB in general is saltwater intrusion from the coastal zone into fresh groundwater supply. Total groundwater pumping in the NCMA (urban, agriculture, and rural domestic) was 3,979.47 af in 2015, which is 41.9% of the calculated 9,500 afy safe yield of the NCMA portion of the basin. However, even with the reduced pumping, water elevations throughout the area declined by several feet, with some areas finishing the year with water elevations below sea level. Typically, when pumping is less than the safe yield, the remaining volume of groundwater results in increased groundwater in storage, which is then manifested by rising water levels. The current condition, with groundwater pumping at 41.9% of the safe yield and declining water elevations, illustrates the impacts of the ongoing severe drought that has significantly reduced recharge. Reduced recharge likely also illustrates the impacts of reduced subsurface inflow recharge from the east (Nipomo Mesa). This condition of declining water levels in the NCMA, even though total pumping is currently 41.9% of the basin safe yield, will likely be exacerbated if the NCMA agencies are required to increase groundwater withdrawals due to reduction in local surface water supplies or State Water project deliveries (5). 5.2.5 Existing and Projected Groundwater Pumping This section quantifies the historical and projected groundwater pumping by the City in Table 5-6 and Table 5-7. The 2008 Annual Monitoring Report for the NCMA indicated that drought conditions and subsequent increased groundwater pumping were causing groundwater elevations to drop below MSL, increasing the risk for and potentially causing seawater intrusion into groundwater aquifers. Since 2008, the City and surrounding municipalities that also rely on groundwater began an aggressive water monitoring program to identify the extent of seawater intrusion and track its progress. In addition, the City and other NCMA agencies have implemented aggressive water conservation programs and initiated efforts to maximize utilization of their surface water supplies to alleviate stress on groundwater supply. Projected groundwater pumping includes groundwater pumped to serve the population within the current City limits, as well as the additional demand from customers within the City’s Sphere of Influence that are a part of the City’s water system. The projected volumes in Table 5-7 assume that groundwater use within the Subbasin will be equal to the remainder of demand not met by all other available sources of supply. The City expects to utilize groundwater to supplement Lopez and State Water during peak demand periods, but intends to minimize usage when possible to protect the resource. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-12 Table 5-6. Historic Groundwater Pumping Basin Name Metered or Unmetered Historic Pumping Rates (afy) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 SMGB (Tri-Cities Mesa Subbasin) Metered 47.11 22.50 73.01 203.81 284.77 Total Groundwater Pumped(1) 47.11 22.50 73.01 203.81 284.77 Groundwater as Percent of Total Water Supply(2) 2% 1% 3% 10% 16% Notes: 1. Groundwater volumes provided by the City. 2. Percentages of total water supply 2011 through 2015 were calculated using the total supply produced based on City production records. Table 5-7. Projected Groundwater Pumping Basin Name Projected Pumping Rates (afy) 2020 2025 2030 2035 SMGB (Tri-Cities Mesa Subbasin) 0 0 0 0 Total Groundwater Pumped 0 0 0 0 Groundwater as Percent of Total Water Supply(1) 0% 0% 0% 0% Notes: 1. It is assumed that Lopez and SWP will be used before groundwater, which will be replenished with recycled water. Groundwater use will vary depending upon availability of the other supply sources and the status of the SMGB Deep Well Index. 5.3 TRANSFER OPPORTUNITIES The City currently does not transfer or exchange water with its neighboring water suppliers. One transfer opportunity for the City lies within the 40 afy of the City’s 1,240 afy of allocated surface water from the SWP, which is currently obligated to the Pismo 98, LLC. The City may have the opportunity to reallocate this supply for City use in the event that the property does not utilize this allocation. Table 5-8 describes the transfer opportunity for the City. The City does not have short or long-term plans to utilize this source, and no specific proposed volume exists for this opportunity. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-13 Table 5-8. Transfer and Exchange Opportunities Transfer Agency Transfer or Exchange Short Term or Long Term Proposed Volume (afy) Pismo 98, LLC Transfer N/A N/A Total N/A 5.4 DESALINATED WATER OPPORTUNITIES The District in coordination with PG&E is performing an assessment of the feasibility to deliver desalinated water from the Diablo Canyon Power Plant near Avila Beach, California, to the current Zone 3 member agencies, along the Lopez Pipeline. Preliminary estimates indicate that between 500 afy to 1,300 afy could be delivered from the project. Next steps include refining the cost estimates, additional coordination with PG&E, obtaining the required permits, developing an Environmental Impact Report, and further optimizing the conveyance infrastructure through additional evaluation of pipeline capacity, pumping requirements, pressure class upgrade requirements and pipeline layout in order to reduce pipeline and conveyance infrastructure costs as the project progresses. 5.5 RECYCLED WATER OPPORTUNITIES The UWMP Act requires that the UWMP address the opportunities for development of recycled water, including the description of existing recycled water applications, quantities of wastewater currently being treated to recycled water standards, limitations on the use of available recycled water, an estimate of projected recycled water use, the feasibility of projected uses, and practices to encourage the use of recycled water. 5.5.1 Wastewater Treatment Facilities The Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) is owned and operated by the City. The WWTP receives wastewater from the City’s wastewater collection system and serves a population of residential and commercial customers entirely within the City limits. The WWTP was originally constructed in 1955. In 2000, the City adopted its Wastewater Treatment Plan Master Plan (WWTP Master Plan), which proposed upgrades to increase treatment capacity and treatment level to provide advanced secondary treatment. The current design flow capacity of the WWTP is 1.9 million gallons per day (mgd), or 2,130 afy. Prior to upgrades, the WWTP consisted of a headworks structure with a manual bar screen and an aerated grit chamber, primary treatment via two clarifiers, and secondary treatment via three aeration tanks and secondary clarifiers. Solids handling included two anaerobic digesters, a dissolved-air flotation thickener, and a belt press. The effluent was disinfected with sodium hypochlorite. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-14 WWTP upgrades were completed in 2006 and include the following:  Headworks structure, primary clarifiers, secondary clarifiers, and chlorine contact basin were all demolished or taken out of service.  A new headworks structure, operations center/laboratory building, oxidation ditches, secondary clarifiers, and sludge pumping station were built.  Existing aeration basins were converted to the new chlorine contact basin.  Effluent pump station was upgraded. Effluent from the WWTP is currently discharged through an outfall to the Pacific Ocean. The ocean outfall has a total capacity of 8.5 MGD (12), of which the City is entitled to 44 percent (13). The WWTP operates under Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR) Order No. R3-2015-0016 as of February 2016. Among other water quality limitations, the WDR states that discharge to the ocean outfall from the City’s WWTP is not to exceed a monthly average of 1.9 mgd. 5.5.2 Wastewater Flow Projections The future average annual wastewater flow was determined by multiplying the projected population by the average observed unit per capita wastewater generation rate, which is 138 gallons per capita per day (gpcd). This is the average gpcd based on WWTP data collected between 2009 and 2013. The resulting average annual historical flow and flow projections are summarized in Table 5-9. Table 5-9. Wastewater Flow Projections Type of Wastewater 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Wastewater collected & treated in service area (afy)(1) 1,184 1,193 1,226 1,260 1,295 1,331 Volume that meets recycled water standard (afy)(2) 1,184 1,193 1,226 1,260 1,295 1,331 Notes: 1. Assumes 138 gallons per capita per day based on analysis in the Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study. Population estimates based on Census and SLOCOG data. 2. In 2010 and 2015, all advanced (disinfected) secondary treated effluent was discharged through an ocean outfall. 5.5.3 Water Recycling Facilities The City’s WWTP currently treats its effluent to an advanced (disinfected) secondary treatment level, as defined by California Code of Regulations Title 22 requirements. The 2010 UWMP projected potential recycled water use for 2015 that was dependent upon WWTP upgrades and future development projects that did not occur as shown in Table 5-10. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-15 Table 5-10. 2010 UWMP Recycled Water Use Projected for 2015 and Actual 2015 Recycled Water Use Use Type 2010 Projection for 2015 (afy) 2015 Actual Use (afy) Agricultural irrigation 60 0 Landscape irrigation 462 0 Commercial irrigation 58 0 Golf course irrigation 77 0 Wildlife habitat 0 0 Wetlands 0 0 Industrial reuse 0 0 Groundwater recharge 764 0 Seawater barrier 0 0 Geothermal/Energy 0 0 Indirect potable reuse 0 0 Total 1,421 0 In 2015, the City completed the Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study (RWFPS) to investigate alternatives for constructing a recycled water system that will enable the City to produce and beneficially use recycled water to enhance its water supply portfolio. The City developed goals and objectives for recycled water through numerous meetings held with potential stakeholders, partner agencies and City staff, considering information presented in prior water supply and recycled water studies, and based on direction given by the City Council. The resulting recycled water goals and objectives are summarized as follows: 1. Offset potable water uses to the extent practicable 2. Further diversify the City’s water supply portfolio by developing a local, sustainable and highly reliable water supply 3. Provide a new source of recharge to the SMGB 4. Relieve increased water demand due to proposed development 5. Develop a viable recycled water project in a timely manner to facilitate regional use of recycled water in South County 6. Secure outside funding and/or financing to support the development of the City’s recycled water system City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-16 As described below and in Table 5-11, four alternatives were identified to be further developed and evaluated in the RWFPS:  Alternative 1: Providing recycled water at Disinfected Secondary-23 standards for restricted reuse.  Alternative 2: Providing recycled water at Disinfected Tertiary standards for unrestricted landscape irrigation.  Alternative 3a: Full advanced treatment (FAT) providing recycled water that meets the standards for groundwater recharge for injection as a coastal seawater intrusion barrier.  Alternative 3b: FAT providing recycled water that meets the standards for groundwater recharge for injection directly into the inland aquifer. Table 5-11. RWFPS Alternatives Quantitative Analysis Summary Alternative Alternative 1 Secondary-23 Irrigation Alternative 2 Tertiary Irrigation Alternative 3a FAT for Coastal Injection Alternative 3b FAT for Inland Injection Total Capital Cost $4,963,000 $20,679,000 $27,045,000 $29,708,000 Annual O&M Cost $44,000 $236,000 $598,000 $628,000 Total RW Used (AFY) 17 214 930(1) 930(1) Annualized Cost ($/AF)(2) $15,900 $5,400 $1,900 $2,100 Estimated % Recoverable 100% 100% 70% 75% Estimated AFY Recoverable 17 214 651 698 Annualized Cost ($/AF Recoverable) $15,900 $5,400 $2,700 $2,800 Notes: 1. Based on estimate of actual recycled water production at buildout 2. The annualized unit cost is calculated by adding the annual payment for borrowed capital costs to the annual O&M cost and dividing by the annual project yield. Annual payment for borrowed capital is based on an interest rate of 5% over a payback period of 30 years. The alternatives analysis concluded that groundwater recharge is the most favorable alternative. Based on the preliminary hydrologic assessment completed as part of the RWFPS, both coastal and inland injection wells warrant further investigation. For the purposes of the RWFPS, Alternative 3b for inland recharge is being carried forward as the recommended alternative, known as the Regional Groundwater Sustainability Project (RGSP). However, a combination of coastal and/or inland injection wells will be considered in subsequent analyses to develop the most beneficial groundwater recharge program for the City and NCMA agencies. The RWFPS was adopted by the City Council on April 21, 2015 and was endorsed by all NCMA agencies. City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-17 The City is currently completing preliminary design for a FAT facility that will allow it and potential regional partners to inject advanced purified water into the groundwater basin. This project will provide additional recharge for the basin and provide a drought-proof source of supply for the region. As shown in Table 5-11, it is anticipated that the entire WWTP recycled water production volume of 930 AFY can be injected in four (4) inland injection wells. It is anticipated that FAT flows could be injected and 75% of the injected amount could be recovered by municipal production wells as sustainable water supply. It is anticipated that 645 afy (based on 2013 flow volume projections) could be recovered as sustainable water supply by 2020, as shown in Table 5-12. Buildout supply, based on buildout flow, is anticipated to be about 698 afy. Table 5-12. Projected Recycled Water Use User type Description 2015 (afy) 2020 (afy) 2025 (afy) 2030 (afy) 2035 (afy) Agricultural irrigation N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Landscape irrigation N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial irrigation N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Golf course irrigation N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Wildlife habitat N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Wetlands N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Industrial reuse N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Groundwater recharge (1) Advanced 0 645 662 680 698 Seawater barrier N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Geothermal/Energy N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Indirect potable reuse N/A 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 645 662 680 698 Notes: 1. These values are 100% of the anticipated yield from a recycled water upgrade to the Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant. The City's goal is to develop a regional recycled water project that could share the recycled water with regional partners and potentially utilize additional flows from the South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District’s (SSLOCSD) wastewater treatment plant. If a regional project is implemented, the volume of recycled water available could increase or decrease depending upon interagency agreements and water availability from the SSLOCSD facility among other factors. 5.5.4 Regional Recycled Water Opportunities The City of Pismo Beach currently discharges the treated effluent from its WWTP through a pipeline that conveys the wastewater to the South San Luis Obispo County Sanitation District’s (SSLOCSD) WWTP, where effluent from both plants is discharged to the ocean through a shared outfall (Figure 5-1). As described previously, the City is evaluating a FAT facility that could be located at its existing WWTP or at an offsite location located somewhere along its effluent pipeline. Development of an offsite FAT facility would provide significant opportunity for a regional recycled water facility that could treat wastewater from both the City and the SSLOCSD WWTP. Analysis completed by the District, estimated that a regional facility could potentially provide up to 2,390 AFY of additional water supply for groundwater recharge through development of a regional FAT facility (14). City of Pismo Beach 5. System Supplies 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 5-18 Figure 5-1. SSLOCSD and City Ocean Outfall 5.6 FUTURE WATER PROJECTS As discussed in Section 5.4, the District in coordination with PG&E is performing an assessment of the feasibility to deliver desalinated water from the Diablo Canyon Power Plant near Avila Beach, California, to the current Zone 3 member agencies along the Lopez Pipeline. Preliminary estimates indicate that between 500 afy to 1,300 afy could be delivered from the project. Next steps include refining the cost estimates, additional coordination with PG&E, obtaining the required permits, developing an Environmental Impact Report, and further optimizing the conveyance infrastructure through additional evaluation of pipeline diameter, pumping requirements, pressure class upgrade requirements and pipeline layout in order to reduce pipeline and conveyance infrastructure costs as the project progresses. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-1 6 WATER SUPPLY RELIABILITY 6.1 SUPPLY RELIABILITY BY SOURCE The relative reduction in available supplies during dry water years is variable, and depends on the projected reductions from each specific water source. 6.1.1 State Water Project For the SWP, DWR periodically compiles a report on the supply reliability of State Water under current and projected future water conditions. DWR’s 2013 Delivery Reliability Report describes the historical and projected deliveries to the State Water Contractors during normal years and over various drought-year periods. Although the relative percent deliveries included in the 2013 Delivery Reliability Report apply specifically to State Water Contractors allocations, these percentages correspond to percent reduction that the City may experience in drought conditions. Additionally, percent reductions for a three-year drought period were calculated using a similar method to that used by CCWA. Single dry year deliveries for State Water supply are reduced to 11 percent of Table A allocations, while deliveries are estimated to be 24 percent of Table A allocations for each year during a multiple dry year period (15). 6.1.2 Lopez Reservoir The supply reliability of the City’s surface water allocation from the Lopez Project is determined by District and based on reservoir storage, historical production and delivery volumes in normal, single dry year, and multiple dry year conditions. According to the Zone 3 2015 UWMP, the Lopez Reservoir is a very reliable source of water with an annual safe yield of 8,730 afy. The Low Reservoir Response Plan (LRRP) was adopted in December 2014 and enacted in April 2015 when storage reached below 20,000 af. The enactment of Stage 2 of the LRRP resulted in a 10% decrease in municipal and downstream releases as shown in Table 6-1 and Table 6-2. The District projects that municipal entitlements will remain constant at 4,530 afy through 2035, and that it will be able to supply all contracted agencies with their requested allocations in full during single dry years and for the first three of four multiple dry years (7). For the purposes of this UWMP, the District anticipates delivering 90% of municipal entitlements, based on reservoir capacity, in the fourth year of a multiple dry years period. Therefore, it is assumed that water supply from the Lopez Reservoir during dry water years will meet the City’s full allocation of 892 afy except for during the fourth year of a multiple dry years period. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-2 Table 6-1. Initial Prescribed Municipal Diversion Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP Amount of Water In Storage (af) Municipal Diversion Reduction Municipal Diversion (afy) (1) 20,000 0% 4,530 15,000 10% 4,077 10,000 20% 3,624 5,000 35%(2) 2,941 4,000 100% 0 Notes: 1. The actual amount of water diverted may vary as agencies extend the delivery of their Lopez Entitlement. 2. The 35% reduction provides sufficient water to supply 55 gallons per capita per day (gpcd) for the estimated population of the Zone 3 agencies (47,696 in 2010 per the 2010 Zone 3 UWMP). 55 gpcd is the target residential indoor water usage standard used in California Department of Water Resource’s 2010 UWMP Method 4 Guidelines. Table 6-2. Initial Prescribed Downstream Release Reduction Strategy Under the LRRP Amount of Water In Storage (af) Downstream Release Reduction Downstream Releases (afy) (1) 20,000 9.5% 3,800 15,000 9.5% 3,800 10,000 75.6% 1,026 5,000 92.9% 300 4,000 100.0% 0 Notes: 1. These downstream releases represent the maximum amount of water that can be released. Actual releases may be less if releases can be reduced while still meeting the needs of the agricultural stakeholders and addressing the environmental requirements. (16) 6.1.3 Groundwater The City’s right to pump groundwater from the SMGB are defined within the Adjudicated Judgement (Appendix K), which states that the Northern Cities (Pismo Beach included) have a paramount right to withdraw 4,330 afy (including Ag conversion credits) from the Northern Cities Area of the SMGB. The City is entitled to 700 afy of this total, as indicated in the Gentlemen’s Agreement with other water purveyors in the Northern Cities Area (Appendix J: described in detail in Section 5.2 of this UWMP). The judgment also states that the court may exercise its equity powers in the condition that the SMGB becomes over drafted. However, there is no current language in the adjudication judgment that stipulates the amount that supply allocations may be reduced. Therefore, for planning purposes, it will be assumed that the City may have its full allocation of groundwater available even in dry water years when you include the RGSP. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-3 However, it is important to note that the City has made and continues to make planning efforts to reduce its reliance on groundwater supplies. In addition, with recent detections of groundwater elevations below sea level and subsequent threat of seawater intrusion, the City realizes the importance of maintaining its groundwater supplies and following a sustainable pumping plan. Therefore, the City considers and will continue to consider minimizing its impact to groundwater resources, especially during dry years or drought conditions. As described in Section 5.5, the City intends to utilize its planned RGSP to ensure groundwater supply reliability. The RGSP will be a year-round effort by the City, and will be supplied with recycled water from the City’s wastewater treatment plant. Since the flow of wastewater is typically reliable even during dry years, the City anticipates that it will be able to provide significant enhancement of groundwater supplies and protection of groundwater resources when threatened by drought conditions. 6.2 SUPPLY RELIABILITY - HISTORIC AND FUTURE CONDITIONS This section considers the City’s water supply reliability during three climate-related water scenarios, or water year types: normal year, single dry year, and multiple dry years. These water year types are defined by DWR as follows:  Normal Year: The normal year is a year or an averaged range of years in the historical sequence that most closely represents mean rainfall and recharge levels and patterns. It is defined as the mean rainfall year over the previous 30 years or more.  Single Dry Year: This is defined as the year with the minimum useable supply. The supply quantities for this condition are derived from the minimum historical annual yield.  Multiple Dry Years: This is defined as the three (or more) consecutive years with the minimum useable supply. Water systems are more vulnerable to these droughts of long duration, because they deplete water storage reserves in local and state reservoirs and in groundwater basins. The supply quantities for this condition are derived from the minimum of historical three-year running average yields. 6.2.1 Basis of Water Year Types Historical rainfall data available for City of Pismo Beach were examined to establish a basis of historical normal, single dry, and multiple dry years. As shown in Table 6-3, for the purposes of this report, the year 1991 is classified as a “normal” year, the year 2015 is classified as a “single dry” year, and the years 2013 to 2015 are classified as “multiple dry” years. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-4 Table 6-3. Basis of Water Year Types Supply Source Average/ Normal Year (1) Single Dry Year (2) Multiple Dry Years(2) 2013 2014 2015 Groundwater 2011 2015 2013 2014 2015 State Water Project 1921-2003 1977 1976-1977 1976-1978 1976-1979 Lopez Reservoir 1991-1992 2015 2013 2014 2015 Notes: 1. Normal year supplies are based on current groundwater pumping rights, and contractual agreements with the SWP and Lopez Project. 2. Single and Multiple Dry values are based on actual groundwater pumping, SWP Table A allocation percentages from the SWP Final Delivery Reliability Report 2013, and Lopez allocations for 2013, 2014 & 2015. Table 6-4. Historical Water Supply Conditions Supply Source Average/ Normal Year (afy) (1) Single Dry Year (afy) (2) Multiple Dry Years (afy)(2) 2013 2014 2015 Groundwater 700 285 73 204 285 State Water Project 1,240 1,232 630 1,087 1,232 Lopez Reservoir 892 803 892 892 803 Total 2,832 2,319 1,595 2,183 2,319 Percent of Normal 82% 56% 77% 82% Notes: 1. Normal year supplies are based on current groundwater pumping rights, and contractual agreements with the SWP and Lopez Project. 2. Single and Multiple Dry values are based on actual groundwater pumping, SWP Table A allocation percentages from the SWP Final Delivery Reliability Report 2013, and Lopez allocations for 2013, 2014 & 2015. 6.2.2 Future Supply Reliability Table 6-5 describes historical supply conditions during normal and dry water years. Table 6-6 describes current supply sources and expected reductions during dry years based on the most recent changes to supply management since the historical supply conditions have occurred. Surface water supply from the SWP, however, is expected to decrease based on DWR reliability projections. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-5 Table 6-5. Historical Water Supply Usage Supply Source(1) Average/ Normal Year (afy) (1991) Single Dry Year (2015) (afy) (2) Multiple Dry Years (afy) (2) 2013 2014 2015 Groundwater 700 285 73 204 285 State Water Project(2) 1,240 1,232 630 1,087 1,232 Lopez Reservoir 892 803 892 892 803 Total 2,832 2,319 1,595 2,183 2,319 Percent of Normal 82% 56% 77% 82% Notes: 1. Normal year supplies are based on groundwater pumped, and contractual agreements with the SWP and Lopez Project. 2. Single and Multiple Dry values are based on actual groundwater pumping, SWP Table A allocation percentages from the SWP Final Delivery Reliability Report 2013, and Lopez allocations for 2013, 2014 & 2015. Table 6-6. Historical Water Supply Allocations – Current Sources Supply Source(1) Water Use (afy) Average/ Normal Year(1) Single Dry Year Multiple Dry Years Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Groundwater 700 700 700 700 700 State Water Project(2) 1,240 257 562 562 562 Lopez Reservoir 892 892 892 892 803(3) Total 2,832 1,849 2,154 2,154 2,064 Percent of Normal 65% 76% 76% 73% Notes: 1.Does not include recycled water because recycled water is not currently used or produced by the City. 2.Percent reductions in SWP supplies are based on a single dry year delivery and multiple dry year annual delivery based on the 2013 Delivery Reliability Report of 11% and 24% reduction during single dry and 2 year drought respectively. The City’s anticipated allocation of drought buffer (1,240 afy) supply is included in these dry year values. 3. Assumes enactment of Stage 2 LRRP reduction of 10%. 6.2.3 Projected Normal Year Supply/Demand The normal year water demands through 2035 are estimated based on the per capita water use targets summarized in Section 4.1 and populations presented in Section 3.3. The projected normal water year water supply and demand projections are provided in Table 6-7. The available supplies during a normal year represent 100 percent of the available supplies discussed in Section 5. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-6 Table 6-7. Supply and Demand – Normal Year Supply/Demand Condition Projected Supply/Demand (afy) 2015 2020(1) 2025(1) 2030(1) 2035(1) Supply Totals 2,832 3,477 3,494 3,512 3,530 Demand Totals 1,736 1,888 1,939 1,990 2,044 Supply and Demand Difference 1,096 1,589 1,556 1,521 1,486 Difference as Percent of Supply 39% 46% 45% 43% 42% Difference as Percent of Demand 63% 84% 80% 76% 73% Notes: 1. Includes 645-698 afy of recycled water supply. 6.2.4 Projected Single Dry Year Supply/Demand The projected single dry year water demands through 2035 are equivalent to normal year demands, assuming that water demands do not change as a result of dry conditions. The anticipated supply decrease during a single dry year, compared to a normal year, is based on the actual water supply from 2015. For years 2020 to 2035, the supply numbers include the addition of 645 afy of recycled water. As shown in Table 6-8, the City’s supplies are consistently above projected demands even during single-dry year conditions. Table 6-8. Supply and Demand Comparisons – Single Dry Year Supply/Demand Condition Projected Supply/Demand (afy) 2015 2020(1) 2025(1) 2030(1) 2035(1) Supply Totals 1,849 2,494 2,512 2,529 2,547 Demand totals 1,736 1,888 1,939 1,990 2,044 Supply and Demand Difference 114 606 573 539 504 Difference as Percent of Supply 6% 24% 23% 21% 20% Difference as Percent of Demand 7% 32% 30% 27% 25% Notes: 1. Includes 645-698 afy of recycled water supply. 6.2.5 Projected Multiple Dry Year Supply/Demand The projected multiple dry year water demands through 2035 are equivalent to normal year demands, assuming that water demands do not change as a result of dry conditions. The anticipated supply decrease during a multiple dry years period, compared to a normal year, is based on the actual water supply from 2013 through 2015. For years 2020 to 2035, the supply numbers include the addition of 645-698 afy of recycled water. As shown in Table 6-9, the City’s supplies are consistently above projected demands even during multiple-dry year conditions when supplemental supplies from the RGSP are included. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-7 Table 6-9. Supply and Demand Comparison - Multiple Dry Year Events 6.2.6 Projected Minimum Three Year Supply The projected three-year minimum supply for 2016-2018 is based on the historically lowest allocations for Lopez and SWP and the lowest production year for SMGB as shown in Table 6-10. Table 6-10. Three-Year Minimum Supply Supply Source Multiple Dry Years (afy) (2) 2016 2017 2018 Groundwater (1) 23 23 23 State Water Project (2) 124 124 124 Lopez Reservoir (3) 803 803 803 Total 949 949 949 Notes: 1. Based on lowest historical production from 2001-2015, which occurred in 2012. 2. Based on lowest SWP allocation of 5% in 2014. 3. Based on lowest Lopez allocation with a 10% allocation reduction in 2015. Supply/Demand Condition Projected Supply/Demand (afy) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Year 1 Supply Totals(1),(2) 2,154 2,799 2,799 2,799 2,799 Demand Totals 1,736 1,888 1,939 1,990 2,044 Supply and Demand Difference 418 910 860 808 755 Year 2 Supply Totals(1),(2) 2,154 2,799 2,799 2,799 2,799 Demand Totals 1,736 1,888 1,939 1,990 2,044 Supply and Demand Difference 418 910 860 808 755 Year 3 Supply Totals(1),(2) (3) 2,064 2,709 2,709 2,709 2,709 Demand Totals 1,736 1,888 1,939 1,990 2,044 Supply and Demand Difference 329 821 771 719 666 Notes: 1. Based on reduced available supply (Table 6-3 Multiple Dry Years 1-2). 2. Includes 645-698 afy of recycled water supply for 2020-2035. 3. Includes a 10% reduction from LRRP for Lopez supply. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-8 6.2.7 Resource Maximization and Import Minimization The City is currently working on numerous projects to reduce its reliance on imported water. These projects are described in Sections 5.5 and 5.6. A key step to reducing imports will be to bolster local groundwater reliability by recharging the groundwater basin and offsetting SWP deliveries. Another potential way to offset SWP deliveries is the use of desalinated water from Diablo Canyon. Improving water conservation and utilizing recycled water or desalinated sources will allow the City to reduce is import SWP demands. Additional information regarding the City’s water conservation efforts is available in Section 8. 6.2.8 Factors Affecting Supply Reliability There are a variety of factors that can impact water supply reliability. Factors impacting the City’s supply sources are indicated as appropriate in Table 6-11. A brief discussion on each of these factors is provided below. Table 6-11 Factors Affecting Water Supply Reliability A fundamental factor that affects water supply reliability is the hydraulic capacity of supply and distribution system facilities (e.g., groundwater wells, treatment facilities, transmission mains). However, as the City continues to grow it will construct the additional supply and distribution system facilities necessary to accommodate the increased water demands associated with this growth. For this reason, the physical capacity of the City’s supply facilities is assumed to not be a limiting factor affecting the reliability of the City’s supply in the future, and is not listed in Table 6-11. 6.2.8.1 Legal Factors The legal factors affecting supply reliability apply to the City’s entitlement to groundwater from the Tri- Cities Mesa Subbasin (Subbasin), within the SMGB. Since the SMGB is adjudicated, the City is entitled only to 700 AFY of groundwater from the Subbasin, as dictated by the Gentlemen’s agreement (Appendix G) and 2008 basin adjudication judgment (Appendix G). The basin adjudication judgment suggests that the allocated groundwater rights may be decreased in the future if drought and/or overdraft conditions persist. Therefore, if groundwater supplies are limited or reduced in this area, the City’s entitlement may be reduced. To prevent groundwater supplies from being reduced, the City may develop the RGSP utilizing recycled water to enhance its groundwater supply. The RGSP will also help to protect groundwater resources, enhance supply, and minimize the impacts due to seawater intrusion. Water Supply Sources Legal Environmental Water Quality Climatic State Water Project X X Lopez Reservoir X X X Groundwater X X X City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-9 Additionally, the District is in the process of updating its expired existing water rights permit by filing an extension of time with the SWRCB. This extension will allow the District to file a change petition to pursue needed changes to the permit that will reflect actual operations of the Dam in terms of direct diversions, diversions to storage and re-diversions. 6.2.8.2 Environmental Factors Environmental factors affecting water supply reliability typically include concerns over protection of ecosystems, particularly for fish and wildlife resources. To date, the City’s groundwater supply has not been impacted by any environmental factors, and the City does not anticipate future disruption of groundwater supply as a result of environmental factors. The City’s surface water supply from the SWP has the potential to be affected by environmental issues, particularly involving the Delta Smelt in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta issues. SWP pumping capacities were reduced as a result of the May 2007 federal court ruling to protect Delta smelt. However, the City and other local SWP users have not been negatively affected to date by reduced SWP supplies since the District’s Table A allocations to its subcontractors are typically fulfilled, even in dry years. This is due to the District’s maintenance of excess, unused SWP entitlement. Therefore, even when SWP supplies are decreased, the District’s excess SWP entitlement provides a buffer so that contracted volumes to water purveyors, like the City, may still be provided in full. However, it is possible that the Delta’s fragile ecosystem, along with severely decreased precipitation patterns, may affect SWP supply reliability for the City at some point in the future (5). Additional, at some point in the future the District’s excess allocation may be sold to other parties and not available to the existing subcontracts for supply reliability. Surface water from the Lopez Reservoir, managed by the District, is a generally reliable water supply source for the City. However, deliveries have the potential to be affected by the presence of steelhead trout and the California red-legged frog that utilize the Arroyo Grande Creek watershed downstream of Lopez Dam, and are considered threatened species under the Federal Endangered Species Act. The Endangered Species Act permits non-federal entities to obtain incidental take authorization for protected species by developing a Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP). As of February 2015, the District initiated a new draft of the HCP that incorporates an updated model. The HCP update is still under development at the time of preparation of this UWMP. It is anticipated that a new downstream release program will be proposed to the environmental regulatory agencies in the near future (7). The HCP, in conjunction with contractual water supply obligations to the Zone 3 member agencies and releases for downstream users, is intended to maintain protection of steelhead, red-legged frog, and habitat enhancement for other environmentally sensitive biota. City of Pismo Beach 6. Water Supply Reliability 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 6-10 6.2.8.3 Water Quality Factors The primary water quality factor affecting supply reliability for the City is the threat of seawater intrusion into fresh groundwater aquifers. Under natural and historical conditions, a net outflow of freshwater from the groundwater basin towards the ocean has kept the seawater/freshwater interface from moving onshore. However, the NCMA monitoring event of 2009 indicated coastal groundwater elevations that were below mean sea level (MSL) and detect water quality constituents consistent with seawater intrusion. Affected coastal cities (including Pismo Beach) implemented water conservation methods and reduced groundwater pumping, ultimately resulting in significant recovery of groundwater elevations to above MSL in 2010 and 2011. However, in the current extended drought, the groundwater levels in the NCMA sentry wells have dropped to levels similar to those seen in 2009 and thus created the potential for seawater to again intrude onshore. If these conditions continue, seawater intrusion will continue to pose a threat to the water quality of the City’s groundwater supply. The City is required by the Safe Drinking Water Act to prepare an annual Consumer Confidence Report, which is an annual water quality report. The purpose of the CCR is to raise customers' awareness of the quality of their drinking water, where there drinking water comes from, what it takes to deliver water to their homes, and the importance of protecting drinking water sources. The City has treated its delivered water to meet state and federal standards. 6.2.8.4 Climatic Factors Climatic factors affecting the reliability of a given water supply system generally are a function of seasonal precipitation and runoff characteristics. As such, limited recharge and/or drought conditions pose threats to availability of both surface water and groundwater supplies. California has experienced below-average precipitation and runoff since approximately 2006, resulting in reduced storage in SWP reservoirs. In response, DWR has continued to limit SWP allocations to contractors. However, the District’s current condition of excess allocation has resulted in the City continually receiving its contracted allocation in full. The natural groundwater hydrology of the area underlying the City results in limited aquifer storage capacity and a higher sensitivity to drought conditions. When yearly precipitation is low, groundwater recharge is not sufficient to meet pumping demands and still maintain a safe yield. Therefore, the City’s groundwater supplies will likely be negatively affected in future drought conditions with below-average rainfall and recharge. The adjudication judgment (Appendix G) and Gentlemen’s Agreement (Appendix G) regarding the City’s groundwater entitlement does not specify reductions in allocations during drought conditions or decreased groundwater supply. The lack of guidance on supply reductions indicates that the City may maintain its full groundwater allocation even during drought conditions. Additionally, the City is planning to use recycled water to increase available groundwater supplies. City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-1 7 WATER SHORTAGE CONTINGENCY PLANNING In 1985, the City Council adopted a Water Operational Policy that established that the City had over- committed its water supply for future development. As a result, the City developed a conservation plan that would potentially save 10 to 15 percent of total water use in the event that sufficient supply from the Lopez Reservoir was not available. A primary component of this policy was a conservation program aimed at instituting demand management measures before a substantial supply deficit occurred, therefore continually maintaining a reliable water supply. In 1990, the City adopted a Mandatory Water Conservation Ordinance that details four water supply conditions of the City. The purpose of the water conservation ordinance is to give the City Council the authority to declare varying stages of water use restriction based on water supply availability. In addition, the City has implemented a development conservation plan that requires all new development to meet rigid standards for both indoor and outdoor water use. In 1992, the City adopted a Water Shortage Contingency Plan (Appendix H), which addresses availability of water supplies for the City and includes the City’s Water Contingency Plan, which outlines steps that the City will take to augment water supplies and reduce the level of rationing. The primary goal of the City’s water conservation program is to eliminate water waste by using water more efficiently, which has a positive impact on the City’s water supply resources. The specific objectives of the water conservation program are:  Educate and inform water customers on short- and long-term water supply conditions and the importance of efficient water use;  Replace old pumping hardware with water efficient plumbing hardware;  Evaluate water customers’ indoor and outdoor water usage and provide specific recommendations for improved efficiency;  Analyze water efficiency programs for cost effectiveness;  Develop new water efficiency programs;  Monitor and enforce water conservation municipal codes. In 2015, the City adopted an ordinance amending Pismo Beach Municipal Code by adding Chapter 15.50, Water-efficient Fixture Standards and Requirements, to Title 15, Buildings and Construction. The ordinance requires waterless urinals in new and existing construction, waterless urinal retrofits within the City, faucet aerator retrofits in publicly accessible restrooms to no more than 0.5 gallons per minute, and sub-meters in new construction. City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-2 7.1 STAGES OF ACTION AND REDUCTION OBJECTIVES The City’s water conservation ordinance describes four stages of rationing that may be invoked during water supply shortages. Each stage includes a water reduction objective, in percent of normal water demands, which may vary based on the nature of water supply emergency. The rationing plan is dependent on the cause, severity, and anticipated duration of the water supply shortage. A combination of voluntary and mandatory water conservation measures would be used to reduce water usage in the event of water shortages. Table 7-1 shows the four stages and their representative shortages. Declarations of water supply conditions occur periodically after evaluation by the City Council. The respective water supply condition dictates the voluntary or mandatory water conservation measures in effect at any particular time in the City. Table 7-1. Water Shortage Contingency - Rationing Stages Stage Condition Reduction Objective I – Normal Water Supply Conditions  Average rainfall in the previous 12-24 months  All municipal supplies available  Normal weather patterns No reduction in total water demands from baseline II – Moderately Restricted Water Supply Conditions  Below average rainfall in the previous 12-24 months  10 percent or more of municipal supply unavailable  Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 10-20% reduction in total water demands from baseline III – Severely Restricted Water Supply Conditions  Below average rainfall in the previous 24-36 months  Prolonged periods of low water pressure  10 percent or more of municipal supply unavailable  Warm weather typical of summer months 20-35% reduction in total water demands from baseline IV – Critical Water Supply Conditions  Below average rainfall in the previous 36 months  Prolonged periods of low water pressure  10 percent or more of municipal supply unavailable  Warm weather patterns typical of summer months 35-50% reduction in total water demands from baseline City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-3 In addition to the conditions specified in Section 13.24.050 of the City’s municipal code, the City Council may impose any water rationing requirement as it deems appropriate to protect public health, safety, welfare, comfort and convenience. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.060). If it appears that the City may be unable to supply the normal demands and requirements of the water customers, the City Council may, by resolution, declare a water supply shortage condition. The City Council declared a critical water supply condition on May 19, 2015. Based on the severity of various shortage stages, the City will take the following actions: Stage I: Normal Water Supply Conditions. Normal water supply conditions are typified by the following: a. Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, paved surfaces, buildings and other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled water devices, typically including spring loaded shutoff nozzles. b. Outdoor irrigation resulting in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited. c. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. Stage II: Moderately Restricted Water Supply Conditions. Moderately restricted water supply conditions are typified by the following: a. Use of water which results in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited. b. Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, buildings or other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled watering devices, typically including spring-loaded shutoff nozzles. c. No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets, or other such uses except as found necessary by the City to protect the public health or safety. d. Outdoor Irrigation.  Outdoor irrigation is prohibited between the hours of ten a.m. and four p.m.;  Irrigation of private and public landscaping, turf areas and gardens is permitted at even- numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays. All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. e. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. f. Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. Stage III: Severely Restricted Water Supply Conditions. Severely restricted water supply conditions are typified by the following: a. Use of water which results in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited. b. Outdoor Water Use--Except Irrigation.  No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets or other such use except where necessary to protect the public health and safety;  Washing cars by use of a hose is prohibited. Use of a bucket is permitted subject to non- wasteful applications. c. Outdoor Irrigation.  Outdoor irrigation is prohibited between the hours of ten a.m. and four p.m.; City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-4  Irrigation of private and public landscaping, turf areas and gardens is permitted at even- numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays. All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. d. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. e. Emptying and refilling swimming pools and commercial spas is prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to provide for the public health and safety. f. Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. Stage IV: Critical Water Supply Conditions. In addition to the conditions specified for Stage III, the City Council may impose any water rationing requirement as it deems appropriate to protect public health, safety, welfare, comfort, and convenience.1F1F1F1F 2 7.2 ADMINISTRATION OF WATER SUPPLY SHORTAGE PROGRAM In the event of a declaration of a water shortage condition or emergency, the administration of a water conservation program would involve coordination of the City’s established emergency services committee. As described in the City’s Municipal Code (§2.32 Emergency Services), the City Manager will have the responsibility of acting as the director of emergency services, and developing and organizing disaster plans. In addition, an emergency services coordinator, chiefs of emergency services and departments, and other applicable City or emergency services representatives will each provide assistance in an emergency response, as appropriate. The major elements to be considered in administering and implementing the program include:  Identifying the City staff members to fill the key roles on the water shortage management team. It is anticipated that the City Manager would designate the appropriate individuals, including the program coordinator.  Intensifying the public information program to provide comprehensive information on the water shortage and necessary actions that must be undertaken by the City and by the public. The scope of the public information program can be developed by reviewing published references, especially those published by the Department of Water Resources (DWR), and researching successful aspects of the current programs conducted by neighboring water agencies. A public information hotline may be advisable to answer any questions regarding the program.  Monitoring program effectiveness. Ongoing monitoring will be needed to track supply availability and actual water user reductions. This procedure will allow the City to continuously re-evaluate the situation and make informal decisions as to whether another reduction level is needed.  Enforcing program requirements. For the 35 to 50 percent reduction programs, enforcement of water use prohibitions and water use allocations will be more important in achieving the program goals. Inspectors and enforcement personnel could be identified among City staff that is in the community on other business, such as police, street maintenance, meter readers, etc. 2 Source: City of Pismo Beach Municipal Code (§ 13.24 Water Conservation). City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-5  Dealing with equity issues that might arise from the mandatory restrictions or higher water rates. Depending on the level of restriction, there may be a greater need to address specific concerns of individual customers who might have special conditions or extenuating circumstances and are unduly affected by the program. A procedure should be identified for dealing with such special requests and/or for reviewing specific accounts.  Coordinating with surrounding water management entities. A groundwater shortage supply for the City would likely affect regional groundwater supplies as well. Therefore, if the City is forced to declare a water shortage condition, surrounding water districts may also be affected. Under the influence of a water shortage situation where the water shortage contingency plan must be implemented, it is critical that the City coordinate its water conservation efforts with surrounding water management entities.  Adjusting water rates. Revenues from water sales should be reviewed periodically to determine whether an increase in rates might be needed to cover revenue shortfalls due to the decrease in demand.  Addressing new development proposals. During periods of severe water shortage, it may be necessary to impose additional requirements on new development to reduce new demand or to temporarily curtail new service connections. 7.3 ACTIONS DURING A CATASTROPHIC INTERRUPTION The City has described its emergency response plan in Title 2, Chapter 2 – Emergency Services of the City’s Municipal Code. The City has developed a response plan and has organized its emergency efforts with applicable relief agencies and municipalities in the area. 7.4 MANDATORY PROHIBITIONS ON WATER WASTING In the event of a critical water supply shortage, the City may implement mandatory compliance measures to induce water conservation. Mandatory compliance measures enacted during a water shortage are more severe than voluntary measures, produce greater savings, and are less costly to the utility. The principal drawback to these measures is the customer resentment if the measures are not seen as equitable. Therefore, such measures should be accompanied by a good public relations campaign. The City’s Municipal Code includes prohibition on various wasteful water uses during a declared water supply shortage. These mandatory prohibitions are implemented during Stages I, II, and III, and are listed in Table 7-2. During a Stage IV water supply shortage, the City Council may impose any water rationing requirement that it deems appropriate to protect public health, safety, welfare, comfort, and convenience. For example, in 2015 the City adopted an ordinance requiring waterless urinals in new and existing construction, waterless urinal retrofits within the City, faucet aerator retrofits in publicly accessible restrooms to no more than 0.5 gallons per minute, and sub-meters in new construction. City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-6 Table 7-2. Water Shortage Contingency - Mandatory Prohibitions 7.5 CONSUMPTION REDUCTION METHODS IN MOST RESTRICTIVE STAGE In order to achieve a 50 percent reduction in water use during the most restrictive stage of a water supply condition, the City will implement and enforce the water prohibitions described in Section 7.4. Other mandated restrictions in water use for all reductions stages will be determined by the City Council, and may include the actions described in Table 7-3. The reduction methods described in Table 7-3 are potential reduction methods that the City could implement if faced with an extreme water shortage situation. Prohibitions Mandatory Prohibition Stage Outdoor irrigation resulting in excessive gutter runoff. Stage I All use of water which results in excessive gutter runoff. Stage II Use of water for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets, or other such uses except as necessary to protect public health or safety. Stage II Outdoor irrigation between the hours of 10 AM and 4 PM. Stage II Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities. Stage II Washing cars by use of a hose. Stage III Emptying and refilling of swimming pools and commercial spas is prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to protect public health or safety. Stage III City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-7 Table 7-3. Reduction Method Description Reduction Method Description Stage When Method Takes Effect(1) Projected Reduction(2) (%) Prohibit or eliminate watering of ornamental turf areas, actively-used turf areas, trees, and shrubs. Stage II - IV Up to 50 Limit number of watering events per week. May include prescription of hand-held hoses with positive shutoff nozzle or drip irrigation systems. Prohibits or eliminates sprinkler use. Stage II - IV Up to 50 Restrict use of potable water for construction purposes. Require use of reclaimed or non-potable water for application to construction sites. Stage II - IV Up to 50 Require certification that a reduction of the projected average water usage for development of construction projects shall be achieved. Stage II - IV Up to 50 Notes: 1. Consumption reduction measures will be implemented by the City as appropriate given the nature of the water supply shortage. 2. Projected reductions, in concept, should be capable of achieving a system-wide reduction of 50 percent. 7.6 EXCESSIVE USE PENALTIES Any violation of the conservation regulations and restrictions on water use may result in termination of water service until the violation is corrected, and until all appropriate fees and penalties are paid in full. Table 7-4 lists the specifics of the penalties and in what stages they may occur. 7.7 REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE IMPACTS/MEASURES TO OVERCOME IMPACTS The majority of operating costs for most water agencies are fixed rather than a function of the amount of water sold. Despite the majority of costs being fixed, revenue is variable because it is a function of the volume of water sold. As a result, when significant conservation programs are undertaken, it is frequently necessary to raise water rates because the revenue generated is based on lower total consumption while the revenue required is basically fixed. The City’s Water Shortage Contingency Plan describes that to counteract the financial impact of conservation, the City may institute an increase in the rate structure so that lower projected water consumption would generate a new rate based on the revenue needed by the City’s Water Enterprise fund. 7.8 WATER CONSERVATION ORDINANCE The City adopted its Water Conservation Ordinance in 1990. A copy of the City’s Municipal Code containing the ordinance is included in Appendix H. City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-8 7.9 REDUCTION MEASURING MECHANISM The City’s primary mechanism of measuring water use and, subsequently, water use reduction, is through the use of water meters and production data. Therefore, to measure actual reductions in water use in the course of carrying out a water supply shortage contingency plan, the City may perform water meter readings for individual connections. Table 7-4. Water Shortage Contingency - Penalties and Charges Penalty/Charge Stage When Penalty Takes Effect Termination of water service until violations of the water conservation ordinance is corrected. I, II, III, IV Criminal misdemeanor for any person who knowingly and willfully violates the provisions in the City’s Municipal code. I, II, III, IV City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-9 7.10 GUIDELINES FOR BUILDING RESTRICTION DURING AN EXTENDED DROUGHT The City Council adopted guidelines in 2015 to limit building in the city should there be extended drought conditions. The guidelines are based on a three-tiered system with the triggers for each tier a function of the health of the SMGB and surface supplies from the SWP and Lopez Reservoir. The following are the triggers for each tier: Tier I – Total water supply at or below 1,630 acre-feet (AF)  SMGB key index level below 7.5’  Surface supplies at or below 1,330 AF  SMGB key index level above 7.5’  Surface supplies at or below 1,180 Tier II – Total water supply at or below 1,130 AF  SMGB key index level below 7.5’  Surface supplies at or below 930 AF  SMGB key index level above 7.5’  Surface supplies at or below 780 AF Tier III – Total water supply at or below 850 AF  SMGB key index level at or below 7.5’  Surface supplies at or below 750 AF  SMGB key index level above 7.5’  Surface supplies at or below 600 AF The actions to be taken during each tier are as follows: Tier I  Existing planning permit applications as of the date of the resolution will be processes and building permits will be issued for these projects.  New planning permit applications for vacant parcels will be accepted and processed, however building permits for these projects will not be issued until Tier I declared over.  New commercial/retail use of existing buildings will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be less than or equal to the existing water demand over the past 24 month period – including if there was no water use during that time (for example if a parcel has no water use over the past 24 months new use of the building would not be allowed to use water).  Redevelopment of existing buildings (commercial, retail, residential, hotel, etc.) will be allowed, but only such that the proposed water demand if less than or equal to the current water use of the existing building. City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-10 Tier II  No outdoor water use will be allowed: – Turf replacement program will continue (see “Cash for Grass” program in section 8.2.1) – Irrigation controller and irrigation retrofit rebates will be suspended  Existing planning permit applications as of the date of the resolution will be processed; however, no building permits will be issued until water supply exceeds Tier II Triggers, and Council approves the issuance of the building permit.  New planning permit applications for vacant parcels will be accepted and processed, however building permits for these projects will not be issued until Tier I is declared over.  New commercial/retail use of existing building will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 15% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period – including if there was no water use during that time (for example if a parcel had no water use over the past 24 months new use of the building would not be allowed to use water).  Redevelopment of existing buildings (commercial, retail, residential, hotel, etc.) will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 15% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period – including if there was no water use during that time.  Municipal reduction of irrigation will be no less than 50%. Tier III  No outdoor water use will be allowed: – “Cash for Grass” will continue – Irrigation controller and irrigation retrofit rebates will be suspended  Existing planning permit applications as of the date on the resolution will be processed; however, no building permits will be issued until water supply exceeds Tier II Triggers, and Council approves the issuance of the building permit.  New planning permit applications for vacant parcels will be accepted and processed, however building permits for these projects will not be issued until Tier I is declared over.  New commercial/retail use of existing buildings will be allowed, but only such that water demand will be at least 30% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period – including if there was no water use during that time.  Redevelopment of existing buildings (commercial, retail, residential, hotel, etc.) will be allowed, not only such that water demand will be at least 15% less than the water demand over the past 24 month period – including if there was no water use during that time.  Municipal reduction of irrigation will occur, except at the direction of the City Council. City of Pismo Beach 7. Water Shortage Contingency Planning 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 7-11 Planning application will be accepted and processed to conclusion at all tiers and discretionary approvals delayed by a building restriction shall be granted an extension of time to inaugurate or activate the approval equal to the amount of time the restriction was in place. Individual owners of vacant R-1 zoned lots that were created before December 1, 2015 and are adjacent to developed R-1 property will receive on exemption from the building restrictions at Tier I, however not at Tier II and III, and will not be exempt from other use restrictions. Enactment by the Council of any of the tiers would take place as follows:  Once the City’s water supplies drop below one of the tier triggers, staff will bring an agenda item for the consideration, which will include the City’s current water delivers, current water production numbers, and a resolution to enact the given tier; and once a tier is enacted, staff will return to the Council once a month to provide the Council with an update on the City’s water supply and demand so the Council can determine if it is appropriate to keep the tier enacted.               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach 8. Demand Management Measures 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 8-1 8 DEMAND MANAGEMENT MEASURES The Demand Management Measures (DMM) section provides a comprehensive description of the water conservation programs that the City has implemented for the past five years, is currently implementing, and plans to implement in order to meet the 2020 urban water use reduction targets. The section of the CWC addressing DMMs was significantly modified in 2014, based on recommendations from the Independent Technical Panel (ITP) to the legislature. The ITP was formed by DWR to provide information and recommendations to DWR and the Legislature on new DMMs, technologies and approaches to water use efficiency. The ITP recommended, and the legislature enacted, streamlining the requirements from the 14 specific measures reported on in the 2010 UWMP to six more general requirements plus an “other” category for measures agencies implemented in addition to the required elements. The required measures are summarized in Table 8-1. Table 8-1. Demand Management Measures Measure 1 Water waste prevention ordinances 2 Metering 3 Conservation pricing 4 Public education and outreach 5 Programs to assess and manage distribution system real loss 6 Water conservation program coordination and staffing 7 Other demand management measures 8.1 DEMAND MANAGEMENT MEASURES (DMMS) IMPLEMENTED OR PLANNED TO BE IMPLEMENTED Consistent with the requirements of the California Water Code (CWC), this section describes the demand measurement measures from Table 8-1 that have been implemented in the past five years and will continued to be implemented into the future in order to meet the City’s 2020 water use targets pursuant to Section 10608.20 of the CWC. 8.1.1 DMM – Water Waste Prevention According to the DWR 2015 UWMP Guidebook, a water waste ordinance explicitly states the waste of water is to be prohibited. The ordinance may prohibit specific actions that waste water, such as excessive runoff from landscape irrigation, or use of a hose outdoors with a without a shut off nozzle. City of Pismo Beach 8. Demand Management Measures 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 8-2 In Chapter 13.24 of the City’s Municipal Code, water waste prohibitions listed for normal, moderately restricted, severely restricted and critical water supply conditions. The restrictions include but are not limited to the following:  Use of shutoff nozzles when washing cars, boats and other similar activities  Excessive runoff from irrigation prohibited  Limited hours of outdoor irrigation  Serving of water in restaurants only by request  No washing of driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, etc. with potable water except to protect public health and safety 8.1.2 DMM – Metering According to the DWR 2015 UWMP Guidebook, an agency that is fully metered will state that fact in the UWMP. If an agency is not yet full metered, it will discuss its plans for becoming fully metered in accordance with CWC 527. All of the City’s service connections are metered and billed based on volume of use. Meter retrofits are performed on an as-needed basis. The City will continue to require that water meters be installed on new service connections and will perform retrofits to help optimize its metering program. 8.1.3 DMM – Conservation Pricing According to the DWR 2015 UWMP Guidebook, retail water agencies need to describe the pricing structure that is used by the water agency. Conservation pricing sends a signal to customers regarding their water use. Conservation pricing is designed to discourage wasteful water habits and encourage conservation. The City applies variable water service rate structures by customer class. Rates based on volume of use encourage water conservation by customers. Table 8-2 is the water bi-monthly base rate and tiered consumption rates for a standard ⅝” meter with a unit defined as 100 cubic feet (748 gallons). Table 8-2. Conservation Pricing Rate Structure Units Rate Base Fee $26.57 0-10 HCF $2.72 11-20 HCF $3.36 21-35 HCF $3.97 36+ HCF $5.43 City of Pismo Beach 8. Demand Management Measures 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 8-3 8.1.4 DMM – Public Information Programs The City has an established public outreach program that includes coordination with media sources for water conservation programs and events, an active website, television campaigns, flyers and brochures, bill stuffers, and public service announcements through local coalitions and on television. The City actively maintains its website and organizes public outreach at community events such as farmers markets, local festivals, school fairs, and other local events. Additionally, the City actively communicates through social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, providing updates up to three times per week. The City has hired the consultant Science Discovery each year, from May 2012 to May 2015, to perform educational outreach to its elementary school program annually. Science Discovery distributed materials and facilitated games geared towards teaching the students about the water cycle, water treatment, water conservation, and other related topics. The elementary school program impacts about 61 students total each year. Teachers are given additional awards and materials to distribute to students to encourage water conservation and to serve as education for the students’ families. Additionally, in the Spring of 2012 through 2016, the City attended a Career Day for 8th grade students, where approximately 250 students were in attendance. Students had the opportunity to interview two presenters from the City of Pismo Beach, and were given flyers to take home. 8.1.5 DMM – Water Loss Control The goals of the City’s water loss control programs are to increase water use efficiency and establish appropriate monitoring of water use to support water loss control activities. The City’s water loss control program is supported by the fact the City’s water users are 100 percent metered. Using metered water data, the City can accurately perform water audits and balances to identify the volume of apparent and real water loss, and can estimate the impact of these losses on utility operations. The City maintains records of its water production and metered deliveries, and can subsequently identify percent losses within the distribution system. System losses are typically less than eight percent. The City completed the AWWA System Water Loss spreadsheet for the fiscal year 2014-15 and will continue to update the spreadsheet on an annual basis. 8.1.6 DMM – Conservation Coordinator and Staffing Support One full-time employee dedicates a portion of time to coordinate the City’s water conservation efforts with the supervision of the Director of Public Works. In 2014, a part-time employee was hired to help with the City’s rebate programs. These employees promote water conservation through a variety of social media outlets, coordinate advertisements, communicate with the public, make updates the City’s two websites, attend special events, and run the water rebate programs. The City and the City of Arroyo Grande hired a Marketing Consultant in 2014 to assist with water conservation outreach. The Consultant built a brand, Think H20, and set up a website, and assisted with water conservation outreach while working with the City of Pismo Beach. City of Pismo Beach 8. Demand Management Measures 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 8-4 8.2 OTHER DEMAND MANAGEMENT MEASURES The City is committed to implementing cost effective programs that will increase water efficiency City- wide. Though not required, the City has implemented the following demand management measures during the past five year in order to increase the overall water efficiency of the City’s customers. 8.2.1 Turf Reduction Program It is estimated that 60% of the City’s water is used for irrigation, largely for turf areas. The City’s Cash for Grass Program helps property owners convert water-thirsty grass to a water efficient landscape. The City offered rebates for up to $2,500 for the removal of turf and replaced with drought tolerant plants, permeable hardscapes or other permeable materials. The goal of the program is to encourage a permanent reduction in the amount of water used for landscaping. 8.2.2 Rebate Programs The City offered four different plumbing hardware retrofit programs. They are as follows:  Commercial Urinal Rebate Program- The City offered up to a $350 rebate for waterless urinals.  High Efficiency Toilet Rebate Program- The City offered up to a $100 rebate when replacing a 3.5 gallon per flush or higher toilet with a 1.28 gallon per flush toilet.  High Efficiency Washing Machine Rebate Program – The offered a $150 rebate for the purchase and installation of a California for Energy Efficiency tier 3 washing machine.  Free Faucet Aerators- Customers could receive up to 3 free faucet aerators upon request. 8.2.3 Irrigation Equipment Rebate Program The City offered two water efficient irrigation equipment rebate programs. They are as follows:  Micro-irrigation Rebate Program- The intent of the program is to give homeowners in Pismo Beach the financial incentive to improve irrigation efficiency by converting overhead spray sprinkler systems to low application rate micro-irrigation systems (i.e. drip, micro-spray, etc.) in order to reduce the amount of water used while maintaining landscaping. The program offered up to $0.25 per square foot when converting an area from overhead spray irrigation to micro- irrigation.  Automatic Irrigation Valve Rebate Program- An automatic irrigation valve typically is installed at the point where the irrigation system connects to the water supply. Automatic valves control the flow of the water to different parts of the landscape and can open and shut from a signal controller. This type of valve will shut off the water if a leak develops in an irrigation system, and some will detect if there is a mainline break so that you save money. The City offers up to $200 for the replacement of manual valves. 8.2.4 Other Programs  Free Mulch- The intent of this program is to provide residents free mulch which is generated from Public Works operations as well as left-over mulch from Public Works projects.  Free Buckets- Free buckets were made available in order for customers to catch shower or other graywater sources to use the water for watering plant City of Pismo Beach 9. References 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final 9-1 9 REFERENCES 1. California Department of Water Resources. Guidebook to Assist Water Suppliers in the Preparation of a 2010 Urban Water Management Plan . March 2011. 2. —. Methodologies for Calculating Baseline and Compliance Urban Per Capita Water Use. February 2011. 3. Carollo Engineers, Inc. City of Pismo Beach 2010 Urban Water Management Plan. September 2011. 4. Beach, City of Pismo. General Plan. 1992. 5. Fugro Consultants, Inc. Northern Cities Management Area 2015 Annual Montitoring Report. April 2016. 6. Water Systems Consulting, Inc. Recycled Water Facilities Planning Study for the City of Pismo Beach. April 2016. 7. Wallace Group. Draft Urban Water Management Plan Update Zone 3. June 2016 . 8. AECOM Technical Services. San Luis Obispo County 2040 Population, Housing & Employment Forecast. August 11, 2011. 9. Associates, John L. Wallace &. City of Pismo Beach Water Master Plan. May 2004. 10. Resources, California Department of Water. California's Groundwater Bulletin 118 Update 2003. October 2003. 11. —. California Water Plan Update BUlletin 160-98. November 1998. 12. Carollo Engineers, Inc. City of Pismo Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant Collection System Master Plans. February 2000. 13. Beach, City of Pismo. Draft Environmental Impact Report on Price Canyon Planning Area, General Plan Update, SOI Change, Annexation and Specific Plan. September 2010. 14. Cannon. San Luis Obispo County Regional Recycled Water Strategic Plan. November 2014. 15. Resources, California Department of Water. The State Water Project Final Delivery Reliability Report. December 2014. 16. 3, San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Zone. Low Reservoir Response Plan. December 16, 2014. 17. AWWA Water Software Results Provided by the City of Pismo Beach. Water Balance from AWWA Water Loss Control Committee Free Audit Software v 5.0. July 2014-June2015.               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-1 APPENDIX A. DWR CHECKLIST CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10620(b) Every person that becomes an urban water supplier shall adopt an urban water management plan within one year after it has become an urban water supplier. Plan Preparation Section 2.1 2.2 10620(d)(2) Coordinate the preparation of its plan with other appropriate agencies in the area, including other water suppliers that share a common source, water management agencies, and relevant public agencies, to the extent practicable. Plan Preparation Section 2.5.2 2.1 10642 Provide supporting documentation that the water supplier has encouraged active involvement of diverse social, cultural, and economic elements of the population within the service area prior to and during the preparation of the plan. Plan Preparation Section 2.5.2 2.1 10631(a) Describe the water supplier service area. System Description Section 3.1 3.1 10631(a) Describe the climate of the service area of the supplier. System Description Section 3.3 3.2 10631(a) Provide population projections for 2020, 2025, 2030, and 2035. System Description Section 3.4 3.3 10631(a) Describe other demographic factors affecting the supplier’s water management planning. System Description Section 3.4 3.3 10631(a) Indicate the current population of the service area. System Description and Baselines and Targets Sections 3.4 3.3 and 5.4 10631(e)(1) Quantify past, current, and projected water use, identifying the uses among water use sectors. System Water Use Section 4.2 4.2 10631(e)(3)(A) Report the distribution system water loss for the most recent 12-month period available. System Water Use Section 4.3 4.2.3; Appendix E 10631.1(a) Include projected water use needed for lower income housing projected in the service area of the supplier. System Water Use Section 4.5 4.2.1 10608.20(b) Retail suppliers shall adopt a 2020 water use target using one of four methods. Baselines and Targets Section 5.7 and App E 4.1 City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-2 CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10608.20(e) Retail suppliers shall provide baseline daily per capita water use, urban water use target, interim urban water use target, and compliance daily per capita water use, along with the bases for determining those estimates, including references to supporting data. Baselines and Targets Chapter 5 and App E 4.1 10608.22 Retail suppliers’ per capita daily water use reduction shall be no less than 5 percent of base daily per capita water use of the 5 year baseline. This does not apply is the suppliers base gpcd is at or below 100. Baselines and Targets Section 5.7.2 4.1 10608.24(a) Retail suppliers shall meet their interim target by December 31, 2015. Baselines and Targets Section 5.8 and App E 4.1 1608.24(d)(2) If the retail supplier adjusts its compliance gpcd using weather normalization, economic adjustment, or extraordinary events, it shall provide the basis for, and data supporting the adjustment. Baselines and Targets Section 5.8.2 N/A 10608.36 Wholesale suppliers shall include an assessment of present and proposed future measures, programs, and policies to help their retail water suppliers achieve targeted water use reductions. Baselines and Targets Section 5.1 N/A 10608.4 Retail suppliers shall report on their progress in meeting their water use targets. The data shall be reported using a standardized form. Baselines and Targets Section 5.8 and App E 4.1 10631(b) Identify and quantify the existing and planned sources of water available for 2015, 2020, 2025, 2030, and 2035. System Supplies Chapter 6 0 10631(b) Indicate whether groundwater is an existing or planned source of water available to the supplier. System Supplies Section 6.2 5.2 10631(b)(1) Indicate whether a groundwater management plan has been adopted by the water supplier or if there is any other specific authorization for groundwater management. Include a copy of the plan or authorization. System Supplies Section 6.2.2 5.2.2 10631(b)(2) Describe the groundwater basin. System Supplies Section 6.2.1 5.2.1 City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-3 CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10631(b)(2) Indicate if the basin has been adjudicated and include a copy of the court order or decree and a description of the amount of water the supplier has the legal right to pump. System Supplies Section 6.2.2 5.2.2; Appendix G 10631(b)(2) For unadjudicated basins, indicate whether or not the department has identified the basin as overdrafted, or projected to become overdrafted. Describe efforts by the supplier to eliminate the long-term overdraft condition. System Supplies Section 6.2.3 5.2.4 10631(b)(3) Provide a detailed description and analysis of the location, amount, and sufficiency of groundwater pumped by the urban water supplier for the past five years System Supplies Section 6.2.4 5.2.5 10631(b)(4) Provide a detailed description and analysis of the amount and location of groundwater that is projected to be pumped. System Supplies Sections 6.2 5.2.5 and 6.9 10631(d) Describe the opportunities for exchanges or transfers of water on a short-term or long- term basis. System Supplies Section 6.7 5.3 10631(g) Describe the expected future water supply projects and programs that may be undertaken by the water supplier to address water supply reliability in average, single- dry, and multiple-dry years. System Supplies Section 6.8 5.6 10631(i) Describe desalinated water project opportunities for long-term supply. System Supplies Section 6.6 5.4 10631(j) Retail suppliers will include documentation that they have provided their wholesale supplier(s) – if any - with water use projections from that source. System Supplies Section 2.5.1 4.3 10631(j) Wholesale suppliers will include documentation that they have provided their urban water suppliers with identification and quantification of the existing and planned sources of water available from the wholesale to the urban supplier during various water year types. System Supplies Section 2.5.1 N/A 10633 For wastewater and recycled water, coordinate with local water, wastewater, groundwater, and planning agencies that operate within the supplier's service area. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.1 5.5 City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-4 CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10633(a) Describe the wastewater collection and treatment systems in the supplier's service area. Include quantification of the amount of wastewater collected and treated and the methods of wastewater disposal. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.2 5.5.1 10633(b) Describe the quantity of treated wastewater that meets recycled water standards, is being discharged, and is otherwise available for use in a recycled water project. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.2.2 5.5.1 10633(c) Describe the recycled water currently being used in the supplier's service area. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.3 5.5.3 and 6.5.4 10633(d) Describe and quantify the potential uses of recycled water and provide a determination of the technical and economic feasibility of those uses. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.4 5.5.3 10633(e) Describe the projected use of recycled water within the supplier's service area at the end of 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, and a description of the actual use of recycled water in comparison to uses previously projected. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.4 5.5.3 10633(f) Describe the actions which may be taken to encourage the use of recycled water and the projected results of these actions in terms of acre-feet of recycled water used per year. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.5 5.5.3 10633(g) Provide a plan for optimizing the use of recycled water in the supplier's service area. System Supplies (Recycled Water) Section 6.5.5 5.5.3 10620(f) Describe water management tools and options to maximize resources and minimize the need to import water from other regions. Water Supply Reliability Assessment Section 7.4 6.2.7 10631(c)(1) Describe the reliability of the water supply and vulnerability to seasonal or climatic shortage. Water Supply Reliability Assessment Section 7.1 6.2.8 10631(c)(1) Provide data for an average water year, a single dry water year, and multiple dry water years Water Supply Reliability Assessment Section 7.2 6.2.1 City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-5 CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10631(c)(2) For any water source that may not be available at a consistent level of use, describe plans to supplement or replace that source. Water Supply Reliability Assessment Section 7.1 6.2.7 10634 Provide information on the quality of existing sources of water available to the supplier and the manner in which water quality affects water management strategies and supply reliability Water Supply Reliability Assessment Section 7.1 6.2.8 10635(a) Assess the water supply reliability during normal, dry, and multiple dry water years by comparing the total water supply sources available to the water supplier with the total projected water use over the next 20 years. Water Supply Reliability Assessment Section 7.3 6.2.3; 6.2.4; 6.2.5 10632(a) and 10632(a)(1) Provide an urban water shortage contingency analysis that specifies stages of action and an outline of specific water supply conditions at each stage. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.1 7 10632(a)(2) Provide an estimate of the minimum water supply available during each of the next three water years based on the driest three- year historic sequence for the agency. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.9 6.2.6 10632(a)(3) Identify actions to be undertaken by the urban water supplier in case of a catastrophic interruption of water supplies. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.8 7.3 10632(a)(4) Identify mandatory prohibitions against specific water use practices during water shortages. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.2 7.4 10632(a)(5) Specify consumption reduction methods in the most restrictive stages. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.4 7.5 10632(a)(6) Indicated penalties or charges for excessive use, where applicable. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.3 7.6 10632(a)(7) Provide an analysis of the impacts of each of the actions and conditions in the water shortage contingency analysis on the revenues and expenditures of the urban water supplier, and proposed measures to overcome those impacts. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.6 7.7 City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-6 CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10632(a)(8) Provide a draft water shortage contingency resolution or ordinance. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.7 7.8; Appendix H 10632(a)(9) Indicate a mechanism for determining actual reductions in water use pursuant to the water shortage contingency analysis. Water Shortage Contingency Planning Section 8.5 7.9 10631(f)(1) Retail suppliers shall provide a description of the nature and extent of each demand management measure implemented over the past five years. The description will address specific measures listed in code. Demand Management Measures Sections 9.2 8.1 and 9.3 10631(f)(2) Wholesale suppliers shall describe specific demand management measures listed in code, their distribution system asset management program, and supplier assistance program. Demand Management Sections 9.1 N/A and 9.3 10631(j) CUWCC members may submit their 2013- 2014 CUWCC BMP annual reports in lieu of, or in addition to, describing the DMM implementation in their UWMPs. This option is only allowable if the supplier has been found to be in full compliance with the CUWCC MOU. Demand Management Measures Section 9.5 N/A 10608.26(a) Retail suppliers shall conduct a public hearing to discuss adoption, implementation, and economic impact of water use targets. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.3 2.2; Appendix B 10621(b) Notify, at least 60 days prior to the public hearing, any city or county within which the supplier provides water that the urban water supplier will be reviewing the plan and considering amendments or changes to the plan. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.2.1 2.2; Appendix B 10621(d) Each urban water supplier shall update and submit its 2015 plan to the department by July 1, 2016. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Sections 2.2; Appendix B 10.3.1 and 10.4 City of Pismo Beach Appendix A. DWR Checklist 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final A-7 CWC Section UWMP Requirement Subject Guidebook Location UWMP Location 10635(b) Provide supporting documentation that Water Shortage Contingency Plan has been, or will be, provided to any city or county within which it provides water, no later than 60 days after the submission of the plan to DWR. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.4.4 2.2; Appendix B 10642 Provide supporting documentation that the urban water supplier made the plan available for public inspection, published notice of the public hearing, and held a public hearing about the plan. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Sections 10.2.2, 10.3, 2.2; Appendix B and 10.5 10642 The water supplier is to provide the time and place of the hearing to any city or county within which the supplier provides water. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Sections 10.2.1 2.2; Appendix B 10642 Provide supporting documentation that the plan has been adopted as prepared or modified. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.3.1 2.2; Appendix B 10644(a) Provide supporting documentation that the urban water supplier has submitted this UWMP to the California State Library. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.4.3 2.2; Appendix B 10644(a)(1) Provide supporting documentation that the urban water supplier has submitted this UWMP to any city or county within which the supplier provides water no later than 30 days after adoption. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.4.4 2.2; Appendix B 10644(a)(2) The plan, or amendments to the plan, submitted to the department shall be submitted electronically. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Sections 2.2; Appendix B 10.4.1 and 10.4.2 10645 Provide supporting documentation that, not later than 30 days after filing a copy of its plan with the department, the supplier has or will make the plan available for public review during normal business hours. Plan Adoption, Submittal, and Implementation Section 10.5 2.2; Appendix B               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix B. Notification and Outreach Materials 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final B APPENDIX B. NOTIFICATION AND OUTREACH MATERIALS               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING                THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING                THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix C. Letter of Adoption 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final C APPENDIX C. LETTER OF ADOPTION               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING                THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix D. Community Development Department Memorandum 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final D APPENDIX D. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT MEMORANDUM               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix E. AWWA Water Loss Audit 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final E APPENDIX E. AWWA WATER LOSS AUDIT               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  4Name of Contact Person: All audit data are entered on theReporting WorksheetEmail Address: Value can be entered by userTelephone (incl Ext.): 805 773-7054 Value calculated based on input data Name of City / Utility: These cells contain recommended default valuesCity/Town/Municipality: State / Province: Pcnt: Value:Country: 0.25%Year: 2015 Financial YearStart Date: 07/2014 Enter MM/YYYY numeric formatEnd Date: 06/2015 Enter MM/YYYY numeric formatAudit Preparation Date: 1/21/2015Volume Reporting Units: PWSID / Other ID: If you have questions or comments regarding the software please contact us via email at:wlc@awwa.orgAWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0 City of Pismo Beach The following worksheets are available by clicking the buttons below or selecting the tabs along the bottom of the pagePismo Beach thembree@pismobeach.orgAuditors are strongly encouraged to refer to the most current edition of AWWA M36 Manual for Water Audits for detailed guidance on the water auditing process and targetting loss reduction levelsThis spreadsheet-based water audit tool is designed to help quantify and track water losses associated with water distribution systems and identify areas for improved efficiency and cost recovery. It provides a "top-down" summary water audit format, and is not meant to take the place of a full-scale, comprehensive water audit format. 4010008USAUse of Option (Radio) Buttons:The spreadsheet contains several separate worksheets. Sheets can be accessed using the tabs towards the bottom of the screen, or by clicking the buttons below. Tom Hembree Acre-feetPlease begin by providing the following informationThe following guidance will help you complete the AuditCalifornia (CA)American Water Works Association Copyright © 2014, All Rights Reserved.Select the default percentage by choosing the option button on the leftTo enter a value, choose this button and enter a value in the cell to the rightInstructionsThe current sheet.Enter contact information and basic audit details (year,  units etc)Performance IndicatorsReview theperformance indicators to evaluate the results of the audit CommentsEnter comments to explain how values were calculated or to document data sourcesWater BalanceThe values entered in the Reporting Worksheet are used to populate the Water BalanceDashboardA graphicalsummary of the water balance and Non‐Revenue Water componentsGrading MatrixPresents the possible grading options for each input component of the auditService Connection DiagramDiagrams depicting possible customer service connection line configurationsAcknowledgementsAcknowledgementsfor the AWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0Loss Control PlanningUse this sheet to interpret the results of the audit validity score and performance indicatorsDefinitionsUse this sheet to understand the terms used in the audit processExample AuditsReporting Worksheet and Performance Indicators examples are shown for two validated auditsReporting WorksheetEnter the required data on this worksheet to calculate the water balance and data gradingAWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0Instructions 1 Water Audit Report for: Reporting Year: All volumes to be entered as: ACRE-FEET PER YEAR Master Meter and Supply Error Adjustments WATER SUPPLIED Pcnt: Value: Volume from own sources:8 181.940 acre-ft/yr 3 0.00%acre-ft/yr Water imported:7 1,658.780 acre-ft/yr 1 0.00%acre-ft/yr Water exported:n/a 0.000 acre-ft/yr n/a acre-ft/yr Enter negative % or value for under-registration WATER SUPPLIED:1,840.720 acre-ft/yr Enter positive % or value for over-registration . AUTHORIZED CONSUMPTION Billed metered:5 1,622.000 acre-ft/yr Billed unmetered:n/a 0.000 acre-ft/yr Unbilled metered:n/a 0.000 acre-ft/yr Pcnt: Value: Unbilled unmetered:3 23.009 acre-ft/yr 1.25%acre-ft/yr AUTHORIZED CONSUMPTION:1,645.009 acre-ft/yr WATER LOSSES (Water Supplied - Authorized Consumption)195.711 acre-ft/yr Apparent Losses Pcnt: Value: Unauthorized consumption: 4.602 acre-ft/yr 0.25%acre-ft/yr Customer metering inaccuracies:3 180.022 acre-ft/yr 9.99%acre-ft/yr Systematic data handling errors:3 4.055 acre-ft/yr 0.25%acre-ft/yr Apparent Losses:188.679 acre-ft/yr Real Losses (Current Annual Real Losses or CARL) Real Losses = Water Losses - Apparent Losses:7.032 acre-ft/yr WATER LOSSES:195.711 acre-ft/yr NON-REVENUE WATER NON-REVENUE WATER:218.720 acre-ft/yr = Water Losses + Unbilled Metered + Unbilled Unmetered SYSTEM DATA Length of mains:6 50.0 miles Number of active AND inactive service connections:6 50 Service connection density: 1 conn./mile main Yes Average length of customer service line:ft Average operating pressure:7 80.0 psi COST DATA Total annual cost of operating water system:8 $4,757,476 $/Year Customer retail unit cost (applied to Apparent Losses):8 $5.95 Variable production cost (applied to Real Losses):8 $1,566.21 $/acre-ft WATER AUDIT DATA VALIDITY SCORE: PRIORITY AREAS FOR ATTENTION: 1: Water imported 2: Customer metering inaccuracies 3: Billed metered Average length of customer service line has been set to zero and a data grading score of 10 has been applied Are customer meters typically located at the curbstop or property line? AWWA Free Water Audit Software: Reporting Worksheet Default option selected for Unbilled unmetered - a grading of 5 is applied but not displayed 2015 7/2014 - 6/2015 City of Pismo Beach (4010008) *** YOUR SCORE IS: 65 out of 100 *** A weighted scale for the components of consumption and water loss is included in the calculation of the Water Audit Data Validity Score 0.000 9.000 Default option selected for Systematic data handling errors - a grading of 5 is applied but not displayed Based on the information provided, audit accuracy can be improved by addressing the following components: $/1000 gallons (US) <----------- Enter grading in column 'E' and 'J' ----------> Default option selected for unauthorized consumption - a grading of 5 is applied but not displayed ? ? ? ? ? ?Click to access definition ? ? ? ? ? ? Please enter data in the white cells below. Where available, metered values should be used; if metered values are unavailable please estimate a value. Indicate your confidence in the accuracy of the input data by grading each component (n/a or 1-10) using the drop-down list to the left of the input cell. Hover the mouse over the cell to obtain a description of the grades ? ? ? ? ? ? (length of service line, beyond the property boundary, that is the responsibility of the utility) Use buttons to select percentage of water supplied OR value ?Click here: for help using option buttons below ? ? ? ? + +Click to add a comment WAS v5.0 + + + + + + American Water Works Association. Copyright © 2014, All Rights Reserved. ? ? ? + + + + + + + + + + + + +Use Customer Retail Unit Cost to value real losses ? To select the correct data grading for each input, determine the highest grade where the utility meets or exceeds all criteria for that grade and all grades below it. AWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0 Reporting Worksheet 1 Water Audit Report for:City of Pismo Beach (4010008)Reporting Year:System Attributes:Apparent Losses: 188.679 acre-ft/yr+ Real Losses: 7.032 acre-ft/yr= Water Losses: 195.711 acre-ft/yrUnavoidable Annual Real Losses (UARL): See limits in definitionacre-ft/yrAnnual cost of Apparent Losses:$365,813Annual cost of Real Losses:$11,014Valued atVariable Production CostPerformance Indicators:Non-revenue water as percent by volume of Water Supplied: 11.9%Non-revenue water as percent by cost of operating system: 8.7% Real Losses valued at Variable Production CostApparent Losses per service connection per day: 3385.76gallons/connection/dayReal Losses per service connection per day:N/Agallons/connection/dayReal Losses per length of main per day*: 125.56gallons/mile/dayReal Losses per service connection per day per psi pressure: N/Agallons/connection/day/psiFrom Above, Real Losses = Current Annual Real Losses (CARL):7.03acre-feet/year* This performance indicator applies for systems with a low service connection density of less than 32 service connections/mile of pipelineInfrastructure Leakage Index (ILI) [CARL/UARL]:2015 7/2014 - 6/2015Return to Reporting Worksheet to change this assumpiton AWWA Free Water Audit Software: System Attributes and Performance Indicators*** YOUR WATER AUDIT DATA VALIDITY SCORE IS: 65 out of 100 ***??American Water Works Association.Copyright © 2014, All Rights Reserved.WAS v5.0Financial:Operational Efficiency:AWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0 Performance Indicators 1 Water Audit Report for:Reporting Year:2015 7/2014 - 6/2015Data Validity Score:65Water Exported0.000Billed Metered Consumption (water exported is removed)Revenue Water1,622.000Own SourcesAuthorized Consumption1,622.000Billed Unmetered Consumption1,622.0000.0001,645.009Unbilled Metered Consumption0.000181.94023.009Unbilled Unmetered Consumption23.009Water Supplied Unauthorized Consumption218.720Apparent Losses4.6021,840.720188.679Customer Metering Inaccuracies180.022Systematic Data Handling ErrorsWater Losses4.055Water Imported195.711Leakage on Transmission and/or Distribution MainsReal LossesNot broken down1,658.7807.032Leakage and Overflows at Utility's Storage TanksNot broken downLeakage on Service ConnectionsNot broken downAWWA Free Water Audit Software: Water BalanceNon-Revenue Water (NRW)Billed Authorized ConsumptionUnbilled Authorized Consumption(Adjusted for known errors)Billed Water ExportedCity of Pismo Beach (4010008)WAS v5.0American Water Works Association.AWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0 Water Balance 1 Water Audit Report for:Reporting Year:2015Show me the VOLUME of Non-Revenue WaterData Validity Score:65Show me the COST of Non-Revenue Water AWWA Free Water Audit Software: Dashboard7/2014 - 6/2015City of Pismo Beach (4010008)0200,000400,000600,000800,0001,000,0001,200,000Cost $Total Cost of NRW =$1,169,690Unbilled metered (valued at Var. Prod. Cost)Unbilled unmetered (valued at Var. Prod. Cost)Unauth. consumptionCust. metering inaccuraciesSyst. data handling errorsReal Losses (valued at Var. Prod. Cost)WAS v5.0American Water Works Association.Water ExportedAuthorized ConsumptionWater Losses0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%Water ExportedWater ImportedVolume From Own SourcesWater ExportedBilled Auth. Cons.Unbilled Auth. Cons.Apparent LossesReal LossesWater ExportedRevenue WaterNon Revenue WaterThe graphic below is a visual representation of the Water Balance with bar heights propotional to the volume of the audit componentsWater ExportedWater SuppliedAWWA Free Water Audit Software v5.0Dashboard 1               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix F. Selected Figures from the NCMA 2015 Annual Monitoring Report 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final F APPENDIX F. SELECTED FIGURES FROM THE NCMA 2015 ANNUAL MONITORING REPORT               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  P a c i f i cOcean £¤101UV1 UV1 Santa Maria ValleyManagement Area Nipomo MesaManagement Area NorthernCitiesManagementArea Northern Cities Managem ent AreaProject No. 04.62150079 SANTA MARIA GROUNDWATER BASINNorthern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California FIGURE 1 Ü 0 51234Miles Legend Northern CitiesManagement Area Adjudication Area Boundary Santa Maria Groundwater Basin(DWR Bulletin 118) Service Layer Credits: Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap,increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri(Thailand), MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS UserCommunity \\Venwest10\Data5\Projects\04_2014\04_6214_0105_NCMA_2014AnnualReport\Outputs\2014_NCMA_Annual_Monitoring_Report\mxd\Figure 1 SantaMariaGroundwaterBasin.mxd, 04/01/15, tnicely ANNUAL PRECIPITATION 1950 TO 2015 Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California Northern Cities Management Area Project No. 04.62150079 FIGURE 3 Northern Cities Management Area Project No. 04.62150079 MONTHLY 2015 AND AVERAGE PRECIPITATION AND EVAPOTRANSPIRATION Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California FIGURE 5 !A !A !A !A !A !APacific O c e a n £¤101 UV1 UV1 Oceano CSD Observation Wells(Green, Blue, Silver, and Yellow) Wells 32S/13E-30N01, N02, & N03 Wells 32S/13E-30F01, F02, & F03 Wells 32S/12E-24 B01, B02, & B03 Wells 12N/36W-36L01 & L02 Well 12N/35W-32C03Me a d o w Cr e e k Arroyo Grande Creek B e r r o s C re e k , L o sPismo CreekSources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, increment PCorp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri(Thailand), MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and theGIS User Community 120°34'0"W 120°34'0"W 120°36'0"W 120°36'0"W 120°38'0"W 120°38'0"W 35°8'0"N35°8'0"N35°6'0"N35°6'0"N35°4'0"N35°4'0"NNorthern Cities Managem ent AreaProject No. 04.62150079 LOCATION OF SENTRY WELLSNorthern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California FIGURE 6 Legend !'A NCMA Sentry Wells Northern Cities Management AreaCreeks \\Venwest10\Data5\Projects\04_2014\04_6214_0105_NCMA_2014AnnualReport\Outputs\2014_NCMA_Annual_Monitoring_Report\mxd\Figure 7 Location of Sentry Wells.mxd, 04/01/15, tnicelyÜ 0 4,000 Feet1:60,000 DEPTHS OF SENTRY WELLS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California Northern Cities Management Area Technical Group Project No. 04.62150079 FIGURE 7 %P %P %P %P %P %P %P%P %P %P%P%P%P %P %P %P %P %P %P %P %P%P%P %P %P %P%P %P%P%P %P %P %P %P %P%P%P %P%P %P %P %P %P %P %P %P %P%P %P %P%P %P%P%P %P %P %P %P%P %P %P %P %P %P%P %P %P %P%P%P%P %P%P%P %P%P%P%P%P%P %P%P %P%P %P %P !A !A !A !A !A !A P a c i f i cOcean £¤101 UV1 UV1Me a d o w Cr e e k Arroyo Grande Creek B e r ro s C re e k , L o sPismo CreekNorthern Cities Managem ent AreaProject No. 04.62150079 SELECTED HYDROGRAPHSNorthern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Ü 0 1 2Miles 1 inch equals 1 mile Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USG S, Intermap,increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, M ETI, Esri FIGURE 10 Legend !P Se lected We ll Location s North ern Cities Ma nage me nt Are a (NC MA) !A Se ntry We lls \\Venwest10\Data5\Projects\04_2014\04_6214_0105_NCMA_2014AnnualReport\Outputs\2014_NCMA_Annual_Monitoring_Report\mxd\Figure 11 Selected Hydrographs.mxd, 03/17/15, tnicely !A !A !A !A !A !A P a c i f i cOcean £¤101 UV1 UV1Me a d o w Cr e e k Arroyo Grande Creek B e r ro s C re e k , L o sPismo CreekNorthern Cities Managem ent AreaProject No. 04.62150079 SENTRY WELL HYDROGRAPHSNorthern Cities Management AreaSan Luis Obispo County, California Ü 0 1 2Miles 1 inch equals 1 mile Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USG S, Intermap,increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, M ETI, Esri FIGURE 11 Legend North ern Cities Ma nage me nt Are a (NC MA) !A Se ntry We lls \\Venwest10\Data5\Projects\04_2014\04_6214_0105_NCMA_2014AnnualReport\Outputs\2014_NCMA_Annual_Monitoring_Report\mxd\Figure 12 NCMA Sentry Well Hydrographs.mxd, 03/17/15, tnicely HYDOGRAPH OF AVERAGE DEEP SENTRY WELL ELEVATIONS Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California Northern Cities Management Area Project No. 04.62150079 FIGURE 12 Northern Cities Management Area Project No. 04.62150079 MUNICIPAL WATER USE BY SOURCE Northern Cities Management Area San Luis Obispo County, California J:\WATER_RESOURCES\NORTHERN CITIES\2015 ANNUAL REPORT\FIGURES\UPDATED FIGURES\FIGURE 21 MUNICIPAL WATER USE BY SOURCE 11X17.DOCX FIGURE 23               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  City of Pismo Beach Appendix G. SMGB Judgment and Gentlemen’s AGreement 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final G APPENDIX G. SMGB JUDGMENT AND GENTLEMEN’S AGREEMENT               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  JAN 2 5 2008 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA CLARA SANTA MARIA VALLEY WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT, Plaintiff, SANTA MARIA GROUNDWATER LITIGATION Lead Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 (CONSOLIDATED FOR ALL PURPOSES) VS. [Consolidated With Case Numbers: CITY OF SANTA MARIA, ET AL.. CV 784900; CV 785509; CV 785522; CV 787150; CV 784921; CV 78551 1; CV 785936; CV 787151; CV 784926; Defendants. CV 785515; CV 786791; CV 787152; 1-05-CV-0364101 I I 1 San Luis Obispo County Superior I AND RELATED CROSS-ACTIONS AND ACTIONS CONSOLIDATED FOR ALL PURPOSES Court Case Nds. 990738 and 990739 JUDGMENT AFTER TRIAL This matter came on for trial in five separate phases. Following the third phase of trial, a large number of parties entered into a written stipulation dated June 30, 2005 to resolve their 1 differences and requested that the cow approve the settlement and make its terms binding on 1 them as a part of any final judgment entered in this case. Subsequent to the execution of the stipulation by the original settling parties, a number of additional parties have agreed to be I I bound by the stipulation - their signatures are included in the attachments to this judgment. I Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial The June 30, 2005 Stipulation is attached as Exhibit "1;" and all exhibits to the ,tipulation are separately attached as Exhibits "1A" through "1H". The Stipulating Parties are ientified on Exhibit "IA." The court approves the Stipulation, orders the Stipulating Parties nly to comply with each and every term thereof, and incorporates the same herein as though et forth in full. No non-stipulating party is bound in any way by the stipulation except as the ourt may otherwise independently adopt as its independent judgment a term or terms that are le same or similar to such term or provision of the stipulation. As to all remaining parties, including those who failed to answer or otherwise appear, le court heard the testimony of witnesses, considered the evidence found to be admissible by le court, and heard the arguments of counsel. Good cause appearing, the court finds and rders judgment as follows. As used in this Judgment, the following terms shall have the meanings herein set forth: - The groundwater basin described in the Phase I and I1 orders of the court, as lodified, with attachments and presented in Exhibit "1B". Defaultinn Parties - All persons or entities listed on Exhibit "3". Imuorted Water - Water within the Basin received from the State Water Project, riginating outside the Basin, that absent human intervention would not recharge or be used in le Basin. LOG Parties - All persons or entities listed on Exhibit "2:" listed under the subheading LOG Parties". Non-Stipulatin~ Parties - All Parties who did not sign the Stipulation, including the )efaulting Parties and the LOG and Wineman Parties. Pavties - All parties to the above-referenced action, including Stipulating Parties, Non- tipulating Parties, and Defaulting Parties. Public Water Producers - City of Santa Maria, Golden State Water Company, Rural Vater Company, the "Northern Cities" (collectively the Cities of Arroyo Grande, Pismo teach, and Grover Beach, and Oceano Community Services District), and the Nipomo 'ommunity Services District. ase No. 1-97-CV-770214 ~dgment After Trial Return Flows - All water which recharges the Basin after in~tial use, through the use of percolation ponds and others means, derived from the use and recharge of imported water delivered through State Water Project facilities. Stipulating Parties - All Parties who are signatories to the Stipulation. Stipulation - The Stipulation dated June 30, 2005 and incorporated herein as Exhibit "1," with each of its Exhibits separately identified and incorporated herein as Exhibits "1A" through " 1 H". Storage Space - The portion of the Basin capable of holding water for subsequent reasonable and beneficial uses. W~nernan Parties - All persons or entities listed on Exhibit "2," under the subheading "Wineman Parties". The following Exhibits are attached to this Judgment: 1. Exhibit "I, "June 30, 2005 Stipulation and the following exhibits thereto: a. Exhibit "IA, " list identifying the Stipulating Parties and the parcels of land bound by the Stipulation. b. Exhibit "IB, " Phase I and I1 Orders, as modified, with attachments. c. Exhibit "IC," map of the Basin and boundaries of the three Management Areas. d. Exhibit "ID," map identifying those lands as of January I, 2005: 1) within the boundaries of a municipality or its sphere of influence, or within the process of inclusion in its sphere of influence; or 2) within the certificated service area of a publicly regulated utility; and a list of selected parcels that are nearby these boundaries which are excluded from within these areas. e. Exhibit "IE, " 2002 Settlement Agreement between the Northern Cities and Northern Landowners. f. Exhibit "IF," the agreement among Santa Maria, Golden State and Guadalupe regarding Twitchell Project and the Twitchell Management Authority. g. Exhibit "lG," the court's Order Concerning Electronic Service of Case No. 1-9743-7702 14 Judgment After Trial 'leadings and Electronic Posting of Discovery Documents dated June 27,2000. h. Exhibit "lH, " the form of memorandum of agreement to be recorded. 2. Exhibit "2, " List of Non-Stipulating LOG and Wineman Parties and recorded eed numbers of property they owned at the time of trial. 3. Exhibit "3, " List of Defaulting parties. A declaratory judgment and physical solution are hereby adjudged and decreed s follows: 1. As of the time of trial, LOG and Wineman Parties owned the real property, sted by assessor's parcel numbers, as presented in Exhibit 2. 2. The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company are awarded rescriptive rights to ground water against the non-stipulating parties, which rights shall be leasured and enforced as described below. 3. The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company have a right to use le Basin for temporary storage and subsequent recapture of the Return Flows generated from leir importation of State Water Project water, to the extent that such water adds to the supply f water in the aquifer and if there is storage space in the aquifer for such return flows, lcluding all other native sources of water in the aquifer. The City of Santa Maria's Return lows represent 65 percent of the amount of imported water used by the City. Golden State Vater Company's Return Flows represent 45 percent of the amount of imported water used by iolden State in the basin. 4. (a) The Northern Cities have a prior and paramount right to produce 7,300 acre- :et of water per year from the Northern Cities Area of the Basin; and (b) the Non-Stipulating arties have no overlying, appropriative, or other right to produce any water supplies in the Iorthern Cities Area of the Basin. 5. The Groundwater Monitoring Provisions and Management Area Monitoring rograms contained in the Stipulation, including Sections IV(D) (All Management Areas); '(B) (Santa Maria Management Area), VI(C) (Nipomo Mesa Management Area), and VII (1) Vorthern Cities Management Area), inclusive, are independently adopted by the court as ase No. I -97-CV-7702 14 ~dgment After Trial necessary to manage water production in the basin and are incorporated herein and made terms of this Judgment. The Non-Stipulating Parties shall participate in, and be bound by. the applicable Management Area Monitoring Program. Each Non-Stipulating Party also shall monitor their water production, maintain records thereof, and make the data available to the court or its designee as may be required by subsequent order of the court. 6. No Party established a pre-Stipulation priority right to any portion of that increment of augmented groundwater supply within the Basin that derives from the Twitchell Project's operation. 7. The court determines that there is a reasonable likelihood that drought and overdraft conditions will occur in the Basin in the foreseeable future that will require the exercise of the court's equity powers. The court therefore retains jurisdiction to make orders enforcing the rights of the parties hereto in accordance with the terms of this judgment. a. Groundwater I. The overlying rights of the LOG and Wineman Parties shall be adjusted by amounts lost to the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company by prescription. The prescriptive rights of the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company must be measured against the rights of all overlying water producers pumping in the acquifer as a whole and not just against the LOG and Wineman Parties because adverse pumping by the said water producers was from the aquifer as a whole and not just against the non-stipulating parties. The City of Santa Maria established total adverse appropriation of 5100 acre feet per year and Golden State Water Company established adverse appropriation of 1900 acre feet a year, measured against all usufructuary rights within the Santa Maria Basin. The City of Santa Maria and Goldcn State Water Company having waived the right to seek prescription against the other stipulating parties, may only assert such rights against the non stipulating parties in a proportionate quantity. To demonstrate the limited right acquired by the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company, by way of example, if the cumulative usufructuary rights of the LOG and Wineman Parties were 1,000 acre-feet and the cumulative usufructuary rights of all other overlying groundwater right holders within the 5 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial Basin were 100,000 acre-feet, the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company would each be entitled to enforce 1% of their total prescriptive right against the LOG and Wineman Parties. That is, Golden State Water Company could assert a prescriptive right of 19 annual acre-feet, and the City of Santa Maria 51 annual acre-feet, cumulatively against the LOG and Wineman Parties, each on a proportionate basis as to each LOG and Wineman Party's individual use. ii. The Defaulting Parties failed to appear at trial and prove any usuhctuary water rights. The rights of the Defaulting Parties, if any, are subject to the prescriptive rights of the City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company, as well as the other rights of said parties as established herein. b. Imported Water The City of Santa Maria and Golden State Water Company shall have rights to Return Flows in the amount provided above. c. Northern Cities The rights of all Parties in the Northern Cities Management Area shall be governed as described above on page 4, lines 21 to 24. 8. The LOG and Wineman Parties have failed to sustain the burden of proof in their action to quiet title to the quantity of their ground water rights as overlying owners. All other LOG and Wineman party causes of action having been dismissed, judgment is hereby entered in favor of the Public Water Producers as to the quiet title causes of action brought by the LOG and the Wineman Parties. Legal title to said real property is vested in the Log and Wineman Parties and was not in dispute in this action. 9. Each and every Party, their officers, agents, employees, successors and assigns, are enjoined and restrained from exercising the rights and obligations provided through this Judgment in a manner inconsistent with the express provisions of this Judgment. 10. Except upon further order of the court. each and every Party and its officers, agents, employees, successors and assigns, is enjoined and restrained from transporting groundwater to areas outside the Basin, except for those uses in existence as of the date of this 6 Case No. 1-97-CV-7702 14 Judgment After Trial Judgment; provided, however. that groundwater may be delivered for use outside the Basin as long as the wastewater generated by that use of water is discharged within the Basin, or agricultural return flows resulting from that use return to the Basin. 11. Jurisdiction, power and authority over the Stipulating Parties as between one another are governed exclusively by the Stipulation. The court retains and reserves jurisdiction as set forth in this Paragraph over all parties hereto. The court shall make such further or supplemental orders as may be necessary or appropriate regarding interpretation and enforcement of all aspects of this Judgment, as well as clarifications or amendments to the Judgment consistent with the law. 12. Any party that seeks the court's exercise of reserved jurisdiction shall file a noticed motion with the court. Any noticed motion shall be made pursuant to the court's Order Concerning Electronic Service of Pleadings and Electronic Posting of Discovery Documents dated June 27,2000. 13. The court shall exercise de novo review in all proceedings. The actions or decisions of any Party, the Monitoring Parties, the TMA, or the Management Area Engineer shall have no heightened evidentiary weight in any proceedings before the court. 14. As long as the court's electronic filing system remains available, all court filings shall be made pursuant to court's Order Concerning Electronic Service of Pleadings and Electronic Posting of Discovery Documents dated June 27, 2000, or any subsequent superseding order. If the court's electronic filing system is eliminated and not replaced, the Parties shall promptly establish a substitute electronic filing system and abide by the same rules as contained in the court's Order. 15. Nothing in this Judgment shall be interpreted as relieving any Party of its responsibilities to comply with state or federal laws for the protection of water quality or the provisions of any permits, standards, requirements, or order promulgated thereunder. 16. Each Party shall designate the name, address and e-mail address, if any, to be used for purposes of all subsequent notices and service by a designation to be filed within thirty days after entry of this Judgment. This designation may be changed from time to time 7 Case No. 1-97-CV-770214 Judgment After Trial )y filing a written notice with the court. Any Party desiring to be relieved of receiving notices nay file a waiver of notice on a form approved by the court. The court shall maintain at all imes a current list of Parties to whom notices are to be sent and their addresses for purposes )f service. The court shall also maintain a full current list of names, addresses, and e-mail rddresses of all Parties or their successors, as filed herein. Copies of such lists shall be wailable to any Person. If no designation is made, a Party's designee shall be deemed to be, in rder of priority: i) the Party's attorney of record; ii) if the Party does not have an attorney of ecord, the Party itself at the address specified. 17. All real property owned by the Parties within the Basin is subject to this ludgment. The Judgment will be binding upon and inure to the benefit of each Party and their espective heirs, executors, administrators, trustees, successors, assigns, and agents. Any )arty, or executor of a deceased party, who transfers property that is subject to this judgment ;hall notify any transferee thereof of this judgment and shall ensure that the judgment is ecorded in the line of title of said property. This Judgment shall not bind the Parties that :ease to own property within the Basin, and cease to use groundwater. Within sixty days ollowing entry of this Judgment, the City of Santa Maria, in cooperation with the San Luis Ibispo entities and Golden State, shall record in the Office of the County Reporter in Santa 3arbara and San Luis Obispo Counties, a notice of entry of Judgment. The Clerk shall enter this Judgment. SO ORDERED, ADJUDGED, AND DECREED. >ate& January 25,2008 Juqge $the Superior Court :ase No. 1-97-CV-770214 udgment After Trial City of Pismo Beach Appendix H. Water Conservation Ordinance 2015 Urban Water Management Plan - Final H APPENDIX H. WATER CONSERVATION ORDINANCE               THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK FOR DUPLEX PRINTING  Chapter 13.24 WATER CONSERVATION 13.24.010 Purpose—Intent. A. The purpose of this chapter is: 1. To protect the public health, safety, welfare, comfort and convenience by ensuring that the city water demand does not exceed the available supply of water; 2. To define the steps necessary to ensure sufficient water supply for human consumption, sanitation and fire protection under all foreseeable water supply conditions; 3. To establish resource management consistent with state law, the authority of the city to implement resource management regulations and restrictions with regard to the use of water; 4. To maximize the public benefit and prevent unnecessary hardship and economic impact during periods of water shortages by matching appropriate water shortage response strategies to various levels of shortage. B. It is the intent of this chapter to recognize that there may be varying durations and intensities of water shortages, and to apply water use restrictions and management techniques commensurate with the water supply. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.010) 13.24.020 Declaration of water supply conditions. A. The city council shall from time to time adopt resolutions declaring the level of the city water supply condition, which in turn will dictate the water conservation measures in effect at any particular time within the city. The four levels of water supply conditions are: 1. Normal water supply condition; 2. Moderately restricted water supply condition; 3. Severely restricted water supply condition; and 4. Critical water supply condition. B.Upon adoption of the required resolution, the restrictions and measures identified in this chapter shall take effect immediately. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.020) 13.24.030 Normal water supply conditions. Normal water supply conditions are typified by the following: A. Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, paved surfaces, buildings and other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled water devices, typically including spring loaded shutoff nozzles. B. Outdoor irrigation resulting in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited. C. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.030) 13.24.040 Moderately restricted water supply conditions. Moderately restricted water supply conditions are typified by the following: A. Use of water which results in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited. B. Outdoor water use for washing vehicles, boats, buildings or other similar uses shall be attended and have hand-controlled watering devices, typically including spring-loaded shutoff nozzles. C. No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets, or other such uses except as found necessary by the city to protect the public health or safety. D. Outdoor Irrigation. 1. Outdoor irrigation is prohibited between the hours of ten a.m. and four p.m.; 2. Irrigation of private and public landscaping, turf areas and gardens is permitted at even-numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays. All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. E. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. F. Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.040) 13.24.050 Severely restricted water supply conditions. A. Use of water which results in excessive gutter runoff is prohibited. B. Outdoor Water Use--Except Irrigation. 1. No water shall be used for cleaning driveways, patios, parking lots, sidewalks, streets or other such use except where necessary to protect the public health and safety; 2. Washing cars by use of a hose is prohibited. Use of a bucket is permitted subject to non-wasteful applications. C. Outdoor Irrigation. 1. Outdoor irrigation is prohibited between the hours of ten a.m. and four p.m.; 2. Irrigation of private and public landscaping, turf areas and gardens is permitted at even-numbered addresses only on Mondays and Thursdays and at odd-numbered addresses only on Tuesdays and Fridays. All customers are directed to use no more water than necessary to maintain landscaping. D. Restaurants shall serve drinking water only in response to a specific request by a customer. E. Emptying and refilling swimming pools and commercial spas is prohibited except to prevent structural damage and/or to provide for the public health and safety. F. Use of potable water for compaction or dust control purposes in construction activities is prohibited. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.050) 13.24.060 Critical water supply conditions. In addition to the conditions specified in Section 13.24.050, the city council may impose any water rationing requirement as it deems appropriate to protect public health, safety, welfare, comfort and convenience. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.060) 13.24.070 Penalties for noncompliance. A. Violation of any provision of this chapter may result in termination of water service until such violation is corrected, and until all appropriate fees and penalties are paid in full. B. An administrative procedure shall be established by resolution of the city council from time to time for enforcement of this section. Such procedures shall include, without limitation, at least the following factors: 1. Provisions for notice to the alleged offender, including the furnishing of informational material and advice where appropriate; 2. Comprehensive guidelines for staff use in determining whether or not the offense justifies disconnection of the water service; 3. An opportunity for the alleged offender to be heard at the department head level or above before the water service is disconnected, except in cases of continuing deliberate water wasting; 4. Provisions for city recovery of all staff costs, including overhead, for any second or greater offense within any one-year period; 5. A schedule of additional civil administrative penalties for any third or greater offense within any one year period; 6. The right to appeal first to the public works commission, and then to the city council, subject to prior deposit of all fees and penalties then due and owing, plus the payment of appeal fees as established by the procedural resolution. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.070) 13.24.080 Violation--Penalty. In addition to, and completely separate from, the civil enforcement provisions of the ordinance codified in this chapter, any person who knowingly and wilfully violates the provisions of this chapter shall be guilty of a criminal misdemeanor as provided in the general penalty provisions of this code. All previous attempts by the city to obtain compliance by the defendant may be introduced as evidence of the offender's knowledge and wilfulness. (Ord. 90-10 § 2 (part), 1990: prior code § 13.06.080)